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Teks -- Luke 5:1-39 (NET)

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Konteks
The Call of the Disciples
5:1 Now Jesus was standing by the Lake of Gennesaret, and the crowd was pressing around him to hear the word of God. 5:2 He saw two boats by the lake, but the fishermen had gotten out of them and were washing their nets. 5:3 He got into one of the boats, which was Simon’s, and asked him to put out a little way from the shore. Then Jesus sat down and taught the crowds from the boat. 5:4 When he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into the deep water and lower your nets for a catch.” 5:5 Simon answered, “Master, we worked hard all night and caught nothing! But at your word I will lower the nets.” 5:6 When they had done this, they caught so many fish that their nets started to tear. 5:7 So they motioned to their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both boats, so that they were about to sink. 5:8 But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!” 5:9 For Peter and all who were with him were astonished astonished at the catch of fish that they had taken, 5:10 and so were James and John, Zebedee’s sons, who were Simon’s business partners. Then Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people.” 5:11 So when they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him.
Healing a Leper
5:12 While Jesus was in one of the towns, a man came to him who was covered with leprosy. When he saw Jesus, he bowed down with his face to the ground and begged him, “Lord, if you are willing, you can make me clean.” 5:13 So he stretched out his hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing. Be clean!” And immediately the leprosy left him. 5:14 Then he ordered the man to tell no one, but commanded him, “Go and show yourself to a priest, and bring the offering for your cleansing, as Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.” 5:15 But the news about him spread even more, and large crowds were gathering together to hear him and to be healed of their illnesses. 5:16 Yet Jesus himself frequently withdrew to the wilderness and prayed.
Healing and Forgiving a Paralytic
5:17 Now on one of those days, while he was teaching, there were Pharisees and teachers of the law sitting nearby (who had come from every village of Galilee and Judea and from Jerusalem), and the power of the Lord was with him to heal. 5:18 Just then some men showed up, carrying a paralyzed man on a stretcher. They were trying to bring him in and place him before Jesus. 5:19 But since they found no way to carry him in because of the crowd, they went up on the roof and let him down on the stretcher through the roof tiles right in front of Jesus. 5:20 When Jesus saw their faith he said, “Friend, your sins are forgiven.” 5:21 Then the experts in the law and the Pharisees began to think to themselves, “Who is this man who is uttering blasphemies? Who can forgive sins but God alone?” 5:22 When Jesus perceived their hostile thoughts, he said said to them, “Why are you raising objections within yourselves? 5:23 Which is easier, to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Stand up and walk’? 5:24 But so that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins”– he said to the paralyzed man– “I tell you, stand up, take your stretcher and go home.” 5:25 Immediately he stood up before them, picked up the stretcher he had been lying on, and went home, glorifying God. 5:26 Then astonishment seized them all, and they glorified God. They were filled with awe, saying, “We have seen incredible things today.”
The Call of Levi; Eating with Sinners
5:27 After this, Jesus went out and saw a tax collector named Levi sitting at the tax booth. “Follow me,” he said to him. 5:28 And he got up and followed him, leaving everything behind. 5:29 Then Levi gave a great banquet in his house for Jesus, and there was a large crowd of tax collectors and others sitting at the table with them. 5:30 But the Pharisees and their experts in the law complained to his disciples, saying, “Why do you eat and drink with tax collectors and sinners?” 5:31 Jesus answered them, “Those who are well don’t need a physician, but those who are sick sick do. 5:32 I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.”
The Superiority of the New
5:33 Then they said to him, “John’s disciples frequently fast and pray, and so do the disciples of the Pharisees, but yours continue to eat and drink.” 5:34 So Jesus said to them, “You cannot cannot make the wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them, can you? 5:35 But those days are coming, and when the bridegroom is taken from them, at that time they will fast.” 5:36 He also told them a parable: “No one tears a patch from a new garment and sews it on an old garment. If he does, he will have torn the new, and the piece from the new will not match the old. 5:37 And no one pours new wine into old wineskins. If he does, the new wine will burst the skins and will be spilled, and the skins will be destroyed. 5:38 Instead new wine must be poured into new wineskins. 5:39 No one after drinking old wine wants the new, for he says, ‘The old is good enough.’”
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Galilee the region of Palestine north of Sameria and west of the upper Jordan River,a region west of Lake Galilee and north of the Jezreel Valley
 · Gennesaret a town and its surrounding plain on the NW shore of Lake Galilee,a lake 21 km long and 12 km wide, in the north of Palestine
 · James a son of Zebedee; brother of John; an apostle,a son of Alpheus; an apostle,a brother of Jesus; writer of the epistle of James,the father (or brother) of the apostle Judas
 · Jerusalem the capital city of Israel,a town; the capital of Israel near the southern border of Benjamin
 · John a son of Zebedee; younger brother of James; the beloved disciple of Christ,a relative of Annas the high priest,a son of Mary the sister of Barnabas, and surnamed Mark,the father of Simon Peter
 · Judea a region that roughly corresponded to the earlier kingdom of Judah
 · Levi members of the tribe of Levi
 · Moses a son of Amram; the Levite who led Israel out of Egypt and gave them The Law of Moses,a Levite who led Israel out of Egypt and gave them the law
 · Peter a man who was a leader among the twelve apostles and wrote the two epistles of Peter
 · Pharisee a religious group or sect of the Jews
 · Simon a son of Jonas and brother of Andrew; an apostle of Jesus Christ,a man who was one of the apostles of Christ and also called 'the Zealot',a brother of Jesus,a man who was a well-know victim of leprosy who had been healed by Jesus (NIV note),a man from Cyrene who was forced to carry the cross of Jesus,a Pharisee man in whose house Jesus' feet were washed with tears and anointed,the father of Judas Iscariot,a man who was a sorcerer in Samaria and who wanted to buy the gifts of the Spirit,a man who was a tanner at Joppa and with whom Peter was staying when Cornelius sent for him
 · Zebedee the father of James and John, who were two of the twelve apostles


Topik/Tema Kamus: Jesus, The Christ | JESUS CHRIST, 4C1 | Miracles | GALILEE, SEA OF | John | Galilee | Peter | James | SIGN | SHIP | PETER, SIMON | FORGIVENESS | FISHING | Net | ABSTINENCE | TEXT AND MANUSCRIPTS OF THE NEW TESTAMENT | Fish | PAPYRUS | Matthew | Faith | selebihnya
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Robertson , Vincent , Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

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Evidence

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Robertson: Luk 5:1 - Pressed upon him Pressed upon him ( epikeisthai ). Luke in this paragraph (Luk 5:1-11; Mar 1:16-20; Mat 4:18-22) does not follow the chronology of Mark as he usually ...

Pressed upon him ( epikeisthai ).

Luke in this paragraph (Luk 5:1-11; Mar 1:16-20; Mat 4:18-22) does not follow the chronology of Mark as he usually does. It seems reasonably clear that the renewed call of the four fishermen came before the first tour of Galilee in Luk 4:42-44. It is here assumed that Luke is describing in his own way the incident given in Mark and Matthew above. Luke singles out Simon in a graphic way. This verb epikeisthai is an old one and means to lie upon , rest upon as of a stone on the tomb (Joh 11:38) or of fish on the burning coals (Joh 21:9). So it is used of a tempest (Act 27:20) and of the urgent demands for Christ’ s crucifixion (Luk 23:23). Here it vividly pictures the eager crowds around Jesus. En tōi epikeisthai is a favourite idiom with Luke as we have already seen, en with the articular infinitive in the locative case.

Robertson: Luk 5:1 - That That ( kai ). Kai does not technically mean the declarative conjunction "that,"but it is a fair rendering of the somewhat awkward idiom of Luke to ...

That ( kai ).

Kai does not technically mean the declarative conjunction "that,"but it is a fair rendering of the somewhat awkward idiom of Luke to a certain extent imitating the Hebrew use of wav .

Robertson: Luk 5:1 - Was standing Was standing ( ēn hestōs ). Periphrastic second past perfect of histēmi which here is equal to a practical imperfect.

Was standing ( ēn hestōs ).

Periphrastic second past perfect of histēmi which here is equal to a practical imperfect.

Robertson: Luk 5:1 - By the lake By the lake ( para tēn limnēn ). The use of the accusative with para , alongside, after a verb of rest used to be called the pregnant use, came a...

By the lake ( para tēn limnēn ).

The use of the accusative with para , alongside, after a verb of rest used to be called the pregnant use, came and was standing. But that is no longer necessary, for the accusative as the case of extension is the oldest of the cases and in later Greek regains many of the earlier uses of the other cases employed for more precise distinctions. See the same idiom in Luk 5:2. We need not here stress the notion of extension. "With characteristic accuracy Luke never calls it a sea, while the others never call it a lake"(Plummer).

Robertson: Luk 5:2 - Two boats Two boats ( ploia duo ). Some MSS. have ploiaria , little boats, but ploia was used of boats of various sizes, even of ships like nēes .

Two boats ( ploia duo ).

Some MSS. have ploiaria , little boats, but ploia was used of boats of various sizes, even of ships like nēes .

Robertson: Luk 5:2 - The fishermen The fishermen ( hoi haleeis ). It is an old Homeric word that has come back to common use in the Koiné. It means "sea-folk"from hals , sea.

The fishermen ( hoi haleeis ).

It is an old Homeric word that has come back to common use in the Koiné. It means "sea-folk"from hals , sea.

Robertson: Luk 5:2 - Were washing Were washing ( eplunon ). Imperfect active, though some MSS. have aorist eplunan . Vincent comments on Luke’ s use of five verbs for washing: th...

Were washing ( eplunon ).

Imperfect active, though some MSS. have aorist eplunan . Vincent comments on Luke’ s use of five verbs for washing: this one for cleaning, apomassō for wiping the dust from one’ s feet (Luk 10:11), ekmassō of the sinful woman wiping Christ’ s feet with her hair (Luk 7:38, Luk 7:44), apolouō of washing away sins (symbolically, of course) as in Act 22:16, and louō of washing the body of Dorcas (Act 9:37) and the stripes of the prisoners (Act 16:33). On "nets"see note on Mat 4:18 and note on Mar 1:16.

Robertson: Luk 5:3 - To put out a little To put out a little ( epanagagein oligon ). Second aorist infinitive of the double compound verb ep -an -agō , found in Xenophon and late Greek wri...

To put out a little ( epanagagein oligon ).

Second aorist infinitive of the double compound verb ep -an -agō , found in Xenophon and late Greek writers generally. Only twice in the N.T. In Mat 21:18 in the sense of leading back or returning and here in the sense of leading a ship up upon the sea, to put out to sea, a nautical term.

Robertson: Luk 5:3 - Taught Taught ( edikasken ). Imperfect active, picturing Jesus teaching from the boat in which he was seated and so safe from the jam of the crowd. "Christ ...

Taught ( edikasken ).

Imperfect active, picturing Jesus teaching from the boat in which he was seated and so safe from the jam of the crowd. "Christ uses Peter’ s boat as a pulpit whence to throw the net of the Gospel over His hearers"(Plummer).

Robertson: Luk 5:4 - Had left speaking Had left speaking ( epausato lalōn ). He ceased speaking (aorist middle indicative and present active participle, regular Greek idiom).

Had left speaking ( epausato lalōn ).

He ceased speaking (aorist middle indicative and present active participle, regular Greek idiom).

Robertson: Luk 5:4 - Put out into the deep Put out into the deep ( epanagage eis to bathos ). The same double compound verb as in Luk 5:3, only here second aorist active imperative second pers...

Put out into the deep ( epanagage eis to bathos ).

The same double compound verb as in Luk 5:3, only here second aorist active imperative second person singular.

Robertson: Luk 5:4 - Let down Let down ( chalasate ). Peter was master of the craft and so he was addressed first. First aorist active imperative second person plural. Here the wh...

Let down ( chalasate ).

Peter was master of the craft and so he was addressed first. First aorist active imperative second person plural. Here the whole crew are addressed. The verb is the regular nautical term for lowering cargo or boats (Act 27:17, Act 27:30). But it was used for lowering anything from a higher place (Mar 2:4; Act 9:25; 2Co 11:33). For a catch (eis agran ). This purpose was the startling thing that stirred up Simon.

Robertson: Luk 5:5 - Master Master ( epistata ). Used only by Luke in the N.T. and always in addresses to Christ (Luk 8:24, Luk 8:45; Luk 9:33, Luk 9:49; Luk 17:13). Common in t...

Master ( epistata ).

Used only by Luke in the N.T. and always in addresses to Christ (Luk 8:24, Luk 8:45; Luk 9:33, Luk 9:49; Luk 17:13). Common in the older writers for superintendent or overseer (one standing over another). This word recognizes Christ’ s authority.

Robertson: Luk 5:5 - We toiled We toiled ( kopiasantes ). This verb is from kopos (work ,toil ) and occurs from Aristophanes on. It used to be said that the notion of weariness ...

We toiled ( kopiasantes ).

This verb is from kopos (work ,toil ) and occurs from Aristophanes on. It used to be said that the notion of weariness in toil appears only in the lxx and the N.T. But Deissmann ( Light from the Ancient East , pp. 312f.) cites examples from inscriptions on tombstones quite in harmony with the use in the N.T. Peter’ s protest calls attention also to the whole night of fruitless toil.

Robertson: Luk 5:5 - But at thy word But at thy word ( epi de tōi rhēmati sou ). On the base of epi . Acquiescence to show his obedience to Christ as "Master,"but with no confidence ...

But at thy word ( epi de tōi rhēmati sou ).

On the base of epi . Acquiescence to show his obedience to Christ as "Master,"but with no confidence whatsoever in the wisdom of this particular command. Besides, fishing in this lake was Peter’ s business and he really claimed superior knowledge on this occasion to that of Jesus.

Robertson: Luk 5:6 - They inclosed They inclosed ( sunekleisan ). Effective aorist active indicative with perfective compound sun .

They inclosed ( sunekleisan ).

Effective aorist active indicative with perfective compound sun .

Robertson: Luk 5:6 - They shut together. Were breaking They shut together. Were breaking ( dierēsseto ). Imperfect passive singular (diktua being neuter plural). This is the late form of the old verb ...

They shut together. Were breaking ( dierēsseto ).

Imperfect passive singular (diktua being neuter plural). This is the late form of the old verb diarēgnumi . The nets were actually tearing in two ( dia - ) and so they would lose all the fish.

Robertson: Luk 5:7 - They beckoned They beckoned ( kateneusan ). Possibly they were too far away for a call to be understood. Simon alone had been ordered to put out into the deep. So ...

They beckoned ( kateneusan ).

Possibly they were too far away for a call to be understood. Simon alone had been ordered to put out into the deep. So they used signs.

Robertson: Luk 5:7 - Unto their partners Unto their partners ( tois metechois ). This word metochos , from metechō , to have with, means participation with one in common blessings (Heb 3:1...

Unto their partners ( tois metechois ).

This word metochos , from metechō , to have with, means participation with one in common blessings (Heb 3:1, Heb 3:14; Heb 6:4; Heb 12:8). While koinōnos (Luk 5:10 here of James and John also) has the notion of personal fellowship, partnership. Both terms are here employed of the two pairs of brothers who have a business company under Simon’ s lead.

Robertson: Luk 5:7 - Help them Help them ( sullabesthai ). Second aorist middle infinitive. Take hold together with and so to help. Paul uses it in Phi 4:3. It is an old word that ...

Help them ( sullabesthai ).

Second aorist middle infinitive. Take hold together with and so to help. Paul uses it in Phi 4:3. It is an old word that was sometimes employed for seizing a prisoner (Luk 22:54) and for conception ( con-capio ) by a woman (Luk 1:24).

Robertson: Luk 5:7 - So that they began to sink So that they began to sink ( hōste buthizesthai auta ). Consecutive use of hōste and the infinitive (present tense, inchoative use, beginning t...

So that they began to sink ( hōste buthizesthai auta ).

Consecutive use of hōste and the infinitive (present tense, inchoative use, beginning to sink). An old verb from buthos . In the N.T. only here and 1Ti 6:9.

Robertson: Luk 5:8 - Fell down at Jesus’ knees Fell down at Jesus’ knees ( prosepesen tois gonasin Iēsou ). Just like Peter, from extreme self-confidence and pride (Luk 5:5) to abject humi...

Fell down at Jesus’ knees ( prosepesen tois gonasin Iēsou ).

Just like Peter, from extreme self-confidence and pride (Luk 5:5) to abject humilation. But his impulse here was right and sincere. His confession was true. He was a sinful man.

Robertson: Luk 5:9 - For he was amazed For he was amazed ( thambos gar perieschen ). Literally, For a wonder held him round. Aorist active indicative. It held Peter fast and all the rest.

For he was amazed ( thambos gar perieschen ).

Literally, For a wonder held him round. Aorist active indicative. It held Peter fast and all the rest.

Robertson: Luk 5:10 - Thou shalt catch men Thou shalt catch men ( esēi zōgrōn ). Periphrastic future indicative, emphasizing the linear idea. The old verb Zōgreō means to catch ali...

Thou shalt catch men ( esēi zōgrōn ).

Periphrastic future indicative, emphasizing the linear idea. The old verb Zōgreō means to catch alive, not to kill. So then Peter is to be a catcher of men, not of fish, and to catch them alive and for life, not dead and for death. The great Pentecost will one day prove that Christ’ s prophecy will come true. Much must happen before that great day. But Jesus foresees the possibilities in Simon and he joyfully undertakes the task of making a fisher of men out of this poor fisher of fish.

Robertson: Luk 5:11 - They left all, and followed him They left all, and followed him ( aphentes panta ēkolouthēsan ). Then and there. They had already become his disciples. Now they leave their busi...

They left all, and followed him ( aphentes panta ēkolouthēsan ).

Then and there. They had already become his disciples. Now they leave their business for active service of Christ. The conduct of this group of business men should make other business men to pause and see if Jesus is calling them to do likewise.

Robertson: Luk 5:12 - Behold Behold ( kai idou ). Quite a Hebraistic idiom, this use of kai after egeneto (almost like hoti ) with idou (interjection) and no verb.

Behold ( kai idou ).

Quite a Hebraistic idiom, this use of kai after egeneto (almost like hoti ) with idou (interjection) and no verb.

Robertson: Luk 5:12 - Full of leprosy Full of leprosy ( plērēs lepras ). Mar 1:40 and Mat 8:2 have simply "a leper."Evidently a bad case full of sores and far advanced as Luke the phy...

Full of leprosy ( plērēs lepras ).

Mar 1:40 and Mat 8:2 have simply "a leper."Evidently a bad case full of sores and far advanced as Luke the physician notes. The law (Lev 13:12.) curiously treated advanced cases as less unclean than the earlier stages.

Robertson: Luk 5:12 - Fell on his face Fell on his face ( pesōn epi prosōpon ). Second aorist active participle of piptō , common verb. Mar 1:40 has "kneeling"(gonupetōn ) and Mat...

Fell on his face ( pesōn epi prosōpon ).

Second aorist active participle of piptō , common verb. Mar 1:40 has "kneeling"(gonupetōn ) and Mat 8:2 "worshipped"(prosekunei ). All three attitudes were possible one after the other. All three Synoptics quote the identical language of the leper and the identical answer of Jesus. His condition of the third class turned on the "will"(thelēis ) of Jesus who at once asserts his will (thēlō ) and cleanses him. All three likewise mention the touch (hēpsato , Luk 5:13) of Christ’ s hand on the unclean leper and the instantaneous cure.

Robertson: Luk 5:14 - To tell no man To tell no man ( mēdeni eipein ). This is an indirect command after the verb "charged"(parēggeilen ). But Luke changes ( constructio variata ) ...

To tell no man ( mēdeni eipein ).

This is an indirect command after the verb "charged"(parēggeilen ). But Luke changes ( constructio variata ) to the direct quotation, a common idiom in Greek and often in Luke (Act 1:4.). Here in the direct form he follows Mar 1:43; Mat 8:4. See discussion there about the direction to go to the priest to receive a certificate showing his cleansing, like our release from quarantine (Lev 13:39; 14:2-32).

Robertson: Luk 5:14 - For a testimony unto them For a testimony unto them ( eis marturion autois ). The use of autois (them) here is "according to sense,"as we say, for it has no antecedent in th...

For a testimony unto them ( eis marturion autois ).

The use of autois (them) here is "according to sense,"as we say, for it has no antecedent in the context, just to people in general. But this identical phrase with absence of direct reference occurs in Mark and Matthew, pretty good proof of the use of one by the other. Both Mat 8:4; Luk 5:14 follow Mar 1:44.

Robertson: Luk 5:15 - So much the more So much the more ( māllon ). Mar 1:45 has only "much"(polla , many), but Mark tells more about the effect of this disobedience.

So much the more ( māllon ).

Mar 1:45 has only "much"(polla , many), but Mark tells more about the effect of this disobedience.

Robertson: Luk 5:15 - Went abroad Went abroad ( diērcheto ). Imperfect tense. The fame of Jesus kept going.

Went abroad ( diērcheto ).

Imperfect tense. The fame of Jesus kept going.

Robertson: Luk 5:15 - Came together Came together ( sunērchonto ). Imperfect tense again. The more the report spread, the more the crowds came.

Came together ( sunērchonto ).

Imperfect tense again. The more the report spread, the more the crowds came.

Robertson: Luk 5:16 - But he withdrew himself in the deserts and prayed But he withdrew himself in the deserts and prayed ( autos de ēn hupochōrōn en tais erēmois kai proseuchomenos ). Periphrastic imperfects. Lit...

But he withdrew himself in the deserts and prayed ( autos de ēn hupochōrōn en tais erēmois kai proseuchomenos ).

Periphrastic imperfects. Literally, "But he himself was with drawing in the desert places and praying."The more the crowds came as a result of the leper’ s story, the more Jesus turned away from them to the desert regions and prayed with the Father. It is a picture of Jesus drawn with vivid power. The wild enthusiasm of the crowds was running ahead of their comprehension of Christ and his mission and message. Hupochōreō (perhaps with the notion of slipping away secretly, hupo -) is a very common Greek verb, but in the N.T. occurs in Luke alone. Elsewhere in the N.T. anachōreō (to go back) appears.

Robertson: Luk 5:17 - That That ( kai ). Use of kai = hoti (that) like the Hebrew wav , though found in Greek also.

That ( kai ).

Use of kai = hoti (that) like the Hebrew wav , though found in Greek also.

Robertson: Luk 5:17 - He He ( autos ). Luke sometimes has autos in the nominative as unemphatic "he"as here, not "he himself."

He ( autos ).

Luke sometimes has autos in the nominative as unemphatic "he"as here, not "he himself."

Robertson: Luk 5:17 - Was teaching Was teaching ( ēn didaskōn ). Periphrastic imperfect again like our English idiom.

Was teaching ( ēn didaskōn ).

Periphrastic imperfect again like our English idiom.

Robertson: Luk 5:17 - Were sitting by Were sitting by ( ēsan kathēmenoi ). Periphrastic imperfect again. There is no "by"in the Greek.

Were sitting by ( ēsan kathēmenoi ).

Periphrastic imperfect again. There is no "by"in the Greek.

Robertson: Luk 5:17 - Doctors of the law Doctors of the law ( nomodidaskaloi ). A compound word formed after analogy of hierodidaskalos , but not found outside of the N.T. and ecclesiastical...

Doctors of the law ( nomodidaskaloi ).

A compound word formed after analogy of hierodidaskalos , but not found outside of the N.T. and ecclesiastical writers, one of the very few words apparently N.T. in usage. It appears here and Act 5:34; 1Ti 1:7. It is not likely that Luke and Paul made the word, but they simply used the term already in current use to describe teachers and interpreters of the law. Our word "doctor"is Latin for "teacher."These "teachers of the law"are called elsewhere in the Gospels "scribes"(grammateis ) as in Matthew and Mark (See note on Mat 5:20; Mat 23:34) and Luk 5:21; Luk 19:47; Luk 21:1; Luk 22:2. Luke also employs nomikos (one skilled in the law, nomos ) as in Luk 10:25. One thinks of our LL.D. (Doctors of Civil and Canon Law), for both were combined in Jewish law. They were usually Pharisees (mentioned here for the first time in Luke) for which see note on Mat 3:7, note on Mat 5:20. Luke will often speak of the Pharisees hereafter. Not all the "Pharisees"were "teachers of the law"so that both terms often occur together as in Luk 5:21 where Luke has separate articles (hoi grammateis kai hoi Pharisaioi ), distinguishing between them, though one article may occur as in Mat 5:20 or no article as here in Mat 5:17. Luke alone mentions the presence here of these Pharisees and doctors of the law "which were come"(hoi ēsan elēluthotes , periphrastic past perfect active, had come ).

