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Teks -- Mark 3:1-35 (NET)

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Konteks
Healing a Withered Hand
3:1 Then Jesus entered the synagogue again, and a man was there who had a withered hand. 3:2 They watched Jesus closely to see if he would heal him on the Sabbath, so that they could accuse him. 3:3 So he said to the man who had the withered hand, “Stand up among all these people.” 3:4 Then he said to them, “Is it lawful to do good on the Sabbath, or evil, to save a life or destroy it?” But they were silent. 3:5 After looking around at them in anger, grieved by the hardness of their hearts, he said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. 3:6 So the Pharisees went out immediately and began plotting plotting with the Herodians, as to how they could assassinate him.
Crowds by the Sea
3:7 Then Jesus went away with his disciples to the sea, and a great multitude from Galilee followed him. And from Judea, 3:8 Jerusalem, Idumea, beyond the Jordan River, and around Tyre and Sidon a great multitude came to him when they heard about the things he had done. 3:9 Because of the crowd, he told his disciples to have a small boat ready for him so the crowd would not press toward him. 3:10 For he had healed many, so that all who were afflicted with diseases pressed toward him in order to touch him. 3:11 And whenever the unclean spirits saw him, they fell down before him and cried out, “You are the Son of God.” 3:12 But he sternly ordered them not to make him known.
Appointing the Twelve Apostles
3:13 Now Jesus went up the mountain and called for those he wanted, and they came to him. 3:14 He appointed twelve (whom he named apostles), so that they would be with him and he could send them to preach 3:15 and to have authority to cast out demons. 3:16 He appointed twelve: To Simon he gave the name Peter; 3:17 to James and his brother John, the sons of Zebedee, he gave the name Boanerges (that is, “sons of thunder”); 3:18 and Andrew, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, James the son of Alphaeus, Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot, 3:19 and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him.
Jesus and Beelzebul
3:20 Now Jesus went home, and a crowd gathered so that they were not able to eat. 3:21 When his family heard this they went out to restrain him, for they said, “He is out of his mind.” 3:22 The experts in the law who came down from Jerusalem said, “He is possessed by Beelzebul,” and, “By the ruler of demons he casts out demons.” 3:23 So he called them and spoke to them in parables: “How can Satan cast out Satan? 3:24 If a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom will not be able to stand. 3:25 If a house is divided against itself, that house will not be able to stand. 3:26 And if Satan rises against himself and is divided, he is not able to stand and his end has come. 3:27 But no one is able to enter a strong man’s house and steal his property unless he first ties up the strong man. Then he can thoroughly plunder his house. 3:28 I tell you the truth, people will be forgiven for all sins, even all the blasphemies they utter. 3:29 But whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will never be forgiven, but is guilty of an eternal sin3:30 (because they said, “He has an unclean spirit”).
Jesus’ True Family
3:31 Then Jesus’ mother and his brothers came. Standing outside, they sent word to him, to summon him. 3:32 A crowd was sitting around him and they said to him, “Look, your mother and your brothers are outside looking for you.” 3:33 He answered them and said, “Who are my mother and my brothers?” 3:34 And looking at those who were sitting around him in a circle, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! 3:35 For whoever does the will of God is my brother and sister and mother.”
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Alphaeus the father of James, one of the twelve,the father of Levi (Matthew), one of the twelve.
 · Andrew the brother of Simon Peter
 · Bartholomew a man who was one of the twelve apostles
 · Beelzebul the prince of demons
 · Boanerges two men, James and John, the sons of Zebedee
 · Galilee the region of Palestine north of Sameria and west of the upper Jordan River,a region west of Lake Galilee and north of the Jezreel Valley
 · Herodians members of a Jewish political party favouring the Herodian Dynasty (IBD).
 · Idumaea a region west of the lower end of the Dead Sea
 · Iscariot the surname of Judas, the man who betrayed Christ
 · James a son of Zebedee; brother of John; an apostle,a son of Alpheus; an apostle,a brother of Jesus; writer of the epistle of James,the father (or brother) of the apostle Judas
 · Jerusalem the capital city of Israel,a town; the capital of Israel near the southern border of Benjamin
 · John a son of Zebedee; younger brother of James; the beloved disciple of Christ,a relative of Annas the high priest,a son of Mary the sister of Barnabas, and surnamed Mark,the father of Simon Peter
 · Jordan the river that flows from Lake Galilee to the Dead Sea,a river that begins at Mt. Hermon, flows south through Lake Galilee and on to its end at the Dead Sea 175 km away (by air)
 · Judas a son of Mary and Joseph; half-brother of Jesus)
 · Judea a region that roughly corresponded to the earlier kingdom of Judah
 · Matthew a son of Alpheus; a tax collector who became one of the twelve apostles
 · Peter a man who was a leader among the twelve apostles and wrote the two epistles of Peter
 · Pharisee a religious group or sect of the Jews
 · Philip a man who was one of the twelve apostles,a son of Herod the Great; husband of Herodias; ruler of Iturea and Traconitis north and west of Galilee,a man who was one of the seven chosen to serve tables at the church at Jerusalem
 · Satan a person, male (evil angelic),an angel that has rebelled against God
 · Sidon residents of the town of Sidon
 · Simon a son of Jonas and brother of Andrew; an apostle of Jesus Christ,a man who was one of the apostles of Christ and also called 'the Zealot',a brother of Jesus,a man who was a well-know victim of leprosy who had been healed by Jesus (NIV note),a man from Cyrene who was forced to carry the cross of Jesus,a Pharisee man in whose house Jesus' feet were washed with tears and anointed,the father of Judas Iscariot,a man who was a sorcerer in Samaria and who wanted to buy the gifts of the Spirit,a man who was a tanner at Joppa and with whom Peter was staying when Cornelius sent for him
 · Thaddeus a man who was one of the twelve apostles
 · Thomas a man who was one of the twelve apostles also called on three occasions,
 · Tyre a resident of the town of Tyre
 · Zealot a man who was one of the twelve apostles
 · Zebedee the father of James and John, who were two of the twelve apostles


Topik/Tema Kamus: Simon | Jesus, The Christ | JESUS CHRIST, 4C1 | Peter | Demons | FORGIVENESS | Mary | Miracles | Call | Apostles | PETER, THE FIRST EPISTLE OF | Blasphemy | Capernaum | Satan | PHARISEES | James | MARK, THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO, 1 | Thomas | PARABLE | Alphaeus | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Robertson , Vincent , Wesley , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Lightfoot , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Barclay , Constable , College , McGarvey , Lapide

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Robertson: Mar 3:1 - Had his hand withered Had his hand withered ( exērammenēn echōn tēn cheira ). He had his ( the in the Greek, common idiom with article as possessive) hand (right ...

Had his hand withered ( exērammenēn echōn tēn cheira ).

He had his ( the in the Greek, common idiom with article as possessive) hand (right hand, Luk 6:6) in a withered state, perfect passive participle (adjective xēran in Matthew and Luke), showing that it was not congenital, but the result of injury by accident or disease. Bengel: Non ex utero, sed morbo aut vulnere .

Robertson: Mar 3:2 - They watched They watched ( paretēroun ). Imperfect tense, were watching on the side (or sly). Luke uses the middle voice, paretērounto , to accent their pers...

They watched ( paretēroun ).

Imperfect tense, were watching on the side (or sly). Luke uses the middle voice, paretērounto , to accent their personal interest in the proceedings. It was the sabbath day and in the synagogue and they were there ready to catch him in the act if he should dare to violate their rules as he had done in the wheat fields on the previous sabbath. Probably the same Pharisees are present now as then.

Robertson: Mar 3:2 - That they might accuse him That they might accuse him ( hina katēgorēsōsin autou ). So Mat 12:10. Luke has it "that they might find how to accuse him"(hina heurōsin kat...

That they might accuse him ( hina katēgorēsōsin autou ).

So Mat 12:10. Luke has it "that they might find how to accuse him"(hina heurōsin katēgorein autou ). They were determined to accuse him. The sabbath controversy offered the best opening. So here they are ready for business.

Robertson: Mar 3:3 - Stand forth Stand forth ( egeire eis to meson ). Step into the middle of the room where all can see. It was a bold defiance of the Christ’ s spying enemies....

Stand forth ( egeire eis to meson ).

Step into the middle of the room where all can see. It was a bold defiance of the Christ’ s spying enemies. Wycliff rightly puts it:

Robertson: Mar 3:3 - They aspieden him. They aspieden him. They played the spy on Jesus. One can see the commotion among the long-bearded hypocrites at this daring act of Jesus.

They aspieden him.

They played the spy on Jesus. One can see the commotion among the long-bearded hypocrites at this daring act of Jesus.

Robertson: Mar 3:4 - But they held their peace But they held their peace ( hoi de esiōpōn ). Imperfect tense. In sullen silence and helplessness before the merciless questions of Jesus as the ...

But they held their peace ( hoi de esiōpōn ).

Imperfect tense. In sullen silence and helplessness before the merciless questions of Jesus as the poor man stood there before them all. Jesus by his pitiless alternatives between doing good (agathopoieō , late Greek word in lxx and N.T.) and doing evil (kakopoieō , ancient Greek word), to this man, for instance, to save a life or to kill (psuchēn sōsai ē apokteinai ), as in this case. It was a terrible exposure.

Robertson: Mar 3:5 - When he had looked round on them with anger When he had looked round on them with anger ( periblepsamenos autous met' orgēs ). Mark has a good deal to say about the looks of Jesus with this w...

When he had looked round on them with anger ( periblepsamenos autous met' orgēs ).

Mark has a good deal to say about the looks of Jesus with this word (Mar 3:5, Mar 3:34; Mar 5:37; Mar 9:8; Mar 10:23; Mar 11:11) as here. So Luke only once, Luk 6:10. The eyes of Jesus swept the room all round and each rabbinical hypocrite felt the cut of that condemnatory glance. This indignant anger was not inconsistent with the love and pity of Jesus. Murder was in their hearts and Jesus knew it. Anger against wrong as wrong is a sign of moral health (Gould).

Robertson: Mar 3:5 - Being grieved at the hardness of their hearts Being grieved at the hardness of their hearts ( sunlupoumenos epi tēi pōrōsei tēs kardias autōn ). Mark alone gives this point. The anger w...

Being grieved at the hardness of their hearts ( sunlupoumenos epi tēi pōrōsei tēs kardias autōn ).

Mark alone gives this point. The anger was tempered by grief (Swete). Jesus is the Man of Sorrows and this present participle brings out the continuous state of grief whereas the momentary angry look is expressed by the aorist participle above. Their own heart or attitude was in a state of moral ossification (pōrōsis ) like hardened hands or feet. Pōros was used of a kind of marble and then of the callus on fractured bones. "They were hardened by previous conceptions against this new truth"(Gould). See also on Mat 12:9-14.

Robertson: Mar 3:6 - And straightway with the Herodians took council And straightway with the Herodians took council ( euthus meta tōn Hērōidianōn ). The Pharisees could stand no more. So out they stalked at on...

And straightway with the Herodians took council ( euthus meta tōn Hērōidianōn ).

The Pharisees could stand no more. So out they stalked at once in a rage of madness (Luk 6:11) and outside of the synagogue took counsel (sumboulion epoiēsan ) or gave counsel (sumboulion edidoun , as some MSS. have it, imperfect tense, offered counsel as their solution of the problem) with their bitter enemies, the Herodians, on the sabbath day still "how they might destroy him"(hopōs auton apolesōsin ), a striking illustration of the alternatives of Jesus a few moments before, "to save life or to kill."This is the first mention of the Herodians or adherents of Herod Antipas and the Herod family rather than the Romans. The Pharisees would welcome the help of their rivals to destroy Jesus. In the presence of Jesus they unite their forces as in Mar 8:15; Mar 12:13; Mat 22:16.

Robertson: Mar 3:7 - Withdrew to the sea Withdrew to the sea ( anechōrēsen eis tēn thalassan ). Evidently Jesus knew of the plot to kill him, "perceiving it"(Mat 12:15). "He and His wo...

Withdrew to the sea ( anechōrēsen eis tēn thalassan ).

Evidently Jesus knew of the plot to kill him, "perceiving it"(Mat 12:15). "He and His would be safer by the open beach"(Swete). He has the disciples with him. Vincent notes that on eleven occasions Mark mentions the withdrawals of Jesus to escape his enemies, for prayer, for rest, for private conference with his disciples (Mar 1:12; Mar 3:7; Mar 6:31, Mar 6:46; Mar 7:24, Mar 7:31; Mar 9:2; Mar 10:1; Mar 14:34). But, as often, a great multitude (polu plēthos ) from Galilee followed him.

Robertson: Mar 3:8 - Hearing what great things he did Hearing what great things he did ( akouontes hosa poiei ). Masculine plural present participle, though plēthos is neuter singular (construction a...

Hearing what great things he did ( akouontes hosa poiei ).

Masculine plural present participle, though plēthos is neuter singular (construction according to sense in both number and gender). This crowd by the sea came from Galilee, Judea, Jerusalem, Idumea, beyond Jordan (Decapolis and Perea), Tyre and Sidon, Phoenicia, North, South, East, and Northwest, even from Idumea (mentioned here alone in the N.T.) won by John Hyrcanus to Palestine. "In our Lord’ s time Idumea was practically a part of Judea with a Jewish circumcised population"(George Adam Smith). Many of these were probably Gentiles (Phoenicia and Decapolis) and may have known only the Greek language. The fame of Jesus had spread through all the regions round about. There was a jam as the crowds came to Jesus by the Sea of Galilee.

Robertson: Mar 3:9 - That a little boat should wait on him That a little boat should wait on him ( hina ploiarion proskarterēi autōi ). The boat was to keep close (note present tense subjunctive of proska...

That a little boat should wait on him ( hina ploiarion proskarterēi autōi ).

The boat was to keep close (note present tense subjunctive of proskartereō ) to the shore in constant readiness and move as Jesus did. Whether he needed it or not is not told, but it was there at hand.

Robertson: Mar 3:9 - Lest they should throng him Lest they should throng him ( hina mē thlibōsin auton ). Press or crush him. Jesus stayed with the crowds for they needed him. Present subjunctiv...

Lest they should throng him ( hina mē thlibōsin auton ).

Press or crush him. Jesus stayed with the crowds for they needed him. Present subjunctive again.

Robertson: Mar 3:10 - Pressed upon him Pressed upon him ( epipiptein autōi ). Were falling upon him to such an extent that it was dangerous. They were not hostile, but simply intensely e...

Pressed upon him ( epipiptein autōi ).

Were falling upon him to such an extent that it was dangerous. They were not hostile, but simply intensely eager, each to have his own case attended to by Jesus.

Robertson: Mar 3:10 - That they might touch him That they might touch him ( hina autou hapsōntai ). If only that much. They hoped for a cure by contact with Christ. Aorist subjunctive. It was a r...

That they might touch him ( hina autou hapsōntai ).

If only that much. They hoped for a cure by contact with Christ. Aorist subjunctive. It was a really pathetic scene and a tremendous strain on Jesus.

Robertson: Mar 3:10 - As many as had plagues As many as had plagues ( hosoi eichon mastigas ). Strokes or scourges, terms used by us today as a paralytic stroke, the influenza scourge. Our word ...

As many as had plagues ( hosoi eichon mastigas ).

Strokes or scourges, terms used by us today as a paralytic stroke, the influenza scourge. Our word plague is from plēgē (Latin plaga ), from plēgnumi , to strike a blow. Common in ancient Greek in this sense. See note on Mar 5:29, Mar 5:34; Luk 7:21 for the same use of mastiges and also 2 Maccabees 9:11.

Robertson: Mar 3:11 - Whensoever they beheld him Whensoever they beheld him ( hotan auton etheōroun ). Imperfect indicative with hotan of repeated action. They kept falling down before him (pros...

Whensoever they beheld him ( hotan auton etheōroun ).

Imperfect indicative with hotan of repeated action. They kept falling down before him (prosepipton ) and crying, (ekrazon ) and he kept charging or rebuking (epitimā ) them, all imperfects. The unclean spirits (demons) recognize Jesus as the Son of God, as before. Jesus charged them not to make him known as he had also done before. He did not wish this testimony. It was a most exciting ordeal and is given only by Mark. Note non-final use of hina .

Robertson: Mar 3:13 - He goeth up into the mountain He goeth up into the mountain ( anabainei eis to oros ). So Matthew (Mat 5:1) and Luke (Luk 6:12), "to pray"Luke adds. Historical present so common i...

He goeth up into the mountain ( anabainei eis to oros ).

So Matthew (Mat 5:1) and Luke (Luk 6:12), "to pray"Luke adds. Historical present so common in Mark’ s vivid narrative. Neither Gospel gives the name of the mountain, assuming it as well known, probably not far from the lake.

Robertson: Mar 3:13 - Whom he himself would Whom he himself would ( hous ēthelen autos ). Emphatic use of autos (himself) at end of sentence. Whether by personal imitation or through the di...

Whom he himself would ( hous ēthelen autos ).

Emphatic use of autos (himself) at end of sentence. Whether by personal imitation or through the disciples Jesus invites or calls to himself (proskaleitai , historical middle present indicative) a select number out of the vast crowds by the sea, those whom he really wished to be with him.

Robertson: Mar 3:13 - They went off to him They went off to him ( apēlthon pros auton ). Luke states that Jesus "continued all night in prayer, to God."It was a crisis in the ministry of Chr...

They went off to him ( apēlthon pros auton ).

Luke states that Jesus "continued all night in prayer, to God."It was a crisis in the ministry of Christ. This select group up in the hills probably respected the long agony of Jesus though they did not comprehend his motive. They formed a sort of spiritual body-guard around the Master during his night vigil in the mountain.

Robertson: Mar 3:14 - He appointed twelve He appointed twelve ( epoiēsen dōdeka ). This was a second selection out of those invited to the hills and after the night of prayer and after da...

He appointed twelve ( epoiēsen dōdeka ).

This was a second selection out of those invited to the hills and after the night of prayer and after day came (Luk 6:13). Why he chose twelve we are not told, probably because there were twelve tribes in Israel. It was a good round number at any rate. They were to be princes in the new Israel (cf. Mat 19:28; Luk 22:30; Rev 21:14, Rev 21:15). Luke (Luk 6:13-16) also gives the list of the twelve at this point while Matthew (Mat 10:1-4) postpones giving the names till they are sent out in Galilee. There is a fourth list in Act 1:13. See discussion of the names of the apostles on Mat 10:1-4 and pp. 271-3 of my Harmony of the Gospels for Students of the Life of Christ. The three groups of four begin alike (Simon, Philip, James). There are some difficulties.

Robertson: Mar 3:14 - Whom he also named apostles Whom he also named apostles ( hous kai apostolous ōnomasen ). Margin of Revised Version, the text of Westcott and Hort after Aleph, B, C, etc. Genu...

Whom he also named apostles ( hous kai apostolous ōnomasen ).

