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Teks -- Romans 15:1-33 (NET)

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Konteks
Exhortation for the Strong to Help the Weak
15:1 But we who are strong ought to bear with the failings of the weak, and not just please ourselves. 15:2 Let each of us please his neighbor for his good to build him up. 15:3 For even Christ did not please himself, but just as it is written, “The insults of those who insult you have fallen on me.” 15:4 For everything that was written in former times was written for our instruction, so that through endurance and through encouragement of the scriptures we may have hope. 15:5 Now may the God of endurance and comfort give you unity with one another in accordance with Christ Jesus, 15:6 so that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.
Exhortation to Mutual Acceptance
15:7 Receive one another, then, just as Christ also received you, to God’s glory. 15:8 For I tell you that Christ has become a servant of the circumcised on behalf of God’s truth to confirm the promises made to the fathers, 15:9 and thus the Gentiles glorify God for his mercy. As it is written, “Because of this I will confess you among the Gentiles, and I will sing praises to your name.” 15:10 And again it says: “Rejoice, O Gentiles, with his people.” 15:11 And again, “Praise the Lord all you Gentiles, and let all the peoples praise him.” 15:12 And again Isaiah says, “The root of Jesse will come, and the one who rises to rule over the Gentiles, in him will the Gentiles hope.” 15:13 Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you believe in him, so that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.
Paul’s Motivation for Writing the Letter
15:14 But I myself am fully convinced about you, my brothers and sisters, that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, and able to instruct one another. 15:15 But I have written more boldly to you on some points so as to remind you, because of the grace given to me by God 15:16 to be a minister of Christ Jesus to the Gentiles. I serve the gospel of God like a priest, so that the Gentiles may become an acceptable offering, sanctified by the Holy Spirit. 15:17 So I boast in Christ Jesus about the things that pertain to God. 15:18 For I will not dare to speak of anything except what Christ has accomplished through me in order to bring about the obedience of the Gentiles, by word and deed, 15:19 in the power of signs and wonders, in the power of the Spirit of God. So from Jerusalem even as far as Illyricum I have fully preached the gospel of Christ. 15:20 And in this way I desire to preach where Christ has not been named, so as not to build on another person’s foundation, 15:21 but as it is written: “Those who were not told about him will see, and those who have not heard will understand.”
Paul’s Intention of Visiting the Romans
15:22 This is the reason I was often hindered from coming to you. 15:23 But now there is nothing more to keep me in these regions, and I have for many years desired to come to you 15:24 when I go to Spain. For I hope to visit you when I pass through and that you will help me on my journey there, after I have enjoyed your company for a while. 15:25 But now I go to Jerusalem to minister to the saints. 15:26 For Macedonia and Achaia are pleased to make some contribution for the poor among the saints in Jerusalem. 15:27 For they were pleased to do this, and indeed they are indebted to the Jerusalem saints. For if the Gentiles have shared in their spiritual things, they are obligated also to minister to them in material things. 15:28 Therefore after I have completed this and have safely delivered this bounty to them, I will set out for Spain by way of you, 15:29 and I know that when I come to you I will come in the fullness of Christ’s blessing. 15:30 Now I urge you, brothers and sisters, through our Lord Jesus Christ and through the love of the Spirit, to join fervently with me in prayer to God on my behalf. 15:31 Pray that I may be rescued from those who are disobedient in Judea and that my ministry in Jerusalem may be acceptable to the saints, 15:32 so that by God’s will I may come to you with joy and be refreshed in your company. 15:33 Now may the God of peace be with all of you. Amen.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Achaia a Roman province located in Greece along the south coast of the Gulf of Corinth
 · Gentile a non-Jewish person
 · Illyricum a mountainous region on the NE of the Adriatic Sea
 · Isaiah a son of Amoz; a prophet active in Judah from about 740 to 701 B.C.,son of Amoz; a major prophet in the time of Hezekiah
 · Jerusalem the capital city of Israel,a town; the capital of Israel near the southern border of Benjamin
 · Jesse a son of Obed; the father of David the king and ancestor of Jesus,son of Obed of Judah; father of David
 · Judea a region that roughly corresponded to the earlier kingdom of Judah
 · Macedonia a Roman province north of Greece which included 10 Roman colonies (IBD),citizens of the province of Macedonia
 · Spain a country at the NW end of the Mediterranean Sea


Topik/Tema Kamus: Rome | ACTS OF THE APOSTLES, 8-12 | Zeal | ROMANS, EPISTLE TO THE | Love | Fellowship | Spain | Minister | Jesus, The Christ | Righteousness | Quotations and Allusions | ALMS | Example | PAUL, THE APOSTLE, 5 | ESCHATOLOGY OF THE NEW TESTAMENT, I-V | Self-denial | One Another | Holy Spirit | Giving | Achaia | selebihnya
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Catatan Kata/Frasa
Robertson , Vincent , Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Barclay , Constable , College , McGarvey

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Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Robertson: Rom 15:1 - We the strong We the strong ( hēmeis hoi dunatoi ). Paul identifies himself with this wing in the controversy. He means the morally strong as in 2Co 12:10; 2Co 1...