Robertson: Luk 5:17 - Out of every village of Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem Out of every village of Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem ( ek pasēs kōmēs tēs Galilaias kai Ioudaias kai Ierousalēm ). Edersheim ( Jewish So...

Out of every village of Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem ( ek pasēs kōmēs tēs Galilaias kai Ioudaias kai Ierousalēm ).

Edersheim ( Jewish Social Life ) observes that the Jews distinguished Jerusalem as a separate district in Judea. Plummer considers it hyperbole in Luke to use "every village."But one must recall that Jesus had already made one tour of Galilee which stirred the Pharisees and rabbis to active opposition. Judea had already been aroused and Jerusalem was the headquarters of the definite campaign now organized against Jesus. One must bear in mind that Joh 4:1-4 shows that Jesus had already left Jerusalem and Judea because of the jealousy of the Pharisees. They are here on purpose to find fault and to make charges against Jesus. One must not forget that there were many kinds of Pharisees and that not all of them were as bad as these legalistic and punctilious hypocrites who deserved the indictment and exposure of Christ in Matthew 23. Paul himself is a specimen of the finer type of Pharisee which, however, developed into the persecuting fanatic till Jesus changed his whole life.

Robertson: Luk 5:17 - The power of the Lord was with him to heal The power of the Lord was with him to heal ( dunamis Kuriou ēn eis to iāsthai auton ). So the best texts. It is neat Greek, but awkward English: ...

The power of the Lord was with him to heal ( dunamis Kuriou ēn eis to iāsthai auton ).

So the best texts. It is neat Greek, but awkward English: "Then was the power of the Lord for the healing as to him (Jesus)."Here Kuriou refers to Jehovah.

Robertson: Luk 5:17 - Dunamis Dunamis ( dynamite) is one of the common words for "miracles"(dunameis ). What Luke means is that Jesus had the power of the Lord God to heal with. H...

Dunamis ( dynamite)

is one of the common words for "miracles"(dunameis ). What Luke means is that Jesus had the power of the Lord God to heal with. He does not mean that this power was intermittent. He simply calls attention to its presence with Jesus on this occasion.

Robertson: Luk 5:18 - That was palsied That was palsied ( hos ēn paralelumenos ). Periphrastic past perfect passive where Mar 2:3; Mat 9:2 have paralutikon (our paralytic). Luke’ ...

That was palsied ( hos ēn paralelumenos ).

Periphrastic past perfect passive where Mar 2:3; Mat 9:2 have paralutikon (our paralytic). Luke’ s phrase is the technical medical term (Hippocrates, Galen, etc.) rather than Mark’ s vernacular word (Ramsay, Luke the Physician , pp. 57f.).

Robertson: Luk 5:18 - They sought They sought ( ezētoun ). Conative imperfect.

They sought ( ezētoun ).

Conative imperfect.

Robertson: Luk 5:19 - By what way they might bring him in By what way they might bring him in ( poias eis enegkōsin auton ). Deliberative subjunctive of the direct question retained in the indirect.

By what way they might bring him in ( poias eis enegkōsin auton ).

Deliberative subjunctive of the direct question retained in the indirect.

Robertson: Luk 5:19 - The housetop The housetop ( to dōma ). Very old word. The flat roof of Jewish houses was usually reached by outside stairway. Cf. Act 10:9 where Peter went for ...

The housetop ( to dōma ).

Very old word. The flat roof of Jewish houses was usually reached by outside stairway. Cf. Act 10:9 where Peter went for meditation.

Robertson: Luk 5:19 - Through the tiles Through the tiles ( dia tōn keramōn ). Common and old word for the tile roof. Mar 2:4 speaks of digging a hole in this tile roof.

Through the tiles ( dia tōn keramōn ).

Common and old word for the tile roof. Mar 2:4 speaks of digging a hole in this tile roof.

Robertson: Luk 5:19 - Let him down Let him down ( kathēkan auton ). First aorist (k aorist) effective active of kathiēmi , common verb. Mar 2:4 has historical present chalōsi , t...

Let him down ( kathēkan auton ).

First aorist (k aorist) effective active of kathiēmi , common verb. Mar 2:4 has historical present chalōsi , the verb used by Jesus to Peter and in Peter’ s reply (Luk 5:4.).

Robertson: Luk 5:19 - With his couch With his couch ( sun tōi klinidiōi ). Also in Luk 5:24. Diminutive of klinē (Luk 5:18) occurring in Plutarch and Koiné writers. Mar 2:4 ha...

With his couch ( sun tōi klinidiōi ).

Also in Luk 5:24. Diminutive of klinē (Luk 5:18) occurring in Plutarch and Koiné writers. Mar 2:4 has krabatton (pallet). It doubtless was a pallet on which the paralytic lay.

Robertson: Luk 5:19 - Into the midst before Jesus Into the midst before Jesus ( eis to meson emprosthen tou Iēsou ). The four friends had succeeded, probably each holding a rope to a corner of the ...

Into the midst before Jesus ( eis to meson emprosthen tou Iēsou ).

The four friends had succeeded, probably each holding a rope to a corner of the pallet. It was a moment of triumph over difficulties and surprise to all in the house (Peter’ s apparently, Mar 2:1).

Robertson: Luk 5:20 - Their faith Their faith ( tēn pistin autōn ). In all three Gospels.

Their faith ( tēn pistin autōn ).

In all three Gospels.

Robertson: Luk 5:20 - Man Man ( anthrōpe ). Mark and Matthew have "child"or "Son"(teknon ). Are forgiven (apheōntai ). This Doric form of the perfect passive indicative ...

Man ( anthrōpe ).

Mark and Matthew have "child"or "Son"(teknon ). Are forgiven (apheōntai ). This Doric form of the perfect passive indicative is for the Attic apheintai . It appears also in Luk 5:23; Luk 7:47, Luk 7:48; Joh 20:23; 1Jo 2:12. Mar 2:6; Mat 9:2 have the present passive aphientai . Possibly this man’ s malady was due to his sin as is sometimes true (Joh 5:14). The man had faith along with that of the four, but he was still a paralytic when Jesus forgave his sins.

Robertson: Luk 5:21 - But God alone But God alone ( ei mē monos ho theos ). Mark has heis (one) instead of monos (alone).

But God alone ( ei mē monos ho theos ).

Mark has heis (one) instead of monos (alone).

Robertson: Luk 5:22 - Perceiving Perceiving ( epignous ). Same form (second aorist active participle of epiginōskō , common verb for knowing fully) in Mar 2:8.

Perceiving ( epignous ).

Same form (second aorist active participle of epiginōskō , common verb for knowing fully) in Mar 2:8.

Robertson: Luk 5:22 - Reason ye Reason ye ( dialogizesthe ) as in Mar 2:8. Mat 9:4 has enthumeisthe .

Reason ye ( dialogizesthe )

as in Mar 2:8. Mat 9:4 has enthumeisthe .

Robertson: Luk 5:24 - He saith unto him that was palsied He saith unto him that was palsied ( eipen tōi paralelumenōi ). This same parenthesis right in the midst of the words of Jesus is in Mar 2:11; Ma...

He saith unto him that was palsied ( eipen tōi paralelumenōi ).

This same parenthesis right in the midst of the words of Jesus is in Mar 2:11; Mat 9:6, conclusive proof of interrelation between these documents. The words of Jesus are quoted practically alike in all three Gospels, the same purpose also hina eidēte (second perfect active subjunctive).

Robertson: Luk 5:25 - Whereon he lay Whereon he lay ( eph' ho katekeito ). Imperfect, upon which he had been lying down. Luke uses this phrase instead of repeating klinidion (Luk 5:24)...

Whereon he lay ( eph' ho katekeito ).

Imperfect, upon which he had been lying down. Luke uses this phrase instead of repeating klinidion (Luk 5:24).

Robertson: Luk 5:25 - Glorifying God Glorifying God ( doxazōn ton theon ). As one can well imagine.

Glorifying God ( doxazōn ton theon ).

As one can well imagine.

Robertson: Luk 5:26 - Amazement Amazement ( ekstasis ). Something out of its place, as the mind. Here the people were almost beside themselves as we say with the same idiom. See not...

Amazement ( ekstasis ).

Something out of its place, as the mind. Here the people were almost beside themselves as we say with the same idiom. See note on Mar 5:42. So they kept glorifying God (imperfect tense, edoxazon ) and at the same time "were filled with fear"(eplēsthēsan phobou , aorist passive).

Robertson: Luk 5:26 - Strange things Strange things ( paradoxa ). Our very word paradox, contrary to (para ) received opinion (doxa ). Plato, Xenophon, and Polybius use it. Here alone ...

Strange things ( paradoxa ).

Our very word paradox, contrary to (para ) received opinion (doxa ). Plato, Xenophon, and Polybius use it. Here alone in the N.T.

Robertson: Luk 5:27 - A publican named Levi A publican named Levi ( telōnen onomati Leuein ). Mar 2:13 has also "The son of Alphaeus"while Mat 9:9 calls him "Matthew."He had, of course, both ...

A publican named Levi ( telōnen onomati Leuein ).

Mar 2:13 has also "The son of Alphaeus"while Mat 9:9 calls him "Matthew."He had, of course, both names. All three use the same words (epi to telōnion ) for the place of toll. See note on publican (telōnēs ) on Mat 9:9.

Robertson: Luk 5:27 - -- @@All three Gospels give the command of Jesus, Follow me (akolouthei ).

@@All three Gospels give the command of Jesus, Follow me (akolouthei ).

Robertson: Luk 5:28 - He forsook all He forsook all ( katalipōn panta ). This detail in Luke alone. He left his profitable business for the service of Christ.

He forsook all ( katalipōn panta ).

This detail in Luke alone. He left his profitable business for the service of Christ.

Robertson: Luk 5:28 - Followed him Followed him ( ēkolouthei autōi ). Imperfect active, perhaps inchoative. He began at once to follow him and he kept it up. Both Mar 2:14; Mat 9:9...

Followed him ( ēkolouthei autōi ).

Imperfect active, perhaps inchoative. He began at once to follow him and he kept it up. Both Mar 2:14; Mat 9:9 have the aorist (ēkolouthēsen ), perhaps ingressive.

Robertson: Luk 5:29 - A great feast A great feast ( dochēn megalēn ). Here and in Luk 14:13 only in the N.T. The word dochē , from dechomai , means reception. Occurs in Plutarch a...

A great feast ( dochēn megalēn ).

Here and in Luk 14:13 only in the N.T. The word dochē , from dechomai , means reception. Occurs in Plutarch and lxx. Levi made Jesus a big reception.

Robertson: Luk 5:29 - Publicans and others Publicans and others ( telōnōn kai allōn ). Luke declines here to use "sinners"like Mar 2:15 and Mat 9:10 though he does so in Luk 5:30 and in ...

Publicans and others ( telōnōn kai allōn ).

Luke declines here to use "sinners"like Mar 2:15 and Mat 9:10 though he does so in Luk 5:30 and in Luk 15:1. None but social outcasts would eat with publicans at such a feast or barbecue, for it was a very large affair.

Robertson: Luk 5:29 - Were sitting at meat with them Were sitting at meat with them ( ēsan met' autōn katakeimenoi ). Literally, were reclining with them (Jesus and the disciples). It was a motley c...

Were sitting at meat with them ( ēsan met' autōn katakeimenoi ).

Literally, were reclining with them (Jesus and the disciples). It was a motley crew that Levi had brought together, but he showed courage as well as loyalty to Jesus.

Robertson: Luk 5:30 - The Pharisees and their scribes The Pharisees and their scribes ( hoi Pharisaioi kai hoi grammateis autōn ). Note article with each substantive and the order, not "scribes and Pha...

The Pharisees and their scribes ( hoi Pharisaioi kai hoi grammateis autōn ).

Note article with each substantive and the order, not "scribes and Pharisees,"but "the Pharisees and the scribes of them"(the Pharisees). Some manuscripts omit "their,"but Mar 2:16 (the scribes of the Pharisees) shows that it is correct here. Some of the scribes were Sadducees. It is only the Pharisees who find fault here.

Robertson: Luk 5:30 - Murmured Murmured ( egogguzon ). Imperfect active. Picturesque onomatopoetic word that sounds like its meaning. A late word used of the cooing of doves. It is...

Murmured ( egogguzon ).

Imperfect active. Picturesque onomatopoetic word that sounds like its meaning. A late word used of the cooing of doves. It is like the buzzing of bees, like tonthorruzō of literary Greek. They were not invited to this feast and would not have come if they had been. But, not being invited, they hang on the outside and criticize the disciples of Jesus for being there. The crowd was so large that the feast may have been served out in the open court at Levi’ s house, a sort of reclining garden party.

Robertson: Luk 5:30 - The publicans and sinners The publicans and sinners ( tōn telōnōn kai hamartōlōn ). Here Luke is quoting the criticism of the critics. Note one article making one gr...

The publicans and sinners ( tōn telōnōn kai hamartōlōn ).

Here Luke is quoting the criticism of the critics. Note one article making one group of all of them.

Robertson: Luk 5:31 - They that are whole They that are whole ( hoi hugiainontes ). Old Greek word for good health from hugiēs , sound in body. So also in Luk 7:10; Luk 15:27; 3Jo 1:2. This...

They that are whole ( hoi hugiainontes ).

Old Greek word for good health from hugiēs , sound in body. So also in Luk 7:10; Luk 15:27; 3Jo 1:2. This is the usual word for good health used by Greek medical writers. Mar 2:17; Mat 9:12 have hoi ischuontes (those who have strength).

Robertson: Luk 5:32 - To repentance To repentance ( eis metanoian ). Alone in Luke not genuine in Mar 2:17; Mat 9:12. Only sinners would need a call to repentance, a change of mind and ...

To repentance ( eis metanoian ).

Alone in Luke not genuine in Mar 2:17; Mat 9:12. Only sinners would need a call to repentance, a change of mind and life. For the moment Jesus accepts the Pharisaic division between "righteous"and "sinners"to score them and to answer their criticism. At the other times he will show that they only pretend to be "righteous"and are "hypocrites"in reality. But Jesus has here blazed the path for all soul-winners. The self-satisfied are the hard ones to win and they often resent efforts to win them to Christ.

Robertson: Luk 5:33 - Often Often ( pukna ). Only in Luke. Common word for thick, compact, often.

Often ( pukna ).

Only in Luke. Common word for thick, compact, often.

Robertson: Luk 5:33 - And make supplications And make supplications ( kai deēseis poiountai ). Only in Luke.

And make supplications ( kai deēseis poiountai ).

Only in Luke.

Robertson: Luk 5:33 - But thine But thine ( hoi de soi ). Sharp contrast between the conduct of the disciples of Jesus and those of John and the Pharisees who here appear together a...

But thine ( hoi de soi ).

Sharp contrast between the conduct of the disciples of Jesus and those of John and the Pharisees who here appear together as critics of Christ and his disciples (Mar 2:18; Mat 9:14), though Luke does not bring that out sharply. It is probable that Levi had his reception for Jesus on one of the Jewish fast days and, if so, this would give special edge to their criticism.

Robertson: Luk 5:34 - Can ye Can ye ( mē dunasthe ). So Luke, adding make , poiēsai , where Mark and Matthew have mē dunantai . All three have mē and expect the answer...

Can ye ( mē dunasthe ).

So Luke, adding make , poiēsai , where Mark and Matthew have mē dunantai . All three have mē and expect the answer no.

Robertson: Luk 5:35 - Then in those days Then in those days ( tote en ekeinais tais hēmerais ). Here Mar 2:20 has "then in that day,"and Mat 9:15 only "then."

Then in those days ( tote en ekeinais tais hēmerais ).

Here Mar 2:20 has "then in that day,"and Mat 9:15 only "then."

Robertson: Luk 5:36 - Also a parable Also a parable ( kai parabolēn ). There are three parables here in the answer of Jesus (the bridegroom, the patch on the garment, the wineskin). Th...

Also a parable ( kai parabolēn ).

There are three parables here in the answer of Jesus (the bridegroom, the patch on the garment, the wineskin). They are not called parables save here, but they are parables and Luke’ s language means that.

Robertson: Luk 5:36 - Rendeth Rendeth ( schisas ). This in Luke alone. Common verb. Used of splitting rocks (Mat 27:51). Our word schism comes from it.

Rendeth ( schisas ).

This in Luke alone. Common verb. Used of splitting rocks (Mat 27:51). Our word schism comes from it.

Robertson: Luk 5:36 - Putteth it Putteth it ( epiballei ). So Mat 9:16 when Mar 2:21 has epiraptei (sews on). The word for "piece"or "patch"(epiblēma ) in all the three Gospels ...

Putteth it ( epiballei ).

So Mat 9:16 when Mar 2:21 has epiraptei (sews on). The word for "piece"or "patch"(epiblēma ) in all the three Gospels is from the verb epiballō , to clap on, and is in Plutarch, Arrian, lxx, though the verb is as old as Homer. See Mat 9:16 and Mar 2:21 for distinction between kainos (fresh), neos (new), and palaios (old).

Robertson: Luk 5:36 - He will rend the new He will rend the new ( kai to kainon schisei ). Future active indicative. So the best MSS.

He will rend the new ( kai to kainon schisei ).

Future active indicative. So the best MSS.

Robertson: Luk 5:36 - Will not agree Will not agree ( ou sumphōnēsei ). Future active indicative. So the best manuscripts again.

Will not agree ( ou sumphōnēsei ).

Future active indicative. So the best manuscripts again.

Robertson: Luk 5:36 - With the old With the old ( tōi palaiōi ). Associative instrumental case. Instead of this phrase in Luke, Mar 2:21; Mat 9:16 have "a worse rent"(cheiron schis...

With the old ( tōi palaiōi ).

Associative instrumental case. Instead of this phrase in Luke, Mar 2:21; Mat 9:16 have "a worse rent"(cheiron schisma ).

Robertson: Luk 5:38 - Must be put Must be put ( blēteon ). This verbal adjective in -teos rather than -tos appears here alone in the N.T. though it is common enough in Attic Gre...

Must be put ( blēteon ).

This verbal adjective in -teos rather than -tos appears here alone in the N.T. though it is common enough in Attic Greek. It is a survival of the literary style. This is the impersonal use and is transitive in sense here and governs the accusative "new wine"(oinon neon ), though the agent is not expressed (Robertson, Grammar , p. 1097).

Robertson: Luk 5:39 - The old is good The old is good ( Ho palaios chrēstos estin ). So the best MSS. rather that chrēstoteros , comparative (better). Westcott and Hort wrongly bracke...

The old is good ( Ho palaios chrēstos estin ).

So the best MSS. rather that chrēstoteros , comparative (better). Westcott and Hort wrongly bracket the whole verse, though occurring in Aleph, B C L and most of the old documents. It is absent in D and some of the old Latin MSS. It is the philosophy of the obscurantist, that is here pictured by Christ. "The prejudiced person will not even try the new, or admit that it has any merits. He knows that the old is pleasant, and suits him; and that is enough; he is not going to change"(Plummer). This is Christ’ s picture of the reactionary Pharisees.

Vincent: Luk 5:1 - Pressed Pressed ( ἐπικεῖσθαι ) Lit., were laid upon.

Pressed ( ἐπικεῖσθαι )

Lit., were laid upon.

Vincent: Luk 5:1 - To hear To hear The A. V. is correct according to the reading τοῦ ἀκούειν , which it follows. The true reading is καὶ ἀκούε...

To hear

The A. V. is correct according to the reading τοῦ ἀκούειν , which it follows. The true reading is καὶ ἀκούειν , and heard. So Rev.

Vincent: Luk 5:1 - He stood He stood ( αὐτὸς ἦν ἑστὼς ) The pronoun distinguishes him from the crowd which pressed upon him: he on his part stood....

He stood ( αὐτὸς ἦν ἑστὼς )

The pronoun distinguishes him from the crowd which pressed upon him: he on his part stood. Render the participle and finite verb as Rev., was standing.

Vincent: Luk 5:1 - Lake Lake ( λίμνην ) An illustration of the more classical style of Luke as compared with Matthew and Mark. They and John also use θάλα...

Lake ( λίμνην )

An illustration of the more classical style of Luke as compared with Matthew and Mark. They and John also use θάλασσα , sea. See on Mat 4:18.

Vincent: Luk 5:2 - Ships Ships ( πλοῖα ) Used of vessels in general. Some texts read πλοιάρια , a diminutive form, meaning little boats.

Ships ( πλοῖα )

Used of vessels in general. Some texts read πλοιάρια , a diminutive form, meaning little boats.

Vincent: Luk 5:2 - Were washing Were washing From the sand and pebbles accumulated during the night's work. Luke uses four different words for washing or cleansing: πλύνω...

Were washing

From the sand and pebbles accumulated during the night's work. Luke uses four different words for washing or cleansing: πλύνω , here, see also Rev 7:14; ἀπομάσσω , of wiping the dust from the feet, only at Luk 10:11; ἐκμάσσω , of the woman wiping Christ's feet with her hair, Luk 7:38, Luk 7:44; ἀπολούω , of washing away sins, Act 22:16; λούω , of washing the prisoners' stripes and the body of Dorcas, Act 16:33; Act 9:37. The reading ἀποπλύνω is rejected by the best texts, so that ἀπομάσσω is the only one peculiar to Luke. All the words were common in medical language.

Vincent: Luk 5:3 - Thrust out Thrust out ( ἐπαναγαγεῖν ) Rev., put out. The special nautical word for putting out to sea.

Thrust out ( ἐπαναγαγεῖν )

Rev., put out. The special nautical word for putting out to sea.

Vincent: Luk 5:3 - Taught Taught ( ἐδίδασκεν ) The imperfect. He continued the teaching he had begun on the shore.

Taught ( ἐδίδασκεν )

The imperfect. He continued the teaching he had begun on the shore.

Vincent: Luk 5:4 - Launch out Launch out Rev., put out. The singular number, addressed to Peter as master of the craft.

Launch out

Rev., put out. The singular number, addressed to Peter as master of the craft.

Vincent: Luk 5:4 - Let down Let down ( χαλάσατε ) The plural, addressed to the whole of the boat's crew. Originally, to slacken or loosen, as a bowstring or th...

Let down ( χαλάσατε )

The plural, addressed to the whole of the boat's crew. Originally, to slacken or loosen, as a bowstring or the reins of horses; hence to let sink as a net. Also of unbarring a door. Metaphorically, to be indulgent, to pardon. The word occurs in the New Testament seven times, and five of these in Luke. He uses it of letting down Paul in a basket at Damascus (Act 9:25); of striking a ship's sails, and of letting down a boat into the sea (Act 27:17, Act 27:30). Matthew, Mark, and John use βάλλω , or ἀμφιβάλλω , for casting a net (Mat 4:18; Mat 13:47; Mar 1:16; Joh 21:6), which appears also in the compound noun for a casting-net (ἀμφίβληστρον , see on Mat 4:18). The word used by Luke was in common use in medical writings, to denote relaxation of the limbs; loosening of bandages; abatement of sickness; letting herbs down into a vessel to be steeped.

Vincent: Luk 5:5 - Master Master ( ἐπιστάτα ) Used by Luke only, and always with reference to Jesus. He never uses Rabbi, as John especially. Wyc., commande...

Master ( ἐπιστάτα )

Used by Luke only, and always with reference to Jesus. He never uses Rabbi, as John especially. Wyc., commander.

Vincent: Luk 5:5 - Toiled Toiled ( κοπιάσαντες ) From κόπος , suffering, weariness; and therefore indicating exhausting toil.

Toiled ( κοπιάσαντες )

From κόπος , suffering, weariness; and therefore indicating exhausting toil.

Vincent: Luk 5:5 - At At thy word ( ἐπί ) Relying on: on the ground of.

At thy word ( ἐπί )

Relying on: on the ground of.

Vincent: Luk 5:5 - The net The net ( δίκτυον ) A general term for a net, whether for fish or fowl. See on Mat 4:18. Some, as Rev., read τὰ δίκτυα , th...

The net ( δίκτυον )

A general term for a net, whether for fish or fowl. See on Mat 4:18. Some, as Rev., read τὰ δίκτυα , the nets.

Vincent: Luk 5:5 - Brake Brake ( διεῤῥήγνυτο ) Some texts read διερήσσετο , from the later form of the verb. The difference is unimportant. T...

Brake ( διεῤῥήγνυτο )

Some texts read διερήσσετο , from the later form of the verb. The difference is unimportant. The A. V. fails to give the force of the imperfect, were breaking, as Rev.; or even better, possibly, began to break. Trench suggests were at the point to break. The word occurs also at Luk 8:29; Act 14:14, and only twice beside in the New Testament. Luke alone uses the two compounds περιῤῥήγνυμι , of rending off clothes (see on Act 16:22), and, προσρήγνυμι to beat violently (Luk 6:48, Luk 6:49). See on those passages. All the words occur in medical writings.