Margin of Revised Version, the text of Westcott and Hort after Aleph, B, C, etc. Genuine in Luk 6:13 and probably so here. The meaning is that Jesus himself gave the name apostle or missionary (apostellō , to send) to this group of twelve. The word is applied in the New Testament to others besides as delegates or messengers of churches (2Co 8:23; Phi 2:25), and messenger (Joh 13:16). It is applied also to Paul on a par with the twelve (Gal 1:1, Gal 1:11., etc.) and also to Barnabas (Act 14:14), and perhaps also to Timothy and Silas (1Ti 2:6.). Two purposes of Jesus are mentioned by Mark in the choice of these twelve, that they might be with him (hina ōsin met' autou ), and that he might send them forth (kai hina apostellēi autous ). They were not ready to be sent forth till they had been with Jesus for some time. This is one of the chief tasks of Christ to train this group of men. See Bruce’ s The Training of the Twelve. The very word apostolos is from apostellō . There were two purposes in sending them forth expressed by two infinitives, one to preach (kērussein , from kērux , herald), the other to have power to cast out demons (echein exousian ekballein ta daimonia ). This double ministry of preaching and healing was to mark their work. The two things are, however, different, and one does not necessarily involve the other.

Robertson: Mar 3:16 - Simon he surnamed Peter Simon he surnamed Peter ( epethēken onoma tōi Simōni Petron ). The Greek idiom seems awkward, but it is not. Peter is in apposition with name ...

Simon he surnamed Peter ( epethēken onoma tōi Simōni Petron ).

The Greek idiom seems awkward, but it is not. Peter is in apposition with name or onoma (accusative). This surname Jesus gave in addition (epethēken ) to Simon (dative case). Here then is a direct reference to what is told in Joh 1:42 when Jesus met Simon for the first time. Mark here reflects Peter’ s own words. Luke (Luk 6:14) simply says "Whom he also surnamed Peter."See note on Mat 16:18 for the full explanation of the name Peter, a Rock, Cephas.

Robertson: Mar 3:17 - Boanerges, which is Sons of thunder Boanerges, which is Sons of thunder ( Boanērges ho estin huioi brontēs ). This Hebrew nickname is given only by Mark and the reason for it is not...

Boanerges, which is Sons of thunder ( Boanērges ho estin huioi brontēs ).

This Hebrew nickname is given only by Mark and the reason for it is not clear. It may refer to the fiery temperament revealed in Luk 9:34 when James and John wanted to call down fire on the Samaritan villages that were unfriendly to them. The word literally means sons of tumult, sons of thunder in Syriac. No other epithets are given by Mark save descriptions to distinguish as Simon the Cananaean (or Zealot) and Judas Iscariot, who also betrayed him (Mar 3:19). Andrew, (from anēr , a man) and Philip (Philippos, fond of horses) are both Greek names. Bartholomew, son of Tolmai, is the Nathanael of John’ s Gospel (Joh 21:2). He probably had both names. Matthew is a Hebrew name meaning gift of God (Maththaios ). Thomas is Hebrew and means Twin (Didymus, Joh 11:16). There are two uses of the name of James (Iacōbos , Jacob). Thaddeus is another name for Lebbaeus.

Robertson: Mar 3:19 - He cometh into a house He cometh into a house ( erchetai eis oikon ). Historical present again and no article with noun. He comes home from the mountain, probably the house...

He cometh into a house ( erchetai eis oikon ).

Historical present again and no article with noun. He comes home from the mountain, probably the house of Simon as in Mar 1:29. Mark passes by the Sermon on the Mount given by Matthew and Luke on the mountain (plateau on the mountain in Luke). We have to allow a reasonable interval for Mark’ s narrative. Mark’ s Gospel is full of action and does not undertake to tell all that Jesus did and said.

Robertson: Mar 3:20 - So that they could not so much as eat bread So that they could not so much as eat bread ( hōste mē dunasthai autous mēde arton phagein ). Note infinitive with hōste . Apparently Jesus a...

So that they could not so much as eat bread ( hōste mē dunasthai autous mēde arton phagein ).

Note infinitive with hōste . Apparently Jesus and the disciples indoors with the great crowd in the house and at the door as in Mar 1:32; Mar 2:2 to which Mark refers by "again."The jam was so great that they could not rest, could not eat, and apparently Jesus could not even teach. The crowd reassembled at once on Christ’ s return from the mountain.

Robertson: Mar 3:21 - His friends His friends ( hoi par' autou ). The phrase means literally "those from the side of him (Jesus)."It could mean another circle of disciples who had jus...

His friends ( hoi par' autou ).

The phrase means literally "those from the side of him (Jesus)."It could mean another circle of disciples who had just arrived and who knew of the crowds and strain of the Galilean ministry who now come at this special juncture. But the idiom most likely means the kinspeople or family of Jesus as is common in the lxx. The fact that in Mar 3:31 "his mother and his brothers"are expressly mentioned would indicate that they are "the friends"alluded to in Mar 3:21. It is a mournful spectacle to think of the mother and brothers saying, He is beside himself (exestē ). Second aorist active indicative intransitive. The same charge was brought against Paul (Act 26:24; 2Co 5:13). We say that one is out of his head. Certainly Mary did not believe that Jesus was in the power of Beelzebub as the rabbis said already. The scribes from Jerusalem are trying to discount the power and prestige of Jesus (Mar 3:22). See notes on Mat 9:32-34; and note on Mat 10:25; and note on Mat 12:24 for Beelzebub and Beelzebul. Mary probably felt that Jesus was overwrought and wished to take him home out of the excitement and strain that he might get rest and proper food. See my The Mother of Jesus: Her Problems and Her Glory. The brothers did not as yet believe the pretensions and claims of Jesus (Joh 7:5). Herod Antipas will later consider Jesus as John the Baptist redivivus , the scribes treat him as under demonic possession, even the family and friends fear a disordered mind as a result of overstrain. It was a crucial moment for Jesus. His family or friends came to take him home, to lay hold of him (kratēsai ), forcibly if need be.

Robertson: Mar 3:23 - In parables In parables ( en parabolais ). In crisp pungent thrusts that exposed the inconsistencies of the scribes and Pharisees. See notes in Matthew 13 for di...

In parables ( en parabolais ).

In crisp pungent thrusts that exposed the inconsistencies of the scribes and Pharisees. See notes in Matthew 13 for discussion of the word parable (parabolē , placing beside for comparison). These short parabolic quips concern Satan’ s casting out (ekballei , the very word used of casting out demons) Satan (rhetorical question), a kingdom divided (meristhēi , for a mere portion) against itself, a house divided (meristhēi ) against itself, two conditions of the third class undetermined, but with prospect of determination.

Robertson: Mar 3:27 - Spoil Spoil ( diarpasai ). Plunder, compound verb, thoroughly ransack. Picture of Satan plundering the demons, the very tools (skeuē ) by which he carri...

Spoil ( diarpasai ).

Plunder, compound verb, thoroughly ransack. Picture of Satan plundering the demons, the very tools (skeuē ) by which he carried on his business. A reductio ad absurdum. Jesus is the conqueror of Satan, not in league with him.

Robertson: Mar 3:29 - Guilty of an eternal sin Guilty of an eternal sin ( enochos estin aiōniou hamartēmatos ). The genitive of the penalty occurs here with enochos . In saying that Jesus had ...

Guilty of an eternal sin ( enochos estin aiōniou hamartēmatos ).

The genitive of the penalty occurs here with enochos . In saying that Jesus had an unclean spirit (Mar 3:30) they had attributed to the devil the work of the Holy Spirit. This is the unpardonable sin and it can be committed today by men who call the work of Christ the work of the devil, Nietzsche may be cited as an instance in point. Those who hope for a second probation hereafter may ponder carefully how a soul that eternally sins in such an environment can ever repent. That is eternal punishment. The text here is hamartēmatos (sin), not kriseōs (judgment), as the Textus Receptus has it.

Robertson: Mar 3:31 - Standing without Standing without ( exō stēkontes ). A late present from the perfect hestēka . Pathetic picture of the mother and brothers standing on the outsi...

Standing without ( exō stēkontes ).

A late present from the perfect hestēka . Pathetic picture of the mother and brothers standing on the outside of the house thinking that Jesus inside is beside himself and wanting to take him home. They were crowded out.

Robertson: Mar 3:31 - They sent unto him, calling him They sent unto him, calling him ( apesteilan pros auton kalountes auton ). They were unwilling to disclose their errand to take him home (Swete) and ...

They sent unto him, calling him ( apesteilan pros auton kalountes auton ).

They were unwilling to disclose their errand to take him home (Swete) and so get the crowd to pass word unto Jesus on the inside, "calling him"through others. Some of the MSS. add "sisters"to mother and brothers as seeking Jesus.

Robertson: Mar 3:32 - Was sitting about him Was sitting about him ( ekathēto peri auton ). They sat in a circle (kuklōi ) around Jesus with the disciples forming a sort of inner circle.

Was sitting about him ( ekathēto peri auton ).

They sat in a circle (kuklōi ) around Jesus with the disciples forming a sort of inner circle.

Robertson: Mar 3:34 - Looking round on them Looking round on them ( periblepsamenos ). Another of Mark’ s life-like touches. Jesus calls those who do the will of God his mother, brothers, ...

Looking round on them ( periblepsamenos ).

Another of Mark’ s life-like touches. Jesus calls those who do the will of God his mother, brothers, and sisters. This does not prove that the sisters were actually there. The brothers were hostile and that gives point to the tragic words of Jesus. One’ s heart goes out to Mary who has to go back home without even seeing her wondrous Son. What did it all mean to her at this hour?

Vincent: Mar 3:1 - A withered hand A withered hand ( ἐξηραμμένην τὴν χεῖρα ) More correctly Rev., his hand withered. The participle indicates that the ...

A withered hand ( ἐξηραμμένην τὴν χεῖρα )

More correctly Rev., his hand withered. The participle indicates that the withering was not congenital, but the result of accident or disease. Luke says his right hand.

Vincent: Mar 3:2 - They watched They watched ( παρετήρουν ) Imperfect tense. They kept watching. The compound verb, with παρά , by the side of, means to ...

They watched ( παρετήρουν )

Imperfect tense. They kept watching. The compound verb, with παρά , by the side of, means to watch carefully or closely, as one who dogs another's steps, keeping beside or near him. Wyc., They aspieden him: i.e., played the spy. On τηρέω , to watch, see on Joh 17:12.

Vincent: Mar 3:2 - He would heal He would heal ( θεραπεύσει ) Future tense: whether he will heal, the reader being placed at the time of the watching, and looking f...

He would heal ( θεραπεύσει )

Future tense: whether he will heal, the reader being placed at the time of the watching, and looking forward to the future.

Vincent: Mar 3:3 - Stand forth Stand forth ( ἔγειρε εἰς τὸ μέσον ) Lit., rise into the midst. So Wyc., Rise into the middle. Tynd., Arise into st...

Stand forth ( ἔγειρε εἰς τὸ μέσον )

Lit., rise into the midst. So Wyc., Rise into the middle. Tynd., Arise into stand in the midst.

Vincent: Mar 3:5 - Being grieved Being grieved ( συλλυπούμενος ) Why the compound verb, with the preposition σύν , together with? Herodotus (vi., 39) uses t...

Being grieved ( συλλυπούμενος )

Why the compound verb, with the preposition σύν , together with? Herodotus (vi., 39) uses the word of condoling with another's misfortune. Plato (" Republic," 4:62) says, " When any one of the citizens experiences good or evil, the whole state will either rejoice or sorrow with him (ξυλλυπήσεται ) . The σύν , therefore implies Christ's condolence with the moral misfortune of these hardhearted ones. Compare the force of con , in condolence. Latin, con, with, dolere, to grieve.

Vincent: Mar 3:5 - Hardness Hardness ( πωρώσει ) From πῶρος , a kind of marble, and thence used of a callus on fractured bones. Πώρωσις is origi...

Hardness ( πωρώσει )

From πῶρος , a kind of marble, and thence used of a callus on fractured bones. Πώρωσις is originally the process by which the extremities of fractured bones are united by a callus . Hence of callousness, or hardness in general. The word occurs in two other passages in the New Testament, Rom 11:25; Eph 4:18, where the A. V. wrongly renders blindness, following the Vulgate caecitas . It is somewhat strange that it does not adopt that rendering here (Vulgate, caecitate ) which is given by both Wyc. and Tynd. The Rev. in all the passages rightly gives hardening, which is better than hardness, because it hints at the process going on. Mark only records Christ's feeling on this occasion.

Vincent: Mar 3:7 - Withdrew Withdrew Mark alone notes no less than eleven occasions on which Jesus retired from his work, in order to escape his enemies or to pray in solitu...

Withdrew

Mark alone notes no less than eleven occasions on which Jesus retired from his work, in order to escape his enemies or to pray in solitude, for rest, or for private conference with his disciples. See Mar 1:12; Mar 3:7; Mar 6:31, Mar 6:46; Mar 7:24, Mar 7:31; Mar 9:2; Mar 10:1; Mar 14:34.

Vincent: Mar 3:7 - A great multitude A great multitude ( πολὺ πλῆθος ) Compare Mar 3:8, where the order of the Greek words is reversed. In the former case the greatnes...

A great multitude ( πολὺ πλῆθος )

Compare Mar 3:8, where the order of the Greek words is reversed. In the former case the greatness of the mass of people is emphasized; in the latter, the mass of people itself

Vincent: Mar 3:8 - He did He did ( ἐποίει ) Imperfect tense. Others read ποιεῖ , he is doing . In either case the tense has a continuous force' what thin...

He did ( ἐποίει )

Imperfect tense. Others read ποιεῖ , he is doing . In either case the tense has a continuous force' what things he was doing or is doing . Note in Mar 3:7, Mar 3:8, Mark's accurate detail of places. See Introduction. The reasons for our Lord's withdrawing into a boat, given with such minuteness of detail in Mar 3:9, are also peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 3:10 - Pressed upon Pressed upon ( ἐπιπίπτειν ) Lit., fell upon.

Pressed upon ( ἐπιπίπτειν )

Lit., fell upon.

Vincent: Mar 3:10 - Plagues Plagues ( μάστιγας ) Lit., scourges. Compare Act 22:24; Heb 11:36. Our word plague is from πληγή , Latin plaga , meaning a b...

Plagues ( μάστιγας )

Lit., scourges. Compare Act 22:24; Heb 11:36. Our word plague is from πληγή , Latin plaga , meaning a blow. Pestilence or disease is thus regarded as a stroke from a divine hand. Πληγή is used in classical Greek in this metaphorical sense. Thus Sophocles, " Ajax," 270: " I fear that a calamity (πληγή ) is really come from heaven (θεοῦ , g od ) . " So of war. Aeschylus, " Persae," 251: " O Persian land, how hath the abundant prosperity been destroyed by a single blow (ἐν μιᾷ πληγῇ ). The word here, scourges, carries the same idea.

Vincent: Mar 3:11 - The The unclean spirits ( τὰ ) The article indicating those particular spirits which took part in that scene. Mark's precision is shown in th...

The unclean spirits ( τὰ )

The article indicating those particular spirits which took part in that scene. Mark's precision is shown in the use of the two articles and in the arrangement of the noun and adjective: The spirits, the unclean ones.

Vincent: Mar 3:11 - When they saw When they saw ( ὅταν ἐθεώρουν ) More accurately as Rev., whenever they beheld. The imperfect tense denotes a repeated act...

When they saw ( ὅταν ἐθεώρουν )

More accurately as Rev., whenever they beheld. The imperfect tense denotes a repeated act. The ἄν in ὅταν gives an indefinite force: as often as they might see him.

Vincent: Mar 3:12 - He charged He charged ( ἐπετίμα ) The word is commonly rendered rebuke in the New Testament. In classical Greek its predominant sense is that o...

He charged ( ἐπετίμα )

The word is commonly rendered rebuke in the New Testament. In classical Greek its predominant sense is that of severe, strenuous reproach for unworthy deeds or acts. It is several times used in the New Testament, as here, in the sense of charge. In this sense the word carries, at bottom, a suggestion of a charge under penalty (τιμὴ ) .

Vincent: Mar 3:12 - That That ( ἵνα ) According to the A. V. and Rev. the that indicates the substance of Christ's charge. Properly, however, it indicates the ...

That ( ἵνα )

According to the A. V. and Rev. the that indicates the substance of Christ's charge. Properly, however, it indicates the intent of his charge. He charged them in order that they should not make him known.

Vincent: Mar 3:13 - Whom he would Whom he would ( οὓς ἤθελεν αὐτός ) Rev., more strictly, " whom he himself would;" not allowing any to offer themselv...

Whom he would ( οὓς ἤθελεν αὐτός )

Rev., more strictly, " whom he himself would;" not allowing any to offer themselves for special work. Out of the larger number thus called he selected twelve. See Mar 3:14.

Vincent: Mar 3:14 - Ordained Ordained ( ἐποίησεν ) Lit., made. Rev., appointed.

Ordained ( ἐποίησεν )

Lit., made. Rev., appointed.

Vincent: Mar 3:14 - Might send them forth Might send them forth ( ἀποστέλλῃ ) As apostles. Compare the kindred noun ἀπόστολοι , apostles.

Might send them forth ( ἀποστέλλῃ )

As apostles. Compare the kindred noun ἀπόστολοι , apostles.

Vincent: Mar 3:15 - To have power To have power ( ἔχειν ἐξουσίαν ) Note that he does not say to preach and to cast out, but to preach and to have authority...

To have power ( ἔχειν ἐξουσίαν )

Note that he does not say to preach and to cast out, but to preach and to have authority to cast out. The power of preaching and the power of exorcising were so different that special mention is made of the divine authority with which they would need to be clothed. The power of driving out demons was given that-they might apply it in confirmation of their teaching. Compare Mar 16:20.

Vincent: Mar 3:16 - And Simon he surnamed Peter And Simon he surnamed Peter Mark relates only his naming and not his appointment, leaving his appointment to be understood.

And Simon he surnamed Peter

Mark relates only his naming and not his appointment, leaving his appointment to be understood.

Vincent: Mar 3:17 - He surnamed them Boanerges Although Mark mentions that the apostles were sent: out in pairs (Mar 6:7), he does not classify them here in pairs. But he alone throws Peter and Ja...

Although Mark mentions that the apostles were sent: out in pairs (Mar 6:7), he does not classify them here in pairs. But he alone throws Peter and James and John, the three who shared the Lord's particular intimacy, into one group. Matthew and Luke both introduce Andrew between Peter and James.

He surnamed them Boanerges ( ἐπέθηκεν αὐτοῖς ὄνομα Βοανηργές )

Lit., he put upon them the name. Some uncertainty attaches to both the origin and the application of the name. Most of the best texts read ὀνόματα , names, instead of name. This would indicate that each of the two was surnamed a " son of thunder." Some, however, have claimed that it was a dual name given to them as a pair, as the name Dioscuri was given to Castor and Pollux. The reason of its bestowal we do not know. It seems to have been intended as a title of honor, though not perpetuated like the surname Peter, this being the only instance of its occurrence; possibly because the inconvenience of a common surname, which would not have sufficiently designated which of them was intended, may have hindered it from ever growing into an appellation. It is justified by the impetuosity and zeal which characterized both the brothers, which prompted them to suggest the calling of fire from heaven to consume the inhospitable Samaritan village (Luk 9:54); which marked James as the victim of an early martyrdom (Act 12:2); and which sounds in the thunders of John's Apocalypse. The Greek Church calls John Βροντόφωνος , the thunder-voiced. The phrase, sons of , is a familiar Hebrew idiom, in which the distinguishing characteristic of the individual or thing named is regarded as his parent. Thus sparks are sons of fire (Job 5:7); threshed corn is son of the floor (Isa 21:10). Compare son of perdition (Joh 17:12); sons of disobedience (Eph 2:2; Eph 5:6).

Vincent: Mar 3:18 - Andrew Andrew ( Ὰνδρέαν ) A name of Greek origin though in use among the Jews, from ἀνήρ , man , and signifying manly. He was one ...

Andrew ( Ὰνδρέαν )

A name of Greek origin though in use among the Jews, from ἀνήρ , man , and signifying manly. He was one of the two who came earliest to Christ (Mat 4:18, Mat 4:20; compare Joh 1:40, Joh 1:41); and hence is always styled by the Greek fathers πρωτόκλητος , first called.

Vincent: Mar 3:18 - Philip Philip ( Φίλιππον ) Another Greek name, meaning fond of horses . In ecclesiastical legend he is said to have been a chariot-driver.

Philip ( Φίλιππον )

Another Greek name, meaning fond of horses . In ecclesiastical legend he is said to have been a chariot-driver.

Vincent: Mar 3:18 - Bartholomew Bartholomew A Hebrew name - Bar Tolmai, son of Tolmai. Almost certainly identical with Nathanael. Philip and Nathanael are associated by John, ...

Bartholomew

A Hebrew name - Bar Tolmai, son of Tolmai. Almost certainly identical with Nathanael. Philip and Nathanael are associated by John, as are Philip and Bartholomew in the parallel passages of the synoptics. Bartholomew is not mentioned in John's list of the twelve (Joh 21:2), but Nathanael is; while the synoptists do not mention Nathanael in their lists, but do mention Bartholomew. Probably he had two names.

Vincent: Mar 3:18 - Matthew Matthew See on the superscription of Matthew's Gospel.

Matthew

See on the superscription of Matthew's Gospel.

Vincent: Mar 3:18 - Thomas Thomas A Hebrew name, meaning twin, and translated by the Greek Didymus (Joh 11:16).

Thomas

A Hebrew name, meaning twin, and translated by the Greek Didymus (Joh 11:16).

Vincent: Mar 3:18 - Thaddaeus or Lebbaeus Thaddaeus or Lebbaeus , as in Mat 10:3 He is the Judas of Joh 14:22. Luther calls him der fromme Judas ( the good Judas ). The two surnames, Lebbaeus...

Thaddaeus or Lebbaeus , as in Mat 10:3

He is the Judas of Joh 14:22. Luther calls him der fromme Judas ( the good Judas ). The two surnames, Lebbaeus and Thaddaeus, mean the same thing - beloved child.

Vincent: Mar 3:18 - Simon the Canaanite Simon the Canaanite Properly, Cananaean. See on Mat 10:4 : " No name is more striking in the list than that of Simon the Zealot, for to none of...

Simon the Canaanite

Properly, Cananaean. See on Mat 10:4 : " No name is more striking in the list than that of Simon the Zealot, for to none of the twelve could the contrast be so vivid between their former and their new position. What revolution of thought and heart could be greater than that which had thus changed into a follower of Jesus one of the fierce war-party of the day, which looked on the presence of Rome in the Holy Land as treason against the majesty of Jehovah, a party who were fanatical in their Jewish strictures and exclusiveness ?" (Geikie, " Life and Words of Christ" ).

Vincent: Mar 3:19 - Judas Iscariot Judas Iscariot See on Mat 10:5.

Judas Iscariot

See on Mat 10:5.

Vincent: Mar 3:20 - Again Again Glancing back to the many notices of crowds in the preceding narrative. This reassembling of the multitudes, and its interference with the ...

Again

Glancing back to the many notices of crowds in the preceding narrative. This reassembling of the multitudes, and its interference with the repast of Christ and the disciples, is peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 3:21 - His friends His friends ( οἱ παῤ αὐτοῦ ) Lit., they who were from beside him: i.e., by origin or birth. His mother and brethren. Compare ...

His friends ( οἱ παῤ αὐτοῦ )

Lit., they who were from beside him: i.e., by origin or birth. His mother and brethren. Compare Mar 3:31, Mar 3:32. Wyc., kinsmen. Tynd., they that belonged unto him. Not his disciples, since they were in the house with him.

Vincent: Mar 3:21 - They said They said ( ἔλεγον ) Imperfect tense. Very graphic, they kept saying.

They said ( ἔλεγον )

Imperfect tense. Very graphic, they kept saying.

Vincent: Mar 3:22 - Beelzebub Beelzebub See on Mat 10:25.

Beelzebub

See on Mat 10:25.

Vincent: Mar 3:22 - And And Not connecting two parts of one accusation, but two accusations, as is evident from the two ὅτις , which are equivalent to quotation ...

And

Not connecting two parts of one accusation, but two accusations, as is evident from the two ὅτις , which are equivalent to quotation marks.

Vincent: Mar 3:24 - And And Note the way in which the sayings are linked by this conjunction; an impressive rhetorical progression.

And

Note the way in which the sayings are linked by this conjunction; an impressive rhetorical progression.

Vincent: Mar 3:26 - But hath an end But hath an end Peculiar to Mark.

But hath an end

Peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 3:27 - Spoil Spoil ( διαρπάσαι ) Mark uses the stronger and more vivid compound verb, where Matthew employs the simple ἁρπάσαι . The ver...

Spoil ( διαρπάσαι )

Mark uses the stronger and more vivid compound verb, where Matthew employs the simple ἁρπάσαι . The verb means, primarily, to tear in pieces; to carry away, as the wind; to efface, as footstePsalms So, generally, to seize as plunder, snatching right and left.

Vincent: Mar 3:27 - His goods His goods ( τὰ σκεύη ) Lit., his vessels. So Wyc. Compare Mar 11:16; Act 9:15; Act 10:11; 2Ti 2:20. The special object of the robb...

His goods ( τὰ σκεύη )

Lit., his vessels. So Wyc. Compare Mar 11:16; Act 9:15; Act 10:11; 2Ti 2:20. The special object of the robber may be precious vessels of gold or silver; but the word is probably used in its general sense of household gear.

Vincent: Mar 3:28 - -- Compare Mat 12:31; and note Mark's superior precision and fulness of detail.

Compare Mat 12:31; and note Mark's superior precision and fulness of detail.

Vincent: Mar 3:29 - Guilty Guilty ( ἔνοχος ) From ἐν , in , ἔχω , to hold or have. Lit., is in the grasp of, or holden of. Compare 1Co 11:27; Jam ...

Guilty ( ἔνοχος )

From ἐν , in , ἔχω , to hold or have. Lit., is in the grasp of, or holden of. Compare 1Co 11:27; Jam 2:10.

Vincent: Mar 3:29 - Eternal damnation Eternal damnation ( αἰωνίου ἁμαρτήματος ) An utterly false rendering. Rightly as Rev., of an eternal sin. So Wyc., e...

Eternal damnation ( αἰωνίου ἁμαρτήματος )

An utterly false rendering. Rightly as Rev., of an eternal sin. So Wyc., everlasting trespass. The A. V. has gone wrong in following Tyndale, who, in turn, followed the erroneous text of Erasmus, κρίσεως , judgment, wrongly rendered damnation. See Mat 23:33, and compare Rev. there.

Vincent: Mar 3:30 - They said They said ( ἔλεγον ) Imperfect tense. They kept saying, or persisted in saying. An addition peculiar to Mark.

They said ( ἔλεγον )

Imperfect tense. They kept saying, or persisted in saying. An addition peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 3:31 - They sent unto him calling him, and a multitude was sitting about him Looking round on them which sat round about him , Mar 3:32 They sent unto him calling him, and a multitude was sitting about him . Detail by Mark only; as also the words in Mar 3:34, Looking round ...

, Mar 3:32

They sent unto him calling him, and a multitude was sitting about him . Detail by Mark only; as also the words in Mar 3:34, Looking round on them which sat round about him .

Wesley: Mar 3:1 - He entered again into the synagogue At Capernaum on the same day. Mat 12:9; Luk 6:6.

At Capernaum on the same day. Mat 12:9; Luk 6:6.

Wesley: Mar 3:2 - And they The scribes and Pharisees, watched him, that they might accuse him - Pride, anger, and shame, after being so often put to silence, began now to ripen ...

The scribes and Pharisees, watched him, that they might accuse him - Pride, anger, and shame, after being so often put to silence, began now to ripen into malice.

Wesley: Mar 3:4 - Is it lawful to save life or to kill? Which he knew they were seeking occasion to do.

Which he knew they were seeking occasion to do.

Wesley: Mar 3:4 - But they held their peace Being confounded, though not convinced.

Being confounded, though not convinced.

Wesley: Mar 3:5 - Looking round upon them with anger, being grieved Angry at the sin, grieved at the sinner; the true standard of Christian anger. But who can separate anger at sin from anger at the sinner? None but a ...

Angry at the sin, grieved at the sinner; the true standard of Christian anger. But who can separate anger at sin from anger at the sinner? None but a true believer in Christ.

Wesley: Mar 3:6 - The Pharisees going out Probably leaving the scribes to watch him still: took counsel with the Herodians - as bitter as they usually were against each other.

Probably leaving the scribes to watch him still: took counsel with the Herodians - as bitter as they usually were against each other.

Wesley: Mar 3:8 - From Idumea The natives of which had now professed the Jewish religion above a hundred and fifty years.

The natives of which had now professed the Jewish religion above a hundred and fifty years.

Wesley: Mar 3:8 - They about Tyre and Sidon The Israelites who lived in those coasts.

The Israelites who lived in those coasts.

Wesley: Mar 3:10 - -- Plagues or scourges (so the Greek word properly means) seem to be those very painful or afflictive disorders which were frequently sent, or at least p...

Plagues or scourges (so the Greek word properly means) seem to be those very painful or afflictive disorders which were frequently sent, or at least permitted of God, as a scourge or punishment of sin.

Wesley: Mar 3:12 - He charged them not to make him known It was not the time: nor were they fit preachers.

It was not the time: nor were they fit preachers.

Wesley: Mar 3:13 - He calleth whom he would With regard to the eternal states of men, God always acts as just and merciful. But with regard to numberless other things, he seems to us to act as a...

With regard to the eternal states of men, God always acts as just and merciful. But with regard to numberless other things, he seems to us to act as a mere sovereign. Luk 6:12

Wesley: Mar 3:14 - -- Mat 10:2; Luk 6:13; Act 1:13.

Wesley: Mar 3:16 - He surnamed them sons of thunder Both with respect to the warmth and impetuosity of their spirit, their fervent manner of preaching, and the power of their word.

Both with respect to the warmth and impetuosity of their spirit, their fervent manner of preaching, and the power of their word.

Wesley: Mar 3:20 - To eat bread That is, to take any subsistence.

That is, to take any subsistence.

Wesley: Mar 3:21 - His relations His mother and his brethren, Mar 3:31. But it was some time before they could come near him.

His mother and his brethren, Mar 3:31. But it was some time before they could come near him.

Wesley: Mar 3:22 - The scribes and Pharisees, Mat 12:22; who had come down from Jerusalem Purposely on the devil's errand. And not without success. For the common people now began to drink in the poison, from these learned, good, honourable...

Purposely on the devil's errand. And not without success. For the common people now began to drink in the poison, from these learned, good, honourable men! He hath Beelzebub - at command, is in league with him: And by the prince of the devils casteth he out devils - How easily may a man of learning elude the strongest proof of a work of God! How readily can he account for every incident without ever taking God into the question. Mat 12:24; Luk 11:15.

Wesley: Mar 3:28 - -- Mat 12:31; Luk 12:10.

Wesley: Mar 3:30 - Because they said, He hath an unclean spirit Is it not astonishing, that men who have ever read these words, should doubt, what is the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost? Can any words declare more...

Is it not astonishing, that men who have ever read these words, should doubt, what is the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost? Can any words declare more plainly, that it is "the ascribing those miracles to the power of the devil which Christ wrought by the power of the Holy Ghost?"

Wesley: Mar 3:31 - Then come his brethren and his mother Having at length made their way through the crowd, so as to come to the door. His brethren are here named first, as being first and most earnest in th...

Having at length made their way through the crowd, so as to come to the door. His brethren are here named first, as being first and most earnest in the design of taking him: for neither did these of his brethren believe on him. They sent to him, calling him - They sent one into the house, who called him aloud, by name. Mat 12:46; Luk 8:19.

Wesley: Mar 3:34 - Looking round on them who sat about him With the utmost sweetness; He said, Behold my mother and my brethren - In this preference of his true disciples even to the Virgin Mary, considered me...

With the utmost sweetness; He said, Behold my mother and my brethren - In this preference of his true disciples even to the Virgin Mary, considered merely as his mother after the flesh, he not only shows his high and tender affection for them, but seems designedly to guard against those excessive and idolatrous honours, which he foresaw would in after ages be paid to her.

Clarke: Mar 3:1 - A man there which had a withered hand A man there which had a withered hand - See this explained on Mat 12:10 (note), etc., and on Luk 6:6, Luk 6:10 (note).

A man there which had a withered hand - See this explained on Mat 12:10 (note), etc., and on Luk 6:6, Luk 6:10 (note).

Clarke: Mar 3:2 - They watched him They watched him - Παρετηρουν αυτον, they maliciously watched him. See on Luk 14:1 (note).

They watched him - Παρετηρουν αυτον, they maliciously watched him. See on Luk 14:1 (note).

Clarke: Mar 3:4 - To do good - or - evil? to save life, or to kill? To do good - or - evil? to save life, or to kill? - It was a maxim with the Jews, as it should be with all men, that he who neglected to preserve li...

To do good - or - evil? to save life, or to kill? - It was a maxim with the Jews, as it should be with all men, that he who neglected to preserve life when it was in his power, was to be reputed a murderer. Every principle of sound justice requires that he should be considered in this light. But, if this be the case, how many murderers are there against whom there is no law but the law of God

To kill - but instead of αποκτειναι, several MSS. and versions have απολεσαι to destroy. Wetstein and Griesbach quote Theophylact for this reading; but it is not in my copy. Paris edit. 1635.

Clarke: Mar 3:5 - With anger, being grieved for the hardness of their hearts With anger, being grieved for the hardness of their hearts - These words are not found in any of the other evangelists. For πωρωσει hardnes...

With anger, being grieved for the hardness of their hearts - These words are not found in any of the other evangelists. For πωρωσει hardness, or rather callousness, the Codex Bezae, and four of the Itala, read νεκρωσει, deadness; the Vulgate and some of the Itala, caecitate , blindness. Join all these together, and they will scarcely express the fullness of this people’ s wretchedness. By a long resistance to the grace and Spirit of God, their hearts had become callous; they were past feeling. By a long opposition to the light of God, they became dark in their understanding, were blinded by the deceitfulness of sin, and thus were past seeing. By a long continuance in the practice of every evil work, they were cut off from all union with God, the fountain of spiritual life; and, becoming dead in trespasses and sins, they were incapable of any resurrection but through a miraculous power of God

With anger. What was the anger which our Lord felt? That which proceeded from excessive grief, which was occasioned by their obstinate stupidity and blindness: therefore it was no uneasy passion, but an excess of generous grief

Clarke: Mar 3:5 - Whole as the other Whole as the other - This is omitted by the best MSS. and versions Grotius, Mill, and Bengel approve of the omission, and Griesbach leaves it out of...

Whole as the other - This is omitted by the best MSS. and versions

Grotius, Mill, and Bengel approve of the omission, and Griesbach leaves it out of the text.

Clarke: Mar 3:6 - Herodians Herodians - For an account of these, see the note on Mat 16:1; Mat 22:16.

Herodians - For an account of these, see the note on Mat 16:1; Mat 22:16.

Clarke: Mar 3:7 - Galilee Galilee - See Mat 4:13, Mat 4:15.

Galilee - See Mat 4:13, Mat 4:15.

Clarke: Mar 3:8 - Tyre - Sidon, etc. Tyre - Sidon, etc. - See Mat 11:21

Tyre - Sidon, etc. - See Mat 11:21

Clarke: Mar 3:8 - When they had heard what great things he did, came unto him When they had heard what great things he did, came unto him - So, if Christ be persecuted and abandoned by the wicked, there are a multitude of piou...

When they had heard what great things he did, came unto him - So, if Christ be persecuted and abandoned by the wicked, there are a multitude of pious souls who earnestly seek and follow him. He who labors for God will always find more than he loses, in the midst of all his contradictions and persecutions.

Clarke: Mar 3:9 - A small ship A small ship - Πλοιαριον . The lytil boot, Old English MS. It was doubtless something of the boat kind, which probably belonged to some of...

A small ship - Πλοιαριον . The lytil boot, Old English MS. It was doubtless something of the boat kind, which probably belonged to some of the disciples. Our Lord was at this time teaching by the sea of Galilee. The word ship is utterly improper in many places of our translation, and tends to mislead the people.

Clarke: Mar 3:10 - They pressed upon him They pressed upon him - Rushed upon him, επιπιπτειν - through eagerness to have their spiritual and bodily maladies immediately removed

They pressed upon him - Rushed upon him, επιπιπτειν - through eagerness to have their spiritual and bodily maladies immediately removed

Clarke: Mar 3:10 - Plagues Plagues - Rather disorders, μαϚιγας ; properly such disorders as were inflicted by the Lord. The word plague also tends to mislead.

Plagues - Rather disorders, μαϚιγας ; properly such disorders as were inflicted by the Lord. The word plague also tends to mislead.

Clarke: Mar 3:11 - Thou art the Son of God Thou art the Son of God - Two MSS., and the later Syriac, have, Thou art the Christ, the Son of God. One of Stephens’ s MSS. has, Thou art the ...

Thou art the Son of God - Two MSS., and the later Syriac, have, Thou art the Christ, the Son of God. One of Stephens’ s MSS. has, Thou art the Holy One of God. A MS. in the library of Leicester has, συ ει ὁ Θεος, υἱος, Thou art God, the Son. This is an uncommon reading, which is not confirmed by any MS. yet discovered.

Clarke: Mar 3:14 - He ordained twelve He ordained twelve - Εποιησε, he made twelve. Here is nothing of what we call ordaining. Christ simply appointed them to be with him; and th...

He ordained twelve - Εποιησε, he made twelve. Here is nothing of what we call ordaining. Christ simply appointed them to be with him; and that he might send them occasionally to preach, etc

Clarke: Mar 3:14 - To preach To preach - The Codex Bezae, Saxon, and all the Itala, except one, add το ευαγγελιον, the Gospel.

To preach - The Codex Bezae, Saxon, and all the Itala, except one, add το ευαγγελιον, the Gospel.

Clarke: Mar 3:15 - To have power to heal - and to cast out devils To have power to heal - and to cast out devils - The business of a minister of Christ is 1st. To preach the Gospel 2dly. To be the physician of soul...

To have power to heal - and to cast out devils - The business of a minister of Christ is

1st. To preach the Gospel

2dly. To be the physician of souls. And

3dly. To wage war with the devil, and destroy his kingdom.

Clarke: Mar 3:16 - Simon, etc. Simon, etc. - See on Mat 10:2 (note), etc.

Simon, etc. - See on Mat 10:2 (note), etc.

Clarke: Mar 3:17 - Sons of thunder Sons of thunder - A Hebraism for thunderers; probably so named because of their zeal and power in preaching the Gospel The term Boanerges is neither...