Vincent: Luk 5:7 - They beckoned They beckoned ( κατένευσαν ) The word originally means to nod assent, and so, generally, to make a sign. They made signs because ...

They beckoned ( κατένευσαν )

The word originally means to nod assent, and so, generally, to make a sign. They made signs because of the distance of the other boat; hardly, as has been suggested, because they were too much amazed to speak.

Vincent: Luk 5:7 - Help Help ( συλλαβέσθαι ) Lit., take hold with. Compare Phi 4:3.

Help ( συλλαβέσθαι )

Lit., take hold with. Compare Phi 4:3.

Vincent: Luk 5:7 - Began to sink Began to sink ( βυθίζεσθαι ) Only here and 1Ti 6:9, of drowning men in destruction. From βυθός , the depth. Wyc., they we...

Began to sink ( βυθίζεσθαι )

Only here and 1Ti 6:9, of drowning men in destruction. From βυθός , the depth. Wyc., they were almost drenched.

Vincent: Luk 5:8 - Fell down at Jesus' knees Fell down at Jesus' knees Compare Sophocles, " Oedipus at Colonus," 1605: " Zeus from the dark depths thundered, and the girls Heard it, and sh...

Fell down at Jesus' knees

Compare Sophocles, " Oedipus at Colonus," 1605:

" Zeus from the dark depths thundered, and the girls

Heard it, and shuddering, at their father's knees

Falling, they wept."

Vincent: Luk 5:9 - He was astonished He was astonished ( θάμβος περιέσχεν αὐτὸν ) Lit., amazement encompassed him. See on 1Pe 2:6.

He was astonished ( θάμβος περιέσχεν αὐτὸν )

Lit., amazement encompassed him. See on 1Pe 2:6.

Vincent: Luk 5:9 - The draught The draught ( τῇ ἄγρα ) The word is used both of the act of catching and of that which is caught. In Luk 5:4 it has the former ...

The draught ( τῇ ἄγρα )

The word is used both of the act of catching and of that which is caught. In Luk 5:4 it has the former sense: " let down your net for catching: " here, the latter, the catch or haul.

Vincent: Luk 5:10 - Partners Partners ( κοινωνοὶ ) In Luk 5:7 the word rendered partners is μέτοχοι ; from μετά , with, and ἔχω , to have...

Partners ( κοινωνοὶ )

In Luk 5:7 the word rendered partners is μέτοχοι ; from μετά , with, and ἔχω , to have. The word here denotes a closer association, a common interest. The kindred noun, κοινωνία , fellowship, is used of the fellowship of believers with Christ (1Co 1:9); the communion of the body and blood of Christ (1Co 10:16); the communion of the Holy Ghost (2Co 13:14). The persons referred to in Luk 5:7 might have been only hired workmen (Mar 1:20), temporarily associated with the principals.

Vincent: Luk 5:10 - Thou shalt catch Thou shalt catch ( ἔσῃ ζωγρῶν ) Lit., thou shalt be catching, the participle and finite verb denoting that this is to be his h...

Thou shalt catch ( ἔσῃ ζωγρῶν )

Lit., thou shalt be catching, the participle and finite verb denoting that this is to be his habitual calling. Both Matthew and Mark make the promise to be addressed to Peter and his companions; Luke to Peter alone. The verb ζωγρέω , to catch, is compounded of ζωός , living, and ἀγρεύω , to catch or take. Hence, lit., to take alive: in war, to take captive, instead of killing. Thus Homer, when Menelaus threatens the prostrate Adrastus:

" Adrastus clasped the warrior's knees and said,

O son of Atreus, take me prisoner " (ζώγρει ) .

Iliad , vi., 45, 6; compare Iliad , x., 378.

So Herodotus: " The Persians took Sardis, and captured Croesus himself alive" (ἔξώγρημαν ). - I., 86.

There is certainly a reason for the use of this term, as indicating that Christ's ministers are called to win men to life. Compare 2Ti 2:26, where, according to the best supported rendering, the servant of God is represented as taking men alive out of the power of Satan, to be preserved unto the will of God; i.e., as instruments of his will (compare A. V. and Rev.). The word thus contains in itself an answer to the sneering remark of the Apostate Julian, that Christ aptly termed his apostles fishers; " for, as the fisherman draws out the fish from waters where they were free and happy, to an element in which they cannot breathe, but must presently perish, so did these."

Vincent: Luk 5:12 - Full of leprosy Full of leprosy Matthew and Mark have simply a leper. The expression, full of leprosy, seems to be used here with professional accuracy. Lepr...

Full of leprosy

Matthew and Mark have simply a leper. The expression, full of leprosy, seems to be used here with professional accuracy. Leprosy was known among physicians under three forms: the dull white, the clear white, and the black. Luke means to describe an aggravated case. The word full in this connection is often used by medical writers, as, full of disease; the veins full of blood; the ears full of roaring.

Vincent: Luk 5:12 - Make me clean Make me clean ( καθαρίσαι ) All three evangelists say cleanse instead of heal, because of the notion of uncleanness which speciall...

Make me clean ( καθαρίσαι )

All three evangelists say cleanse instead of heal, because of the notion of uncleanness which specially attached to this malady.

Vincent: Luk 5:13 - I will I will ( θέλω ) See on Mat 1:19.

I will ( θέλω )

See on Mat 1:19.

Vincent: Luk 5:13 - Be thou clean Be thou clean ( καθαρίσθητι ) Rev., more accurately, gives the force of the passive voice, be thou made clean.

Be thou clean ( καθαρίσθητι )

Rev., more accurately, gives the force of the passive voice, be thou made clean.

Vincent: Luk 5:14 - He charged He charged ( παρήγγειλεν ) A strong word, often of military orders. Aristotle uses it of a physician: to prescribe. Mark has ε...

He charged ( παρήγγειλεν )

A strong word, often of military orders. Aristotle uses it of a physician: to prescribe. Mark has ἐμβριμησάμενος , strictly or sternly charged. See on Mar 1:43.

Vincent: Luk 5:14 - No one No one ( μηδενὶ ) The conditional negative: no one that he might chance to meet.

No one ( μηδενὶ )

The conditional negative: no one that he might chance to meet.

Vincent: Luk 5:14 - Go, shew thyself Go, shew thyself A lively change from the narrative to direct address.

Go, shew thyself

A lively change from the narrative to direct address.

Vincent: Luk 5:15 - Went abroad Went abroad ( διήρχετο ) Διά throughout the region. Wyc., the word walked about.

Went abroad ( διήρχετο )

Διά throughout the region. Wyc., the word walked about.

Vincent: Luk 5:15 - Came together Came together ( σηνήρχοντο ) Imperfect. Kept coming together, or were coming.

Came together ( σηνήρχοντο )

Imperfect. Kept coming together, or were coming.

Vincent: Luk 5:15 - To be healed To be healed ( θεραπεύεσθαι ) Originally, to be an attendant, to do service; and therefore of a physician, to attend upon, or...

To be healed ( θεραπεύεσθαι )

Originally, to be an attendant, to do service; and therefore of a physician, to attend upon, or treat medically. In classical writers it has also the meaning to heal, as undoubtedly in the New Testament, and in Luke (Luk 13:14; Act 4:14, etc.). See on Mat 8:7, and compare ἰαομαι , to heal, in Luk 5:17.

Vincent: Luk 5:15 - Infirmities Infirmities ( ἀσθενειῶν ) A strictly literal rendering; ἀ , not, and σθένος strength, exactly answering to the Latin ...

Infirmities ( ἀσθενειῶν )

A strictly literal rendering; ἀ , not, and σθένος strength, exactly answering to the Latin in, not, and firmus, strong.

Vincent: Luk 5:16 - Withdrew Withdrew ( ἦν ὑποχωρῶν ) The participle with the imperfect of the finite verb denoting something in progress, and thus correspo...

Withdrew ( ἦν ὑποχωρῶν )

The participle with the imperfect of the finite verb denoting something in progress, and thus corresponding to the imperfect in Luk 5:15. The multitudes were coming together, but he was engaged in retirement and prayer, so that he was inaccessible. The word occurs only in Luke, the usual New Testament word for withdraw being ἀναχωρέω . See Mat 2:12; Mat 12:15; Mar 3:7.

Vincent: Luk 5:17 - He was teaching He was teaching The pronoun has a slightly emphatic force: he as distinguished from the Pharisees and teachers of the law.

He was teaching

The pronoun has a slightly emphatic force: he as distinguished from the Pharisees and teachers of the law.

Vincent: Luk 5:17 - Doctors of the law Doctors of the law ( νομοδιδάσκαλοι ) Only in Luke and 1Ti 1:7. Luke often uses νομικὸς , conversant with the law, but ...

Doctors of the law ( νομοδιδάσκαλοι )

Only in Luke and 1Ti 1:7. Luke often uses νομικὸς , conversant with the law, but in the other word the element of teaching is emphasized, probably in intentional contrast with Christ's teaching.

Vincent: Luk 5:17 - Judaea and Jerusalem Judaea and Jerusalem The Rabbinical writers divided Judaea proper into three parts - mountain, sea-shore, and valley - Jerusalem being regard...

Judaea and Jerusalem

The Rabbinical writers divided Judaea proper into three parts - mountain, sea-shore, and valley - Jerusalem being regarded as a separate district. " Only one intimately acquainted with the state of matters at the time, would, with the Rabbis, have distinguished Jerusalem as a district separate from all the rest of Judaea, as Luke markedly does on several occasions (Act 1:8; Act 10:39)" (Edersheim, " Jew ish Social Life" ).

Vincent: Luk 5:17 - Was present to heal them Was present to heal them The A. V. follows the reading, αὐτούς , them; i.e., the sufferers who were present, referring back to Luk 5:1...

Was present to heal them

The A. V. follows the reading, αὐτούς , them; i.e., the sufferers who were present, referring back to Luk 5:15. The best texts, however, read αὐτόν , him, referring to Christ, and meaning was present that he should heal; i.e., in aid of his healing. So Rev.

Vincent: Luk 5:18 - Taken with a palsy Taken with a palsy ( παραλελυμένος ) Rev., more neatly, palsied. Whenever Luke mentions this disease, he uses the verb and not t...

Taken with a palsy ( παραλελυμένος )

Rev., more neatly, palsied. Whenever Luke mentions this disease, he uses the verb and not the adjective παραλυτικός paralytic (as Mat 4:24; Mat 8:6; Mar 2:3-10; compare Act 8:7; Act 9:33); his usage in this respect being in strict accord with that of medical writers.

Vincent: Luk 5:19 - Tiles Tiles Wyc. has sclattis, elates.

Tiles

Wyc. has sclattis, elates.

Vincent: Luk 5:19 - Couch Couch ( κλινιδίῳ ) Luke uses four words for the beds o£ the sick: κλίνη , as Luk 5:18, the general word for a bed or couch; ...

Couch ( κλινιδίῳ )

Luke uses four words for the beds o£ the sick: κλίνη , as Luk 5:18, the general word for a bed or couch; κράββατος , (Act 5:15; Act 9:33), a rude pallet (see on Mar 2:4); κλινίδιον , a small couch or litter, as here, a couch so light that a woman could lift and carry it away. Thus, in the " Lysistrata" of Aristophanes, 916, Myrrine says: " Come now, let me carry our couch" (κλινίδιον ) . The fourth term, κλινάριον (Act 5:15), cannot be accurately distinguished from the last. The last two are peculiar to Luke.

Vincent: Luk 5:19 - Into the midst before Jesus Into the midst before Jesus See on Mar 2:4.

Into the midst before Jesus

See on Mar 2:4.

Vincent: Luk 5:21 - To reason To reason See on Mar 2:6. The words who is this that speaketh blasphemy, form an iambic verse in the Greek.

To reason

See on Mar 2:6. The words who is this that speaketh blasphemy, form an iambic verse in the Greek.

Vincent: Luk 5:22 - Perceived Perceived See on Mar 2:8.

Perceived

See on Mar 2:8.

Vincent: Luk 5:23 - Walk Walk ( περιπάτει ) Lit., walk about.

Walk ( περιπάτει )

Lit., walk about.

Vincent: Luk 5:24 - Unto thee Unto thee ( σοὶ ) Standing first for emphasis. Luke emphasizes the direct address to the man: unto thee I say, in contrast with the appare...

Unto thee ( σοὶ )

Standing first for emphasis. Luke emphasizes the direct address to the man: unto thee I say, in contrast with the apparently less direct, thy sins be forgiven thee. In Jesus' mind the connection between the sins and the man's personal condition was assumed; now he brings out the personal side of the connection. In forgiving the man's sins he had healed him radically. The command to rise and walk was of the same piece.

Vincent: Luk 5:26 - They were all amazed They were all amazed ( ἔκστασις ἔλαβεν ἅπαντας ) Lit., amazement took hold on all, as Rev. On ἔκστασ...

They were all amazed ( ἔκστασις ἔλαβεν ἅπαντας )

Lit., amazement took hold on all, as Rev. On ἔκστασις , amazement, see on Mar 5:42.

Vincent: Luk 5:26 - Strange things Strange things ( οαρα.διξα ) From παρά , contrary to, and δόξα , opinion. Something contrary to received opinion, and hence...

Strange things ( οαρα.διξα )

From παρά , contrary to, and δόξα , opinion. Something contrary to received opinion, and hence strange. Compare the English paradox. Only here in New Testament.

Vincent: Luk 5:27 - He saw He saw ( ἐθεάσατο ) Better, as Rev., beheld, since the verb denotes looking attentively. See on Mat 11:7.

He saw ( ἐθεάσατο )

Better, as Rev., beheld, since the verb denotes looking attentively. See on Mat 11:7.

Vincent: Luk 5:27 - A publican A publican See on Luk 3:12.

A publican

See on Luk 3:12.

Vincent: Luk 5:27 - Receipt of custom Receipt of custom See on Mat 9:9.

Receipt of custom

See on Mat 9:9.

Vincent: Luk 5:28 - He followed He followed ( ἠκολούθει ) Imperfect. He began to follow, and continued following.

He followed ( ἠκολούθει )

Imperfect. He began to follow, and continued following.

Vincent: Luk 5:29 - Feast Feast ( δοχὴν ) Only here and Luk 14:13. From the same root as δέχομαι , to receive. A reception.

Feast ( δοχὴν )

Only here and Luk 14:13. From the same root as δέχομαι , to receive. A reception.

Vincent: Luk 5:31 - They that are whole They that are whole ( οἱ ὑγιαίνοντες ) Both Matthew and Mark use ἰσχύοντες , the strong. This use of the verb in...

They that are whole ( οἱ ὑγιαίνοντες )

Both Matthew and Mark use ἰσχύοντες , the strong. This use of the verb in its primary sense, to be in sound health, is found in Luk 7:10; Luk 15:27; and once in John, 3 Ep. 3Jo 1:2. For this meaning it is the regular word in medical writings. Paul uses it only in the metaphorical sense: sound doctrine, sound words, sound in faith, etc. See 1Ti 1:10; 1Ti 6:3; Tit 1:13, etc.

Vincent: Luk 5:33 - Often Often ( πυκνὰ ) Only here, Act 24:26; 1Ti 5:23. The word literally means close-packed, as a thicket, or the plumage of a bird.

Often ( πυκνὰ )

Only here, Act 24:26; 1Ti 5:23. The word literally means close-packed, as a thicket, or the plumage of a bird.

Vincent: Luk 5:33 - Prayers Prayers ( δεήσεις ) Used by no other evangelist. From δέομαι , to want, and hence distinctively of petitionary prayer. In cla...

Prayers ( δεήσεις )

Used by no other evangelist. From δέομαι , to want, and hence distinctively of petitionary prayer. In classical Greek the word is not restricted to sacred uses, but is employed of requests preferred to men. Rev., more correctly, supplications.

Vincent: Luk 5:34 - Children of the bride-chamber Children of the bride-chamber Better, as Rev., sons (υἱοὺς ). See on Mar 2:19.

Children of the bride-chamber

Better, as Rev., sons (υἱοὺς ). See on Mar 2:19.

Vincent: Luk 5:35 - But the days will come when But the days will come when, etc. ( ἐλεύσονται δὲ ἡμέραι καὶ ὅταν ) The A. V. follows a reading which ...

But the days will come when, etc. ( ἐλεύσονται δὲ ἡμέραι καὶ ὅταν )

The A. V. follows a reading which omits καὶ , and, which is inserted in all the best texts. The thought is broken off. " The days shall come - and when the bridegroom shall be taken away, then shall they fast." So Rev.

Vincent: Luk 5:36 - A parable A parable " From a garment and from wine, especially appropriate at a banquet" (Bengel).

A parable

" From a garment and from wine, especially appropriate at a banquet" (Bengel).

Vincent: Luk 5:36 - Putteth a piece of a new garment upon an old Putteth a piece of a new garment upon an old ( ἐπίβλημα ἱματίου καινοῦ ἐπιβάλλει ἐπὶ ἱμάτ...

Putteth a piece of a new garment upon an old ( ἐπίβλημα ἱματίου καινοῦ ἐπιβάλλει ἐπὶ ἱμάτιον παλαιόν )

The best texts, however, insert σχίσας , having rent, which directly governs ἐπίβλημα , piece; so that the rendering is, No man having rent a piece from, a new garment, putteth it, etc. So Rev., No man tendeth a piece and putteth. Both Matthew and Mark have cloth instead of garment, by the use of which latter term " the incongruity of the proceeding comes more strongly into prominence" (Meyer). ἐπίβλημα , a piece, is, literally, a patch, from ἐπί , upon, and βάλλω , to throw: something clapped on. Compare the kindred verb here, ἐπιβάλλει , putteth upon.

Vincent: Luk 5:36 - The new maketh a rent The new maketh a rent ( τὸ καινὸν σχίζει ) The best texts read σχίσει , will rend, governing the new, instead of b...

The new maketh a rent ( τὸ καινὸν σχίζει )

The best texts read σχίσει , will rend, governing the new, instead of being used intransitively. Render, as Rev., He will rend the new.

Vincent: Luk 5:36 - Agreeth not Agreeth not ( οὐ συμφωνεῖ ) The best texts read συμφωνήσει , the future; will not agree. So Rev. In Matthew and Mar...

Agreeth not ( οὐ συμφωνεῖ )

The best texts read συμφωνήσει , the future; will not agree. So Rev.

In Matthew and Mark there is only a single damage, that, namely, to the old garment, the rent in which is enlarged. In Luke the damage is twofold; first, in injuring the new garment by cutting out a piece; and second, in making the old garment appear patched, instead of widening the rent, as in Matthew and Mark.

Vincent: Luk 5:37 - Bottles Bottles ( ἀσκοὺς ) Rev., wine-skins. See on Mat 9:17.

Bottles ( ἀσκοὺς )

Rev., wine-skins. See on Mat 9:17.

Vincent: Luk 5:39 - Better Better ( χρηστότερος ) The best texts read χρηστός , good. See on Mat 11:30.

Better ( χρηστότερος )

The best texts read χρηστός , good. See on Mat 11:30.

Wesley: Luk 5:1 - -- Mat 4:18; Mar 1:16.

Wesley: Luk 5:6 - Their net brake Began to tear.

Began to tear.

Wesley: Luk 5:8 - Depart from me, for I am a sinful man And therefore not worthy to be in thy presence.

And therefore not worthy to be in thy presence.

Wesley: Luk 5:11 - They forsook all and followed him They had followed him before, Joh 1:43, but not so as to forsake all. Till now, they wrought at their ordinary calling.

They had followed him before, Joh 1:43, but not so as to forsake all. Till now, they wrought at their ordinary calling.

Wesley: Luk 5:12 - -- Mat 8:2; Mar 1:40.

Wesley: Luk 5:14 - -- Lev 14:2.

Wesley: Luk 5:16 - He withdrew The expression in the original implies, that he did so frequently.

The expression in the original implies, that he did so frequently.

Wesley: Luk 5:17 - Sitting by As being more honourable than the bulk of the congregation, who stood.

As being more honourable than the bulk of the congregation, who stood.

Wesley: Luk 5:17 - And the power of the Lord was present to heal them To heal the sickness of their souls, as well as all bodily diseases.

To heal the sickness of their souls, as well as all bodily diseases.

Wesley: Luk 5:18 - -- Mat 9:2; Mar 2:3.

Wesley: Luk 5:19 - Not being able to bring him in through the multitude, they went round about by a back passage, and going up the stairs on the outside, they came upon the flat roofed house, and let him down through the trap door, such as was on the top of most of the Jewish houses: doubtless, with such circumspection as the ...

roofed house, and let him down through the trap door, such as was on the top of most of the Jewish houses: doubtless, with such circumspection as the circumstances plainly required.

Wesley: Luk 5:26 - -- We have seen strange things to.

We have seen strange things to.

Wesley: Luk 5:26 - day Sins forgiven, miracles wrought.

Sins forgiven, miracles wrought.

Wesley: Luk 5:27 - -- Mat 9:9; Mar 2:14.

Wesley: Luk 5:28 - Leaving all His business and gain.

His business and gain.

Wesley: Luk 5:29 - And Levi made him a great entertainment It was necessarily great, because of the great number of guests.

It was necessarily great, because of the great number of guests.

Wesley: Luk 5:33 - Make prayers Long and solemn. Mat 9:14; Mar 2:18.

Long and solemn. Mat 9:14; Mar 2:18.

Wesley: Luk 5:34 - Can ye make That is, is it proper to make men fast and mourn, during a festival solemnity?

That is, is it proper to make men fast and mourn, during a festival solemnity?

Wesley: Luk 5:36 - He spake also a parable Taken from clothes and wine; therefore peculiarly proper at a feast.

Taken from clothes and wine; therefore peculiarly proper at a feast.

Wesley: Luk 5:39 - And no man having drunk old wine And beside, men are not wont to be immediately freed from old prejudices.

And beside, men are not wont to be immediately freed from old prejudices.

JFB: Luk 5:3 - taught . . . out of the ship (See on Mat 13:2).

(See on Mat 13:2).

JFB: Luk 5:4 - for a draught Munificent recompense for the use of his boat.

Munificent recompense for the use of his boat.

JFB: Luk 5:5 - Master Betokening not surely a first acquaintance, but a relationship already formed.

Betokening not surely a first acquaintance, but a relationship already formed.

JFB: Luk 5:5 - all night The usual time of fishing then (Joh 21:3), and even now Peter, as a fisherman, knew how hopeless it was to "let down his net" again, save as a mere ac...

The usual time of fishing then (Joh 21:3), and even now Peter, as a fisherman, knew how hopeless it was to "let down his net" again, save as a mere act of faith, "at His word" of command, which carried in it, as it ever does, assurance of success. (This shows he must have been already and for some time a follower of Christ.)

JFB: Luk 5:6 - net brake Rather "was breaking," or "beginning to break," as in Luk 5:7, "beginning to sink."

Rather "was breaking," or "beginning to break," as in Luk 5:7, "beginning to sink."

JFB: Luk 5:8 - Depart, &c. Did Peter then wish Christ to leave him? Verily no. His all was wrapt up in Him (Joh 6:68). "It was rather, Woe is me, Lord! How shall I abide this bl...

Did Peter then wish Christ to leave him? Verily no. His all was wrapt up in Him (Joh 6:68). "It was rather, Woe is me, Lord! How shall I abide this blaze of glory? A sinner such as I am is not fit company for Thee." (Compare Isa 6:5.)

JFB: Luk 5:10 - Simon, fear not This shows how the Lord read Peter's speech. The more highly they deemed Him, ever the more grateful it was to the Redeemer's spirit. Never did they p...

This shows how the Lord read Peter's speech. The more highly they deemed Him, ever the more grateful it was to the Redeemer's spirit. Never did they pain Him by manifesting too lofty conceptions of Him.

JFB: Luk 5:10 - from henceforth Marking a new stage of their connection with Christ. The last was simply, "I will make you fishers."

Marking a new stage of their connection with Christ. The last was simply, "I will make you fishers."

JFB: Luk 5:10 - fishers of men "What wilt thou think, Simon, overwhelmed by this draught of fishes, when I shall bring to thy net what will beggar all this glory?" (See on Mat 4:18....

"What wilt thou think, Simon, overwhelmed by this draught of fishes, when I shall bring to thy net what will beggar all this glory?" (See on Mat 4:18.)

JFB: Luk 5:11 - forsook all They did this before (Mat 4:20); now they do it again; and yet after the Crucifixion they are at their boats once more (Joh 21:3). In such a business ...

They did this before (Mat 4:20); now they do it again; and yet after the Crucifixion they are at their boats once more (Joh 21:3). In such a business this is easily conceivable. After pentecost, however, they appear to have finally abandoned their secular calling.