Sons of thunder - A Hebraism for thunderers; probably so named because of their zeal and power in preaching the Gospel

The term Boanerges is neither Hebrew nor Syriac. Calmet and others think that there is reason to believe that the Greek transcribers have not copied it exactly. בני רעם beney raam , which the ancient Greeks would pronounce Beneregem, and which means sons of thunder, was probably the appellative used by our Lord: or בני רעש beni reges , sons of tempest, which comes nearest to the Boanerges of the evangelist. St. Jerome, on Daniel 1, gives בני רעם (which he writes Benereem , softening the sound of the ע ain ) as the more likely reading, and Luther, supposing our Lord spoke in Hebrew, gives the proper Hebrew term above mentioned, which he writes Bnehargem. Some think that the reason why our Lord gave this appellative to the sons of Zebedee was, their desire to bring fire down from heaven, i.e. a storm of thunder and lightning, to overturn and consume a certain Samaritan village, the inhabitants of which would not receive their Master. See the account in Luk 9:53, Luk 9:54 (note). It was a very usual thing among the Jews to give surnames, which signified some particular quality or excellence, to their rabbins. See several instances in Schoettgen.

Clarke: Mar 3:19 - Into a house Into a house - As Christ was now returned to Capernaum, this was probably the house of Peter, mentioned Mar 2:1.

Into a house - As Christ was now returned to Capernaum, this was probably the house of Peter, mentioned Mar 2:1.

Clarke: Mar 3:20 - Eat bread Eat bread - Had no time to take any necessary refreshment.

Eat bread - Had no time to take any necessary refreshment.

Clarke: Mar 3:21 - His friends His friends - Or, relations. On this verse several MSS. differ considerably. I have followed the reading of the Syriac, because I think it the best:...

His friends - Or, relations. On this verse several MSS. differ considerably. I have followed the reading of the Syriac, because I think it the best: οἱ παρ αυτου signify merely his relatives, his brethren, etc., see Mar 3:31; and the phrase is used by the best writers to signify relatives, companions, and domestics. See Kypke in loc

Clarke: Mar 3:21 - They said, He is beside himself They said, He is beside himself - It was the enemies of Christ that raised this report; and his relatives, probably thinking that it was true, went ...

They said, He is beside himself - It was the enemies of Christ that raised this report; and his relatives, probably thinking that it was true, went to confine him. Let a Christian but neglect the care of his body for a time, in striving to enter in at the strait gate; let a minister of Christ but impair his health by his pastoral labors; presently "he is distracted;"he has "not the least conduct nor discretion."But let a man forget his soul, let him destroy his health by debaucheries, let him expose his life through ambition, and he may, notwithstanding, pass for a very prudent and sensible man

Schoettgen contends that the multitude, and not Christ, is here intended. Christ was in the house: the multitude, οχλος, Mar 3:20, pressed upon him so that he could not eat bread. His disciples, or friends, went out, κρατησαι αυτον (scil. οχλον ), to restrain it, viz. the multitude, to prevent them from rushing into the house and disturbing their Master, who was now taking some refreshment. This conjecture should not be lightly regarded.

Clarke: Mar 3:22 - He hath Beelzebub He hath Beelzebub - See on Mat 12:24-26 (note).

He hath Beelzebub - See on Mat 12:24-26 (note).

Clarke: Mar 3:27-30 - No man, etc. No man, etc. - For an explanation of these verses, and a definition of the sin against the Holy Ghost, see Mat 12:29-33.

No man, etc. - For an explanation of these verses, and a definition of the sin against the Holy Ghost, see Mat 12:29-33.

Clarke: Mar 3:31 - His brethren and his mother His brethren and his mother - Or rather, his mother and his brethren. This is the arrangement of the best and most ancient MSS.; and this clause, ...

His brethren and his mother - Or rather, his mother and his brethren. This is the arrangement of the best and most ancient MSS.; and this clause, και αἱ αδελφαι σου, and thy sisters, Mar 3:32, should be Added, on the authority of ADEFGMSUV, fifty-five others, some editions, the margin of the later Syriac, Slavonic, Gothic, and all the Itala except four. Griesbach has received this reading into the text

Clarke: Mar 3:31 - Calling him Calling him - This clause is wanting in one copy of the Itala. The Codex Alexandrinus has ζητουντες αυτον, seeking him.

Calling him - This clause is wanting in one copy of the Itala. The Codex Alexandrinus has ζητουντες αυτον, seeking him.

Clarke: Mar 3:33 - Who is my mother? Who is my mother? - See on Mat 12:46-50 (note).

Who is my mother? - See on Mat 12:46-50 (note).

Calvin: Mar 3:5 - And when he had looked around upon them with indignation Mar 3:5.And when he had looked around upon them with indignation To convince us that this was a just and holy anger, Mark explains the reason of it to...

Mar 3:5.And when he had looked around upon them with indignation To convince us that this was a just and holy anger, Mark explains the reason of it to be, that he was grieved on account of the blindness of their hearts. First, then, Christ is grieved, because men who have been instructed in the Law of God are so grossly blind; but as it was malice that blinded them, his grief is accompanied by indignation. This is the true moderation of zeal, to be distressed about the destruction of wicked men, and, at the same time, to be filled with wrath at their ungodliness. Again, as this passage assures us, that Christ was not free from human passions, we infer from it, that the passions themselves are not sinful, provided there be no excess. In consequence of the corruption of our nature, we do not preserve moderation; and our anger, even when it rests on proper grounds, is never free from sin. With Christ the case was different; for not only did his nature retain its original purity, but he was a perfect pattern of righteousness. We ought therefore to implore from heaven the Spirit of God to correct our excesses.

Calvin: Mar 3:6 - The Pharisees took counsel with the Herodians Mar 3:6.The Pharisees took counsel with the Herodians Now they regarded the Herodians with the fiercest hatred; for their eagerness to be considered...

Mar 3:6.The Pharisees took counsel with the Herodians Now they regarded the Herodians with the fiercest hatred; for their eagerness to be considered the guardians and protectors of public liberty made it necessary for them to make an open profession of mortal hatred to the ministers of that tyrant. And yet this aversion is counteracted by their hatred and fury against Christ, 88 which makes them not only enter into a conspiracy with foreigners, but insinuate themselves into the good graces of those with whom, on other occasions, they would have shrunk from intercourse. While ungodliness hurries men in various directions, and drives them to different courses, it engages them, with one consent, in a contest with God. No hostilities prevent them from giving their hand to each other for opposing the truth of God.

Calvin: Mar 3:13 - And he went up into a mountain // He called to him whom he would Mar 3:13.And he went up into a mountain By this election he does not yet ordain them to be Apostles, to enter immediately into the discharge of thei...

Mar 3:13.And he went up into a mountain By this election he does not yet ordain them to be Apostles, to enter immediately into the discharge of their office, but merely admits them to enjoy his private instructions 348 with a view to the apostleship. Commentators have fallen into a mistake here, by confounding those passages with the tenth chapter of the Gospel by Matthew. For the plain meaning of the words is, that they are only destined to a future commission, the bestowal of which is recorded by Matthew; and Mark and Luke will be found afterwards relating, in its proper place, the mission which Matthew there describes. And we need not wonder, if their heavenly Master chose to train and accustom them gradually to so arduous an employment: for, even by a long course of instruction, their ignorance could not be corrected.

Both the Evangelists say, that Christ went up into a mountain. Luke explains the cause to have been, that he might pray with greater freedom in his retirement, which he was accustomed to do frequently, as is evident from other passages. Now, this example ought to be regarded by us as a perpetual rule, to begin with prayer, when we are about to choose pastors to churches: otherwise, what we attempt will not succeed well. And certainly our Lord prayed, not so much on his own account, as to lay down a rule for us. We are deficient in prudence and skill; and though our sagacity were of the highest order, nothing is more easy than to be deceived in this matter. Granting that we were in no danger of mistake, if the Lord does not regulate our affections, with what force, or rather violence, shall we be carried away 349 by favor and prepossession, or hatred or ambition? Besides, though the election were conducted in the very best manner, all will be unsuccessful, unless the Lord take under his guidance those who are elected, and furnish them with the necessary gifts. “What then?” it will be said, “did not Christ earnestly implore the Father to preside in the election?” This I readily acknowledge, and I have also to state, that this was a declaration and acknowledgment of his care for his Church. Accordingly, he did not pray to the Father in the ordinary manner, but spent the whole night in prayer. But if he, who was full of the Holy Spirit, (Joh 3:34,) implored the Father, with such ardor and earnestness, to preside in the election, how much greater need have we to do so?

He called to him whom he would By this expression, I have no doubt, Mark conveys to us the instruction, that it was to the unmixed grace of Christ, and not to any excellence of their own, that they were indebted for receiving so honorable an office: for, if you understand him to say, that those were chosen, who were more excellent than others, this will not apply to Judas. The meaning, therefore, is the apostle-ship was not bestowed on account of any human merits; but, by the free mercy of God, persons, who were altogether unworthy of it, were raised to that high rank; and thus was fulfilled what Christ says on another occasion, “Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you,” (Joh 15:16.) To the same effect Paul frequently speaks, extolling the purpose of God in bestowing on him the apostleship, (Eph 3:7; Col 1:25.)

But here many questions arise. First, why did our Lord deliberately choose Judas, who, he perfectly knew, was unworthy of the honor, and would be his betrayer? Secondly, why did God, after being so earnestly supplicated by his Son, and as if he had given a refusal to Christ, permit a base and wicked man to find his way to the highest rank in his Church? 350 Thirdly, why did he resolve that the first-fruits 351 of his Church should be stained by so foul a disgrace? Fourthly, how came it, that Jesus Christ, knowingly and willingly, preferred Judas to honest and faithful ministers?

The first objection is met by the following reply. Our Lord expressly intended to prevent future offenses, that we may not feel excessive uneasiness, when unprincipled men occupy the situation of teachers in the Church, or when professors of the Gospel become apostates. He gave, at the same time, in the person of one man, an instance of fearful defection, 352 that those who occupy a higher rank may not indulge in self-complacency. At the same time, with regard to the second question, we do not admit that our Lord suffered a refusal. 353 This answer will serve also for the third question. At the very beginning, it was judged proper to give an early demonstration of the future state of the Church, that weak persons might not stumble on account of the fall of a reprobate; for it is not proper, that the stability of the Church should depend on men. With regard to the last objection, Christ did not prefer Judas to devout and holy disciples, but raised him to an eminence from which he was afterwards to fall, and thus intended to make him an example and instruction to men of every condition and of every age, that no one may abuse the honor which God has conferred upon him, and likewise that, when even the pillars fall, those who appear to be the weakest of believers may remain steady.

Calvin: Mar 3:16 - And to Simon he gave the name Peter Mar 3:16.And to Simon he gave the name Peter Though all Christians must be living stones 354, of the spiritual temple, yet Christ gave this name pec...

Mar 3:16.And to Simon he gave the name Peter Though all Christians must be living stones 354, of the spiritual temple, yet Christ gave this name peculiarly to Simon, according to the measure of grace which he intended to bestow upon him. This is not inconsistent with the shameful weakness which he manifested in denying his Lord: for this title showed his invincible power and steadiness, which continued till his death. Yet it is absurd in the Papists to infer from this, that the Church is founded on him, as will afterwards be more fully explained, ( Mat 16:18 .) Christ called the sons of Zebedee sons of thunder, because he was to give them a powerful voice, that they might thunder throughout the whole world. 355 And that thunder is heard, in the present day, from the mouth of John. As to his brother, there can be no doubt that, so long as he lived, he shook the earth. The word has been corrupted: for the full pronunciation would be בני רגש , (Benae-regesh;) 356 but the changes which words undergo in passing into other languages are well known.

Calvin: Mar 3:20 - And they come into the house. Mark Mar 3:20.And they come into the house. Mark undoubtedly takes in a somewhat extended period of time, when he passes from the miracles to that wicked c...

Mar 3:20.And they come into the house. Mark undoubtedly takes in a somewhat extended period of time, when he passes from the miracles to that wicked conspiracy which the relatives of Christ formed with each other, to bind him as if he had been a madman. Matthew and Luke mention not more than a single miracle, as having given to the Pharisees an opportunity of slander; but as all the three agree in this last clause which is contained in Mark’s narrative, I have thought it proper to insert it here.

It is wonderful that such wickedness should have been found among the relatives of Christ, who ought to have been the first to aid him in advancing the kingdom of God. When they see that he has already obtained some reputation, their ambition leads them to desire that he should be admired in Jerusalem; for they exhort him to go up to that city,

that he may show himself more openly, (Joh 7:3.)

But now that they perceive him to be hated on one side by the rulers, exposed on another to numerous slanders, and even despised by the great body of the people--to prevent any injury, or envy, or dishonor, from arising to the whole family, they form the design of laying hands on him, and binding him at home, as if he had been a person who labored under mental derangement; and, as appears from the words of the Evangelist, such was their actual belief.

Hence we learn, first, how great is the blindness of the human mind, in forming such perverse judgments about the glory of God when openly displayed. Certainly, in all that Christ said and did, the power of the Holy Spirit shone magnificently; and if others had not clearly perceived it, how could it be unknown to his relatives, who were intimately acquainted with him? But because Christ’s manner of acting does not please the world, and is so far from gaining its good graces that it exposes him to the resentments of many, they give out that he is deranged. Let us learn, in the second place, that the light of faith does not proceed from flesh and blood, but from heavenly grace, that no man may glory in any thing else than in the regeneration of the Spirit; as Paul tells us,

If any man wishes to be considered to be in Christ,
let him be a new creature, (2Co 5:17.)

Defender: Mar 3:6 - Herodians This seems an odd alliance. The Herodians were political adherents to Herod and the Romans, normally hated by the religious Pharisees. But mutual enem...

This seems an odd alliance. The Herodians were political adherents to Herod and the Romans, normally hated by the religious Pharisees. But mutual enemies will often make common cause in opposition to Christ and Biblical Christianity."

Defender: Mar 3:12 - not make him known These unclean spirits recognized Christ, even though His own friends thought He was mentally ill (Mar 3:21). Nevertheless, Christ did not want the spi...

These unclean spirits recognized Christ, even though His own friends thought He was mentally ill (Mar 3:21). Nevertheless, Christ did not want the spirits to identify Him openly. The Lord Jesus does not need nor desire any affirmation by His enemies, but only the witness of His own disciples. There is always a great temptation for Christians to seek acclaim or testimony from ungodly people of influence, but Christ Himself would have none of it."

Defender: Mar 3:21 - beside himself Despite His wonderful works of healing and His strong Bible-centered preaching, Christ's enemies accused Him of being in league with Beelzebub (Mar 3:...

Despite His wonderful works of healing and His strong Bible-centered preaching, Christ's enemies accused Him of being in league with Beelzebub (Mar 3:22), and His friends thought He had lost His mind. Paul also was later accused by the Roman governor Festus of being mad (Act 26:24). If Paul, the greatest preacher, and even Christ Himself were accused of such things by the world, we must expect the same if we are faithful to His teachings (Joh 15:20)."

Defender: Mar 3:29 - blaspheme On the unforgivable sin, see note on Mat 12:32."

On the unforgivable sin, see note on Mat 12:32."

Defender: Mar 3:31 - his brethren Mary and Jesus' brethren did not yet believe in Him (Joh 7:5). Joseph was evidently dead by this time, so they were going to persuade Him, if they cou...

Mary and Jesus' brethren did not yet believe in Him (Joh 7:5). Joseph was evidently dead by this time, so they were going to persuade Him, if they could, to come home with them. Perhaps they also had been influenced by their friends in Nazareth to think He was "beside Himself" (Mar 3:21). On His mild rebuke, even including His mother, see note on Mat 12:50."

TSK: Mar 3:1 - he entered // withered he entered : Mar 1:21; Mat 12:9-14; Luk 6:6-11 withered : 1Ki 13:4; Joh 5:3

he entered : Mar 1:21; Mat 12:9-14; Luk 6:6-11

withered : 1Ki 13:4; Joh 5:3

TSK: Mar 3:2 - -- Psa 37:32; Isa 29:20,Isa 29:21; Jer 20:10; Dan 6:4; Luk 6:7, Luk 11:53, Luk 11:54, Luk 14:1; Luk 20:20; Joh 9:16

TSK: Mar 3:3 - he saith // Stand forth he saith : Isa 42:4; Dan 6:10; Luk 6:8; Joh 9:4; 1Co 15:58; Gal 6:9; Phi 1:14, Phi 1:28-30; 1Pe 4:1 Stand forth : or, Arise, stand forth in the midst

he saith : Isa 42:4; Dan 6:10; Luk 6:8; Joh 9:4; 1Co 15:58; Gal 6:9; Phi 1:14, Phi 1:28-30; 1Pe 4:1

Stand forth : or, Arise, stand forth in the midst

TSK: Mar 3:4 - Is it // But Is it : Mar 2:27, Mar 2:28; Hos 6:6; Mat 12:10-12; Luk 6:9, Luk 13:13-17, Luk 14:1-5 But : Mar 9:34

TSK: Mar 3:5 - with anger // grieved // hardness // Stretch with anger : With anger at their desperate malice and wickedness, and with commiseration for the calamities which they would thereby bring on themselv...

with anger : With anger at their desperate malice and wickedness, and with commiseration for the calamities which they would thereby bring on themselves. Luk 6:10, Luk 13:15; Eph 4:26; Rev 6:16

grieved : Gen 6:6; Jdg 10:16; Neh 13:8; Psa 95:10; Isa 63:9, Isa 63:10; Luk 19:40-44; Eph 4:30; Heb 3:10,Heb 3:17

hardness : or, blindness, Isa 6:9, Isa 6:10, Isa 42:18-20, Isa 44:18-20; Mat 13:14, Mat 13:15; Rom 11:7-10,Rom 11:25; 2Co 3:14; Eph 4:18

Stretch : 1Ki 13:6; Mat 12:13; Luk 6:10, Luk 17:14; Joh 5:8, Joh 5:9, Joh 9:7; Heb 5:9

TSK: Mar 3:6 - Pharisees // Herodians Pharisees : Psa 109:3, Psa 109:4; Mat 12:14; Luk 6:11, Luk 20:19, Luk 20:20, Luk 22:2; Joh 11:53 Herodians : Mar 8:15, Mar 12:13; Mat 22:16

TSK: Mar 3:7 - Jesus // and a // Galilee Jesus : Mat 10:23, Mat 12:15; Luk 6:12; Joh 10:39-41, Joh 11:53, Joh 11:54; Act 14:5, Act 14:6; Act 17:10,Act 17:14 and a : Mat 4:25; Luk 6:17 Galilee...

TSK: Mar 3:8 - Idumaea // beyond // Tyre Idumaea : Isa 34:5; Eze 35:15, Eze 36:5; Mal 1:2-4, Edom beyond : Num 32:33-38; Jos 13:8-14 Tyre : Mar 7:24, Mar 7:31; Jos 19:28, Jos 19:29; Psa 45:12...

Idumaea : Isa 34:5; Eze 35:15, Eze 36:5; Mal 1:2-4, Edom

beyond : Num 32:33-38; Jos 13:8-14

Tyre : Mar 7:24, Mar 7:31; Jos 19:28, Jos 19:29; Psa 45:12, Psa 87:4; Isa. 23:1-18; Ezek. 26:1-28:26

TSK: Mar 3:9 - because because : Mar 5:30; Joh 6:15

because : Mar 5:30; Joh 6:15

TSK: Mar 3:10 - he had // pressed // as many he had : Mat 12:15, Mat 14:14 pressed : or, rushed, touched, Mar 5:27, Mar 5:28, Mar 6:56; Mat 14:36; Act 5:15, Act 19:11, Act 19:12 as many : Mar 5:2...

TSK: Mar 3:11 - unclean // the Son unclean : Mar 1:23, Mar 1:24, Mar 5:5, Mar 5:6; Mat 8:31; Luk 4:41; Act 16:17, Act 19:13-17; Jam 2:19 the Son : Mar 1:1; Mat 4:3, Mat 4:6, Mat 8:29, M...

TSK: Mar 3:12 - -- Mar 1:25, Mar 1:34; Mat 12:16; Act 16:18

TSK: Mar 3:13 - -- Mat 10:1-4; Luk 6:12-16

TSK: Mar 3:14 - he ordained // and he ordained : Joh 15:16; Act 1:24, Act 1:25; Gal 1:1, Gal 1:15-20 and : Luk 9:1-6, Luk 10:1-11, Luk 24:47; Act 1:8

TSK: Mar 3:16 - Simon Simon : Mar 1:16; Mat 16:16-18; Joh 1:42; 1Co 1:12, 1Co 3:22, 1Co 9:5; Gal 2:7-9, Cephas, 2Pe 1:1

TSK: Mar 3:17 - James // he surnamed James : Mar 1:19, Mar 1:20, Mar 5:37, Mar 9:2, Mar 10:35, Mar 14:33; Joh 21:2, Joh 21:20-25; Act 12:1 he surnamed : Isa 58:1; Jer 23:29; Heb 4:12; Rev...

TSK: Mar 3:18 - Andrew // Philip // Bartholomew // Matthew // Thomas // James // Alphaeus // Thaddaeus // Simon // Canaanite Andrew : Joh 1:40, Joh 6:8, Joh 12:21, Joh 12:22; Act 1:13 Philip : Joh 1:43-45, Joh 6:5-7, Joh 14:8, Joh 14:9 Bartholomew : Mat 10:3; Luk 6:14; Act 1...

Andrew : Joh 1:40, Joh 6:8, Joh 12:21, Joh 12:22; Act 1:13

Philip : Joh 1:43-45, Joh 6:5-7, Joh 14:8, Joh 14:9

Bartholomew : Mat 10:3; Luk 6:14; Act 1:13

Matthew : Mar 2:14; Mat 9:9; Luk 5:27-29, Levi, Luk 6:15

Thomas : Joh 11:16, Joh 20:24-29, Joh 21:2; Act 1:13

James : Mar 6:3; Mat 10:3, Mat 13:55; Luk 6:15; Act 15:13, Act 21:18; 1Co 9:5, 1Co 15:7; Gal 1:19; Gal 2:9; Jam 1:1

Alphaeus : Mar 2:14

Thaddaeus : Mat 10:3; Luk 6:16; Joh 14:22; Act 1:13, Judas the brother of James, Jud 1:1

Simon : Mat 10:4; Luk 6:15; Act 1:13, Simon Zelotes

Canaanite : Κανανιτης [Strong’ s G2581], so called, not from being a native of Canaan, Χανααν [Strong’ s G5477], which would have been Χαναναος , but from the Hebrew Kana, to be zealous, whence he is called in Greek Ζηλωτης [Strong’ s G2208], Zelotes, or the Zealot, from ζηλοω [Strong’ s G2206], to be zealous.

TSK: Mar 3:19 - Judas // into an house Judas : Mat 26:14-16, Mat 26:47, Mat 27:3-5; Joh 6:64, Joh 6:71, Joh 12:4-6, Joh 13:2, Joh 13:26-30; Act 1:16-25 into an house : or, home

TSK: Mar 3:20 - so that so that : Mar 3:9, Mar 6:31; Luk 6:17; Joh 4:31-34

TSK: Mar 3:21 - when // friends // He is when : Some render, ""And they who were with him (in the house, Mar 3:19), hearing (the noise) went out to restrain ( αυτον , i.e., οχλον ...

when : Some render, ""And they who were with him (in the house, Mar 3:19), hearing (the noise) went out to restrain ( αυτον , i.e., οχλον [Strong’ s G3793], the multitude), for they said, It (the mob) is mad.""This, however, is contrary to all the versions; and appears an unnatural construction.

friends : or, kinsmen, Mar 3:31; Joh 7:3-10

He is : 2Ki 9:11; Jer 29:26; Hos 9:7; Joh 10:20; Act 26:24; 2Co 5:13

TSK: Mar 3:22 - which // He hath which : Mar 7:1; Mat 15:1; Luk 5:17 He hath : Psa 22:6; Mat 9:34, Mat 10:25, Mat 12:24; Luk 11:15; Joh 7:20, Joh 8:48, Joh 8:52, Joh 10:22

TSK: Mar 3:23 - in parables // How in parables : Psa 49:4; Mat 13:34 How : Mat 12:25-30; Luk 11:17-23

TSK: Mar 3:24 - -- Judg. 9:23-57, Jdg 12:1-6; 2Sa 20:1, 2Sa 20:6; 1Ki 12:16-20; Isa 9:20,Isa 9:21, Isa 19:2, Isa 19:3; Eze 37:22; Zec 11:14; Joh 17:21; 1Co 1:10-13; Eph ...

TSK: Mar 3:25 - -- Gen 13:7, Gen 13:8, Gen 37:4; Psa 133:1; Gal 5:15; Jam 3:16

TSK: Mar 3:27 - -- Gen 3:15; Isa 27:1, Isa 49:24-26, Isa 53:12, Isa 61:1; Mat 12:29; Luk 10:17-20; Luk 11:21-23; Joh 12:31; Rom 16:20; Eph 6:10-13; Col 2:15; Heb 2:14; 1...

TSK: Mar 3:28 - -- Mat 12:31, Mat 12:32; Luk 12:10; Heb 6:4-8, Heb 10:26-31; 1Jo 5:16

TSK: Mar 3:29 - but is but is : Mar 12:40; Mat 25:46; 2Th 1:9; Jud 1:7, Jud 1:13

TSK: Mar 3:30 - -- Mar 3:22; Joh 10:20

TSK: Mar 3:31 - -- Mat 12:46-48; Luk 8:19-21

TSK: Mar 3:33 - Who // or Who : Deu 33:9; Luk 2:49; Joh 2:4; 2Co 5:16 or : Mar 3:21, Mar 6:3; Joh 7:3-5

TSK: Mar 3:34 - Behold Behold : Psa 22:22; Son 4:9, Son 4:10, Son 5:1, Son 5:2; Mat 12:49, Mat 12:50, Mat 25:40-45, Mat 28:10; Luk 11:27, Luk 11:28; Joh 20:17; Rom 8:29; Heb...

TSK: Mar 3:35 - do do : Mat 7:21; Joh 7:17; Jam 1:25; 1Jo 2:17, 1Jo 3:22, 1Jo 3:23

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Mar 3:1 - Ver. 1-5. See Poole on "Mat 12:9" Mar 3:1-5 Christ appealing to reason healeth the withered hand on the sabbath day. Mar 3:6-12 The Pharisees conspire his death: he retires to the...

Mar 3:1-5 Christ appealing to reason healeth the withered hand

on the sabbath day.

Mar 3:6-12 The Pharisees conspire his death: he retires to the

seaside, and healeth many.

Mar 3:13-19 He chooseth his twelve apostles.

Mar 3:20-21 His friends look upon him as beside himself.

Mar 3:22-30 He confutes the blasphemous absurdity of the Pharisees

in ascribing his casting out of devils to the power of

Beelzebub.

Mar 3:31-35 Those who do the will of God he regardeth as his

nearest relations.

Ver. 1-5. See Poole on "Mat 12:9" , and following verses to Mat 12:13 . The word pwrwsei , used Mar 3:5 , may be understood to signify blindness, or hardness, as it may derive from pwrov , callus, or pwrov , caecus, but the derivation of it from the former best obtains. Hardness being a quality in a thing by which it resisteth our touch, and suffers us not to make an impression upon it, that ill condition of the soul by which it becomes rebellious, and disobedient to the will of God revealed, so as it is not affected with it, nor doth it make any impression of faith or holiness upon the soul, is usually called hardness of heart. But for the argument of this history, proving acts of mercy lawful on the sabbath day, it is fully spoken to in the notes on Mat 12:9-13 .

Poole: Mar 3:6-12 - -- Ver. 6-12. Who these Herodians were we cannot learn plainly from holy writ; it is most probable that they were a civil faction, who took Herod’ ...

Ver. 6-12. Who these Herodians were we cannot learn plainly from holy writ; it is most probable that they were a civil faction, who took Herod’ s part, and were stiff for promoting his interest, and the interest of the Roman emperor, whose substitute Herod was. With these the Pharisees (in other cases their implacable enemies) mix counsels how they might destroy Christ. Christ gives place to their fury, his time being not yet come, and withdraweth himself from their sight, being followed by great multitudes, who in the fame of his miracles, or the hopes they had of receiving some good from him for themselves or for their friends, drew after him. Some of these are said to have come from Idumea, which was the country of Edom, and distinct from Judea anciently, as may be gathered from Jos 15:1 , and Num 34:3 , but whether it was at this time so or no, is doubted. Our Lord commandeth the devils not to make him known, not desiring any such preachers.

Poole: Mar 3:11 - -- Ver. 11 . See Poole on "Mar 3:6"

Ver. 11 . See Poole on "Mar 3:6"

Poole: Mar 3:13-15 - -- Ver. 13-15. We have this piece of history, or rather something to which it relates, both in Matthew and in Luke, only Mark hath this peculiar to hims...

Ver. 13-15. We have this piece of history, or rather something to which it relates, both in Matthew and in Luke, only Mark hath this peculiar to himself, that our Saviour did this upon a mountain. It is the opinion of Bucer, that this was the mountain at the foot of which he preached the sermon largely recorded, Mat 5:1-7:29 , and (as some judge) more shortly by Luk 6:17-45 : he thinketh the multitude here mentioned is the same with that mentioned Mat 4:25 , and Luk 3:7 , and that our Saviour did not go up into this mountain to preach, or ordain his disciples, but only to pray, and to discourse with some of his disciples more privately about spiritual mysteries. That it was at this time that he continued all night in prayer to God, Luk 6:12 ; and in the morning called unto him such of his disciples as he thought fit, and discoursed with them his intentions concerning them, telling them,

1. That he had chosen them to be with him, ordinarily, to be eye and ear witnesses of what he spake and did.

2. That he designed soon after to send them out to preach; which we read he did, Mar 6:7 Mat 10:1 ; to give them a power to heal sicknesses, and to cast out devils: so that this chapter only mentions Christ’ s election of them, not his actual sending them, which is discoursed Mar 6:7-13 , as also Mat 10:1-42 .

These things being privately transacted on the mountain, Bucer thinks he came down into the plain at the foot of the mountain, according to Luk 6:17 , and there preached that sermon mentioned Mat 5:1-7:29 , as we before said. The evangelist telling us that he called to him which of his disciples he would, lets us know, that he chose them, and not they him; that the choice of them was of his free grace and mercy; and his continuing all night in prayer before this choice, lets us know the gravity of the work of choosing persons fit to be sent out to preach the gospel.

Poole: Mar 3:16-19 - -- Ver. 16-19. Matthew nameth the apostles upon his relating the history of their mission, or sending out; Mark nameth them upon their election, or firs...

Ver. 16-19. Matthew nameth the apostles upon his relating the history of their mission, or sending out; Mark nameth them upon their election, or first choice. Both these evangelists agree with Luke in their names, saving that Luke calleth him Judas whom Matthew calls Lebbaeus, and Mark, Thaddaeus, so that he had three names. Christ changeth the name of Simon, whom he called Cephas, or Peter, Joh 1:42 ; we have the reason, Mat 16:18 ; he also changed the names of James and John, the sons of Zebedee, calling them Boanerges, about the etymology of which name critics must dispute. The evangelists tell us it signifieth Sons of thunder, thereby minding them of their duty, to cry aloud, and to preach the gospel as on the housetops; or perhaps declaring what he knew was in the fervour and warmth of their spirits. We must not here inquire too narrowly into the secret counsels of God, in suffering a son of perdition to come into the number of his first ministers: Christ did it not because he did not know what was in his heart, for before that he showed himself a devil, by informing against his Master, Christ told his disciples that he had chosen twelve, and one of them was a devil; nor yet because he had no others to send, he had multitudes of disciples, and he who of stones could have raised up children to Abraham, could easily have fitted out a person for this service; nor yet did he do it to let in any sots and scandalous persons into the ministry, for we read of no scandal in Judas’ s life. We ought to believe that God had wise ends in the permission of this, and that Christ did out of infinite wisdom do this, though we possibly are not able to give a satisfactory account in the case. What if we should say that Christ by this:

1. Instructed those that after his ascension should have the care of the church, not to pretend to judge of secret things, but only to judge as man ought to judge, according to the outward appearance, leaving the judgment of the heart to God alone.

2. God by this arms his people against the scandal of wicked ministers, such in whom corruption may break out after their entrance into that holy function, though before no such thing appeared, that they may not think the ministerial acts performed by them to have been nullities.

3. God by this also lets us know, that the efficacy of the ordinance doth not depend upon the goodness of the spiritual state of the minister that administers.

A bell may call others to hear the word, though itself receives no benefit by it. In the mean time here is no warrant either for people to choose, or the governors of a church to ordain, lewd and visibly scandalous persons. Judas was no such person; nor yet for people to own, or the governors of churches to continue, lewd and scandalous persons in the ministry, God ordinarily not blessing the labours of such. No sooner had Judas discovered himself, but he went out and hanged himself. Christ no longer allowed him his company, nor the disciples their fellowship. There is a great deal of difference with relation to our fellowship and communion, between secret wickedness concealed in the heart and open and scandalous sinning, though both be alike dangerous to the soul of the sinner.

Poole: Mar 3:20-21 - -- Ver. 20,21. There is no small dispute who are here called our Saviour’ s friends, oi par’ autou , those who were of him, whether it signif...

Ver. 20,21. There is no small dispute who are here called our Saviour’ s friends, oi par’ autou , those who were of him, whether it signifieth his neighbours, the citizens of his city, or his nearer relations, those who belonged to the family of which he was (for he had some brethren that did not believe in him, Joh 7:5 ).

They went to lay hands on him, that is, to take him from the multitude, which pressed upon him by force, (for so the word signifies),

for they said, He is beside himselfexesth : various senses are given of this word, but certainly the most ordinary interpretation of it doth best agree to this place. They saw our Saviour’ s warmth of spirit and zeal in the prosecution of that for which he came into the world, and did so well understand his person, or mission, and receiving the Spirit not by measure, that they took what he did to be the product and effect of a natural infirmity and imperfect head and disordered reason. The young prophet sent by Elisha was counted a mad fellow by Jehu’ s comrades, 2Ki 9:11 ; so was Paul by Festus, Act 26:24 , or by the Corinthians, or some crept in amongst them, 2Co 5:13 . We are naturally inclined to inquire the causes of strange and unusual effects, and cannot always discern the true causes, and often make false guesses at them. I am not so prone as I find some to condemn these friends, or neighbours, or kinsmen of Christ, believing that they did verily believe as they spake, not yet fully understanding that the Spirit of the Lord in that measure was upon him, but through their infirmity fearing that he had been under some distraction, and charitably offering their help to him. The next words tell us of a far worse sense the scribes put upon his actions.

Poole: Mar 3:22-30 - See Poole on "Mat 9:34" Ver. 22-30. Here is no passage in all this piece of history, but what the reader will find opened these notes: See Poole on "Mat 9:34" . See Poole...

Ver. 22-30. Here is no passage in all this piece of history, but what the reader will find opened these notes:

See Poole on "Mat 9:34" . See Poole on "Mat 12:24" , and following verses to Mat 12:32 . To which I refer the reader.

Poole: Mar 3:31-35 - -- Ver. 31-35. See Poole on "Mat 12:46" , and following verses to Mat 12:50 .

Ver. 31-35. See Poole on "Mat 12:46" , and following verses to Mat 12:50 .

Lightfoot: Mar 3:4 - But they held their peace And he saith unto them, Is it lawful to do good on the sabbath days, or to do evil? to save life, or to kill? But they held their peace.  &...

And he saith unto them, Is it lawful to do good on the sabbath days, or to do evil? to save life, or to kill? But they held their peace.   

[But they held their peace.] This reminds me of the like carriage of the Sanhedrim in judging a servant of king Jannaeus, a murderer, when Jannaeus himself was present in the Sanhedrim. It was found sufficiently that he was guilty; but, for fear, they dared not to utter their opinion; when Simeon Ben Sheta, president of the Sanhedrim, required it: " He looked on his right hand, and they fixed their eyes upon the earth; on his left hand, and they fixed their eyes upon the earth," etc.

Lightfoot: Mar 3:17 - Boanerges And James the son of Zebedee, and John the brother of James; and he surnamed them Boanerges, which is, The sons of thunder:   [Boanerge...

And James the son of Zebedee, and John the brother of James; and he surnamed them Boanerges, which is, The sons of thunder:   

[Boanerges.] I. See what Beza saith here. To which our very learned Hugh Broughton, a man very well exercised in these studies, replies: "The Jews to this very day pronounce Scheva by oa; as Noabhyim for Nebhyim. So Boanerges. When Theodore Beza will have it written Benerges; the very Jews themselves will defend our gospel."  

Certainly, it is somewhat hard and bold to accuse the Scripture of St. Mark as corrupt for this manner of pronunciation, when, among the Jews, the pronouncing of some letters, vowels, and words was so different and indifferent, that they pronounced one way in Galilee, another way in Samaria, and another way in Judea. "And I remember (saith the famous Ludovicus de Dieu), that I heard the excellent Erpenius say, that he had it from the mouth of a very learned Maronite, that it could not be taught by any grammatical rules, and hardly by word of mouth, what sound Scheva hath among the Syrians."   

That castle of noted fame which is called Masada in Josephus, Pliny, Solinus, and others in Strabo is Moasada; very agreeable to this our sound: They shew some scorched rocks about 'Moasada.' Where, without all controversy, he speaks of Masada.   

II. There is a controversy also about the word erges; it is obscure, in what manner it is applied to thunder. But give me your judgment, courteous reader, what Rigsha is in this story: "The father of Samuel sat in the synagogue of Shaph, and Jathib, in Nehardea: the divine glory came; he heard the voice of 'Rigsha,' and went not out; the angels came, and he was affrighted."  

Of the word Rigsha; the Glossers say nothing. And we do not confidently render it thunder; nor yet do we well know how to render it better: if so be it doth not denote the sound as of a mighty rushing wind; Act 2:2; but let the reader judge.  

III. As obscure is the reason of the name imposed upon these two disciples, as the derivation of the word. We have only this certain in this business, that we never find them called by this name elsewhere. Christ called Simon Peter; and likewise others called him Peter; and he calls himself so. But you never find James called Boanerges; or John so called, either by themselves or by others. We must trust conjecture for the rest.  

IV. It is well enough known what the phrase Bath Kol, the daughter of thunder; means among the Jews. Our Saviour, using another word, seems to respect another etymology of the name. But it is demanded, what that is. He calls Simon Peter with respect had to the work he was to play in building the church of the Gentiles upon a rock. For he first opened the door to let in the gospel among the Gentiles. Whether were James and John called sons of thunder with respect had to their stout discoursing against the Jews, we neither dare to say, nor can we deny it. James did this, as it seems, to the loss of his life, Acts_12.  