JFB: Luk 5:15 - But so, &c. (See Mar 1:45).

(See Mar 1:45).

JFB: Luk 5:17 - Pharisees and doctors . . . sitting by The highest testimony yet borne to our Lord's growing influence, and the necessity increasingly felt by the ecclesiastics throughout the country of co...

The highest testimony yet borne to our Lord's growing influence, and the necessity increasingly felt by the ecclesiastics throughout the country of coming to some definite judgment regarding Him.

JFB: Luk 5:17 - power of the Lord . . . present With Jesus.

With Jesus.

JFB: Luk 5:17 - to heal them The sick people.

The sick people.

JFB: Luk 5:19 - housetop The flat roof.

The flat roof.

JFB: Luk 5:19 - through the tiling . . . before Jesus (See on Mar 2:2).

(See on Mar 2:2).

JFB: Luk 5:24 - take up thy couch "sweet saying! The bed had borne the man; now the man shall bear the bed!" [BENGEL].

"sweet saying! The bed had borne the man; now the man shall bear the bed!" [BENGEL].

JFB: Luk 5:30 - their scribes A mode of expression showing that Luke was writing for Gentiles.

A mode of expression showing that Luke was writing for Gentiles.

Clarke: Luk 5:1 - The people pressed upon him The people pressed upon him - There was a glorious prospect of a plentiful harvest, but how few of these blades came to full corn in the ear! To hea...

The people pressed upon him - There was a glorious prospect of a plentiful harvest, but how few of these blades came to full corn in the ear! To hear with diligence and affection is well; but a preacher of the Gospel may expect that, out of crowds of hearers, only a few, comparatively, will fully receive the truth, and hold out to the end

Clarke: Luk 5:1 - To hear the word of God To hear the word of God - Του λογον του Θεου, The doctrine of God, or, the heavenly doctrine

To hear the word of God - Του λογον του Θεου, The doctrine of God, or, the heavenly doctrine

Clarke: Luk 5:1 - The lake of Gennesaret The lake of Gennesaret - Called also the sea of Galilee, Mat 4:18, and Mar 1:16; and the sea of Tiberias, Joh 6:1. It was, according to Josephus, fo...

The lake of Gennesaret - Called also the sea of Galilee, Mat 4:18, and Mar 1:16; and the sea of Tiberias, Joh 6:1. It was, according to Josephus, forty furlongs in breadth, and one hundred and forty in length. No synagogue could have contained the multitudes who attended our Lord’ s ministry; and therefore he was obliged to preach in the open air. But this also some of the most eminent rabbins were in the habit of doing; though among some of their brethren it was not deemed reputable.

Clarke: Luk 5:2 - Two ships Two ships - Δυο πλοια, Two vessels, It is highly improper to term these ships. They appear to have been only such small boats as are used t...

Two ships - Δυο πλοια, Two vessels, It is highly improper to term these ships. They appear to have been only such small boats as are used to manage nets on flat smooth beaches: one end of the net is attached to the shore; the fishermen row out, and drop the net as they go, making a kind of semicircle from the shore; they return, and bring the rope attached to the other end with them, and then the net is hauled on shore; and, as it was sunk with weights to the bottom, and floated with corks at the top, all the fish in that compass were included, and drawn to shore.

Clarke: Luk 5:3 - And taught - out of the ship And taught - out of the ship - They pressed so much upon him on the land, through their eagerness to hear the doctrine of life, that he could not co...

And taught - out of the ship - They pressed so much upon him on the land, through their eagerness to hear the doctrine of life, that he could not conveniently speak to them, and so was obliged to get into one of the boats; and, having pushed a little out from the land, he taught them. The smooth still water of the lake must have served excellently to convey the sounds to those who stood on the shore;

Clarke: Luk 5:5 - Simon - said - Master Simon - said - Master - ΕπιϚατα . This is the first place where this word occurs; it is used by none of the inspired penmen but Luke, and he...

Simon - said - Master - ΕπιϚατα . This is the first place where this word occurs; it is used by none of the inspired penmen but Luke, and he applies it only to our blessed Lord. It properly signifies a prefect, or one who is set over certain affairs or persons: it is used also for an instructer, or teacher. Peter considered Christ, from what he had heard, as teacher of a Divine doctrine, and as having authority to command, etc. He seems to comprise both ideas in this appellation; he listened attentively to his teaching, and readily obeyed his orders. To hear attentively, and obey cheerfully, are duties we owe, not only to the sovereign Master of the world, but also to ourselves. No man ever took Jesus profitably for his teacher, who did not at the same time receive him as his Lord

Clarke: Luk 5:5 - We have toiled all the night We have toiled all the night - They had cast the net several times in the course of the night, and drew it to shore without success, and were now gr...

We have toiled all the night - They had cast the net several times in the course of the night, and drew it to shore without success, and were now greatly disheartened. I have seen several laborious draughts of this kind made without fruit. All labor must be fruitless where the blessing of God is not; but especially that of the ministry. It is the presence and influence of Christ, in a congregation, that cause souls to be gathered unto himself: without these, whatever the preacher’ s eloquence or abilities may be, all will be night, and fruitless labor

Clarke: Luk 5:5 - At thy word I will let down the net At thy word I will let down the net - He who assumes the character of a fisher of men, under any authority that does not proceed from Christ, is sur...

At thy word I will let down the net - He who assumes the character of a fisher of men, under any authority that does not proceed from Christ, is sure to catch nothing; but he who labors by the order and under the direction of the great Shepherd and Bishop of souls, cannot labor in vain.

Clarke: Luk 5:6 - Their net brake Their net brake - Or, began to break, διερῥηγνυτο, or, was likely to be broken. Had it broke, as our version states, they could have c...

Their net brake - Or, began to break, διερῥηγνυτο, or, was likely to be broken. Had it broke, as our version states, they could have caught no fish. Grammarians give the following rule concerning words of this kind. Verba completiva inchoative intelligenda . Verbs which signify the accomplishment of a thing, are often to be understood as only signifying the beginning of that accomplishment. Raphelius gives some very pertinent examples of this out of Herodotus.

Clarke: Luk 5:7 - They beckoned unto their partners They beckoned unto their partners - Had not these been called in to assist, the net must have been broken, and all the fish lost. What a pity there ...

They beckoned unto their partners - Had not these been called in to assist, the net must have been broken, and all the fish lost. What a pity there should be such envious separation among the different sects that profess to believe in Christ Jesus! Did they help each other in the spirit of Christian fellowship, more souls would be brought to the knowledge of the truth. Some will rather leave souls to perish than admit of partners in the sacred work. It is an intolerable pride to think nothing well done but what we do ourselves; and a diabolic envy to be afraid lest others should be more successful than we are

Clarke: Luk 5:7 - They - filled both the ships They - filled both the ships - Both the boats had as many as they could carry, and were so heavily laden that they were ready to sink. As one justly...

They - filled both the ships - Both the boats had as many as they could carry, and were so heavily laden that they were ready to sink. As one justly observes, "There are fish plenty to be taken, were there skillful hands to take, and vessels to contain them. Many are disputing about the size, capacity, and goodness of their nets and their vessels, while the fish are permitted to make their escape."Did the faithful fishers in both the vessels in these lands (the established Church, and the various branches of the dissenting interest) join heartily together, the nations might be converted to God; but, while the ridiculous disputes for and against particular forms last, there can be no unity. Were men as zealous to catch souls, as they are to support their particular creeds, and forms of worship, the state of Christianity would be more flourishing than it is at present. But the wall of separation is continually strengthened, each party fortifying it on his own side.

Clarke: Luk 5:8 - Depart from me; for I am a sinful man Depart from me; for I am a sinful man - Εξελθε απ ’ εμου, Go out from me, i.e. from my boat. Peter was fully convinced that this...

Depart from me; for I am a sinful man - Εξελθε απ εμου, Go out from me, i.e. from my boat. Peter was fully convinced that this draught of fish was a miraculous one; and that God himself had particularly interfered in this matter, whose presence and power he reverenced in the person of Jesus. But as he felt himself a sinner, he was afraid the Divine purity of Christ could not possibly endure him; therefore he wished for a separation from that power, which he was afraid might break forth and consume him. It seems to have been a received maxim among the Jews, that whoever had seen a particular manifestation of God should speedily die. Hence Jacob seemed astonished that his life should have been preserved, when he had seen God face to face, Gen 32:30. So the nobles of Israel saw God, and yet did eat and drink; for on them he had laid not his hand, i.e. to destroy them, though it appears to have been expected by them, in consequence of this discovery which he made of himself. See Exo 24:10, Exo 24:11 (note), and the notes there. This supposition of the Jews seems to have been founded on the authority of God himself, Exo 33:20 : There shall no man see my Face and Live. So Moses, Deu 5:26 : Who is there of all flesh that hath heard the voice of the living God, speaking out of the midst of the fire as we have, and Lived? So Gideon expected to be immediately slain, because he had seen an angel of the Lord, and a miracle performed by him. See Jdg 6:21-23. So likewise Manoah and his wife, Jdg 13:22 : We shall surely Die, for we have Seen God. These different passages sufficiently show in what sense these words of Peter are to be understood.

Clarke: Luk 5:10 - Thou shalt catch men Thou shalt catch men - Ανθρωπους εσῃ ζωγρων, Thou shalt catch men alive; this is the proper signification of the word. Fear not...

Thou shalt catch men - Ανθρωπους εσῃ ζωγρων, Thou shalt catch men alive; this is the proper signification of the word. Fear not: these discoveries of God tend to life, not to death; and ye shall become the instruments of life and salvation to a lost world. These fish are taken to be killed and fed on; but those who are converted under your ministry shall be preserved unto eternal life. See on Mat 4:18 (note), etc., where this subject is considered more at large.

Clarke: Luk 5:11 - They forsook all, and followed him They forsook all, and followed him - God expects this from every person, and especially from those in whose hearts, or in whose behalf, he has wroug...

They forsook all, and followed him - God expects this from every person, and especially from those in whose hearts, or in whose behalf, he has wrought a miracle of grace or of providence. Jesus intended to call Peter, James, and John, to become his disciples; and that they might see the propriety and importance of the call, he: -

1st. Teaches in their presence, that they may know his doctrine

2dly. He Works a Miracle before their eyes, that they might see and be convinced of his power

3dly. He Calls them to go forth with this doctrine, and through this power, that they might teach the ignorant, and be successful in their work.

Clarke: Luk 5:12 - A certain city A certain city - This was some city of Galilee; probably Chorazin or Bethsaida

A certain city - This was some city of Galilee; probably Chorazin or Bethsaida

Clarke: Luk 5:12 - A man full of leprosy A man full of leprosy - See this disease, and the cure, largely explained on Mat 8:2-4 (note); and see it particularly applied to the use of public ...

A man full of leprosy - See this disease, and the cure, largely explained on Mat 8:2-4 (note); and see it particularly applied to the use of public preaching, Mar 1:40 (note), etc. See also the notes on Leviticus 13 (note), and 14 (note).

Clarke: Luk 5:14 - And offer for thy cleansing And offer for thy cleansing - A Hindoo, after recovering from sickness, presents the offerings he had vowed when in distress, as a goat, sweetmeats,...

And offer for thy cleansing - A Hindoo, after recovering from sickness, presents the offerings he had vowed when in distress, as a goat, sweetmeats, milk, or any thing directed by the Shaster. All nations agreed in these gratitude-offerings for benefits received from the object of their worship.

Clarke: Luk 5:16 - And he withdrew himself into the wilderness And he withdrew himself into the wilderness - Or rather, He frequently withdrew into the desert. This I believe to be the import of the original wor...

And he withdrew himself into the wilderness - Or rather, He frequently withdrew into the desert. This I believe to be the import of the original words, ην ὑποχωρων . He made it a frequent custom to withdraw from the multitudes for a time, and pray, teaching hereby the ministers of the Gospel that they are to receive fresh supplies of light and power from God by prayer, that they may be the more successful in their work; and that they ought to seek frequent opportunities of being in private with God and their books. A man can give nothing unless he first receive it; and no man can be successful in the ministry who does not constantly depend upon God, for the excellence of the power is all from him. Why is there so much preaching, and so little good done? Is it not because the preachers mix too much with the world, keep too long in the crowd, and are so seldom in private with God? Reader! Art thou a herald for the Lord of hosts? Make full proof of thy ministry! Let it never be said of thee, "He forsook all to follow Christ, and to preach his Gospel, but there was little or no fruit of his labor; for he ceased to be a man of prayer, and got into the spirit of the world."Alas! alas! is this luminous star, that was once held in the right hand of Jesus, fallen from the firmament of heaven, down to the Earth!

Clarke: Luk 5:17 - On a certain day On a certain day - This was when he was at Capernaum. See Mar 2:1

On a certain day - This was when he was at Capernaum. See Mar 2:1

Clarke: Luk 5:17 - The power of the Lord The power of the Lord - Δυναμις Κυριου The mighty or miraculous power of the Lord, i.e. of Jesus, was there to heal them - as many as...

The power of the Lord - Δυναμις Κυριου The mighty or miraculous power of the Lord, i.e. of Jesus, was there to heal them - as many as were diseased either in body or soul. Where the teaching of Christ is, there also is the power of Christ to redeem and save.

Clarke: Luk 5:18 - A man - taken with a palsy A man - taken with a palsy - See this case described on Mat 9:1 (note), etc., and Mar 2:1 (note), etc.

A man - taken with a palsy - See this case described on Mat 9:1 (note), etc., and Mar 2:1 (note), etc.

Clarke: Luk 5:19 - Went upon the housetop Went upon the housetop - See on Mat 24:17 (note).

Went upon the housetop - See on Mat 24:17 (note).

Clarke: Luk 5:21 - Who can forgive sins, but God alone? Who can forgive sins, but God alone? - If Jesus were not God, he could not forgive sins; and his arrogating this authority would have been blasphemy...

Who can forgive sins, but God alone? - If Jesus were not God, he could not forgive sins; and his arrogating this authority would have been blasphemy against God, in the most proper sense of the word. That these scribes and Pharisees might have the fullest proof of his Godhead, he works in their presence three miracles, which from their nature could only be effected by an omniscient and omnipotent Being. The miracles are

1.    The remission of the poor man’ s sins

2.    The discernment of the secret thoughts of the scribes

3.    The restoration of the paralytic in an instant to perfect soundness

See on Mat 9:5, Mat 9:6 (note).

Clarke: Luk 5:26 - Strange things Strange things - Παραδοξα, paradoxes. A paradox is something that appears false and absurd, but is not really so: or, something contrary to...

Strange things - Παραδοξα, paradoxes. A paradox is something that appears false and absurd, but is not really so: or, something contrary to the commonly received opinion. We have seen wonders wrought which seem impossible; and we should conclude them to be tricks and illusions, were it not for the indisputable evidence we have of their reality.

Clarke: Luk 5:27 - Levi Levi - See on Mat 9:9 (note); Mar 2:14 (note).

Levi - See on Mat 9:9 (note); Mar 2:14 (note).

Clarke: Luk 5:28 - And he left all And he left all - Καταλιπων - completely abandoning his office, and every thing connected with it. He who wishes to preach the Gospel, li...

And he left all - Καταλιπων - completely abandoning his office, and every thing connected with it. He who wishes to preach the Gospel, like the disciples of Christ, must have no earthly entanglement. If he have, his whole labor will be marred by it. The concerns of his own soul, and those of the multitudes to whom he preaches, are sufficient to engross all his attention, and to employ all his powers.

Clarke: Luk 5:29 - A great feast A great feast - Δοχην μεγαλην, A splendid entertainment. The word refers more properly to the number of the guests, and the manner in w...

A great feast - Δοχην μεγαλην, A splendid entertainment. The word refers more properly to the number of the guests, and the manner in which they were received, than to the quality or quantity of the fare. A great number of his friends and acquaintance was collected on the occasion, that they might be convinced of the propriety of the change he had made, when they had the opportunity of seeing and hearing his heavenly teacher.

Clarke: Luk 5:30 - Why do ye eat and drink, etc. Why do ye eat and drink, etc. - See what passed at this entertainment considered at large on Mat 9:10-17 (note); Mar 2:15-22 (note).

Why do ye eat and drink, etc. - See what passed at this entertainment considered at large on Mat 9:10-17 (note); Mar 2:15-22 (note).

Clarke: Luk 5:37 - The new wine will burst the bottles The new wine will burst the bottles - These old bottles would not be able to stand the fermentation of the new wine, as the old sewing would be apt ...

The new wine will burst the bottles - These old bottles would not be able to stand the fermentation of the new wine, as the old sewing would be apt to give way. It is scarcely necessary to remark, that the eastern bottles are made of skins; generally those of goats.

Clarke: Luk 5:39 - The old is better The old is better - ΧρηϚοτερος - Is more agreeable to the taste or palate. Herodotus, the scholiast on Aristophanes, and Homer, use the ...

The old is better - ΧρηϚοτερος - Is more agreeable to the taste or palate. Herodotus, the scholiast on Aristophanes, and Homer, use the word in this sense. See Raphelius. The old wine, among the rabbins, was the wine of three leaves; that is, wine three years old; because, from the time that the vine had produced that wine, it had put forth its leaves three times. See Lightfoot

1.    The miraculous draught of fishes, the cleansing of the leper, the healing of the paralytic person, the calling of Levi, and the parable of the old and new bottles, and the old and new wine - all related in this chapter, make it not only very entertaining, but highly instructive. There are few chapters in the New Testament from which a preacher of the Gospel can derive more lessons of instruction; and the reader would naturally expect a more particular explanation of its several parts, had not this been anticipated in the notes and observations on Matthew 9, to which chapter it will be well to refer

2.    The conduct as well as the preaching of our Lord is highly edifying. His manner of teaching made every thing he spoke interesting and impressive. He had many prejudices to remove, and he used admirable address in order to meet and take them out of the way. There is as much to be observed in the manner of speaking the truth, as in the truth itself, in order to make it effectual to the salvation of them who hear it. A harsh, unfeeling method of preaching the promises of the Gospel, and a smiling manner of producing the terrors of the Lord, are equally reprehensible. Some preachers are always severe and magisterial: others are always mild and insinuating: neither of these can do God’ s work; and it would take two such to make one Preacher.

Calvin: Luk 5:1 - He stood near the lake Luk 5:1.He stood near the lake Matthew and Mark, according to the usual custom of their language, call it the sea of Galilee. The proper name of thi...

Luk 5:1.He stood near the lake Matthew and Mark, according to the usual custom of their language, call it the sea of Galilee. The proper name of this lake among the ancient Hebrews was כנרת , ( Chinnereth;) 338 but, when the language became corrupted, the word was changed to Gennesaret. Profane authors call it Gennesar; and that part, which lay towards Galilee, was called by them the sea of Galilee. The bank, which adjoined to Tiberias, received its name from that city. Its breadth and situation will be more appropriately discussed in another place. Let us now come to the fact here related.

Luke says, that Christ entered into a ship which belonged to Peter, and withdrew to a moderate distance from the land, that he might more conveniently address from it the multitudes, who flocked from various places to hear him; and that, after discharging the office of teaching, he exhibited a proof of his divine power by a miracle. It was no unusual thing, indeed, that fishers cast their nets, on many occasions, with little advantage: and that all their fruitless toil was afterwards recompensed by one successful throw. But it was proved to be a miracle by this circumstance, that they had taken nothing during the whole night, (which, however, is more suitable for catching fish,) and that suddenly a great multitude of fishes was collected into their nets, sufficient to fill the ships. Peter and his companions, therefore, readily conclude that a take, so far beyond the ordinary quantity, was not accidental, but was bestowed on them by a divine interposition.

Calvin: Luk 5:5 - Master, toiling all the night, we have taken nothing Luk 5:5.Master, toiling all the night, we have taken nothing The reason why Peter calls him Master unquestionably is, that he knows Christ to be acc...

Luk 5:5.Master, toiling all the night, we have taken nothing The reason why Peter calls him Master unquestionably is, that he knows Christ to be accustomed to discharge the office of a Teacher, and is moved with reverence toward him. But he has not yet made such progress as to deserve to be ranked among his disciples: for our sentiments concerning Christ do not render him sufficient honor, unless we embrace his doctrine by the obedience of faith, and know what he requires from us. He has but a slender perception — if he has any at all — of the value of the Gospel; but the deference which he pays to Christ is manifested by this, that, when worn out by fruitless toil, he commences anew what he had already attempted in vain. Yet it cannot be denied, that he highly esteemed Christ, and had the highest respect for his authority. But a particular instance of faith, rendered to a single command of Christ, would not have made Peter a Christian, or given him a place among the sons of God, if he had not been led on, from this first act of submission, to a full obedience. But, as Peter yielded so readily to the command of Christ, whom he did not yet know to be a Prophet or the Son of God, no apology can be offered for our disgraceful conduct, if, while we call him our Lord, and King, and Judge, (Isa 33:22 ,) we do not move a finger to perform our duty, to which we have ten times received his commands.

Calvin: Luk 5:6 - They inclosed a great multitude of fishes Luk 5:6.They inclosed a great multitude of fishes The design of the miracle undoubtedly was, to make known Christ’s divinity, and thus to induce Pet...

Luk 5:6.They inclosed a great multitude of fishes The design of the miracle undoubtedly was, to make known Christ’s divinity, and thus to induce Peter and others to become his disciples. But we may draw from this instance a general instruction, that we have no reason to be afraid lest our labor should not be attended by the blessing of God and desirable success, when it is undertaken by the authority and guidance of Christ. Such was the multitude of fishes, that the ships were sinking, and the minds of the spectators were thus excited to admiration: for it must have been in consequence of the divine glory of Christ manifested by this miracle, that his authority was fully acknowledged.

Calvin: Luk 5:8 - Depart from me, O Lord Luk 5:8.Depart from me, O Lord Although men are earnest in seeking the presence of God, yet, as soon as God appears, they must be struck with terror, ...

Luk 5:8.Depart from me, O Lord Although men are earnest in seeking the presence of God, yet, as soon as God appears, they must be struck with terror, and almost rendered lifeless by dread and alarm, until he administers consolation. They have the best reason for calling earnestly on God, because they cannot avoid feeling that they are miserable, while he is absent from them: and, on the other hand, his presence is appalling, because they begin to feel that they are nothing, and that they are overpowered by an immense mass of evils. In this manner, Peter views Christ with reverence in the miracle, and yet is so overawed by his majesty, that he does all he can to avoid his presence. Nor was this the case with Peter alone: for we learn, from the context, that astonishment had overpowered all who were with him. Hence we see, that it is natural to all men to tremble at the presence of God. And this is of advantage to us, in order to humble any foolish confidence or pride that may be in us, provided it is immediately followed by soothing consolation. And so Christ relieves the mind of Peter by a mild and friendly reply, saying to him, Fear not. Thus Christ sinks his own people in the grave, that he may afterwards raise them to life. 339

Calvin: Luk 5:10 - For afterwards thou shalt catch men Luk 5:10.For afterwards thou shalt catch men The words of Matthew are, I will make you fishers of men; and those of Mark are, I will cause that you...

Luk 5:10.For afterwards thou shalt catch men The words of Matthew are, I will make you fishers of men; and those of Mark are, I will cause that you may become fishers of men. They teach us, that Peter, and the other three, were not only gathered by Christ to be his disciples, but were made apostles, or, at least, chosen with a view to the apostleship. It is, therefore, not merely a general call to faith, but a special call to a particular office, that is here described. The duties of instruction, I do admit, are not yet enjoined upon them; but still it is to prepare them for being instructors, 340 that Christ receives and admits them into his family. This ought to be carefully weighed; for all are not commanded to leave their parents and their former occupation, and literally 341 to follow Christ. There are some whom the Lord is satisfied with having in his flock and his Church, while he assigns to others their own station. Those who have received from him a public office ought to know, that something more is required from them than from private individuals. In the case of others, our Lord makes no change as to the ordinary way of life; but he withdraws those four disciples from the employment from which they had hitherto derived their subsistence, that he may employ their labors in a nobler office.

Christ selected rough mechanics, — persons not only destitute of learning, but inferior in capacity, that he might train, or rather renew them by the power of his Spirit, so as to excel all the wise men of the world. He intended to humble, in this manner, the pride of the flesh, and to present, in their persons, a remarkable instance of spiritual grace, that we may learn to implore from heaven the light of faith, when we know that it cannot be acquired by our own exertions. Again, though he chose unlearned and ignorant persons, he did not leave them in that condition; and, therefore, what he did ought not to be held by us to be an example, as if we were now to ordain pastors, who were afterwards to be trained to the discharge of their office. We know the rule which he prescribes for us, by the mouth of Paul that none ought to be called to it, unless they are apt to teach,” (1Ti 3:2.) When our Lord chose persons of this description it was not because he preferred ignorance to learning as some fanatics do, who are delighted with their own ignorance, and fancy that, in proportion as they hate literature, they approach the nearer to the apostles. He resolved at first, no doubt, to choose contemptible persons, in order to humble the pride of those who think that heaven is not open to the unlearned; but he afterwards gave to those fishers, as an associate in their office, Paul, who had been carefully educated from his childhood.