But what if allusion be here made to the two registrars, or scribes of the Sanhedrim? whereof one sat on the right hand, and the other on the left; one wrote the votes of those that acquitted, the other the votes of those that condemned. Or to the president himself, and the vice-president? whose definitive sentence, summing up the votes of the whole Sanhedrim, was like thunder and lightning to the condemned persons, and seemed to all like the oracles given from Sinai out of lightning and thunder.  

V. But whatsoever that was in the mind of our Saviour, that moved him to imprint this name upon them, when these two brethren, above all the other disciples, would have fire fall from heaven upon that town of the Samaritans which refused to give Christ entertainment, Luk 9:54; they seem to act according to the sense of this surname. And when the mother of these desired a place for one of them on Christ's right hand, and for the other on his left, she took the confidence of such a request probably from this, that Christ had set so honourable a name upon them above the other disciples. And when John himself calls himself the elder; and he was sufficiently known to those to whom he writ under that bare title, the elder; I cannot but suspect this distinguishing character arose hence. All the apostles, indeed, were elders; which Peter saith of himself, 1Pe 5:1; but I ask, whether any of the twelve, besides this our apostle (his brother James being now dead), could be known to those that were absent under this title, the elder; by a proper, not additional name, as he is in his two latter Epistles.

Lightfoot: Mar 3:21 - He is beside himself And when his friends heard of it; they went out to lay hold on him: for they said, He is beside himself.   [He is beside himself.] In t...

And when his friends heard of it; they went out to lay hold on him: for they said, He is beside himself.   

[He is beside himself.] In the Talmudists it is his judgment is gone; and his understanding is ceased. "If any becomes mute, and yet is of a sound mind; and they say to him, Shall we write a bill of divorce for thy wife? And he nods with his head, they try him thrice, etc. And it is necessary that they make trial of him more exactly, lest, perhaps, he might be deprived of his senses." This is to be understood of a dumb person, made so by some paralytical or apoplectical stroke, which sometimes wounds the understanding.  

"The Rabbins deliver: If any one is sick, and in the mean time any of his friends die, they do not make it known to him that such a one is dead, lest his understanding be disturbed." "One thus lamented R. Simeon Ben Lachish; 'Where art thou, O Bar Lachish? Where art thou, O Bar Lachish?' And so cried out until his understanding perished." For so the Gloss renders it.  

How fitly this word beside himself expresseth these phrases is readily observed by him who understandeth both languages. And a Jew, reading these words in Mark, would presently have recourse to the sense of those phrases in his nation; which do not always signify madness; or being bereft of one's wits, in the proper sense, but sometimes, and very frequently, some discomposure of the understanding for the present, from some too vehement passion. So say Christ's friends, " His knowledge is snatched away; he hath forgotten himself, and his own health; he is so vehement and hot in discharging his office, and in preaching, that he is transported beyond himself, and his understanding is disturbed, that he neither takes care of his necessary food nor of his sleep." Those his friends, indeed, have need of an apology, that they had no sounder, nor holier, nor wiser conceit of him; but it is scarcely credible that they thought him to be fallen into plain and absolute madness, and pure distraction. For he had conversed among the multitudes before, at all times in all places; and yet his friends to not say this of him. But now he was retired to his own house at Capernaum, where he might justly expect rest and repose; yet the multitudes rush upon him there, so that he could not enjoy his table and his bed at his own home. Therefore his friends and kinsfolk of Nazareth (among whom was his mother, Mar 3:31), hearing this, unanimously run to him to get him away from the multitude; for they said among themselves, He is too much transported beyond himself, and is forgetful of himself.

Haydock: Mar 3:1 - He entered again into the synagogue He entered again into the synagogue, viz. of Capharnaum. The man was there either, of course, on account of the sabbath, or to be cured by Jesus Chr...

He entered again into the synagogue, viz. of Capharnaum. The man was there either, of course, on account of the sabbath, or to be cured by Jesus Christ.

Haydock: Mar 3:4 - -- A difficulty here arises, how to reconcile St. Mark with St. Matthew. St. Mark puts the words into the mouth of Jesus Christ: Is it lawful? When S...

A difficulty here arises, how to reconcile St. Mark with St. Matthew. St. Mark puts the words into the mouth of Jesus Christ: Is it lawful? When St. Matthew says, that they interrogated him: Is it lawful? To cut the knot of this apparent difficulty, we must understand that they first put the question to our Lord, whether it was lawful to heal on the sabbath-day or not: and that Jesus understanding their thoughts, that they wished to have some grounds of accusation against him, placed the sick man in the midst of them, and said what St. Mark here relates of him: Is it lawful to do good on the sabbath-day, or to do evil? (St. Augustine)

Haydock: Mar 3:8 - -- What is to be understood by Idumea, see Rutter's Evangelical Harmony, Vol. i. p. 286.

What is to be understood by Idumea, see Rutter's Evangelical Harmony, Vol. i. p. 286.

Haydock: Mar 3:11-12 - -- The unclean spirits being obliged by the Divine Power, not only to come and worship, but also to declare his majesty, exclaimed: Thou art the Son of ...

The unclean spirits being obliged by the Divine Power, not only to come and worship, but also to declare his majesty, exclaimed: Thou art the Son of God. How astonishing then is the blindness of the Arians, who even after his resurrection denied him to be the Son of God, whom the devils confessed as such when clothed with human nature. But it is certain that not only the devils, but the infirm that were healed, and the apostles themselves were forbidden, as well as the unclean spirits, to proclaim his divinity; lest the passion and death of Christ might be on that account deferred. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Mar 3:13 - -- He spent here the whole night in prayer, not that he who had all things to bestow, stood in need of prayer, or had any thing to ask; but to teach us t...

He spent here the whole night in prayer, not that he who had all things to bestow, stood in need of prayer, or had any thing to ask; but to teach us that we must undertake nothing without previously recommending the affair to heaven, in humble and fervent prayer.

Haydock: Mar 3:14 - -- The number twelve is mystical, as appeareth by choosing Mathias to full up the place of Judas: they are the twelve foundations, under Christ, of the h...

The number twelve is mystical, as appeareth by choosing Mathias to full up the place of Judas: they are the twelve foundations, under Christ, of the heavenly Jerusalem. (Apocalypse xxi.)

Haydock: Mar 3:15 - -- He gave his apostles the power of curing maladies both of soul and body, and of expelling devils, that they might prove the truth of their doctrines b...

He gave his apostles the power of curing maladies both of soul and body, and of expelling devils, that they might prove the truth of their doctrines by the authority of miracles. (Bible de Vence)

Haydock: Mar 3:16 - -- The evangelist here gives the names of the twelve. First, Simon, to whom he gave the name of Peter, in Greek, Petron, which signifies a rock; thus ...

The evangelist here gives the names of the twelve. First, Simon, to whom he gave the name of Peter, in Greek, Petron, which signifies a rock; thus shewing that upon him his Church should be founded, as on a rock, never to be overturned. (Tirinus) ---

Polus, in his Synopsis Criticorum on this verse says that some Greek copies have, Proton Simona, First, Simon, which he believes to be the genuine reading: "nec dubito quin hæc sit germana lectio."

Haydock: Mar 3:17 - And // Boanerges And he called James, &c. The words, he called, are no addition, as they only express the literal sense: they are included in what is said, ver. ...

And he called James, &c. The words, he called, are no addition, as they only express the literal sense: they are included in what is said, ver. 13, that he called to him whom he would. ---

Boanerges, the sons of thunder, or thunderers, is only to express their great zeal. (Witham) ---

He gave also the two sons of Zebedee the name of Boanerges, ( Greek: Boanerges ) from the Syriac, Benairegesch; or the Hebrew, Bene, sons, regesch, thunder, noise or tumult. In conformity to their name, we find these two apostles asking Jesus, (Luke ix. 54.) wilt thou that we command fire to come down from heaven, to consume them? They spread the fame of the gospel through the whole world. So great was the zeal of St. James, that he incurred the resentment of king Agrippa, and was the first of the apostles to seal the doctrines of Jesus Christ with his blood. St. John also fulfilled the import of his name, as appears form his gospel, epistles, apocalypse, and the sufferings he underwent at Rome for the faith. Sts. Peter, James, and John, were the only apostles to whom our Saviour gave particular names, a mark, perhaps, of his special affection for them. (Tirinus)

Haydock: Mar 3:21 - And when his friends had heard of it // For they said // He is become mad And when his friends had heard of it; [1] literally, his own. We cannot here understand his apostles, for they were in the house with him; but eith...

And when his friends had heard of it; [1] literally, his own. We cannot here understand his apostles, for they were in the house with him; but either some of his kindred and friends, or some that were of the same country and town of Nazareth, though perhaps enemies to him. ---

For they said. It is not certain who said this, whether his friends or his adversaries. ---

He is become mad. [2] By the Greek, he is not himself. Christ might be called a madman by the Scribes and Pharisees, when he blamed their vices and when he preached with such extraordinary zeal. Or, as the Greek implies, he was thought to be transported out of his wits, and , as the Protestant translation hath it, was beside himself. If there were his friends that said this of him, they did not think so, but only pretended it, that they might get him safe out of the hands of his adversaries. (Witham)

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Sui, Greek: oi par autou.

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

In furorem versus est, Greek: exeste; the word Greek: existasthai, is extra se esse, from which cometh the word ecstacy. See 2 Corinthians v. 13, where St. Paul useth the same Greek word.

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Haydock: Mar 3:22 - -- From St. Matthew xii. 22. et dein. we learn that it was on the occasion of the delivery of a possessed person, this blasphemy was uttered.

From St. Matthew xii. 22. et dein. we learn that it was on the occasion of the delivery of a possessed person, this blasphemy was uttered.

Haydock: Mar 3:24 - Kingdom against kingdom Kingdom against kingdom. As this is true in all kingdoms and states where civil dissensions obtaineth, so it is especially verified in heresies and ...

Kingdom against kingdom. As this is true in all kingdoms and states where civil dissensions obtaineth, so it is especially verified in heresies and heretics which have always divisions among themselves, as a punishment for their abandoning the Church, the pillar and ground of truth, the only centre of peace and unity.

Haydock: Mar 3:29 - Of an everlasting sin See St. Matthew xii. 32. --- Of an everlasting sin; i.e. of eternal punishment. (Witham) --- What is here called everlasting offence, is (as St. ...

See St. Matthew xii. 32. ---

Of an everlasting sin; i.e. of eternal punishment. (Witham) ---

What is here called everlasting offence, is (as St. Matthew expresseth it) that which shall neither be remitted in this life, nor in the life to come; which words would not be true, says St. Augustine, if some sins were not forgiven in the world to come. Now, as no mortal sin can be forgiven after death, there must necessarily be smaller transgressions, which we call venial; though many of our separated brethren will needs have all sins to be mortal; which is very far from a comfortable tenet.

Haydock: Mar 3:32 - -- The brethren of our Lord were not the children of the blessed Virgin: nor were they the sons of St. Joseph by a former wife, as some pretend; but in t...

The brethren of our Lord were not the children of the blessed Virgin: nor were they the sons of St. Joseph by a former wife, as some pretend; but in the Scripture language, and in this place, we understand by brethren the relatives of Mary and Joseph. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Mar 3:33 - -- Our Lord does not refuse to go out through any, the least, inattention to his mother; he wishes hereby, to teach us the preference we should give to t...

Our Lord does not refuse to go out through any, the least, inattention to his mother; he wishes hereby, to teach us the preference we should give to the business of our heavenly Father, before that of our earthly parents. Neither does he consider his brethren as beneath his attention, but prefers spiritual before temporal duties; and shews us, that a religious union of hearts and feelings is far more lasting, and better rooted than any other ties of affinity or friendship whatsoever. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Mar 3:34 - -- The Pharisees were afraid lest the greatness of Christ's miracles, and the excellence of his doctrines, should put an end to their credit and authorit...

The Pharisees were afraid lest the greatness of Christ's miracles, and the excellence of his doctrines, should put an end to their credit and authority among the people. Hence their calumnies against him.

Gill: Mar 3:1 - And he entered again into the synagogue // And there was a man there which had a withered hand And he entered again into the synagogue,.... Perhaps in Capernaum, where he had before cast out the unclean spirit; but not on the same day, nor on th...

And he entered again into the synagogue,.... Perhaps in Capernaum, where he had before cast out the unclean spirit; but not on the same day, nor on that day he had had the debate with the Pharisees, about his disciples plucking the ears of corn on the sabbath day; but on another sabbath, perhaps the next; see Luk 6:6.

And there was a man there which had a withered hand; who came there either for a cure, knowing Christ to be in the synagogue, or for the sake of worship; See Gill on Mat 12:10.

Gill: Mar 3:2 - And they watched him // whether he would heal him on the sabbath day // that they might accuse him And they watched him,.... The ruler of the synagogue, and the principal men in it; particularly the Scribes and Pharisees, who followed him wherever h...

And they watched him,.... The ruler of the synagogue, and the principal men in it; particularly the Scribes and Pharisees, who followed him wherever he went; they observed him diligently, and kept their eyes upon him; this lame man being in the synagogue, to see

whether he would heal him on the sabbath day; which, knowing his readiness to do good, they might expect he would:

that they might accuse him; as they had accused his disciples before, of the violation of the sabbath: according to the Evangelist Matthew, they put a question to him, whether it was lawful to heal on the sabbath day? with this view, that they might, one way or another, have something to accuse him of, either to the people, or to the sanhedrim; See Gill on Mat 12:10.

Gill: Mar 3:3 - And he saith unto the man which had the withered hand // stand forth And he saith unto the man which had the withered hand,.... After he had reasoned with them from the lesser to the greater, upon their own principles a...

And he saith unto the man which had the withered hand,.... After he had reasoned with them from the lesser to the greater, upon their own principles and practices, in relieving and taking out a sheep fallen into a ditch, on a sabbath day, Mat 12:10, and knowing "their thoughts", as Luke says, Luk 6:8, their reasonings and designs; and as the Persic version here, from thence "understanding their conspiracy", turns himself to the lame man, and bids him

stand forth: or, as in Luke, "rise up and stand forth in the midst", Luk 6:8. He bid him rise up from his seat, and stand forth in the midst of the synagogue: this he said, partly to raise the attention of the people to the following miracle; and partly to move commiseration upon the sight of the object; and to aggravate the hard heartedness of the Pharisees; as also, that it might be manifest to all, that the man's hand was really withered; and that there was no fraud in the following cure.

Gill: Mar 3:4 - And he saith unto them // is it lawful to do good on the sabbath days, or to do evil, to save life, or to kill // but they held their peace And he saith unto them,.... Either to the whole multitude, to all the assembly in the synagogue; and so the Persic version renders it, "again he said ...

And he saith unto them,.... Either to the whole multitude, to all the assembly in the synagogue; and so the Persic version renders it, "again he said to the multitude"; or rather, to the Scribes and Pharisees, who were watching him, and had put a question to him, which he answers by another:

is it lawful to do good on the sabbath days, or to do evil, to save life, or to kill? The Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Arabic, and Persic versions read, or "to destroy", as in Luk 6:9, To do evil, kill, or destroy, are not lawful at any time; and to do good, and to save life, must be right at all times: our Lord has a particular view to the Scribes and Pharisees, and the question is put home to their own consciences; whose hearts and thoughts, designs and views, were all open to Christ; and who were now watching to do evil to him, and even to destroy and take away his life: for the violation of the sabbath was death by the law, and this was what they sought to accuse him of: now he puts the question to them, and makes them judges which must appear most right and just in the sight of God and men, for him to heal this poor man of his withered hand, though on the sabbath day; which would be doing a good and beneficent action to him, whereby his life would be saved, and preserved with comfort and usefulness, and he would be in a capacity of getting his livelihood; or for them to cherish an evil intention against him, to seek to bring mischief on him; and not only destroy his character and usefulness as much as in them lay, but even take away his very life also: he leaves it with them to consider of which was most agreeable to the law of God, the nature of a sabbath, and the good of mankind;

but they held their peace; or "were silent", not being able to return an answer, but what must have been in his favour, and to their own confusion, and therefore chose to say nothing.

Gill: Mar 3:5 - And when he had looked round about on them // with anger // being grieved for the hardness of their hearts // he saith unto the man, stretch forth thine hand // and he stretched it out, and his hand was restored whole as the other And when he had looked round about on them,.... In the several parts of the synagogue; for there were many of them on every side of him; which he migh...

And when he had looked round about on them,.... In the several parts of the synagogue; for there were many of them on every side of him; which he might do, to observe their countenances, which might justly fall, upon such a close question put to them, and what answer they would return to him: and his look upon them was

with anger, with a stern countenance, which showed indignation at them, though without sin, or any desire of revenge, for the evil they were meditating against him; for at the same time he had pity and compassion for them,

being grieved for the hardness of their hearts: or "the blindness of their hearts", as the Vulgate Latin, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions render it; being troubled in his human soul, both at their inhumanity and cruelty to a miserable object, whose cure, in their opinion, would have been a breach of the sabbath; and to himself, having a malicious design against him, should he perform it; and at their stupidity and ignorance of the law of God, the nature and design of the sabbath, and of their duty to God, and their fellow creatures: wherefore as one not to be intimidated by their evil designs against him, or prevented thereby from doing good,

he saith unto the man, stretch forth thine hand; that is, the lame one; and such power went along with his words, as at once effected a cure:

and he stretched it out, and his hand was restored whole as the other. This last clause, "whole as the other", is not in the Vulgate Latin, nor in the Syriac, Arabic, Persic, and Ethiopic versions; and may be added from Mat 12:13; see the note there; since it is wanting in the Alexandrian copy, and in Beza's most ancient copy, and in others.

Gill: Mar 3:6 - And the Pharisees went forth // and straightway took counsel with the Herodians against him // How they might destroy him And the Pharisees went forth,.... Out of the synagogue, being dreadfully galled with the reasonings of Christ, at the silence and confusion they were ...

And the Pharisees went forth,.... Out of the synagogue, being dreadfully galled with the reasonings of Christ, at the silence and confusion they were put to, and with the miracle he wrought, to the exposing of them, and establishing his own credit:

and straightway took counsel with the Herodians against him: See Gill on Mat 22:16.

How they might destroy him: persisting still in their evil intentions, though Christ had so fully and clearly exposed the wickedness of them: and it is to be observed, that those men who thought it was not lawful to heal a lame man on the sabbath day, yet make no scruple of meeting and consulting together on that day, and even with profane men, what measures and methods were best to take, to destroy the life of an innocent person.

Gill: Mar 3:7 - But Jesus withdrew himself with his disciples to the sea // and a great multitude from Galilee // and from Judea But Jesus withdrew himself with his disciples to the sea,.... Knowing their evil designs against him, he departed out of the synagogue, and city of Ca...

But Jesus withdrew himself with his disciples to the sea,.... Knowing their evil designs against him, he departed out of the synagogue, and city of Capernaum; and taking his disciples with him, he went to the shore of the sea of Galilee; not out of fear, but because his time was not yet come, and he had more work to do:

and a great multitude from Galilee: from the several parts of it, in which country he now was:

and from Judea: that part of the land of Israel, which was particularly so called, and belonged to the tribe of Judah.

Gill: Mar 3:8 - And from Jerusalem // and from Idumea // and from beyond Jordan // and they about Tyre and Sidon // a great multitude // when they had heard what great things he did, came unto him And from Jerusalem,.... The metropolis of the country of Judea; and from Idumea, or Edom, as the Syriac version reads it; a country that lay on the...