As to the meaning of the metaphor, fishers of men, there is no necessity for a minute investigation. Yet, as it was drawn from the present occurrence, the allusion which Christ made to fishing, when he spoke of the preaching of the Gospel, was appropriate: for men stray and wander in the world, as in a great and troubled sea, till they are gathered by the Gospel. The history related by the Evangelist John (Joh 1:37) differs from this: for Andrew, who had been one of John’s disciples, was handed over by him to Christ, and afterwards brought his brother along with him. At that time, they embraced him as their master, but were afterwards elevated to a higher rank.

Calvin: Luk 5:29 - And Levi made him a great banquet Luk 5:29.And Levi made him a great banquet This appears to be at variance with what Luke relates, that he left all: but the solution is easy. Matthe...

Luk 5:29.And Levi made him a great banquet This appears to be at variance with what Luke relates, that he left all: but the solution is easy. Matthew disregarded every hinderance, and gave up himself entirely to Christ, but yet did not abandon the charge of his own domestic affairs. When Paul, referring to the example of soldiers, exhorts the ministers of the word to be free and disentangled from every hinderance, and to devote their labors to the church, he says:

No man that warreth entangleth himself with the affairs of life,
that he may please the commander, (2Ti 2:4.)

He certainly does not mean, that those who enroll themselves in the military profession divorce their wives, forsake their children, and entirely desert their homes; but that they quit their homes for a time, and leave behind them every care, that they may be wholly employed in war. In the same manner, nothing kept Matthew from following where Christ called; and yet he freely used both his house and his property, as far as the nature of his calling allowed. It was necessary, indeed, that he should leave the custom-house: for, had he been detained there, he would not have been a follower of Christ. 519

It is called a great banquet, with reference not to the multitude of the guests, but to the abundance and magnificence of the provisions: for we know that Christ did not practise such austerity, as not to allow himself to be sometimes entertained more splendidly by the rich, provided that there were no superfluity. Yet we cannot doubt that, as he was a remarkable example of temperance, so he exhorted those who entertained him to frugality and moderation in diet, and would never have endured wasteful and extravagant luxuries. Matthew says that sinners that is, men of wicked lives and of infamous character came to the banquet. The reason was, that the publicans, being themselves generally hated and despised, did not disdain to associate with persons of that description; for, as moderate correction produces shame and humiliation in transgressors, so excessive severity drives some persons to despair, makes them leave off all shame, and abandon themselves to wickedness. In levying custom or taxes there was nothing wrong: but when the publicans saw themselves cast off as ungodly and detestable persons, they sought consolation in the society of those who did not despise them on account of the bad and disgraceful reputation which they shared along with them. Meanwhile, they mixed with adulterers, drunkards, and such characters; whose crimes they would have detested, and whom they would not have resembled, had not the public hatred and detestation driven them to that necessity.

Calvin: Luk 5:39 - And no person who has drunk old wine Luk 5:39.And no person who has drunk old wine This statement is given by Luke alone, and is undoubtedly connected with the preceding discourse. Though...

Luk 5:39.And no person who has drunk old wine This statement is given by Luke alone, and is undoubtedly connected with the preceding discourse. Though commentators have tortured it in a variety of ways, I take it simply as a warning to the Pharisees not to attach undue importance to a received custom. For how comes it that wine, the taste of which remains unaltered, is not equally agreeable to every palate, but because custom and habit form the taste? Hence it follows, that Christ’s manner of acting towards his disciples is not less worthy of approbation, because it has less show and splendor: as old wine, though it does not foam with the sharpness of n ew wine, is not less agreeable on that account, or less fitted for the nourishment of the body.

Defender: Luk 5:3 - Simon's This was not the first time He had met Simon Peter (Joh 1:40-42). He had first called Peter and Andrew to follow Him when John the Baptist had so dire...

This was not the first time He had met Simon Peter (Joh 1:40-42). He had first called Peter and Andrew to follow Him when John the Baptist had so directed them. Although they were intermittently with Him as He traveled around Galilee, they still continued plying their fishermen's trade as well (see Mat 4:18-20). On this occasion, however, they "forsook all" to go with Him (Luk 5:11). Luke's record is not strictly chronological but topical.

Defender: Luk 5:3 - out of the ship He used a fishing vessel as a pulpit with the docks as a meeting hall on more than one occasion (Mat 13:2), indicating that His first parables of the ...

He used a fishing vessel as a pulpit with the docks as a meeting hall on more than one occasion (Mat 13:2), indicating that His first parables of the kingdom were delivered in this fashion."

Defender: Luk 5:6 - fishes This was not necessarily a miracle of creation (like the multiplication of the loaves and fishes at the feeding of the five thousand), but rather, a m...

This was not necessarily a miracle of creation (like the multiplication of the loaves and fishes at the feeding of the five thousand), but rather, a miracle of providence, whereby the omniscient Lord understood and controlled the time and place where the fish would be (compare to Joh 21:6-8)."

Defender: Luk 5:13 - be thou clean When Jesus touched the "untouchable" one, he was instantly healed of an "incurable disease," thus demonstrating Jesus' power over natural law (on the ...

When Jesus touched the "untouchable" one, he was instantly healed of an "incurable disease," thus demonstrating Jesus' power over natural law (on the significance of this miracle, see note on Mat 8:4)."

Defender: Luk 5:20 - their faith It was not the faith of the palsied man, but the faith of His friends that prompted Jesus to heal the man. However, the man must have exercised repent...

It was not the faith of the palsied man, but the faith of His friends that prompted Jesus to heal the man. However, the man must have exercised repentance and faith as well, for Jesus to forgive his sins. Significantly, he was immediately "glorifying God" after his cure (Luk 5:25; see notes on Mat 9:6)."

Defender: Luk 5:27 - Levi Levi is the same as Matthew (Mat 9:9). With reference to the discussions at Matthew's feast by both Christ and the Pharisees, see Mat 9:13, Mat 9:17, ...

Levi is the same as Matthew (Mat 9:9). With reference to the discussions at Matthew's feast by both Christ and the Pharisees, see Mat 9:13, Mat 9:17, note; and Mar 2:20, note."

Defender: Luk 5:39 - new This is a statement of fact, not a commendation of drinking intoxicating (old) wine. The new, unfermented wine is much better for one's health and con...

This is a statement of fact, not a commendation of drinking intoxicating (old) wine. The new, unfermented wine is much better for one's health and conduct, but the half-intoxicated man will not say so. The same holds true with the Pharisees, who preferred their old economy and traditions to the new and better way brought by Christ."

TSK: Luk 5:1 - it // the lake it : Luk 8:45, Luk 12:1; Mat 4:18-22, Mat 11:12; Mar 1:16-20, Mar 3:9, Mar 5:24 the lake : Num 34:11, Chinnereth, Jos 12:3, Chinneroth, Mat 14:34; Mar...

TSK: Luk 5:2 - washing washing : Mat 4:21; Mar 1:19

washing : Mat 4:21; Mar 1:19

TSK: Luk 5:3 - which // he sat which : Mat 4:18; Joh 1:41, Joh 1:42 he sat : Mat 13:1, Mat 13:2; Mar 4:1, Mar 4:2; Joh 8:2

TSK: Luk 5:4 - Launch Launch : Mat 17:27; Joh 21:6

Launch : Mat 17:27; Joh 21:6

TSK: Luk 5:5 - we // nevertheless we : Psa 127:1, Psa 127:2; Eze 37:11, Eze 37:12; Joh 21:3 nevertheless : Luk 6:46-48; 2Ki 5:10-14; Eze 37:4-7; Joh 2:5, Joh 15:14

TSK: Luk 5:6 - they enclosed they enclosed : 2Ki 4:3-7; Ecc 11:6; Joh 21:6-11; Act 2:41, Act 4:4; 1Co 15:58; Gal 6:9

TSK: Luk 5:7 - that they should that they should : Exo 23:5; Pro 18:24; Act 11:25; Rom 16:2-4; Gal 6:2; Phi 4:3

TSK: Luk 5:8 - he // Depart // I am he : Mat 2:11; Joh 11:32; Act 10:25, Act 10:26; Rev 1:17, Rev 22:8, Rev 22:9 Depart : Exo 20:19; Jdg 13:22; 1Sa 6:20; 2Sa 6:9; 1Ki 17:18; 1Co 13:12; D...

TSK: Luk 5:9 - he he : Luk 4:32, Luk 4:36; Psa 8:6, Psa 8:8; Mar 9:6

TSK: Luk 5:10 - James // partners // from James : Luk 6:14; Mat 4:21, Mat 20:20 partners : Luk 5:7; 2Co 8:23 from : Eze 47:9, Eze 47:10; Mat 4:19, Mat 13:47; Mar 1:17; Act 2:4

TSK: Luk 5:11 - they forsook they forsook : Luk 18:28-30; Mat 4:20, Mat 10:37, Mat 19:27; Mar 1:18-25, Mar 10:21, Mar 10:29, Mar 10:30; Phi 3:7, Phi 3:8

TSK: Luk 5:12 - a man // full // fell // besought // if a man : Mat 8:2-4; Mar 1:40-45 full : Luk 17:12; Exo 4:6; Lev. 13:1-14:57; Num 12:10-12; Deu 24:8; 2Ki 5:1, 2Ki 5:27, 2Ki 7:3; 2Ch 26:19, 2Ch 26:20; M...

TSK: Luk 5:13 - I will // immediately I will : Gen 1:3, Gen 1:9; Psa 33:9; 2Ki 5:10,2Ki 5:14; Eze 36:25-27, Eze 36:29; Hos 14:4; Mat 9:29, Mat 9:30 immediately : Luk 4:39, Luk 8:54, Luk 8:...

TSK: Luk 5:14 - he charged // and show // and offer // for he charged : Mat 8:4, Mat 9:30, Mat 12:16 and show : Luk 17:14; Lev 13:2 and offer : Lev 14:4, Lev 14:10,Lev 14:21, Lev 14:22 for : Luk 9:5; Mat 10:18...

TSK: Luk 5:15 - so // went // great so : Pro 15:33; 1Ti 5:25 went : Mat 4:23-25, Mat 9:26; Mar 1:28, Mar 1:45 great : Luk 12:1, Luk 14:25; Mat 4:25, Mat 15:30,Mat 15:31; Mar 2:1, Mar 2:2...

TSK: Luk 5:16 - -- Luk 6:12; Mat 14:23; Mar 1:35, Mar 1:36, Mar 6:46; Joh 6:15

TSK: Luk 5:17 - that there // Jerusalem // power that there : Luk 5:21, Luk 5:30, Luk 7:30, Luk 11:52-54, Luk 15:2; Joh 3:21 Jerusalem : Mat 15:1; Mar 3:22, Mar 7:1 power : Luk 6:19, Luk 8:46; Mat 11...

TSK: Luk 5:18 - -- Mat 9:2-8; Mar 2:3-12; Joh 5:5, Joh 5:6; Act 9:33

TSK: Luk 5:19 - they went // housetop they went : Mar 2:4 housetop : Deu 22:8; 2Sa 11:2; Jer 19:13; Mat 10:27

they went : Mar 2:4

housetop : Deu 22:8; 2Sa 11:2; Jer 19:13; Mat 10:27

TSK: Luk 5:20 - he saw // Man he saw : Gen 22:12; Joh 2:25; Act 11:23, Act 14:9; Jam 2:18 Man : Luk 7:48; Psa 90:7, Psa 90:8, Psa 107:17, Psa 107:18; Isa 38:17; Mat 9:2; Mar 2:5; J...

TSK: Luk 5:21 - scribes // blasphemies // Who can scribes : Luk 5:17, Luk 7:49; Mar 2:6, Mar 2:7 blasphemies : Lev 24:16; 1Ki 21:10-14; Mat 9:3, Mat 26:65; Joh 10:33; Act 6:11-13 Who can : Exo 34:6, E...

TSK: Luk 5:22 - perceived // What perceived : 1Ch 28:9; Psa 139:2; Pro 15:26; Isa 66:18; Eze 38:10; Mat 9:4, Mat 12:25; Heb 4:12; Rev 2:23 What : Luk 24:38; Mar 8:17; Act 5:3

TSK: Luk 5:23 - -- Mat 9:5; Mar 2:9

TSK: Luk 5:24 - that the // power // I say // and take that the : Dan 7:13; Mat 16:13, Mat 25:31, Mat 26:64; Joh 3:13, Joh 5:27; Rev 1:13 power : Isa 53:11; Mat 9:6, Mat 28:18; Joh 5:8, Joh 5:12, Joh 5:22,...

TSK: Luk 5:25 - immediately // glorifying immediately : Luk 5:13; Gen 1:3; Psa 33:9 glorifying : Luk 13:13, Luk 17:15-18, Luk 18:43; Psa 50:23, Psa 103:1-3, Psa 107:20-22; Joh 9:24

TSK: Luk 5:26 - and they // and were and they : Luk 7:16; Mat 9:8, Mat 12:23; Mar 2:12; Act 4:21; Gal 1:24 and were : Luk 5:8, Luk 8:37; Jer 33:9; Hos 3:5; Mat 28:8; Act 5:11-13

TSK: Luk 5:27 - and saw // Follow me and saw : Mat 9:9-13, Mat 10:3, Matthew, Mar 2:13, Mar 2:14, Mar 3:18 Follow me : Luk 18:22; Mat 4:19-21, Mat 8:22, Mat 16:24; Joh 1:43, Joh 12:26, Jo...

TSK: Luk 5:28 - -- Luk 5:11, Luk 9:59-62; 1Ki 19:19-21; Mat 19:22-27

TSK: Luk 5:29 - made // and there made : Joh 12:2 and there : Mat 9:10; Mar 2:15; 1Co 5:9-11, 1Co 10:27

TSK: Luk 5:30 - -- Luk 5:17, Luk 5:21, Luk 7:29, Luk 7:30,Luk 7:34, Luk 7:39, Luk 15:1, Luk 15:2, Luk 18:11, Luk 19:7; Isa 65:5; Mat 21:28-32; Mar 7:3

TSK: Luk 5:31 - They that They that : Jer 8:22; Mat 9:12, Mat 9:13; Mar 2:17

TSK: Luk 5:32 - -- Luk 4:18, Luk 4:19, Luk 15:7, Luk 15:10, Luk 18:10-14, Luk 19:10, Luk 24:47; Isa 55:6, Isa 55:7, Isa 57:15; Mat 18:11; Mar 15:7, Mar 15:10; Act 2:38, ...

TSK: Luk 5:33 - Why // and make // but Why : Luk 18:12; Isa 58:3-6; Zec 7:6; Mat 9:14-17; Mar 2:18-22 and make : Luk 11:1, Luk 20:47; Pro 28:9; Isa 1:15; Mat 6:5, Mat 6:6, Mat 23:14; Mar 12...

TSK: Luk 5:34 - the children // bridegroom the children : Jdg 14:10,Jdg 14:11; Psa 45:14; Son 2:6, Son 2:7, Son 3:10,Son 3:11, Son 5:8, Son 6:1; Mat 25:1-10; Rev 19:7-9 bridegroom : Psa 45:10-1...

TSK: Luk 5:35 - when // and when : Luk 24:17-21; Dan 9:26; Zec 13:7; Joh 12:8, Joh 13:33, Joh 14:3, Joh 14:4, Joh 16:4-7, Joh 16:16-22; Joh 16:28, Joh 17:11-13; Act 1:9, Act 3:21...

TSK: Luk 5:36 - No man // agreeth No man : Mat 9:16, Mat 9:17; Mar 2:21, Mar 2:22 agreeth : Lev 19:19; Deu 22:11; 2Co 6:16

TSK: Luk 5:37 - old old : Jos 9:4, Jos 9:13; Psa 119:83

TSK: Luk 5:38 - -- Eze 36:26; 2Co 5:17; Gal 2:4, Gal 2:12-14, Gal 4:9-11, Gal 5:1-6, Gal 6:13, Gal 6:14; Phi 3:5-7; Col 2:19-23; 1Ti 4:8; Heb 8:8-13, Heb 13:9, Heb 13:10...

TSK: Luk 5:39 - -- Jer 6:16; Mar 7:7-13; Rom 4:11, Rom 4:12; Heb 11:1, Heb 11:2, Heb 11:39

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Luk 5:1 - -- Luk 5:1-3 Christ teacheth the people out of Simon’ s ship. Luk 5:4-11 The miraculous draught of fishes: Simon and the two sons of Zebedee fo...

Luk 5:1-3 Christ teacheth the people out of Simon’ s ship.

Luk 5:4-11 The miraculous draught of fishes: Simon and the two

sons of Zebedee follow him.

Luk 5:12-15 Christ cleanseth a leper,

Luk 5:16 prayeth in the wilderness,

Luk 5:17-26 answereth the reasonings of the scribes and Pharisees

concerning his forgiving sins, and healeth the sick of

the palsy,

Luk 5:27,28 calleth Levi from the receipt of custom,

Luk 5:29-32 justifieth his eating with publicans and sinners,

Luk 5:33-35 excuses his disciples from fasting for the present,

Luk 5:36-39 and illustrates the matter by a twofold parable.

Ver. 1,2. It is by many interpreters thought that Luke in this history, to Luk 5:11 , doth but give us a larger account of what Matthew, Mat 4:18 , and Mark, Mar 1:16 , told us shortly. The sea of Galilee (as they call it) and the lake of Gennesaret were both the same, receiving the different denomination from the opposite coasts between which it was. hara thn limnhn had been better translated upon , or at , than by the lake , for without doubt the two ships here mentioned were upon the water, though possibly fastened as usually to the shore.

Poole: Luk 5:3-11 - Answer // See Poole on "Mat 4:18" Ver. 3-11. Here is a plain and orderly story, related with many circumstances, tending to show us the power and influence of God upon men’ s suc...

Ver. 3-11. Here is a plain and orderly story, related with many circumstances, tending to show us the power and influence of God upon men’ s successes, in their honest and ordinary callings, and also that God hath a command upon the fish in the sea; together with an account of Christ’ s call of Simon Peter to be a preacher of the gospel. The only difficulty is to reconcile this to what Matthew tells us, Mat 4:18,19 , &c. Matthew’ s words are these: And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brethren, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea: for they were fishers. And he saith unto them, Follow me and I will make you fishers of men. And they straightway left their nets, and followed him. And going on from thence, he saw other two brethren, James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother, in a ship with Zebedee their father, mending their nets; and he called them. And they immediately left the ship, and their father, and followed him. Mark’ s relation doth much agree with Matthew’ s. The differences are in these things:

1. Matthew and Mark speak of Christ’ s calling these disciples as he was walking by the sea. Luke seems to mention it as done in the ship.

Answer: Luke doth not say that Christ spake so to Simon in the ship, though he doth indeed mention those words to Simon, before he mentions their bringing the ship to land, because possibly he would give account of all that Christ did or spake together.

2. a) They might be out of the ship, walking by the sea, before he called James and John, whose call Luke doth not mention, but Matthew and Mark alone.

b) Matthew and Mark mention no ships, nor going of Christ into any, nor any draught of fishes.

Answer: Matthew saith that he saw Simon and Andrew casting their nets into the sea. But there is nothing more ordinary than for one evangelist to relate more fully what another repeateth summarily.

3. Matthew and Mark speak of Andrew being with Simon; Luke mentions Simon alone.

Answer: Luke denies not that Andrew was there, and we are sure Simon alone could not manage the nets with such a draught of fishes.

4. Matthew and Mark speak of the calling of Simon, Andrew, James, and John; Luke only of the calling of Simon.

Answer: It doth not follow from thence that they were not called during Christ’ s walk by the sea after he came out of the ship: Matthew and Mark assure us they were.

5. Matthew and Mark say that James and John were mending their nets.

Answer: Luke saith nothing to the contrary, for he doth not mention their call at that instant when Simon was. That immediately after such a draught of fishes their nets should want mending, and they be so employed, is nothing at all strange. So as it was like there was a little distance of time between the call of Peter and the others; yet Luke, omitting some circumstances mentioned by Matthew and Mark, as well as adding much to this history by them omitted, saith (at least) of more than one, they forsook all, and followed him. Hence appeareth that there may be a coherent history, taking in what all three evangelists say, only allowing that Christ came upon the shore, and walked by the sea side some short time, before he called James and John.

The history instructs us:

1. How good a thing it is for men to be employed in their honest callings, though never so mean. There God meets people with blessings.

2. How much it is our duty to yield obedience to God’ s commands, and how advantageous it will prove, how contrary soever they appear to our sense and reason.

3. Upon whom our blessing depends, let our labour be what it will.

4. That it is the work of the ministers of the gospel to catch men, to gain souls to God.

5. How powerful God’ s calls are: They forsook all, and followed him .

For the difference between what John saith, Joh 1:40,41 , of the call of Andrew and Simon, from what the other three evangelists say, we have spoken something in our notes:

See Poole on "Mat 4:18" , and shall add more when we come to that place in John. In short, John speaketh of another time, before that either of them were called to follow Christ.

Poole: Luk 5:12-15 - -- Ver. 12-15. See Poole on "Mat 8:2" , and verses following to Mat 8:5 . See Poole on "Mar 1:40" , and verses following to Mar 1:45 . Matthew reports...

Ver. 12-15. See Poole on "Mat 8:2" , and verses following to Mat 8:5 . See Poole on "Mar 1:40" , and verses following to Mar 1:45 . Matthew reports this miracle done when Christ came down from the mountain , and immediately after saith, that he entered into Capernaum, Mat 8:5 . Mark also, concluding the first chapter with this piece of history, he begins the second with telling us, that he entered into Capernaum after some days . So that some think he was near Capernaum, within the bounds of it, when he wrought this miracle, but there is no certainty of that.

Poole: Luk 5:16 - -- We meet with Christ often commending to us the duty of secret prayer, by his own example, as he had done by his precept, Mat 6:1-34 , and always cho...

We meet with Christ often commending to us the duty of secret prayer, by his own example, as he had done by his precept, Mat 6:1-34 , and always choosing for it the most private and retired places, to teach us to go and to do likewise, often to pray to our Father which seeth in secret: and his example more presseth us, because we have much more business with God in prayer than he had; he had no sins to confess, nor to beg pardon for, no need to ask for any sanctifying habits of grace, &c. It is possible also that he withdrew into desert places oft times to avoid all show of ostentation, or dangers of tumults, and to obtain a little rest for himself. But suppose that the reason of his motion, yet the spending of his leisure hours in communion with his Father is very imitable for us. Christ had no idle hours, he was always either preaching or healing, thereby doing good to others; or praying, thereby paying a homage to God. If it could be said of the Roman, (with respect to his studies), it should be much more said of Christians, They should never be less alone than when they are alone, nor less idle than when they are most at leisure from their public employments.

Poole: Luk 5:17 - Answer We shall observe that the scribes and Pharisees much haunted our Saviour wherever he came, either to cavil at him, or out of curiosity to see the mi...

We shall observe that the scribes and Pharisees much haunted our Saviour wherever he came, either to cavil at him, or out of curiosity to see the miracles he wrought. It seems they were many of them present at this time. But here ariseth a question or two.

1. How is it said, the power of the Lord was present with Christ to heal? had not Christ this power of healing then at all times?

Answer: Doubtless he had, for he was always the Lord that healeth us. The Divine nature once united to the human was never separated from Christ, but it did not always put forth itself, being as to that directed by his will. But as the end of Christ’ s miracles was for the confirmation of his doctrine; so we shall observe, that mostly after preaching he wrought his miraculous operations.

2. Who are here meant by them? by reading the words one would think them related to the Pharisees and doctors of the law, of none of which we read that they were sick, nor do we read of any cures that Christ made upon them.

Answer: We must know that sometimes in holy writ these relative terms are put out of due order, as in Mat 11:1 , where we have these words, And it came to pass, when Jesus had made an end of commanding his twelve disciples, he departed thence to teach and to preach in their cities: not in the disciples’ cities; poor men, they had no cities; but in the Jewish cities, the cities of that country: yet the verse mentions no other persons than Jesus and the twelve disciples.

So here, though the verse mentions no other persons present than the Pharisees and doctors of the law, yet there doubtless were many others, and some amongst them labouring under chronical distempers; of these the text is to be understood.

Poole: Luk 5:18-26 - glorified God, who had given such power unto men Ver. 18-26. See Poole on "Mat 9:2" , and following verses to Mat 9:8 . See Poole on "Mar 2:3" , and following verses to Mar 2:12 . Both those evang...

Ver. 18-26. See Poole on "Mat 9:2" , and following verses to Mat 9:8 . See Poole on "Mar 2:3" , and following verses to Mar 2:12 . Both those evangelists record the same story with very small alterations in the phrase, nothing in the sense. Instead of the last words, We have seen strange things today , Matthew saith, they glorified God, who had given such power unto men . By which appeareth that all the effect this miracle had was,

1. Amazement. A thing was done; they understood not how it could be effected.

2. They apprehended a Divine power as to the effect.

They therefore

glorified God, who had given such power unto men So as it is plain they only looked upon Christ as a great Prophet, to whom God had communicated such a Divine power, as of old he had communicated to Elijah, and then to Elisha. Lest any should stumble at what is said, that they uncovered the house, and let him down through the tiling, fancying the roofs of their houses built as ours, they must know, that the most of their houses were built (like some amongst us) with flat roofs, which were covered with some slates or stones, so as they might easily be uncovered; and this appeareth by the command of God, Deu 22:8 , concerning making battlements on the tops of their houses, to prevent casualties. The object of the faith here mentioned, was plainly the Divine power and goodness, but not as coming from Christ originally, as eternal God, but as an instrument by which God conveyed it to men under such miserable circumstances as this poor man was.

Poole: Luk 5:20 - See Poole on "Luk 5:18 " See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

Poole: Luk 5:21 - See Poole on "Luk 5:18 " See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

Poole: Luk 5:22 - See Poole on "Luk 5:18 " See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

Poole: Luk 5:23 - See Poole on "Luk 5:18 " See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

Poole: Luk 5:24 - See Poole on "Luk 5:18 " See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

Poole: Luk 5:25 - See Poole on "Luk 5:18 " See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

Poole: Luk 5:26 - See Poole on "Luk 5:18 " See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

See Poole on "Luk 5:18 "

Poole: Luk 5:27-32 - See Poole on "Mat 9:9" Ver. 27-32. See Poole on "Mat 9:9" , and following verses to Mat 9:13 . See Poole on "Mar 2:14" , and following verses to Mar 2:17 , both which eva...

Ver. 27-32. See Poole on "Mat 9:9" , and following verses to Mat 9:13 . See Poole on "Mar 2:14" , and following verses to Mar 2:17 , both which evangelists have also recorded this call of Levi; the first calls him Matthew ; Mark and Luke call him Levi . There was nothing more ordinary amongst the Jews than for persons to have two names. Mark tells us his father’ s name also, saying he was the son of Alphaeus. All agree in his employment, that he was a publican, one employed in the gathering of the public revenue, that part of it which arose from the exportation and importation of commodities; for he was sitting at the receipt of custom. Christ from thence calls him; he follows him, that is, gave up his name to be his disciple; in gratitude, Matthew, or Levi, invites him to a feast, and with him several other publicans and others. The other two evangelists say nothing of Matthew’ s preparing this feast; but it is implied in them, for they take notice of his sitting at meat in his house, and of the offence taken at it by the scribes and the Pharisees, and of our Saviour’ s taking notice of it, and what he said in justification of himself: see the notes before mentioned above. Only Matthew adds, that our Lord also said unto them, Go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice. But for the explication of our Saviour’ s entire answer,

See Poole on "Mat 9:9" , and following verses to Mat 9:13 .

Poole: Luk 5:28 - See Poole on "Lu 5:27 " See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

Poole: Luk 5:29 - See Poole on "Lu 5:27 " See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

Poole: Luk 5:30 - See Poole on "Lu 5:27 " See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

Poole: Luk 5:31 - See Poole on "Lu 5:27 " See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

Poole: Luk 5:32 - See Poole on "Lu 5:27 " See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

See Poole on "Lu 5:27 "

Poole: Luk 5:33-39 - -- Ver. 33-39. We have also both in Matthew and Mark met with this piece of history. See Poole on "Mat 9:14" , and following verses to Mat 9:17 ; See ...

Ver. 33-39. We have also both in Matthew and Mark met with this piece of history. See Poole on "Mat 9:14" , and following verses to Mat 9:17 ; See Poole on "Mar 2:18" , and following verses to Mar 2:22 . Both Matthew and Mark say, that they were the disciples of John who came, and thus said to our Saviour. In our notes upon the two former evangelists, we have fully opened this piece of history. John the Baptist was of a more severe deportment than our Saviour thought fit to show himself; and complying more with the practices of the Pharisees (though in much more sincerity) in their exercises of discipline, the Pharisees did more easily get his disciples to join with them in this address to our Saviour; though probably John’ s disciples did it more out of infirmity, and the Pharisees out of malice, that they might have whereby to lessen Christ’ s reputation amongst the people: thus weak, though good, men are often drawn in by those who are more subtle and malicious to promote their designs. Besides, we naturally desire to be the standard to all, and that others should take their measures from us, and possibly John’ s disciples might have a little of that envy for their master’ s sake, which we find them sick of, Joh 3:26 . Our Lord, who might have told them that he was to be their exemplar, and not they his, dealeth more gently with them, and gives them sufficient reason why, as yet, he did not inure his disciples to those severer acts of religion:

1. Because this was all the rejoicing time they were like to have. He was now with them; when he should be gone from them, before which it would not be long, they should have time to mourn.

2. That they were but newly entered into his discipleship, and therefore not at first to be discouraged, that they might not have a temptation upon them to leave off as soon as they began. But see the notes more fully upon the same history in Matthew and Mark.

Lightfoot: Luk 5:1 - To hear the word of God, he stood by the lake, etc. And it came to pass, that, as the people pressed upon him to hear the word of God, he stood by the lake of Gennesaret,   [To hear the wor...

And it came to pass, that, as the people pressed upon him to hear the word of God, he stood by the lake of Gennesaret,   

[To hear the word of God, he stood by the lake, etc.] for they were wont to teach also without the synagogue and Beth Midrash; in the highways and in the streets. "Rabban Jochanan Ben Zaccai taught in the street before the Mountain of the Temple the whole day." See the Gloss upon it: "Ben Azzai taught in the streets of Tiberias."  

This custom R. Judah forbade in this canon: "Let not the doctors teach their disciples in the streets." And accordingly he severely rebuked R. Chaijam, because he taught his brothers' sons in the street.  

And yet it is related of the same R. Judah, R. Judah sat labouring in the law [labouring in the word and doctrine; as the expression is 1Ti_5:17], "before the Babylonish synagogue in Zippor: there was a bullock passed by him to the slaughter, and it lowed." This bullock because he did not deliver from the slaughter, he was struck with the toothache for the space of thirteen years.

Lightfoot: Luk 5:5 - We have toiled all night And Simon answering said unto him, Master, we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net...

And Simon answering said unto him, Master, we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net.   

[We have toiled all night.] In the Talmud's way of expressing it laborious all night. Labouring all the day.

Lightfoot: Luk 5:12 - When he was in a certain city, behold, a man full of leprosy And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city, behold a man full of leprosy: who seeing Jesus fell on his face, and besought him, saying, ...

And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city, behold a man full of leprosy: who seeing Jesus fell on his face, and besought him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.   

[When he was in a certain city, behold, a man full of leprosy.] "The walled cities are more holy than the land of Israel in general, because they cast out the leprous from them." Which must be understood (if we allow of the Rabbins for interpreters) of cities that had been walled from the days of Joshua. If this city which the evangelist here mentions were of that number, no leper would have been suffered in it, unless absolved from his uncleanness by the priest. For the leprosy remained after that absolution; and the sick man was not healed but restored to the church. That the man is here said to be full of leprosy; the passage may not impertinently be compared with Lev 13:12-13.  

Whether he had been purified by the priest before or no, however, Christ sends him to the priest, to offer what was required from the leper that was cleansed. The law of Moses hardly supposeth the leper healed when he was made clean. It is a question, indeed, whether the disease was ever curable but by a miracle. And therefore is this man sent to the Temple to shew himself to the priest, and offer for a testimony unto them; Lev 13:14; that is, that he might bear witness, that the leprosy, an incurable disease, was now healed by miracle, as formerly it had been in Miriam and Naaman: and so there was now a great prophet arisen in Israel.

Lightfoot: Luk 5:17 - On a certain day And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of ever...

And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judaea, and Jerusalem: and the power of the Lord was present to heal them.   

[On a certain day.] In Talmudic writing it is on a certain time.

Lightfoot: Luk 5:27 - At the receipt of custom And after these things he went forth, and saw a publican, named Levi, sitting at the receipt of custom: and he said unto him, Follow me.  &...

And after these things he went forth, and saw a publican, named Levi, sitting at the receipt of custom: and he said unto him, Follow me.   

[At the receipt of custom.] The house of tribute. "This thing is like a king of flesh and blood passing by the house of tribute. He saith to his servants, Pay the tax to the publicans."

Lightfoot: Luk 5:39 - The old is better No man also having drunk old wine straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better.   [The old is better.] Is not the old bett...

No man also having drunk old wine straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better.   

[The old is better.] Is not the old better? The Gloss is, Old wine: that is, of three years old.  

Wine of three leaves. The Gloss is, "Of three years: because from the time that the vine had produced that wine, it had put forth its leaves three times."

Haydock: Luk 5:1 - -- What St. Luke here gives till ver. 10, is mentioned purposely to shew on what occasion, and by what miracle, Peter, Andrew, James, and John, were call...

What St. Luke here gives till ver. 10, is mentioned purposely to shew on what occasion, and by what miracle, Peter, Andrew, James, and John, were called. (Maldonatus)

Haydock: Luk 5:2 - Washing their nets Washing their nets. See St. Matthew iv. 18. and St. Mark i. 16, where it is said, that Christ saw them when they were casting their nets; i.e. som...

Washing their nets. See St. Matthew iv. 18. and St. Mark i. 16, where it is said, that Christ saw them when they were casting their nets; i.e. some of them were casting, others washing, or mending, their nets. (Witham)

Haydock: Luk 5:3 - -- Why is it mentioned that there were two ships; that one of them was Simon Peter's, that Christ went into that one, and sat down in it, and sitting he ...

Why is it mentioned that there were two ships; that one of them was Simon Peter's, that Christ went into that one, and sat down in it, and sitting he taught out of that ship? No doubt, answer many of the ancient commentators, to shew that the Church was figured by the bark of Peter, and that in it is the chair of Christ, a permanent authority, prefigured by Christ's sitting down, and the true word of God.

Haydock: Luk 5:4 - Greek: Epanagage eis to bathos Greek: Epanagage eis to bathos. Put back from whence you have just now returned. Where you failed without Christ, with Christ you will prove succes...

Greek: Epanagage eis to bathos. Put back from whence you have just now returned. Where you failed without Christ, with Christ you will prove successful. Now is the proper time, when you act in my presence, and according to my orders; before it was not, when you followed your own, and not my will. (Maldonatus) ---

St. Augustine interprets the text, Launch out into the deep, as spoken of distant nations, to whom the gospel was afterwards delivered: tolle signum in gentes, ad eas, quæ prope, et ad eas quæ longe. (Isaias v. 26. and xi. 12.)

Haydock: Luk 5:5 - -- Though these words of St. Peter seem to express his little hope of success, as he had been toiling ( Greek: kopiasantes ) the whole night, the most fa...

Though these words of St. Peter seem to express his little hope of success, as he had been toiling ( Greek: kopiasantes ) the whole night, the most favourable time for fishing, yet they were intended by St. Peter to shew his great confidence, that notwithstanding his bad success, he was willing to obey; he relied on his words, and let go his net in the same place where before he had been disappointed; and the event proved that the obedience and confidence of Peter were not in vain. (Maldonatus, &c.)

Haydock: Luk 5:6 - -- When Christ commanded Peter to let go the net, as great a quantity of fishes were taken as this Lord of the land and sea wished. For the voice of the...

When Christ commanded Peter to let go the net, as great a quantity of fishes were taken as this Lord of the land and sea wished. For the voice of the Lord is the voice of power, at the command of which, in the beginning of the world, light and every created thing sprang into existence. This it was that so much astonished Peter. (St. Gregory of Nazianzus, chap. xxxi.) ---

The net is broken, but the fishes are not lost, because the Lord preserves his servants among the scandals (schisms and heresies) of his enemies. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Luk 5:7 - -- The other ship was probably at such a distance from them, that they could not be heard, had they called out to them; and this also is another proof of...

The other ship was probably at such a distance from them, that they could not be heard, had they called out to them; and this also is another proof of the greatness of the miracle, that though the other ship was fishing in the same place, though a little removed, they could catch nothing. (Maldonatus) ---

This also shews that Peter was to call in other co-labourers, and that all were to come into Peter's ship. (St. Ambrose, in Luc.)

Haydock: Luk 5:8 - -- Such was the excess of St. Peter's humility, that he judged himself unworthy the presence of Christ, and by this rendered himself more worthy. So the...

Such was the excess of St. Peter's humility, that he judged himself unworthy the presence of Christ, and by this rendered himself more worthy. So the centurion, for a similar act of self-abasement, merited to hear from Truth itself, that he was preferred to all Israel. Euthymius is however of opinion, that St. Peter desired Christ to leave him through fear, lest some evil should befall him, because he was not worthy of his presence. In the same manner as the widow of Sarepta thought her son had died, because she was not worthy of the presence of Elias. (3 Kings xvii. 18.) (Maldonatus)

Haydock: Luk 5:10 - -- Jesus Christ answers the thought of St. Peter, that instead of any loss or evil coming to him, he should, on the contrary, receive a great reward, by ...

Jesus Christ answers the thought of St. Peter, that instead of any loss or evil coming to him, he should, on the contrary, receive a great reward, by being appointed a fisher of men; and, as he had taken so many fishes by the divine assistance, so he should take in his net innumerable souls, not so much by his own industry, as by the divine grace and assistance. (Maldonatus)

Haydock: Luk 5:11 - -- We may suppose that these four apostles, like Andrew, followed Jesus Christ at the first call, but without attaching themselves to him; and that now t...

We may suppose that these four apostles, like Andrew, followed Jesus Christ at the first call, but without attaching themselves to him; and that now they attached themselves to him, never to leave him more.

Haydock: Luk 5:12 - -- By falling on his face, he shewed his humility and modesty, that all men might learn to be ashamed of the stains of their lives; but this, his bashful...

By falling on his face, he shewed his humility and modesty, that all men might learn to be ashamed of the stains of their lives; but this, his bashfulness, did not prevent him from confessing his misery; he exposed his wound, he solicits a cure: Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. He did not doubt the goodness of the Lord, but in consideration of his own unworthiness, he durst not presume. That confession is full of religion and faith, which places its trust in the will of God. (St. Ambrose)

Haydock: Luk 5:13 - -- The law forbade lepers to be touched; but he, who is the Lord of the law, dispenses with it. He touches the leper, not because he could not cleanse h...

The law forbade lepers to be touched; but he, who is the Lord of the law, dispenses with it. He touches the leper, not because he could not cleanse him without it, but in order to shew that he was not subject to the law, nor to fear of any infection. At the touch of Christ leprosy is dispelled, which before communicated contagion to all that touched it. (St. Ambrose)

Haydock: Luk 5:14 - -- Because men in sickness generally turn their thoughts towards God, but when they recover, forget him, the leper is commanded to think of God, and retu...

Because men in sickness generally turn their thoughts towards God, but when they recover, forget him, the leper is commanded to think of God, and return him thanks. Therefore is he sent to the priest, to make his offering, (Leviticus xiv. 4.) that, committing himself to the examination of the priest, he might be accounted among the clean. (St. John Chrysostom, hom. xxvi. in Matt.) ---

By this our Saviour would testify to the priest, that this man was healed not by the ordination of the law, but by the power of grace, which is above the law. He likewise shews that he did not come to destroy, but to fulfil the law. (St. Ambrose) ---

Jesus Christ seems here to approve of the legal sacrifices, which the Church does not receive; and this he did, because he had not yet established that most holy of all holy sacrifices, the sacrifice of his own body. The figurative sacrifices were not to be abrogated, before that, which they prefigured, was established by the preaching of the apostles, and the faith of Christian believers. (St. Augustine, quest. ii. b. 3. de quæst. evang.) ---

By this leper is represented the whole human race, which was covered with a spiritual leprosy, and languishing in the corruption of sin; for all have sinned, and need the glory of God; (Romans iii.) therefore he stretched forth his hand, i.e. he clothed himself with our human nature, that we might be cleansed from our former errors, and might offer in return for this favour our bodies, a living sacrifice to God. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Luk 5:16 - Greek: en upochoron Christ did not stand in need of this retirement, since, being God, he was free from every stain, and likewise present in every place. But, by this hi...

Christ did not stand in need of this retirement, since, being God, he was free from every stain, and likewise present in every place. But, by this his conduct, he wished to teach us the time most proper, both for our active employments, and for the more sublime duties of prayer and contemplation. (St. Gregory of Nazianzus, Orat. xxviii.) ---

Greek: en upochoron, he withdrew after his great prodigies, to avoid the praise of the multitude, and to pray assiduously, and with fresh instance, for the salvation of man.

Haydock: Luk 5:17 - -- But the fame of Jesus had spread far and wide. It was for this reason that it is here said, the Pharisees and doctors of the law came out of every to...

But the fame of Jesus had spread far and wide. It was for this reason that it is here said, the Pharisees and doctors of the law came out of every town in Galilee, &c. not indeed through any intention of becoming his disciples, but through a spirit of envy; as they now saw every one leaving them, and following our Saviour. Perhaps also to calumniate him, as we often find them to have done, when they beheld him making converts from them. (Denis the Carthusian)

Haydock: Luk 5:19 - -- Let us learn from this example, how diligent we should be in procuring spiritual health, both for ourselves and for our friends. (Haydock)

Let us learn from this example, how diligent we should be in procuring spiritual health, both for ourselves and for our friends. (Haydock)

Haydock: Luk 5:20 - -- Great is the Lord, who pardons men on account of the merits of others. If you are diffident of the pardon of your grievous sins, have recourse to the...

Great is the Lord, who pardons men on account of the merits of others. If you are diffident of the pardon of your grievous sins, have recourse to the Church. She will pray for you; and the Almighty, at her intercession, will grant you that pardon he might have denied to your prayers. (St. Ambrose, lib. v. in Luc.)

Haydock: Luk 5:21 - -- How great is the madness of this unbelieving people, who confessing that God alone can forgive sins, will not believe God when he grants pardon. (St. ...

How great is the madness of this unbelieving people, who confessing that God alone can forgive sins, will not believe God when he grants pardon. (St. Ambrose) ---

They indeed spoke the truth, for none can forgive sins but God only, who forgives our offences by the ministry of others, to whom he has committed this power, both in baptism and penance. But Christ, by forgiving sins as God, i.e. with his own power, clearly proves to all his divinity. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Luk 5:24 - The Son of man ... on earth The Son of man ... on earth. By which act, says St. Cyril, it is clear that the Son of man hath power on earth to remit sins; which he said both for...

The Son of man ... on earth. By which act, says St. Cyril, it is clear that the Son of man hath power on earth to remit sins; which he said both for himself and us. For he, as God-man, the Lord of the law, forgiveth sins; and we also have obtained by him that wonderful grace when he said to his disciples: Whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them. (John xx. 23.) And how should he not be able to remit sins, who gave others the power to do the same? (Bristow)

Haydock: Luk 5:26 - -- At the sight of the exertion of divine power, the Jews would rather fear than believe; for had they believed they would never have feared, but rather ...

At the sight of the exertion of divine power, the Jews would rather fear than believe; for had they believed they would never have feared, but rather loved; for perfect love excludes fear. (St. Ambrose)

Haydock: Luk 5:28 - -- The profane Julian charge St. Matthew with levity, in leaving all and following a stranger at one word. But hereby is seen the marvellous efficacy of...

The profane Julian charge St. Matthew with levity, in leaving all and following a stranger at one word. But hereby is seen the marvellous efficacy of Christ's word and internal working, which in a moment can alter the heart of man, and cause him to despise what before was most near and dear to him. And this was done not only whilst Christ was living on earth, but daily in his Church. Thus St. Anthony, St. Francis, and others, hearing this word in the Church, forsook all and followed Jesus. (St. Jerome, in Matt. ix.; St. Athanasius, in vita. St. Anthony; St. Augustine, Confess. lib. viii. chap. 11.; St. Bonaventure, in vit. St. Francis.)

Haydock: Luk 5:29 - And Levi made him a great feast And Levi made him a great feast, to testify his gratitude to Jesus for the favour he had done him. It appears that both St. Mark and St. Luke affect...

And Levi made him a great feast, to testify his gratitude to Jesus for the favour he had done him. It appears that both St. Mark and St. Luke affect, through consideration for St. Matthew, to designate him here by his less known name of Levi; whereas he designates himself, through humility, in this same circumstance, by his more known appellation of Matthew. (See Matthew ix. 9.) (Bible de Vence)

Haydock: Luk 5:31 - -- Jesus Christ gives them here to understand, that they were of the number of those who languished under a severe indisposition, and that he was come to...

Jesus Christ gives them here to understand, that they were of the number of those who languished under a severe indisposition, and that he was come to act as their Physician. (St. John Chrysostom, hom. xxxi. in Matt.)

Haydock: Luk 5:33 - -- St. Matthew says, it was St. John the Baptist's disciples themselves that objected this to Christ. Most probably both they and the Pharisees endeavou...

St. Matthew says, it was St. John the Baptist's disciples themselves that objected this to Christ. Most probably both they and the Pharisees endeavoured all they could to press this objection. (St. Augustine, de cons. Evang. lib. ii. chap. 27) ---

Why do you not fast, as is customary with all that wish to regulate their lives according to the law? The reason why the saints fasted was, that they might, by afflicting their bodies, subdue their passions. Jesus Christ, therefore, had no need of fasting, being God, and of course free from every, the least, disorderly motion of concupiscence. Neither did his attendants stand in need of fasting, for being enriched with his grace, they were strengthened in virtue, without the help of fasting. When, therefore, Christ fasted forty days, he fasted to set an example to carnal men. (St. Cyril) ---

As long as the Spouse is with us, we are in joy, we cannot fast, we cannot mourn. But when he has been driven away by sin, then we must both fast and weep. (Ven. Bede)

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Gill: Luk 5:1 - And it came to pass, that as the people pressed upon him // to hear the word of God // he stood by the lake of Gennesaret And it came to pass, that as the people pressed upon him,.... As Christ went through Galilee, and preached in the synagogues there, great crowds of pe...

And it came to pass, that as the people pressed upon him,.... As Christ went through Galilee, and preached in the synagogues there, great crowds of people attended on him, and they followed him wherever he went; and so large were their numbers, and so very eager were they to see him, and hear him, that they were even troublesome to him, and bore hard upon him, and were ready to press him down, though they had no ill design upon him, but only

to hear the word of God; the scriptures of the Old Testament explained, and the doctrines of the Gospel preached; and which were preached by him, as never were before or since, and in such a manner as were not by the Scribes and Pharisees; and both the matter and manner of his ministry drew a vast concourse of people after him:

he stood by the lake of Gennesaret; the same with the sea of Chinnereth, Num 34:11 where the Targums of Onkelos, Jonathan, and the Jerusalem, call it, ימא דגנוסר, "the sea of Geausar" or "Gennesaret": and so it is elsewhere called a, and is the same which is called the sea of Galilee, and of Tiberias, Joh 6:1 and is, by other writers b, as here, called the lake of Gennesaret, and said to be sixteen miles long, and six broad. Josephus says c, it is forty furlongs broad, and an hundred long. The Jews say d, that

"the holy, blessed God created seven seas, but chose none of them all, but the sea of Gennesaret.''

And indeed, it was a place chosen by Christ, and honoured, and made famous by him, by his preaching at it, his miracles upon it, and showing himself there after his resurrection.

Gill: Luk 5:2 - And saw two ships standing by the lake // but the fishermen were gone out of them // and were washing their nets And saw two ships standing by the lake,.... Or two fishing boats; which were, as the Arabic version renders it, "detained by anchors at the shore of t...

And saw two ships standing by the lake,.... Or two fishing boats; which were, as the Arabic version renders it, "detained by anchors at the shore of the lake"; the one belonging to Peter and Andrew, and the other to Zebedee, and his two sons, James and John:

but the fishermen were gone out of them; that is, either the above persons, or their servants:

and were washing their nets; on shore; they having gathered a great deal of soil and filthiness, but had caught no fish; and therefore were cleansing their nets, in order to lay them up, finding it to be in vain to make any further attempts with them at present; and which considered, makes the following miracle the more illustrious.

Gill: Luk 5:3 - And he entered into one of the ships, which was Simon's // and prayed him that he would thrust out a little from the land // he sat down and taught the people out of the ship And he entered into one of the ships, which was Simon's,.... Simon Peter's, and Andrew his brother's, who were both together at this time, though the ...