And from Jerusalem,.... The metropolis of the country of Judea;

and from Idumea, or Edom, as the Syriac version reads it; a country that lay on the south of Judea, formerly inhabited by the sons of Edom, but now by Jews; or at least the inhabitants of it were proselytes to the Jewish religion. Mention is made of the plains of Idumea, along with Gazera, Azotus, and Jamnia, as in 1 Maccabees:

"Howbeit all the hindmost of them were slain with the sword: for they pursued them unto Gazera, and unto the plains of Idumea, and Azotus, and Jamnia, so that there were slain of them upon a three thousand men.'' (1 Maccabees 4:15)

Pliny t speaks of Idumea and Judea together, as a part of Syria; and Ptolemy says u, this country lies on the west of the river Jordan; and it is here added,

and from beyond Jordan; the country of Peraea, on the east of Jordan:

and they about Tyre and Sidon; either the inhabitants of these places, as the Syriac, Arabic, Persic, and Ethiopic versions favour, reading "a great company from Tyre and Sidon"; or those that lived near the borders, and upon the confines of these cities of Phoenicia:

a great multitude; when all met together, from these several parts; who

when they had heard what great things he did, came unto him: for his fame went through all the countries, for the miracles he wrought; which drew this vast concourse of people after him; and who, inquiring where he was, came to him at the sea of Galilee.

Gill: Mar 3:9 - And he spake unto his disciples // that a small ship should wait on him // because of the multitude // lest they should throng him And he spake unto his disciples,.... In an authoritative way; he ordered and commanded them, that a small ship should wait on him: that a boat shou...

And he spake unto his disciples,.... In an authoritative way; he ordered and commanded them,

that a small ship should wait on him: that a boat should be got ready, be near at hand, and attend him, who was on shore; that he might go into it, should there be any occasion for it; and from thence preach to the people:

because of the multitude; which came from the above parts, and all together made a very numerous body of people:

lest they should throng him; crowd, press, afflict, and distress, and make him uneasy, that he could not be able to stand conveniently, and preach to them: so that should this be the case, as it was very likely it would, having a small vessel near the shore, he could go into it, and free himself from such an inconvenience.

Gill: Mar 3:10 - For he had healed many // insomuch that they pressed upon him // for to touch him // As many as had plagues For he had healed many,.... Of various diseases, and the fame of this brought more still to him: insomuch that they pressed upon him; or pushed upo...

For he had healed many,.... Of various diseases, and the fame of this brought more still to him:

insomuch that they pressed upon him; or pushed upon him, with great eagerness and violence. The Arabic version renders it, "they rushed upon him, so that they fell": they pushed on, and pressed so hard to get to him, that they fell upon one another, and on him: the Persic version renders it, "they cast themselves on him, for the sake of touching him"; which must be very troublesome indeed. Though some think the phrase signifies no more, than that they fell down before him at his feet, in a submissive and petitionary way, entreating they might have the favour

for to touch him; either any part of his body, or his garments, even the hem of them: and so the Ethiopic version translates the words; "they prayed him that they might touch him"; see Mar 6:56.

As many as had plagues; of leprosy, and other diseases, which were inflicted on them by God, as scourges and chastisements for their sins, as the word signifies, and which answers to נגעים, "Negaim"; concerning which, there is a whole treatise in the Misna; and which bears that name, and particularly regards the plagues of leprosy. Some versions join this with the beginning of the next verse. The Syriac version reads thus, "who had plagues of unclean spirits"; as if these plagues were their being possessed by unclean spirits. The Persic version thus, "having plagues from unclean spirits"; as if these plagues were inflicted upon them by them, and which was sometimes the case. The Arabic version after this manner, "who had diseases and unclean spirits"; both the one and the other.

Gill: Mar 3:11 - And unclean spirits, when they saw him // fell down before him // and // cried, saying, thou art the Son of God And unclean spirits, when they saw him,.... That is, as the Syriac and Arabic versions read, "they who had unclean spirits": or, as the Ethiopic, "the...

And unclean spirits, when they saw him,.... That is, as the Syriac and Arabic versions read, "they who had unclean spirits": or, as the Ethiopic, "they that were possessed with unclean spirits"; as soon as ever they beheld Christ, though they had never seen him before, and he was an entire stranger to them, yet

fell down before him: the unclean spirits being said to do that, which they that were possessed with them did; and which, notwithstanding their possession of them, they could not prevent, but were obliged to admit of it, as a token of their subjection to Christ:

and even the devils themselves in the men,

cried, saying, thou art the Son of God; a divine person, equal with God; and such his power over them, and his healing all manner of diseases, by a word, or touch, showed him to be.

Gill: Mar 3:12 - And he straitly charged them // that they should not make him known And he straitly charged them,.... Or vehemently rebuked them, as the Syriac and Arabic versions render it; or threatened them much and vehemently, as ...

And he straitly charged them,.... Or vehemently rebuked them, as the Syriac and Arabic versions render it; or threatened them much and vehemently, as the Vulgate Latin and Ethiopic. The Persic version renders it, "threatened many"; both the devils that confessed him, and the many that were healed of their diseases: he gave them a strict and severe charge,

that they should not make him known; or "his work", as the Arabic, his miracles: he sought not vain glory and popular applause, nor did he need the testimony of men or devils; and especially did not choose the latter, lest his enemies should traduce him, as having familiarity with them, as they did.

Gill: Mar 3:13 - And he goeth up into a mountain // and calleth unto him whom he would // and they came unto him And he goeth up into a mountain,.... Near Capernaum, being solitary, and a place of recess and retirement, "to pray", as Luke says, Luk 6:12, who adds...

And he goeth up into a mountain,.... Near Capernaum, being solitary, and a place of recess and retirement, "to pray", as Luke says, Luk 6:12, who adds, "and continued all night in prayer to God", notwithstanding the great fatigue of the day past. His prayer, as is very probable, was chiefly concerning the great and important work, which was upon his mind, and he was about to do; the making and constituting twelve of his disciples, as his apostles, to preach in his name, and work miracles:

and calleth unto him whom he would; that is, "when it was day", as the above evangelist observes; when he called his disciples, such as had been for some time followers of him, as many of them as he thought fit: for it seems by the same evangelist, that others were called to him besides the twelve; and out of them he chose them: the phrase "whom he would", is in the Arabic version rendered, "whom he loved"; and it is a common observation of expositors, that the choice and call of the apostles to office, were not according to their will, works and merits, but according to the sovereign will and grace of Christ, who chose them, and not they him: but to me there seems no foundation for such a remark here, though it is a truth; because this regards not the call of the twelve only, and much less of them to office, but a call of many of the followers of Christ to come to him on the mountain:

and they came unto him; as many as he called out of the multitude; and from among these he made the following choice.

Gill: Mar 3:14 - And he ordained twelve // That they should be with him // and that he might send them forth to preach And he ordained twelve,.... Or made, constituted, and appointed twelve men, out of those he called to him. The Arabic version adds, "and called them a...

And he ordained twelve,.... Or made, constituted, and appointed twelve men, out of those he called to him. The Arabic version adds, "and called them apostles"; which seems to be taken out of Luk 6:13.

That they should be with him; constantly, in private and in public; be taken into his family, and reckoned such; be his familiars, and privy to all his affairs; hear all his discourses, and see his miracles; that so they might be trained up and fitted for the great work he designed them for:

and that he might send them forth to preach; the Gospel in Judea first, and then in all the world: for he did not at this time send them to preach, only chose; called, and appointed them; and after they had been with him some time, and were better qualified for such service, he sent them forth, as in Mat 10:1, for this constitution of them was before that mission, and was in order to it.

Gill: Mar 3:15 - And to have power to heal sicknesses // and to cast out devils And to have power to heal sicknesses,.... All manner of corporeal diseases that attend men and women: and to cast out devils; from such who were po...

And to have power to heal sicknesses,.... All manner of corporeal diseases that attend men and women:

and to cast out devils; from such who were possessed with them: that is, he chose and appointed them to be his apostles, with a view of conferring such powers upon them hereafter; for as yet, they were not vested with them, nor sent out to exercise them; no, not till near twelve months after.

Gill: Mar 3:16 - And Simon he surnamed Peter. And Simon he surnamed Peter. Or Cephas, which signifies a rock, or stone, because of his courage and constancy, his strength and fortitude, steadiness...

And Simon he surnamed Peter. Or Cephas, which signifies a rock, or stone, because of his courage and constancy, his strength and fortitude, steadiness and firmness of mind: this name was imposed upon him, not at the time of his mission as an apostle; nor when he made that noble confession of his faith in Christ, as the Son of the living God, at which time this name was taken notice of; but when Christ first called him to be his disciple and apostle; see Joh 1:42.

Gill: Mar 3:17 - And James the son of Zebedee, and John the brother of James // and he surnamed them Boanerges, which is, the sons of thunder And James the son of Zebedee, and John the brother of James,.... These are mentioned next, as being first called after Peter and Andrew: and he sur...

And James the son of Zebedee, and John the brother of James,.... These are mentioned next, as being first called after Peter and Andrew:

and he surnamed them Boanerges, which is, the sons of thunder: either because of their loud and sonorous voice; or their warm zeal for Christ, and fervency in their ministry: or for their courage in opposing the enemies of Christ, and the power that went along with their words; which either put to confusion and silence, or issued in conviction and conversion. The Syriac version reads, "Benai Regesh", and the Persic, "Beni Reg'sch". The Jews, as our learned countryman Mr. Broughton has observed w, sometimes pronounce "Scheva" by on, as Noabyim", for "Nebyim"; so here, "Boanerges" for Benereges", or "Benerges". There is a city which was in the tribe of Dan, mentioned in Jos 19:45, which is called "Bene-berak, the sons of lightning"; and is spoken of in the Jewish x writings, as a place where several of the Rabbins met, and conversed together: the reason of this name may be inquired after.

Gill: Mar 3:18 - And Andrew // and Philip // and Bartholomew // and Matthew // and Thomas // and James, the son of Alphaeus // and Thaddaeus // and Simon the Canaanite And Andrew,.... The brother of Peter; and Philip, who was of Bethsaida; and Bartholomew, whom Dr. Lightfoot thinks is the same with Nathaniel: t...

And Andrew,.... The brother of Peter;

and Philip, who was of Bethsaida;

and Bartholomew, whom Dr. Lightfoot thinks is the same with Nathaniel: the name may be the same with בר תלמיון, "Bar Talmion", with the Jews y; See Gill on Mat 10:3. See Gill on Joh 1:41.

and Matthew, the publican, who was called Levi;

and Thomas, who was called Didymus, from his being a twin;

and James, the son of Alphaeus, to distinguish him from the other James, the son of Zebedee, and who is sometimes called "the less";

and Thaddaeus, whose name was also Lebbaeus, and likewise Jude, the author of the Epistle that bears that name;

and Simon the Canaanite, or Zelotes; of these men, and their several names; see Gill on Mat 10:2. See Gill on Mat 10:3. See Gill on Mat 10:4.

Gill: Mar 3:19 - And Judas Iscariot // which also betrayed him // And they went into an house at Capernaum And Judas Iscariot,.... So called to distinguish him from the other Judas; and is mentioned last for the following reason: which also betrayed him;...

And Judas Iscariot,.... So called to distinguish him from the other Judas; and is mentioned last for the following reason:

which also betrayed him; and which action of his will ever render his name infamous among men. This man, with the rest, our Lord chose to be an apostle of his, though he knew he would betray him; in order to fulfil the purposes of God, the prophecies of the Old Testament, and bring on the work of man's redemption he came into the world to perform.

And they went into an house at Capernaum; the house of Simon and Andrew, where Jesus used to be when there: they went home with him from the mountain; and from that time became his domestics, and were looked upon by him as his family, and were admitted to the greatest nearness and intimacy with him.

Gill: Mar 3:20 - And the multitude coming together again // so that they could not so much as eat bread And the multitude coming together again,.... Either the multitude that were about the door of this house; insomuch that there was no room about, nor a...

And the multitude coming together again,.... Either the multitude that were about the door of this house; insomuch that there was no room about, nor any coming near it, Mar 2:2, or the multitude that came from different parts, and had thronged about him at the sea side, before he went up into the mountain: these understanding that he was come down from thence, and was returned to Capernaum, and was at Simon's house, flocked thither, in great numbers, to see his person, hear his doctrines, and observe his miracles;

so that they could not so much as eat bread; the press was so great, and their importunities so urgent, either to hear him preach, or have their sick healed, that Christ, and his disciples, had neither room nor opportunity to eat some food for the refreshment of nature; though it was very necessary, and high time they had, especially Christ, who had been up all night, which he had spent in prayer; and had been very busy that morning in calling and appointing his apostles, and instructing them what they should do.

Gill: Mar 3:21 - When his friends heard of it // they went out to lay hold on him // for they said, he is beside himself When his friends heard of it,.... Not his spiritual friends, his disciples and followers, that believed in him; but his kinsmen, as the Syriac and Eth...

When his friends heard of it,.... Not his spiritual friends, his disciples and followers, that believed in him; but his kinsmen, as the Syriac and Ethiopic versions render the words, who were so according to the flesh; when they heard where he was, and what a crowd was about him, so that he could not so much as take the necessaries of life for his refreshment and support,

they went out to lay hold on him: either out of their houses at Capernaum, or they went forth from Nazareth, where they dwelt, to Capernaum, to take him from this house, where he was thronged and pressed, along with them; where he might have some refreshment without being incommoded, and take some rest, which seemed very necessary: so that this was done in kindness to him, and does not design any violent action upon him, in order to take him home with them, and to confine him as a madman; though the following words seem to incline to such a sense;

for they said, he is beside himself: some render it, "he is gone out": that is, out of doors, to preach again to the people, which they might fear would be greatly detrimental to his health, since, he had had no sleep the night before; had been much fatigued all that morning, and for the throng of the people could take no food; so that for this reason they came to take him with them, to their own habitations, to prevent the ill consequences of such constant exercise without refreshment. Moreover, though this may not be the sense of the word, yet it is not to be understood of downright madness and distraction, but of some perturbation of mind, which they imagined, or heard, he was under; and answers to a phrase frequently used by the Jews, that such an one, נטרפה דעתו, "his knowledge is snatched away", or his mind is disturbed; which was sometimes occasioned by disorder of body: so it is said z,

"a deaf woman, or one that is foolish, or blind, דעתה ושנטרפה, or "whose mind is disturbed"; and if there are any wise women, they prepare themselves, and eat of the oblation.''

On that phrase, "whose mind is disturbed", the note of Maimonides is,

"it means a sick person, whose understanding is disturbed through the force of the disease:''

and was sometimes the case of a person when near death a: and it was usual to give a person that was condemned to die, and going to be executed, a grain of frankincense in a cup of wine, שתטרף דעתו כדי, "that so his knowledge may be snatched away", or his mind disturbed b, and: be intoxicated; that so he might not be sensible of his pain, or feel his misery; in all which cases, there was nothing of proper madness: and so the kinsmen and friends of Christ, having heard of the situation that he was in, said one to another, he is in a transport and excess of mind; his zeal carries him beyond due bounds; he has certainly forgotten himself; his understanding is disturbed; he is unmindful of himself; takes no care of his health; he will certainly greatly impair it, if he goes on at this rate, praying all night, and preaching all day, without taking any rest or food: wherefore they came out, in order to dissuade him from such excessive labours, and engage him to go with them, where he might have rest and refreshment, and be composed, and retire.

Gill: Mar 3:22 - And the Scribes which came down from Jerusalem // said, he hath Beelzebub // and by the prince of devils casteth he out devils And the Scribes which came down from Jerusalem,.... Or, "but the Scribes", &c. who had an aversion to Christ, and a different opinion of him: these we...

And the Scribes which came down from Jerusalem,.... Or, "but the Scribes", &c. who had an aversion to Christ, and a different opinion of him: these were they, who having heard much of the doctrine and miracles of Christ, came down from Jerusalem, which lay in the upper, and higher part of the land of Israel, into Galilee, a low country, to make their observations upon him; and take every advantage they could against him, being men, in their way, letter learned, and artful, and cunning: these

said, he hath Beelzebub: or, as the Syriac and Persic versions render it, "Beelzebub is in him": sometimes they call him Beelzebub; sometimes say that he cast out devils by him; and here, that he had him, or was in him; Beelzebub possessed him, and assisted him, and there was a confederacy and familiarity between them:

and by the prince of devils casteth he out devils; for so they reckoned Beelzebub to be; See Gill on Mat 10:25, Mat 12:24.

Gill: Mar 3:23 - And he called them unto him // and said unto them in parables // how can Satan cast out Satan And he called them unto him,.... The Jerusalem Scribes, to come nearer to him, and attend to what he had to say in defence of his character and miracl...

And he called them unto him,.... The Jerusalem Scribes, to come nearer to him, and attend to what he had to say in defence of his character and miracles:

and said unto them in parables: similitudes, and proverbial expressions, as the following seem to be,

how can Satan cast out Satan? or one devil cast out another? how unreasonable is it to suppose it? can it ever be thought that such, whose interest it is to unite, would ever oppose and dispossess one another? if therefore, as if he should say, I am Beelzebub, or have him, and he is in me, and I am in confederacy with him; was this the case, can any think I should ever cast him out of others, as I do?

Gill: Mar 3:24 - And if a kingdom be divided against itself // that kingdom cannot stand And if a kingdom be divided against itself,.... Any of the kingdoms of this world, and the kingdom of "Satan": that kingdom cannot stand: not long;...

And if a kingdom be divided against itself,.... Any of the kingdoms of this world, and the kingdom of "Satan":

that kingdom cannot stand: not long; its internal broils and divisions will, soon bring it to desolation; See Gill on Mat 12:25.

Gill: Mar 3:25 - And if a house be divided against itself // that house cannot stand And if a house be divided against itself,.... Any family, small or great, that house cannot stand; its contentions and discords will soon bring it ...

And if a house be divided against itself,.... Any family, small or great,

that house cannot stand; its contentions and discords will soon bring it down from a comfortable and flourishing situation, to a very distressed one; See Gill on Mat 12:25.

Gill: Mar 3:26 - And if Satan rise up against himself // and be divided // he cannot stand, but hath an end And if Satan rise up against himself,.... As he must do in such a case as this, if devils are cast out by Beelzebub, the prince of devils: and be d...

And if Satan rise up against himself,.... As he must do in such a case as this, if devils are cast out by Beelzebub, the prince of devils:

and be divided; one devil against another, as the above calumny supposes;

he cannot stand, but hath an end: his kingdom cannot stand long, but must soon come to an end; his power and authority will soon be destroyed, both over his own species, and among men; See Gill on Mat 12:26.

Gill: Mar 3:27 - No man can enter into a strong man's house No man can enter into a strong man's house,.... This is properly a parable; the other seem to be proverbs, or sayings, that were commonly used to show...

No man can enter into a strong man's house,.... This is properly a parable; the other seem to be proverbs, or sayings, that were commonly used to show the ill consequences of discords, factions, and divisions, as is explained in the note on See Gill on Mat 12:29.

Gill: Mar 3:28 - Verily I say unto you // all sins shall be forgiven unto the sons of men, and blasphemies wherewith soever they shall blaspheme Verily I say unto you,.... The Scribes and Pharisees, who had not only blasphemed him, but the Spirit of God also: all sins shall be forgiven unto ...