And he entered into one of the ships, which was Simon's,.... Simon Peter's, and Andrew his brother's, who were both together at this time, though the last is not here mentioned:

and prayed him that he would thrust out a little from the land: as Simon was the owner of the vessel, Christ desired him; he asked the favour of him to put off a little way from shore; though the Arabic and Ethiopic versions render it, "he commanded him", being his Lord and master: To which the Syriac and Persic versions agree; only they make the orders to be given not to Simon singly, but to others, to all in the boat; the former rendering it, and he said, or ordered, that they should carry him a little way from the dry land to the waters; and the latter thus, and said, carry ye the ship from dry land a little into the sea. And which adds, agreeable to the sense enough, though it is not in the text, "when they had executed his command": had done as he entreated, or ordered, and put off the vessel a little way from the shore:

he sat down and taught the people out of the ship; for the boat was not carried neither out of sight, nor beyond the hearing of the people: this method Christ took at another time, and that for conveniency, as now; see Mat 13:1 and whereas he sat while he taught, this was according to the then custom of the times with the Jews; See Gill on Mat 5:1.

Gill: Luk 5:4 - Now when he had left speaking // He said unto Simon, launch out into the deep // and let down your nets for a draught Now when he had left speaking,.... Teaching the people, and preaching the word of God unto them out of the ship, as they stood on the shore before him...

Now when he had left speaking,.... Teaching the people, and preaching the word of God unto them out of the ship, as they stood on the shore before him.

He said unto Simon, launch out into the deep; he spoke to Simon Peter, being the master of the vessel, to thrust it out, or put it off further into deep water, more convenient for fishing;

and let down your nets for a draught; of fishes: his meaning is, that he would give orders to his servants, to put out the vessel to sea, to take their nets and cast them into the sea, in order to take and draw up a quantity of fish, which was their business.

Gill: Luk 5:5 - And Simon answering said unto him, master // we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing // nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net And Simon answering said unto him, master,.... Or Rabbi, as the Syriac version renders it: he knew him to be the Messiah, the king of Israel, and a te...

And Simon answering said unto him, master,.... Or Rabbi, as the Syriac version renders it: he knew him to be the Messiah, the king of Israel, and a teacher sent from God:

we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing; which carries in it an objection to what Christ advised and directed to: they had been fishing that "night", which was the best time for catching fish; and they had been at it all the night, and had "laboured" hard; and were even "fatigued", and quite wearied out; and what was most discouraging of all, their labour was in vain; they had caught "nothing":

nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net; which showed faith in Christ, and obedience to him: thus the faithful preachers of the Gospel, sometimes labour and toil in the ministry of the word a great while, with little or no success; and are discouraged from going on, and would be tempted to leave off, were it not for the commission and word of command they have received from Christ, which they dare not be disobedient to; and for the word of promise he has given them, to be with them, on which they depend.

Gill: Luk 5:6 - And when they had done this // they enclosed a great multitude of fish // and their net brake And when they had done this,.... Had put the ship out further to sea, and had let down their net: they enclosed a great multitude of fish; in their...

And when they had done this,.... Had put the ship out further to sea, and had let down their net:

they enclosed a great multitude of fish; in their net, which by the secret divine power of Christ, were gathered together just in that place, where by his order they cast the net:

and their net brake; with the weight and number, of the fishes, yet not so as to let the fish out; the Arabic version reads, "it was within a little that their nets were broke": they were just upon breaking, the draught was so numerous, the struggling so great, and the weight so heavy.

Gill: Luk 5:7 - And they beckoned unto their partners // which were in the other ship // that they should come and help them // and they came and filled both the ships // so that they began to sink And they beckoned unto their partners,.... Zebedee, and his two sons, James and John; Luk 5:10 who were at some distance from them, probably lay at an...

And they beckoned unto their partners,.... Zebedee, and his two sons, James and John; Luk 5:10 who were at some distance from them, probably lay at anchor near the shore, not having put out to sea when the other vessel did, and so were not within call; but they were obliged to make signs to them, and beckon with their hands to come to them:

which were in the other ship; mentioned in Luk 5:2 which lay by the shore:

that they should come and help them; take up the net, and take the fish out of it:

and they came and filled both the ships; with the fishes they took out of the net, as full as they could hold, and which they were not well able to carry:

so that they began to sink; or "were almost immersed", as Beza's ancient copy, and another manuscript, with the Syriac, Arabic, and Persic versions read; the vessels were so heavy laden, with the vast quantity of fish that was taken, that they were just ready to sink with their burden.

Gill: Luk 5:8 - When Simon Peter saw it // he fell down at Jesus' knees // saying, depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord When Simon Peter saw it,.... The multitude of fish that was taken, and both vessels filled with them, and the danger they were in of sinking, he fe...

When Simon Peter saw it,.... The multitude of fish that was taken, and both vessels filled with them, and the danger they were in of sinking,

he fell down at Jesus' knees. The Arabic and Persic versions read, "at" his "feet": he fell on his knees before him, and threw himself prostrate at his feet, as a worshipper of him, and a supplicant unto him:

saying, depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord; this he said, not as though the presence of Christ was burdensome, or disagreeable to him; but as one amazed at the greatness of the miracle wrought, and struck with the sense of the power of Christ, put forth therein; and with the greatness of his majesty so near him; and as conscious to himself of his own vileness and unworthiness to be in his presence; and so the Persic version adds, and which may serve as a comment, "and am not worthy that thou shouldst be with me": he had much the same sense of things as the centurion had, Mat 8:8 and when it is considered how gracious persons have been struck with awe and fear, and a consciousness of sin, weakness, and unworthiness, at the appearance of an angel, as Zacharias, Luk 1:12 and the shepherds, Luk 2:9 yea, at the presence of an holy man of God, as the widow of Sarepta at Elijah, saying much the same as Peter does here, 1Ki 17:18 it need not be wondered at, that Peter should so express himself, in these circumstances.

Gill: Luk 5:9 - Far he was astonished, and all that were with him // at the draught of the fishes they had taken Far he was astonished, and all that were with him,.... His brother Andrew, and the servants they had with them to manage the vessel, and cast the nets...

Far he was astonished, and all that were with him,.... His brother Andrew, and the servants they had with them to manage the vessel, and cast the nets:

at the draught of the fishes they had taken; being so large and numerous, as the like was never seen, nor known by them before.

Gill: Luk 5:10 - And so was also James and John, the sons of Zebedee // which were partners with Simon // and Jesus said unto Simon // fear not // from henceforth thou shalt catch men And so was also James and John, the sons of Zebedee,.... Who were in the other ship, and had been beckoned to them to come and help them, and did come...

And so was also James and John, the sons of Zebedee,.... Who were in the other ship, and had been beckoned to them to come and help them, and did come, and were witnesses of the miracle:

which were partners with Simon; were sharers with him in loss and gain in the fishing trade; these were equally astonished at the miracle, as Simon and his brother, and the men that were in the boat with them, where Jesus was:

and Jesus said unto Simon; who was at his knees, and expressed his dread of his majesty, and the consternation of mind he was in particularly:

fear not; do not be afraid of me, I shall do thee no harm, nor shall the boats sink, or any damage come to any person, or to the vessels, nor be so much amazed and affrighted, at the multitude of the fish taken:

from henceforth thou shalt catch men; alive, as the word signifies, or "unto life", as the Syriac and Persic versions render it; thou shalt cast the net of the Gospel, and be the happy instrument of drawing many persons out of the depths of sin and misery, in which they are plunged, into the way of life and salvation; and which was greatly verified, in the conversion of three thousand at one cast, under one sermon of his, Act 2:41

Gill: Luk 5:11 - And when they had brought their ships to land // they forsook all // and followed him And when they had brought their ships to land,.... Both Simon Peter's, and the other in which his partners were, and which were laden with fish: th...

And when they had brought their ships to land,.... Both Simon Peter's, and the other in which his partners were, and which were laden with fish:

they forsook all; even all their fish, which they doubtless might have made much money of, and their nets, and their ships, and their servants, and their relations, and friends:

and followed him; Christ; and became his disciples, even all four of them, Peter, Andrew, James, and John.

Gill: Luk 5:12 - And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city,.... Or near it, hard by it, very probably Capernaum; Mat 8:1 Behold a man full of leprosy; a disea...

And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city,.... Or near it, hard by it, very probably Capernaum; Mat 8:1 Behold a man full of leprosy; a disease to which the Jews were very incident, and concerning which, many laws and rules are given, in Lev 13:1. The symptoms of the ancient "lepra", as laid down by Galen, Aretaeus, Pontanus, Aegineta, Cardan, Varanda, Gordon, Pharaeus, and others, are as follow. The patient's voice is hoarse, and comes rather through the nose than the mouth; the blood full of little white shining bodies, like groins of millet, which upon filtration, separate themselves from it; the serum is scabious, and destitute of its natural humidity, insomuch that salt applied to it, does not dissolve; it is so dry, that vinegar poured on it boils; and is so strongly bound together by little imperceptible threads, that calcined lead thrown into it swims. The face resembles a coal half extinct, unctuous, shining, and bloated, with frequent hard knobs, green at bottom, and white at top. The hair is short, stiff, and brinded; and not to be torn off, without bringing away, some of the rotten flesh, to which it adheres; if it grows again, either on the head or chin, it is always white: athwart the forehead, run large wrinkles or furrows, from one temple to the other; the eyes red and inflamed, and shine like those of a cat; the ears swollen and red, eaten with ulcers towards the bottom, and encompassed with little glands; the nose sunk, because of the rotting of the cartilage; the tongue dry and black, swollen, ulcerated, divided with furrows, and spotted with grains of white; the skin covered with ulcers, that die and revive on each other, or with white spots, or scales like a fish; it is rough and insensible, and when cut, instead of blood, yields a sanious liquor: it arrives in time to such a degree of insensibility, that the wrist, feet, or even the large tendon, may be pierced with a needle, without the patient's feeling any pain; at last the nose, fingers, toes, and even privy members, fall off entire; and by a death peculiar to each of them, anticipate that of the patient: it is added, that the body is so hot, that a fresh apple held in the hand an hour, will be dried and wrinkled, as if exposed to the sun for a week e. Think now what a miserable deplorable object this man was, said to be full of it. Between this disease and sin, there is a very great likeness. This disease is a very filthy one, and of a defiling nature, by the ceremonial law; under which it was considered rather as an uncleanness, than as a disease; the person attended with it was pronounced unclean by the priest, and was put out of the camp, and out of the cities and walled towns, that he might not defile others; and was obliged to put a covering on his upper lip, and cry Unclean, Unclean, to acknowledge his pollution, and that others might shun him: all mankind, by reason of sin, are by the Lord pronounced filthy; and by their evil actions, not only defile themselves, but others; evil communications corrupt good manners; and when they are made sensible, freely own that their righteousnesses are as filthy rags, and they themselves as an unclean thing: it is a very nauseous and loathsome disease, as is sin; it is abominable to God, and renders men abominable in his sight; it causes the sinner himself, when convinced of it, to loath and abhor himself: David calls his sin a loathsome disease, Psa 38:7 it is of a spreading nature: this was a sign of it, if it did not spread, it was only a, scab; if it spread, it was a leprosy, Lev 13:5. Sin has spread itself over all mankind, and over all the powers and faculties of the soul, and members of the body; there is no place free of it: and as the leprosy is of consuming nature, it eats and wastes the flesh, see Num 12:10 2Ki 5:10 so sin eats like a canker, and brings ruin and destruction upon men, both soul and body. This disease was incurable by medicine; persons that had it were never sent to a physician, but to a priest; and what he did was only this, he looked upon it, and if it was a clear case, he declared the person unclean; and if it was doubtful, shut him up for seven days, and then inspected him again; and after all he could not cure him; this was the work of God, 2Ki 5:7. All which shows the nature and use of the law, which shuts men up, concludes them under sin, and by which they have knowledge of it, but no healing: the law heals none, it is the killing letter, the ministration of condemnation and death; Christ only, by his blood and stripes, heals the disease of sin, and cleanses from it. There is one thing in the law of the leprosy very surprising, and that is, that if there was any quick raw flesh, or any sound flesh in the place where the leprosy was, the man was pronounced unclean; but if the leprosy covered his skin, and all his flesh, then he was pronounced clean: this intimates, that he that thinks he has some good thing in him, and fancies himself sound and well, and trusts to his own works of righteousness, he is not justified in the sight of God; but if a man acknowledges that there is no soundness in his flesh, that in him, that is, in his flesh, dwells no good thing, but that his salvation is alone, by the grace and mercy of God, such a man is justified by faith in Christ Jesus: the parable of the Pharisee and publican will illustrate this, Luk 18:10. "Who, seeing Jesus, fell on his face, and besought him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean"; See Gill on Mat 8:2. Christ could cure lepers, and did; and which was a proof of his Messiahship, and is given among the signs of it, to John's disciples, Mat 11:5 and as there is a likeness between the leprosy and sin, so between the cleansing of a leper under the law, and the healing of a sinner by Christ: for the cleansing of a leper, two birds were to be taken clean and alive, which were both typical of Christ, and pointed at the meekness of his human nature, his innocence, harmlessness, and purity, and that he had a life to lay down; one of these was to be killed, in an earthen vessel over running water, showing that Christ must be killed, his blood must be shed for the cleansing of leprous sinners; the earthen vessel denoted his human nature, his flesh, in which he was put to death; and the running water signified the purifying nature of his blood, and the continued virtue of it, to cleanse from all sin; and the blood and the water being mixed together, may put us in mind of the blood and water which flowed from the side of Christ, when pierced with the spear; which was an emblem of our justification and sanctification being both from him, on account of which, he is said to come both by water and by blood, 1Jo 5:6. The other bird, after it was dipped with the cedar wood, scarlet and hyssop in the blood of the slain bird, was let go alive; which typified the resurrection of Christ, who was put to death in the flesh, and quickened in the Spirit; and who rose again, for the justification of his people from all sin: the cedar wood, scarlet, and hyssop, which were used in the cleansing of the leper, may either relate to the sufferings, and death, and blood of Christ; the scarlet wool may denote the bloody sufferings of Christ, through which he was red in his apparel; the cedar wood may signify the incorruptibleness and preciousness of the blood of Christ, and the hyssop the purging virtue of it; or else these three may have regard to the three principal graces of the Spirit of God, which have to do with, and are in influenced by the sin cleansing blood of Christ: the cedar wood may signify the incorruptible and precious grace of faith; the green hyssop, the lively grace of hope; and the scarlet, the flaming grace of love, when it is in its full exercise: or else the grace of faith, by which dealing with the blood of Christ, the heart is purified, is only meant; signified by cedar wood, for its permanency; by scarlet, for its concern with the crimson blood of Christ; by which sins, though as scarlet, are made white as wool; and by hyssop, for its being an humble and lowly grace: now the cedar stick, with the scarlet wool, and bunch of hyssop bound unto it, was used to sprinkle the blood of the bird upon the leper seven times, when he was pronounced clean; and expresses the instrumentality of faith, in the application of the blood of Christ for cleansing: though after this, the leper was to shave off all his hair, and wash himself and clothes in water; suggesting to us, that holiness of life and conversation which should follow, upon cleansing through faith in the blood of Christ.

Gill: Luk 5:13 - And he put forth his hand and touched him // saying, I will, be thou clean; and immediately the leprosy departed from him And he put forth his hand and touched him,.... Having compassion on him, and commiserating his sad case: saying, I will, be thou clean; and immedia...

And he put forth his hand and touched him,.... Having compassion on him, and commiserating his sad case:

saying, I will, be thou clean; and immediately the leprosy departed from him; See Gill on Mat 8:3.

Gill: Luk 5:14 - And he charged him to tell no man // but go show thyself to the priest And he charged him to tell no man,.... Of his cure, and by whom he received it; but go show thyself to the priest. The Syriac and Persic versions r...

And he charged him to tell no man,.... Of his cure, and by whom he received it;

but go show thyself to the priest. The Syriac and Persic versions read, "to the priests: and offer for thy cleansing, according as Moses has commanded, for a testimony unto them"; See Gill on Mat 8:4.

Gill: Luk 5:15 - But so much the more went there a fame abroad of him // And great multitudes came together to hear But so much the more went there a fame abroad of him,.... For the more he charged the man to keep silence, the more he blazed it abroad, being elated ...

But so much the more went there a fame abroad of him,.... For the more he charged the man to keep silence, the more he blazed it abroad, being elated with the cure he received, and filled with gratitude to his benefactor; Mar 1:45.

And great multitudes came together to hear: him, or from him, as the Syriac, Arabic, Persic, and Ethiopic versions add; to hear the doctrines of the Gospel preached by him: "and to be healed by him of their infirmities"; their bodily weaknesses and disorders.

Gill: Luk 5:16 - And he withdrew himself into the wilderness // and prayed And he withdrew himself into the wilderness,.... Into a desert place, that he might have rest from the fatigues of preaching and healing diseases; and...

And he withdrew himself into the wilderness,.... Into a desert place, that he might have rest from the fatigues of preaching and healing diseases; and being alone, and free from company, might have an opportunity for private prayer to God, for so it lows:

and prayed; this is to be understood of Christ, as man: as God, he is the object of prayer, and petitions are often addressed unto him; and as mediator, he offers up the prayers of all saints, and presents them to his Father; which are acceptable to him, through the incense of his mediation; and as man, he prayed himself: what he now prayed for, is not known; sometimes he prayed for his disciples, and for all that should believe; for their conversion, sanctification, union, perseverance, and glorification; and sometimes for himself, that the cup might pass from him, and he be saved from death; but always with submission to the will of his Father.

Gill: Luk 5:17 - And it came to pass on a certain day // As he was teaching // That there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by // which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judea, and Jerusalem // and the power of the Lord was present to heal them And it came to pass on a certain day,.... When he was at Capernaum, as appears from Mar 2:1 As he was teaching: in the house where such numbers wer...

And it came to pass on a certain day,.... When he was at Capernaum, as appears from Mar 2:1

As he was teaching: in the house where such numbers were gathered together, to hear the word of God preached by him, that there was not room for them, neither within the house, nor about the door, Mar 2:2

That there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by; who were sometimes called Scribes, and sometimes lawyers, and were generally of the sect of the Pharisees:

which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judea, and Jerusalem: having heard much of his doctrine and miracles, they came from all parts to watch and observe him, and to take all opportunities and advantages against him, that they might expose him to the people:

and the power of the Lord was present to heal them; not the Pharisees and doctors of the law, who did not come to be healed by him, either in body or mind; but the multitude, some of whom came to hear his doctrine, and others to be healed of their infirmities, Luk 5:15. The Persic version reads the words thus, "and from all the villages of Galilee, and from Judea, and from Jerusalem, multitudes came, and the power of God was present to heal them."

Gill: Luk 5:18 - And behold, men brought in a bed a man which was taken with a palsy // and to lay him before him And behold, men brought in a bed a man which was taken with a palsy,.... Four men brought him, as Mark says, Mar 2:3 and which the Ethiopic version ex...

And behold, men brought in a bed a man which was taken with a palsy,.... Four men brought him, as Mark says, Mar 2:3 and which the Ethiopic version expresses here: "and they sought means to bring him in": into the house where Jesus was:

and to lay him before him; at his feet, in hope of moving his compassion, and to obtain a cure of him: of the nature of this disease, and of the sort which this man's seems to be; see Gill on Mar 2:3.

Gill: Luk 5:19 - And when they could not find by what way // they might bring him in // because of the multitude // they went upon the housetop // and let him down through the tiling with his couch And when they could not find by what way,.... As by the door, or in at a window of the house: they might bring him in; to Jesus, in the house: b...

And when they could not find by what way,.... As by the door, or in at a window of the house:

they might bring him in; to Jesus, in the house:

because of the multitude; which was about the door, and all the fore part of the house:

they went upon the housetop; by a ladder, or pair of stairs, which usually were on the outside of houses; See Gill on Mat 24:17 the houses of the Jews being flat roofed:

and let him down through the tiling with his couch, into the midst before Jesus; that is, they untiled the roof, or took away the tiles which were about the trap door, or passage, into the inside of the house; and so making it wider, let down the man upon his couch, or bed, into the middle of the room and of the people, just before Jesus, where he was sitting; See Gill on Mar 2:4.

Gill: Luk 5:20 - And when he saw their faith // he said unto him // man, thy sins are forgiven thee And when he saw their faith,.... That is, Jesus, as the Syriac and Persic versions express it; when he saw the faith both of the paralytic man, and of...

And when he saw their faith,.... That is, Jesus, as the Syriac and Persic versions express it; when he saw the faith both of the paralytic man, and of the men that brought him, which was shown in the pains they took, and trouble they were at, in getting him to him;

he said unto him. The Vulgate Latin only reads, "he said"; but the Syriac, Arabic, and Persic versions, still more fully express the sense, rendering it, "he said to the paralytic man"; and the Ethiopic version, "he said to the infirm man"; as follows:

man, thy sins are forgiven thee. The other evangelists say, he said "son"; perhaps he used both words: however, all agree that he pronounced the forgiveness of sins, which were the cause of his disease; and which being removed, the effect must cease; so that he had healing both for soul and body; See Gill on Mat 9:2.

Gill: Luk 5:21 - And the Scribes and the Pharisees began to reason // saying, who is this which speaketh blasphemies // Who can forgive sins but God alone And the Scribes and the Pharisees began to reason,.... To think and say within themselves, and it may be to one another, in a private manner: sayin...

And the Scribes and the Pharisees began to reason,.... To think and say within themselves, and it may be to one another, in a private manner:

saying, who is this which speaketh blasphemies? what vain boaster, and blaspheming creature is this, who assumes that to himself, which is the prerogative of God?

Who can forgive sins but God alone? against whom they are committed, whose law is transgressed, and his will disobeyed, and his justice injured and affronted. Certain it is, that none can forgive sins but God; not any of the angels in heaven, or men on earth; not holy good men, nor ministers of the Gospel; and if Christ had been a mere man, though ever so good a man, even a sinless one, or ever so great a prophet, he could not have forgiven sin; but he is truly and properly God, as his being a discerner of the thoughts of these men, and his healing the paralytic man in the manner he did, are sufficient proofs. The Scribes and Pharisees therefore, though they rightly ascribe forgiveness of sin to God alone, yet grievously sinned, in imputing blasphemy to Christ: they had wrong notions of Christ, concluding him to be but a mere man, against the light and evidence of his works and miracles; and also of his office as a Redeemer, who came to save his people from their sins; and seem to restrain the power of forgiving sin to God the Father, whereas the Son of God, being equal with him, had the same power, and that even on earth, to forgive sin; See Gill on Mar 2:7.

Gill: Luk 5:22 - But when Jesus perceived their thoughts // he answering said unto them, what reason ye in your hearts But when Jesus perceived their thoughts,.... Being God omniscient; he answering said unto them, what reason ye in your hearts? This he said, not as...

But when Jesus perceived their thoughts,.... Being God omniscient;

he answering said unto them, what reason ye in your hearts? This he said, not as being ignorant what their reasonings were, for it is before said he perceived their thoughts, but to expose the wickedness of them; in one exemplar of Beza's it is added, "evil things", as in Mat 9:4. See Gill on Mat 9:4.

Gill: Luk 5:23 - Whether is it easier to say // thy sins be forgiven thee, or to say, rise up and walk Whether is it easier to say,.... Mark adds, "to the sick of the palsy"; to whom Christ had said that his sins were forgiven him, which had given offen...

Whether is it easier to say,.... Mark adds, "to the sick of the palsy"; to whom Christ had said that his sins were forgiven him, which had given offence to the Scribes and Pharisees, imagining that he had assumed too much to himself: wherefore he proposes the following case to them, which they thought was most easy for man, or more proper and peculiar to God to say,

thy sins be forgiven thee, or to say, rise up and walk? Neither of them could be said by a mere man, with effect, so as that sins would be really remitted on so saying; or that a man sick of a palsy, by such a word speaking, would be able to stand upon his feet and walk; but both of them were equally easy to him, that is truly God; and he that could say the one effectually, could also say the other: or in other words, he that could cure a man of a palsy with a word speaking, ought not to be charged with blasphemy, for taking upon him to forgive sin: our Lord meant, by putting this question, and acting upon it, to prove himself to be God, and to remove the imputation of blasphemy from him; See Gill on Mat 9:5. See Gill on Mar 2:9.

Gill: Luk 5:24 - But that ye may know, that the son of man // hath power upon earth to forgive sins // he said unto the sick of the palsy // I say unto thee, arise, and take up thy couch, and go into thine house But that ye may know, that the son of man,.... Whom the Scribes and Pharisees took for a mere man, in which they were mistaken; for though he was real...

But that ye may know, that the son of man,.... Whom the Scribes and Pharisees took for a mere man, in which they were mistaken; for though he was really a man, and the son of man, yet he was God as well as man; he was God manifest in the flesh:

hath power upon earth to forgive sins; even in the days of his flesh, whilst he was in his humble form on earth; for he did not cease to be God by becoming man, nor lose any branch of his power, not this of forgiving sin, by appearing in the form of a servant; and, that it might be manifest,

he said unto the sick of the palsy: these are the words of the evangelist, signifying, that Christ turned himself from the Scribes and Pharisees to the paralytic man, and thus addressed him:

I say unto thee, arise, and take up thy couch, and go into thine house.

Gill: Luk 5:25 - And immediately he rose up before them // and took up that whereon he lay // glorifying God And immediately he rose up before them,.... As soon as ever these words were spoken by Christ, the man, before sick of the palsy, finding himself perf...

And immediately he rose up before them,.... As soon as ever these words were spoken by Christ, the man, before sick of the palsy, finding himself perfectly well, got off of his couch, and stood up on his feet before the Scribes and Pharisees, and all the people:

and took up that whereon he lay; his couch, or bed: and departed to his own house; with it upon his back: "and went to his business", as the Persic version renders it:

glorifying God; both for the healing of his body, and for the pardon of his sins; each of which he knew none but God could do. This circumstance is only mentioned by Luke, and shows the sense the man had of the great favours bestowed upon him: he glorified God, by ascribing them to his goodness and power; by offering the sacrifice of praise, or giving thanks unto him for them; by publishing them among his neighbours, to the honour of his name; and by living a holy life and conversation, to his glory, under a grateful sense of his kindness: yea, he glorified Jesus Christ as God, who he knew must be God, by forgiving his sins, and curing his disease; he proclaimed his divine power, and ascribed greatness to him; he confessed him as the Messiah, and owned him as his Saviour, and became subject to him as his Lord.

Gill: Luk 5:26 - And they were all amazed, and they glorified God // and were filled with fear // saying, we have seen strange things today And they were all amazed, and they glorified God,.... Not the Pharisees, and doctors of the law, but the common people: and were filled with fear; ...

And they were all amazed, and they glorified God,.... Not the Pharisees, and doctors of the law, but the common people:

and were filled with fear; of the Divine Being, whose presence and power they were sensible must be in this case:

saying, we have seen strange things today; paradoxes, things wonderful, unthought of, unexpected, and incredible by carnal reason, and what were never seen, nor known before; as that a man, who was so enfeebled by the palsy, that he was obliged to be carried on a bed by four men, yet, on a sudden, by a word speaking, rose up, and carried his bed, on his back, home.

Gill: Luk 5:27 - And after these things he went forth // and saw a publican named Levi // sitting at the receipt of custom // and he said unto him, follow me And after these things he went forth,.... After his discourse with the Scribes and Pharisees, and his healing of the man, sick with the palsy, he went...

And after these things he went forth,.... After his discourse with the Scribes and Pharisees, and his healing of the man, sick with the palsy, he went forth from the city of Capernaum, to the sea side; not only for retirement and recreation, after the work of the day hitherto, but in order to meet with, and call one that was to be a disciple of his:

and saw a publican named Levi who is said to be the son of Alphaeus, Mar 2:14 and so it is said to be in Beza's ancient copy here; and who was also called Matthew, see Mat 9:9

sitting at the receipt of custom; at the place where custom was received, and toll taken, near the sea side, of such that went over. The Syriac and Persic versions read, "sitting among publicans", of which business he himself was; and these might be his servants under him, or partners with him; See Gill on Mar 2:14.

and he said unto him, follow me: of all the publicans that were there, he singled out Levi, or Matthew, and directed his discourse to him, and called him to be a follower of him: an instance of powerful, special, and distinguishing grace this; See Gill on Mat 9:9.

Gill: Luk 5:28 - And he left all // rose up // and followed him And he left all,.... His company, his business, and all the profits of it: rose up; directly; such power went along with the words of Christ, that ...

And he left all,.... His company, his business, and all the profits of it:

rose up; directly; such power went along with the words of Christ, that he could not withstand it:

and followed him; not only in a literal, but in a spiritual sense, and became a disciple of his.

Gill: Luk 5:29 - And Levi made him a great feast in his own house // and there was a great company of publicans, and of others // that sat down with them And Levi made him a great feast in his own house,.... At Capernaum, which, very likely, was made some time after his call, though recorded here; for i...

And Levi made him a great feast in his own house,.... At Capernaum, which, very likely, was made some time after his call, though recorded here; for it is not reasonable to think there could be time enough that day to get ready so great a feast, as this is said to be Levi, it should seem, was a rich man, and in gratitude to Christ for his special grace and honour bestowed on him, made this entertainment for him; and he seems to have had also another view in it, to bring him into the company of his fellow publicans, hoping he might be useful to them, as he had been to him; for of this nature is true grace, to wish for, and desire the salvation of the souls of others, as well as a man's own:

and there was a great company of publicans, and of others: אחרים, which word is sometimes used in Talmudic writings for Gentiles; so אשת אחרים, "the wife of others", is interpreted the wife of the Cuthites, or Samantans f: and thus the Jews explain the text in Deu 24:14 "thou shalt not oppress an hired servant, that is poor and needy", whether he be "of thy brethren", on which they make this remark, פרט לאחרים, "this excepts others"; that, is, as the gloss interprets it, it excepts the nations of the world, or the Gentiles: they go on to expound the text, "or of thy strangers that are in thy land"; these are the proselytes of righteousness: "within thy gates"; these are they that eat things that are torn g: so that the "others" are distinguished from the Jews, and from both the proselytes of righteousness, and of the gate; and it is easy to observe, that publicans and Heathens are sometimes mentioned together: here it means sinners, as appears from Mat 9:10 such the Gentiles were reckoned:

that sat down with them; being invited by Matthew.

Gill: Luk 5:30 - But their Scribes and Pharisees // murmured against his disciples, saying // why do ye eat and drink with publicans and sinners? But their Scribes and Pharisees,.... Not the Scribes of the publicans and sinners that sat down, but the Scribes of the people in general; the Scribes...

But their Scribes and Pharisees,.... Not the Scribes of the publicans and sinners that sat down, but the Scribes of the people in general; the Scribes of the Jewish nation: all the eastern versions leave out the word "their":

murmured against his disciples, saying; or, "murmured, and said unto his disciples", as the Syriac and Persic versions render it: that is, they either murmured at the publicans and sinners sitting down at meat; or "against him", as the Ethiopic version reads: either against Matthew for inviting them; or rather against Christ for sitting down with them: and not caring to speak to him, address themselves to his disciples in these words,

why do ye eat and drink with publicans and sinners? The other evangelists represent these as saying, why does he, or your master, eat with such? doubtless, they included both Christ, and his disciples; though they chiefly designed him, and to bring an accusation against him, and fix a charge upon him, in order to render him odious to the people.

Gill: Luk 5:31 - And Jesus answering, said unto them // they that are whole need not a physician, but they that are sick And Jesus answering, said unto them,.... Knowing that they aimed at him; though, according to this evangelist, they only mentioned his disciples, howe...

And Jesus answering, said unto them,.... Knowing that they aimed at him; though, according to this evangelist, they only mentioned his disciples, however, he takes up the cause, and vindicates both himself and them, by observing to them the following proverb;

they that are whole need not a physician, but they that are sick: suggesting hereby, that as such who are in good health, who are free from all diseases, wounds, bruises, and putrefying sores, stand in no need of the advice and assistance of a physician, or surgeon, but such who have either distempers or sores on their bodies; so they, the Scribes and Pharisees, who, in their own opinion, were free from the disease of sin, original and actual, and touching the righteousness of the law, were blameless, stood not in any need of him, the physician, who came to cure the maladies of the souls, as well as of the bodies of men; but such persons, who not only are sick with sin, but sick of it, who are sensible of it, and desire healing: and therefore this was the reason of his conduct, why he conversed with sinners, and not with the Scribes and Pharisees; his business, as a physician, lying among the one, and not the other; See Gill on Mat 9:12. See Gill on Mar 2:17.

Gill: Luk 5:32 - I came not to call the righteous I came not to call the righteous,.... Such as the Scribes and Pharisees were in their own apprehension, and in the esteem of others, who trusted in th...

I came not to call the righteous,.... Such as the Scribes and Pharisees were in their own apprehension, and in the esteem of others, who trusted in themselves, that they were righteous, and submitted not to the righteousness of Christ: these Christ came not to call by his grace, and therefore did not associate himself with them: but sinners to repentance; such as the publicans, and others, with them, were; and therefore he was chiefly with such, and chose to be among them: these he not only called to repentance by the outward ministry of the word, but brought them to it; he having power to bestow the grace of repentance, as well as to call to the duty of it; See Gill on Mat 9:13. See Gill on Mar 2:17.

Gill: Luk 5:33 - And they say unto him // why do the disciples of John fast often, and make prayers // But thine eat and drink? And they say unto him,.... The Scribes and Pharisees, or the disciples of John; see Mat 9:14 why do the disciples of John fast often, and make pray...

And they say unto him,.... The Scribes and Pharisees, or the disciples of John; see Mat 9:14

why do the disciples of John fast often, and make prayers? set times apart frequently for fasting and prayer. The Ethiopic version reads, "why do the disciples of John baptize frequently, fast, and make prayers?" in which the former clause is added; and as without any authority, so without judgment, since it must suppose that the Pharisees did so likewise, whereas they rejected the baptism of John; for it follows, and "likewise" the disciples of "the Pharisees"; who fasted often, at least twice in the week, and made frequent prayers in the synagogues, and corners of the streets, and in widows' houses.

But thine eat and drink? instead of fasting and praying; See Gill on Mat 9:14.

Gill: Luk 5:34 - And he said unto them // can ye make the children of the bride chamber fast, while the bridegroom is with them? And he said unto them,.... The disciples of John, or the Scribes and Pharisees: can ye make the children of the bride chamber fast, while the bride...

And he said unto them,.... The disciples of John, or the Scribes and Pharisees:

can ye make the children of the bride chamber fast, while the bridegroom is with them? signifying, that he was the bridegroom, and his disciples the children of the bride chamber; and that as it is unreasonable to expect, and morally impossible, that persons, attending the festivals of a nuptial solemnity, should be engaged in severe fastings; so it was not to be thought, that whilst Christ was corporeally present with his disciples, that they should be prevailed upon to live such an austere and mortified life.

Gill: Luk 5:35 - But the days will come // when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them // and then they shall fast in those days But the days will come,.... And that in a very little time, as they did: when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them: as their master, John, ...

But the days will come,.... And that in a very little time, as they did:

when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them: as their master, John, was taken away from them, and now in prison, and therefore it was no wonder they mourned and fasted; signifying, that in a short time he, the bridegroom of his church and people, should be taken away by death:

and then they shall fast in those days; mourn, and be humbled, of which fasting was, a sign, for the death of their Lord, and on account of the many afflictions and persecutions they should endure for his sake; See Gill on Mat 9:15.

Gill: Luk 5:36 - And he spake also a parable unto them // no man putteth a piece of a new garment upon an old // If otherwise, then both the new, maketh the rent // And the piece that was taken out of the new, agreeth not with the old And he spake also a parable unto them,.... The Scribes and Pharisees; illustrating what he had just now said: no man putteth a piece of a new garme...

And he spake also a parable unto them,.... The Scribes and Pharisees; illustrating what he had just now said:

no man putteth a piece of a new garment upon an old; by "a piece of a new garment" meaning the new and upstart notions and traditions of the elders, which were so in comparison of the law of Moses; and by the "old", the robe of their own righteousness, wrought out in obedience to the moral and ceremonial law: and Christ suggests, that to join these together, in order to patch up a garment of righteousness, to appear in before God, was equally as weak and ridiculous, as to put a piece of new and undressed cloth into a garment that was old, and wore threadbare.

If otherwise, then both the new, maketh the rent; that is, much worse than it was, as it is expressed both in Matthew and Mark; the old and new cloth being unsuitable, and not of equal strength to hold together: by this Christ intimates, that the Jews, by being directed to the observance of the traditions of the elders, were drawn off from a regard to the commandments of God; so that instead of having a better righteousness, they had one much the worse, a ragged, and a rent one.

And the piece that was taken out of the new, agreeth not with the old; and so the statutes of men, and the ordinances of God, or the traditions of the elders, and the commands of God, are no more like one another, than the piece of a new and an old garment, and as unlike is obedience to the one, and to the other;

See Gill on Mat 9:16. See Gill on Mat 9:17. See Gill on Mar 2:21.

See Gill on Mar 2:22 where this, and the following parable, are more largely explained.

Gill: Luk 5:37 - And no man putteth new wine into old bottles // Else the new wine will burst the bottles, and be spilled // And the bottles shall perish And no man putteth new wine into old bottles,.... To which the Scribes and Pharisees are here compared, into whose hearts the new wine of Gospel grace...

And no man putteth new wine into old bottles,.... To which the Scribes and Pharisees are here compared, into whose hearts the new wine of Gospel grace was not put; or to whom was not made known the love of God Comparable to new wine; nor the blessings of the new covenant of grace, now exhibited; nor the truths of the Gospel now more clearly and newly revealed.

Else the new wine will burst the bottles, and be spilled; they not being able to receive and bear these things, no, not the relation of them: these were hard sayings to them, of which they said, who can hear them? they could not hear them with patience, much less receive them in the love of them; but were at once filled with wrath and indignation, and rejected them.

And the bottles shall perish; their condemnation shall be the greater.

Gill: Luk 5:38 - But new wine must be put into new bottles // And both are preserved But new wine must be put into new bottles,.... Such as the disciples of Christ were, and sinners called to repentance are, who are renewed by the Spir...

But new wine must be put into new bottles,.... Such as the disciples of Christ were, and sinners called to repentance are, who are renewed by the Spirit and grace of God: and these are filled with spiritual joy and comfort, as with new wine, arising from discoveries of the love of God, a view of interest in the blessings of the covenant, and an application of Gospel truths and promises.

And both are preserved; both these renewed ones, who are preserved unto the kingdom and glory of Christ; and the grace that is put into them, which is a well of living water, springing up to everlasting life; as well as the Gospel, and its blessings.

Gill: Luk 5:39 - No man also having drunk old wine // straightway desireth new // for he saith, the old is better No man also having drunk old wine,.... "Wine", though not in the text, is rightly supplied by our translators, as it is by the Syriac and Persic versi...

No man also having drunk old wine,.... "Wine", though not in the text, is rightly supplied by our translators, as it is by the Syriac and Persic versions:

straightway desireth new; new wine:

for he saith, the old is better; old wine is more grateful, more generous, and more reviving to the spirits, than new wine is. This is a proverbial expression, and which Luke only records; which may be applied to natural men, who having drunk the old wine of their carnal lusts and pleasures, do not desire the new wine of the Gospel, and of the grace of God, and of spiritual things, but prefer their old sins and lusts unto them: carnal lusts may be signified by old wine, both for the antiquity of them, being as old as men themselves, and therefore called the old man, and for the gratefulness of them to them; and who may be said to drink of them, as they do drink iniquity like water; which is expressive of their great desire and thirst after it, and delight in it: now whilst they are such, they cannot desire the new wine of the Gospel, which is insipid and ungrateful to them; nor the grace of God, to which their carnal minds are enmity; nor any thing that is evangelical and spiritual, at least, not straightway, or immediately; not until they are regenerated by the Spirit of God, and their taste is changed, but will prefer their old lusts and former course of life unto them: or it may be accommodated to legalists, and men of a "pharisaical spirit", to whom spiritual and evangelical things are very disagreeable: Scribes and Pharisees, who have drank of the old wine of the law, and the traditions of the elders, do not desire the new wine of the Gospel, but prefer the former to it: the ceremonial law may be expressed by old wine, being originally instituted of God, and acceptable to him; and one part of which lay in libations of wine, and was of long standing, but now waxen old, and ready to vanish away; and likewise the traditions of the elders, which were highly pleasing to the Pharisees, and which pretended to great antiquity: and of these they might be said to drink, being inured to them from their youth, and therefore could not like the new dispensation of the Gospel, neither its doctrines, nor its ordinances; but preferred their old laws and traditions to them: or rather this proverb, as used by Christ here, may be considered as intimating the reason why the disciples did not give into the practices of the Pharisees, because they had drank of the old wine of the Gospel; which, as upon some account it may be called new, because of the new dispensation, fresh discovery and clearer revelation of it; in other respects it may be said to be old, being what was prepared and ordained before the world began; and what Adam drank of, in the first hint and promise of the Messiah; and after him Noah, the preacher of righteousness; and Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to whom the Gospel was preached before; and even Moses, who wrote and testified of Christ; and David, and Solomon, and Isaiah, and all the prophets of the former dispensation: and now the disciples having more largely drank of it, under the ministry of Christ, could not easily desire the new wine of the fastings and prayers of the Pharisees, and John's disciples; for the old wine of the Gospel was much better in their esteem, more grateful to the taste, more refreshing to their spirits, and more salutary and healthful, being the wholesome words of our Lord Jesus Christ. Old wine, with the Jews h was wine of three years old, and was always by them preferred to new: so they descant on those words in Deu 15:16 "because he is well with thee i, (i.e. the servant,)"

"with thee in food, with thee in drink; for thou shalt not eat bread of fine flour, and he eat bread of bran; or thou drink, יין ישן, "old wine", and he drink, יין הדש, "new wine".''

And sometimes they use this distinction of old and new wine proverbially and parabolically, as here k.

"Rabbi Jose bar Juda, a man of a village in Babylon, used to say, he that learns of young men, to what is he like? to him that eateth unripe grapes, and drinks wine out of the fat: but he; that learns of old men, to what is he like? to him that eats ripe grapes, and drinks, יין ישן, "old wine"''

signifying, that the knowledge of old men is more solid, and mature, and unmixed, and free from dregs of ignorance, than that of young men: though it follows, that

"Ribbi had used to say, do not look upon the tankard, but on what is in it; for sometimes there is a new tankard full of old wine, and an old one in which there is not so much as new in it:''

signifying, that sometimes young men are full of wisdom and knowledge, when old men are entirely devoid of them.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Luk 5:1 The image of the crowd pressing around him suggests the people leaning forward to catch Jesus’ every word.

NET Notes: Luk 5:2 Grk “And he.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

NET Notes: Luk 5:3 Grk “sitting down”; the participle καθίσας (kaqisa") has been translated as a finite verb due to r...

NET Notes: Luk 5:4 Or “let down.” The verb here is plural, so this is a command to all in the boat, not just Peter.

NET Notes: Luk 5:5 Or “let down.”

NET Notes: Luk 5:6 In context, this imperfect verb is best taken as an ingressive imperfect (BDF §338.1).

NET Notes: Luk 5:7 This infinitive conveys the idea that the boats were at the point of sinking.

NET Notes: Luk 5:8 Peter was intimidated that someone who was obviously working with divine backing was in his presence (“Go away from me”). He feared his si...

NET Notes: Luk 5:9 In the Greek text, this term is in an emphatic position.

NET Notes: Luk 5:10 The kind of fishing envisioned was net – not line – fishing, which involved a circular net that had heavy weights around its perimeter. Th...

NET Notes: Luk 5:11 The expression left everything and followed him pictures discipleship, which means that to learn from Jesus is to follow him as the guiding priority o...

NET Notes: Luk 5:12 This is a third class condition. The report portrays the leper making no presumptions about whether Jesus will heal him or not.

NET Notes: Luk 5:13 Touched. This touch would have rendered Jesus ceremonially unclean (Lev 14:46; also Mishnah, m. Nega’im 3.1; 11.1; 12.1; 13.6-12).

NET Notes: Luk 5:14 Or “as an indictment against them”; or “as proof to the people.” This phrase could be taken as referring to a positive witness...

NET Notes: Luk 5:15 The word “him” is not in the Greek text, but is implied. Direct objects were frequently omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

NET Notes: Luk 5:16 Or “desert.”

NET Notes: Luk 5:17 Most mss (A C D [K] Θ Ψ Ë1,13 33 Ï latt bo) read αὐτούς (autous) instead of αὐτa...

NET Notes: Luk 5:18 Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Luk 5:19 The phrase right in front of Jesus trailing as it does at the end of the verse is slightly emphatic, adding a little note of drama: What would Jesus d...

NET Notes: Luk 5:20 The passive voice here is a divine passive (ExSyn 437). It is clear that God does the forgiving.

NET Notes: Luk 5:21 Uttering blasphemies meant to say something that dishonored God. To claim divine prerogatives or claim to speak for God when one really does not would...

NET Notes: Luk 5:22 The Greek verb διαλογίζεσθε (dialogizesqe, “you reason”), used in context with...

NET Notes: Luk 5:23 Which is easier is a reflective kind of question. On the one hand to declare sins are forgiven is easier, since one does not need to see it, unlike te...

NET Notes: Luk 5:24 Grk “to your house.”

NET Notes: Luk 5:25 Note the man’s response, glorifying God. Joy at God’s work is also a key theme in Luke: 2:20; 4:15; 5:26; 7:16; 13:13; 17:15; 18:43; 23:47...

NET Notes: Luk 5:26 See the note on today in 2:11.

NET Notes: Luk 5:27 Follow me. For similar calls on the part of Jesus see Luke 5:10-11; 9:23, 59; 18:22.

NET Notes: Luk 5:28 The participial phrase “leaving everything behind” occurs at the beginning of the sentence, but has been transposed to the end in the tran...

NET Notes: Luk 5:29 Grk “reclining.” This term reflects the normal practice in 1st century Jewish culture of eating a meal in a semi-reclining position. Since...

NET Notes: Luk 5:30 The issue here is inappropriate associations (eat and drink with tax collectors and sinners) and the accusation comes not against Jesus, but his disci...

NET Notes: Luk 5:31 Jesus’ point is that he associates with those who are sick because they have the need and will respond to the offer of help. A person who is wel...

NET Notes: Luk 5:32 Though parallels exist to this saying (Matt 9:13; Mark 2:17), only Luke has this last phrase but sinners to repentance. Repentance is a frequent topic...

NET Notes: Luk 5:33 Grk “but yours are eating and drinking.” The translation “continue to eat and drink” attempts to reflect the progressive or du...

NET Notes: Luk 5:34 Questions prefaced with μή (mh) in Greek anticipate a negative answer. This can sometimes be indicated by using a “tag” at the ...

NET Notes: Luk 5:35 Grk “then in those days.”

NET Notes: Luk 5:36 The piece from the new will not match the old. The imagery in this saying looks at the fact that what Jesus brings is so new that it cannot simply be ...

NET Notes: Luk 5:37 Wineskins were bags made of skin or leather, used for storing wine in NT times. As the new wine fermented and expanded, it would stretch the new wines...

NET Notes: Luk 5:38 The meaning of the saying new wine…into new skins is that the presence and teaching of Jesus was something new and signaled the passing of the o...

NET Notes: Luk 5:39 The third illustration points out that those already satisfied with what they have will not seek the new (The old is good enough).

Geneva Bible: Luk 5:1 And ( 1 ) it came to pass, that, as the people ( a ) pressed upon him to hear the word of God, he stood by the lake of Gennesaret, ( 1 ) Christ revea...

Geneva Bible: Luk 5:5 And Simon answering said unto him, ( b ) Master, we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at thy word I will let down the ne...

Geneva Bible: Luk 5:12 ( 2 ) And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city, behold a man full of leprosy: who seeing Jesus fell on [his] face, and besought him, saying,...

Geneva Bible: Luk 5:15 ( 3 ) But so much the more went there a fame abroad of him: and great multitudes came together to hear, and to be healed by him of their infirmities. ...

Geneva Bible: Luk 5:17 ( 4 ) And it came to pass on a certain day, as he was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of ev...

Geneva Bible: Luk 5:27 ( 5 ) And after these things he went forth, and saw a publican, named Levi, sitting at the receipt of custom: and he said unto him, Follow me. ( 5 ) ...

Geneva Bible: Luk 5:33 ( 6 ) And they said unto him, Why do the disciples of John fast often, and make prayers, and likewise [the disciples] of the Pharisees; but thine eat ...

Geneva Bible: Luk 5:34 ( 7 ) And he said unto them, Can ye make the children of the bridechamber fast, while the bridegroom is with them? ( 7 ) Laws generally made without ...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Luk 5:4 - A Libation To Jehovah Instructions For Fishermen Now when He had left speaking, He said unto Simon, Launch out into the deep, and let down your nets for a draught.'--Luke ...

Maclaren: Luk 5:8 - A Libation To Jehovah Fear And Faith When Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord.'--Luke 5:8. Now, when Si...