Verily I say unto you,.... The Scribes and Pharisees, who had not only blasphemed him, but the Spirit of God also:

all sins shall be forgiven unto the sons of men, and blasphemies wherewith soever they shall blaspheme; God; or the Son of God, angels, and men, and that through the blood of Christ, and when brought to a sense of the evil of them; for though pardon is procured before, it is not applied till then; See Gill on Mat 12:31.

Gill: Mar 3:29 - But he that shall blaspheme against the Holy Ghost // hath never forgiveness // but is in danger of eternal damnation But he that shall blaspheme against the Holy Ghost,.... Against his person, and the works performed by him, by ascribing them to diabolical power and ...

But he that shall blaspheme against the Holy Ghost,.... Against his person, and the works performed by him, by ascribing them to diabolical power and influence, as the Scribes did,

hath never forgiveness: there is no pardon provided in the covenant of grace, nor obtained by the blood of Christ for such persons, or ever applied to them by the Spirit;

but is in danger of eternal damnation. The Vulgate Latin reads it, and so it is read in an ancient copy of Beza's, guilty of an eternal sin; a sin which can never be blotted out, and will never be forgiven, but will be punished with everlasting destruction; See Gill on Mat 12:32.

Gill: Mar 3:30 - Because they, said, he hath an, unclean spirit. Because they, said, he hath an, unclean spirit. They charged Christ with having a devil, and his miracles with being wrought by the help of the devil;...

Because they, said, he hath an, unclean spirit. They charged Christ with having a devil, and his miracles with being wrought by the help of the devil; when, at the same time, they knew in their own consciences they were works which were wrought by the finger and Spirit of God, and so were guilty of the sin against the Holy Ghost; the unpardonable sin, for which there is no remission: and this is mentioned as a reason why our Lord said what he did concerning that sin; because they had been guilty of it, and so were liable to everlasting punishment on account of it.

Gill: Mar 3:31 - There came then his brethren and his mother // and standing without // sent unto him, calling him There came then his brethren and his mother,.... At the same time he was speaking to the Scribes, who seem to be different persons from his friends an...

There came then his brethren and his mother,.... At the same time he was speaking to the Scribes, who seem to be different persons from his friends and kinsmen, Mar 3:21,

and standing without; for Christ was within, in the house, talking with the Scribes and Pharisees, and preaching to the people; and the crowd being so great, that they could not get into the house; they

sent unto him, calling him: they not only sent one in to let him know who they were, and that they were without doors, desirous to speak with him; but also, with a voice as loud as they could, called to him themselves; See Gill on Mat 12:46.

Gill: Mar 3:32 - And the multitude sat about him // and they said unto him, behold, thy mother and thy brethren without seek for thee And the multitude sat about him,.... In a circle, all around him, to hear him preach; so that there was no such thing as the messenger coming near him...

And the multitude sat about him,.... In a circle, all around him, to hear him preach; so that there was no such thing as the messenger coming near him; but the message being whispered from one to another, it came to those who sat nearest him:

and they said unto him, behold, thy mother and thy brethren without seek for thee: in five of Beza's ancient copies, and in his most ancient one, are added, and thy sisters: agreeably, Christ hereafter makes mention of sister, as well as mother and brother; See Gill on Mat 12:47, and so it is read in the Alexandrian copy.

Gill: Mar 3:33 - And he answered them // saying, who is my mother, or my brethren And he answered them,.... The multitude that sat about him, and informed him of his mother and brethren being without, and desirous of speaking with h...

And he answered them,.... The multitude that sat about him, and informed him of his mother and brethren being without, and desirous of speaking with him:

saying, who is my mother, or my brethren? which is said not through ignorance or contempt, but either, as displeased with the interruption given him; or with a view to take an opportunity from hence of expressing his superior value to his spiritual relations; which looks with no favourable aspect on the superstitious notions, and veneration of the virgin Mary among the papists; See Gill on Mat 12:48.

Gill: Mar 3:34 - And he looked round about on them which sat about him // behold my mother and my brethren And he looked round about on them which sat about him,.... To find out his disciples among them, and point them out particularly, by stretching forth ...

And he looked round about on them which sat about him,.... To find out his disciples among them, and point them out particularly, by stretching forth his hand towards them: and said,

behold my mother and my brethren: not in a natural, but in a spiritual sense; his mother, because, in regeneration, he was formed in them; his brethren, because, by adoption, his God was their God, his Father their Father; See Gill on Mat 12:49.

Gill: Mar 3:35 - For whosoever shall do the will of God // the same is my brother, and my sister, and my mother For whosoever shall do the will of God,.... By believing in Christ, receiving him as a Saviour and Redeemer, and submitting to him in all his ordinanc...

For whosoever shall do the will of God,.... By believing in Christ, receiving him as a Saviour and Redeemer, and submitting to him in all his ordinances, as King of saints:

the same is my brother, and my sister, and my mother: such are openly, and manifestly related to Christ in a spiritual sense; and are as dear to him, and more so, than such persons are who stand in such a relation to others, or did to him according to the flesh. And this shows not only the near relation, and strong affection which Christ has for his people, but that he is not ashamed of them; and it may be concluded, that he will resent, in the keenest manner, every injury that is done them; See Gill on Mat 12:50.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Mar 3:1 Withered means the man’s hand was shrunken and paralyzed.

NET Notes: Mar 3:2 The background for this is the view that only if life was endangered should one attempt to heal on the Sabbath (see the Mishnah, m. Shabbat 6.3; 12.1;...

NET Notes: Mar 3:3 Most likely synagogues were arranged with benches along the walls and open space in the center for seating on the floor.

NET Notes: Mar 3:4 Grk “And.” Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the n...

NET Notes: Mar 3:5 The passive was restored points to healing by God. Now the question became: Would God exercise his power through Jesus, if what Jesus was doing were w...

NET Notes: Mar 3:6 Grk “destroy.”

NET Notes: Mar 3:7 The word “him” is not in the Greek text, but is implied. Direct objects were often omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

NET Notes: Mar 3:8 For location see Map1 A1; JP3 F3; JP4 F3.

NET Notes: Mar 3:9 Grk “they”; the referent (the crowd) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Mar 3:11 Unclean spirits refers to evil spirits.

NET Notes: Mar 3:12 Jesus did not permit the demons to make him known because the time for such disclosure was not yet at hand, and such a revelation would have certainly...

NET Notes: Mar 3:13 The expression up the mountain here may be idiomatic or generic, much like the English “he went to the hospital” (cf. 15:29), or even inte...

NET Notes: Mar 3:14 The phrase “whom he named apostles” is lacking in the majority of mss (A C2 [D] L Ë1 33 Ï latt sy). Several primary Alexandrian ...

NET Notes: Mar 3:16 In the various lists of the twelve, Simon (that is, Peter) is always mentioned first (see also Matt 10:1-4; Luke 6:13-16; Acts 1:13) and the first fou...

NET Notes: Mar 3:17 Grk “to James, the son of Zebedee, and John, the brother of James.”

NET Notes: Mar 3:18 Grk “the Cananean,” but according to both BDAG 507 s.v. Καναναῖος and L&N 11.88, this te...

NET Notes: Mar 3:19 Grk “who even betrayed him.”

NET Notes: Mar 3:20 Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Mar 3:21 The incident involving the religious leaders accusing Jesus of being in league with the devil (3:22-30) is sandwiched between Mark’s mention of ...

NET Notes: Mar 3:22 Or “prince.”

NET Notes: Mar 3:23 Jesus spoke two parables to demonstrate the absurdity of the thinking of the religious leaders who maintained that he was in league with Satan and tha...

NET Notes: Mar 3:24 The three conditional statements in vv. 24-26 express the logical result of the assumption that Jesus heals by Satan’s power, expressed by the r...

NET Notes: Mar 3:27 Some see the imagery here as similar to Eph 4:7-10, although no opponents are explicitly named in that passage. Jesus has the victory over Satan. Jesu...

NET Notes: Mar 3:28 Grk “all the sins and blasphemies they may speak will be forgiven the sons of men.”

NET Notes: Mar 3:29 Is guilty of an eternal sin. This passage has troubled many people, who have wondered whether or not they have committed this eternal sin. Three thing...

NET Notes: Mar 3:30 Unclean spirit refers to an evil spirit.

NET Notes: Mar 3:31 Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation.

NET Notes: Mar 3:32 ‡ Many mss read “and your sisters” here after “your brothers” (A D Γ 700 pm it). However, the pedigree of several o...

NET Notes: Mar 3:33 Grk “Who is my mother and my brothers?” The use of the singular verb ἐστιν (estin) here singles out Mary above J...

NET Notes: Mar 3:34 Grk “Behold my mother and my brothers.”

NET Notes: Mar 3:35 The pleonastic pronoun οὗτος (Jouto", “this one”) which precedes this verb has not been translated.

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:1 And ( 1 ) he entered again into the synagogue; and there was a man there which had a ( a ) withered hand. ( 1 ) Thirdly, because they preferred the c...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:4 And he saith unto them, Is it lawful to do good on the sabbath days, or to do evil? to save ( b ) life, or to kill? But they held their peace. ( b ) ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:5 And when he had looked round about on them ( c ) with anger, being grieved for the ( d ) hardness of their hearts, he saith unto the man, Stretch fort...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:6 ( 2 ) And the Pharisees went forth, and straightway took counsel with the ( e ) Herodians against him, how they might destroy him. ( 2 ) The more the...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:8 And from Jerusalem, and from Idumaea, and [from] ( f ) beyond Jordan; and they about Tyre and Sidon, a great multitude, when they had heard what great...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:9 And he spake to his disciples, that a small ship should ( g ) wait on him because of the multitude, lest they should throng him. ( g ) Should always ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:10 For he had healed many; insomuch that they pressed upon him for to touch him, as many as had ( h ) plagues. ( h ) Diseases with which God scourges me...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:11 And ( i ) unclean spirits, when they saw him, fell down before him, and cried, saying, Thou art the Son of God. ( i ) In those whom they had entered ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:14 ( 3 ) And he ( k ) ordained twelve, that they should be with him, and that he might send them forth to preach, ( 3 ) The twelve apostles are set apar...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:18 And Andrew, and Philip, and Bartholomew, and Matthew, and Thomas, and James the [son] of Alphaeus, and ( l ) Thaddaeus, and Simon the Canaanite, ( l ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:19 And Judas Iscariot, which also betrayed him: and they went into an ( m ) house. ( m ) The disciples whom Christ had taken as part of his company and ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:21 ( 4 ) And when his ( n ) friends heard [of it], they went out to lay hold on him: for they said, He is beside himself. ( 4 ) None are worse enemies o...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:26 And if ( o ) Satan rise up against himself, and be divided, he cannot stand, but hath an end. ( o ) Satan's servants or followers.

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:28 ( 5 ) Verily I say unto you, All sins shall be forgiven unto the sons of men, and blasphemies wherewith soever they shall blaspheme: ( 5 ) Only those...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:30 ( p ) Because they said, He hath an unclean spirit. ( p ) These are the words of the evangelist.

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:31 There came then his ( q ) brethren and his mother, and, standing without, sent unto him, calling him. ( q ) By the name "brother" the Hebrews underst...

Geneva Bible: Mar 3:34 ( 6 ) And he looked round about on them which sat about him, and said, Behold my mother and my brethren! ( 6 ) The spiritual family is larger than th...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Mar 3:5 - A Libation To Jehovah The Anger And Grief Of Jesus He looked round about on them with anger, being grieved for the hardness of their hearts.'--Mark 3:5. OUR Lord goes into...

Maclaren: Mar 3:6-19 - A Libation To Jehovah Ambassadors For Christ And the Pharisees went forth, and straightway took counsel with the Herodians against Him, how they might destroy Him. 7. But ...

Maclaren: Mar 3:21 - A Libation To Jehovah He Is Beside Himself And where His friends heard of it, they went out to lay hold on Him.' for they said, He is beside Himself.'--Mark 3:21. THERE ha...

Maclaren: Mar 3:22-35 - A Libation To Jehovah The Mistakes Of Christ's Foes And Friends And the scribes which came down from Jerusalem said, He hath Beelzebub. and by the prince of the devils cas...

Maclaren: Mar 3:31-35 - A Libation To Jehovah Chrisms Kindred There came then His brethren and His mother, and, standing without, sent unto Him, calling Him. 32. And the multitude sat about Him; ...

Maclaren: Mar 3:35 - A Libation To Jehovah Christ's Relations Whosoever shall do the will of God, the same is My brother, and My sister, and mother.'--Mark 3:35. THERE was a conspiracy to seiz...

MHCC: Mar 3:1-5 - --This man's case was piteous; he had a withered hand, which disabled him from working for his living; and those that are so, are the most proper object...

MHCC: Mar 3:6-12 - --All our sicknesses and calamities spring from the anger of God against our sins. Their removal, or the making them blessings to us, was purchased to u...

MHCC: Mar 3:13-21 - --Christ calls whom he will; for his grace is his own. He had called the apostles to separate themselves from the crowd, and they came unto him. He now ...

MHCC: Mar 3:22-30 - --It was plain that the doctrine of Christ had a direct tendency to break the devil's power; and it was as plain, that casting of him out of the bodies ...

MHCC: Mar 3:31-35 - --It is a great comfort to all true Christians, that they are dearer to Christ than mother, brother, or sister as such, merely as relations in the flesh...

Matthew Henry: Mar 3:1-12 - -- Here, as before, we have our Lord Jesus busy at work in the synagogue first, and then by the sea side; to teach us that his presence should not ...

Matthew Henry: Mar 3:13-21 - -- In these verses, we have, I. The choice Christ made of the twelve apostles to be his constant followers and attendants, and to be sent abroad as t...

Matthew Henry: Mar 3:22-30 - -- I. Here is, The impudent impious brand which the scribes fastened upon Christ's casting out devils, that they might evade and invalidate the convict...

Matthew Henry: Mar 3:31-35 - -- Here is, 1. The disrespect which Christ's kindred, according to the flesh, showed to him, when he was preaching (and they knew very well that he...

Barclay: Mar 3:1-6 - "THE CLASH OF IDEAS" This is a crucial incident in the life of Jesus. It was already clear that he and the orthodox leaders of the Jews were quite at variance. For him t...

Barclay: Mar 3:7-12 - "IN THE MIDST OF THE CROWDS" Unless Jesus wished to be involved in a head-on collision with the authorities he had to leave the synagogues. It was not that he withdrew through fe...

Barclay: Mar 3:13-19 - "THE CHOSEN COMPANY" Jesus had come to a very important moment in his life and work. He had emerged with his message; he had chosen his method; he had gone throughout G...

Barclay: Mar 3:20-21 - "THE VERDICT OF HIS OWN" Sometimes a man drops a remark which cannot be interpreted otherwise than as the product of bitter experience. Once when Jesus was enumerating the th...

Barclay: Mar 3:22-27 - "ALLIANCE OR CONQUEST?" The orthodox officials never questioned Jesus' power to exorcise demons. They did not need to, for exorcism was a common phenomenon then, as it st...

Barclay: Mar 3:28-30 - "THE SIN FOR WHICH THERE IS NO FORGIVENESS" If we are to understand what this terrible saying means we must first understand the circumstances in which it was said. It was said by Jesus when th...

Barclay: Mar 3:31-35 - "THE CONDITIONS OF KINSHIP" Here Jesus lays down the conditions of true kinship. It is not solely a matter of flesh and blood. It can happen that a man is really nearer to some...

Constable: Mar 1:14--3:7 - --II. The Servant's early Galilean ministry 1:14--3:6 Mark omitted Jesus' year of early Judean ministry (John 1:15...

Constable: Mar 2:1--3:7 - --D. Jesus' initial conflict with the religious leaders 2:1-3:6 Mark next recorded five instances in which...

Constable: Mar 2:23--3:7 - --4. The controversies about Sabbath observance 2:23-3:6 The remaining two instances of opposition...

Constable: Mar 3:1-6 - --Healing on the Sabbath 3:1-6 (cf. Matt. 12:9-14; Luke 6:6-11) The following incident demonstrated Jesus' sovereign authority over the Sabbath. This is...

Constable: Mar 3:7--6:7 - --III. The Servant's later Galilean ministry 3:7--6:6a There are some structural similarities between 1:14-3:6 and...

Constable: Mar 3:7-19 - --A. The broadening of Jesus' ministry 3:7-19 This section is similar to 1:14-20 in that it records a gene...

Constable: Mar 3:7-12 - --1. Jesus' ministry to the multitudes 3:7-12 (cf. Matt. 12:15-21) This pericope introduces Jesus' continuing ministry in Galilee following the religiou...

Constable: Mar 3:13-19 - --2. Jesus' selection of 12 disciples 3:13-19 (cf. Luke 6:12-16) Jesus' selection of 12 disciples constituted an important advance in His ministry. Thes...

Constable: Mar 3:20--4:35 - --B. The increasing rejection of Jesus and its result 3:20-4:34 As Jesus' ministry expanded, so did reject...

Constable: Mar 3:20-35 - --1. The increasing rejection of Jesus 3:20-35 Mark again returned to the opposition theme (cf. 2:...

Constable: Mar 3:20-21 - --The plan of Jesus' family 3:20-21 The picture the writer painted was of Jesus and his di...

Constable: Mar 3:22-30 - --The unbelief of Jesus' enemies 3:22-30 (cf. Matt. 12:22-37; Luke 11:14-26) Evidently it was between the time that Jesus' family left Nazareth to take ...

Constable: Mar 3:31-35 - --The interference of Jesus' family 3:31-35 (cf. Matt. 12:46-50; Luke 8:19-21) 3:31 Mary, along with Jesus' half brothers, finally arrived from Nazareth...

College: Mar 3:1-35 - --MARK 3 5. Controversy over Healing on the Sabbath (3:1-6) 1 Another time he went into the synagogue, and a man with a shriveled hand was there. 2 So...

McGarvey: Mar 3:1-13 - -- XXXVI. THE CALL OF MATTHEW. (At or near Capernaum.) aMATT. IX. 9; bMARK II. 13, 14; cLUKE V. 27, 28.    c27 And after these thingsa [...

McGarvey: Mar 3:2-6 - -- XXXIX. JESUS DEFENDS HEALING A WITHERED HAND ON THE SABBATH. (Probably Galilee.) aMATT. XII. 9-14; bMARK III. 1-6; cLUKE VI. 6-11.    ...

McGarvey: Mar 3:8-12 - -- XL. JESUS HEALS MULTITUDES BESIDE THE SEA OF GALILEE. aMATT. XII. 15-21; bMARK III. 7-12.    a15 And Jesus perceiving it withdrew bwi...

McGarvey: Mar 3:13-19 - -- XLI. AFTER PRAYER JESUS SELECTS TWELVE APOSTLES. (Near Capernaum.) aMATT. X. 2-4; bMARK III. 13-19; cLUKE VI. 12-16.    c12 And it ca...

McGarvey: Mar 3:19-30 - -- XLVIII. BLASPHEMOUS ACCUSATIONS OF THE JEWS. (Galilee.) aMATT. XII. 22-37; bMARK III. 19-30; cLUKE XI. 14-23.    b19 And he cometh in...

McGarvey: Mar 3:31-35 - -- L. CHRIST'S TEACHING AS TO HIS MOTHER AND BRETHREN. (Galilee, same day as the last lesson.) aMATT. XII. 46-50; bMARK III. 31-35; cLUKE VIII. 19-21. ...