We the strong ( hēmeis hoi dunatoi ).

Paul identifies himself with this wing in the controversy. He means the morally strong as in 2Co 12:10; 2Co 13:9, not the mighty as in 1Co 1:26.

Robertson: Rom 15:1 - The infirmities The infirmities ( ta asthenēmata ). "The weaknesses"(cf. asthenōn in Rom 14:1, Rom 14:2), the scruples "of the not strong"(tōn adunatōn )....

The infirmities ( ta asthenēmata ).

"The weaknesses"(cf. asthenōn in Rom 14:1, Rom 14:2), the scruples "of the not strong"(tōn adunatōn ). See note on Act 14:8 where it is used of the man weak in his feet (impotent).

Robertson: Rom 15:1 - To bear To bear ( bastazein ). As in Gal 6:2, common in the figurative sense.

To bear ( bastazein ).

As in Gal 6:2, common in the figurative sense.

Robertson: Rom 15:1 - Not to please ourselves Not to please ourselves ( mē heautois areskein ). Precisely Paul’ s picture of his own conduct in 1Co 10:33.

Not to please ourselves ( mē heautois areskein ).

Precisely Paul’ s picture of his own conduct in 1Co 10:33.

Robertson: Rom 15:2 - For that which is good For that which is good ( eis to agathon ). "For the good."As in Rom 14:16, Rom 14:19. Not to please men just for popular favours, but for their benef...

For that which is good ( eis to agathon ).

"For the good."As in Rom 14:16, Rom 14:19. Not to please men just for popular favours, but for their benefit.

Robertson: Rom 15:3 - Pleased not himself Pleased not himself ( ouch heautōi ēresen ). Aorist active indicative of areskō with the usual dative. The supreme example for Christians. Se...

Pleased not himself ( ouch heautōi ēresen ).

Aorist active indicative of areskō with the usual dative. The supreme example for Christians. See Rom 14:15. He quotes Psa 69:9 (Messianic Psalm) and represents the Messiah as bearing the reproaches of others.

Robertson: Rom 15:4 - Were written aforetime Were written aforetime ( proegraphē ). Second aorist passive indicative of prographō , old verb, in N.T. only here, Gal 3:1 (which see); Eph 3:3;...

Were written aforetime ( proegraphē ).

Second aorist passive indicative of prographō , old verb, in N.T. only here, Gal 3:1 (which see); Eph 3:3; Jud 1:4.

Robertson: Rom 15:4 - For our learning For our learning ( eis tēn hēmeteran didaskalian ). "For the instruction of us."Objective sense of possessive pronoun hēmeteros . See Mat 15:9 ...

For our learning ( eis tēn hēmeteran didaskalian ).

"For the instruction of us."Objective sense of possessive pronoun hēmeteros . See Mat 15:9 and note on 2Ti 3:16 for didaskalian (from didaskō , to teach).

Robertson: Rom 15:4 - We might have hope We might have hope ( tēn elpida echōmen ). Present active subjunctive of echō with hina in final clause, "that we might keep on having hope...

We might have hope ( tēn elpida echōmen ).

Present active subjunctive of echō with hina in final clause, "that we might keep on having hope."One of the blessed uses of the Scriptures.

Robertson: Rom 15:5 - The God of patience and comfort The God of patience and comfort ( ho theos tēs hupomonēs kai tēs paraklēseōs ). Genitive case of the two words in Rom 15:4 used to describe...

The God of patience and comfort ( ho theos tēs hupomonēs kai tēs paraklēseōs ).

Genitive case of the two words in Rom 15:4 used to describe God who uses the Scriptures to reveal himself to us. See note on 2Co 1:3 for this idea; Rom 15:13 for "the God of hope"; Rom 15:33 for "the God of peace."

Robertson: Rom 15:5 - Grant you Grant you ( dōiē humin ). Second aorist active optative ( Koiné[28928]š form for older doiē ) as in 2Th 3:16; Eph 1:17; 2Ti 1:16, 2Ti 1:18;...

Grant you ( dōiē humin ).

Second aorist active optative ( Koiné[28928]š form for older doiē ) as in 2Th 3:16; Eph 1:17; 2Ti 1:16, 2Ti 1:18; 2Ti 2:25, though MSS. vary in Eph 1:17; 2Ti 2:25 for dōēi (subjunctive). The optative here is for a wish for the future (regular idiom).

Robertson: Rom 15:5 - According to Christ Jesus According to Christ Jesus ( kata Christon Iēsoun ). "According to the character or example of Christ Jesus"(2Co 11:17; Col 2:8; Eph 5:24).

According to Christ Jesus ( kata Christon Iēsoun ).

"According to the character or example of Christ Jesus"(2Co 11:17; Col 2:8; Eph 5:24).

Robertson: Rom 15:6 - With one accord With one accord ( homothumadon ). Here alone in Paul, but eleven times in Acts (Act 1:14, etc.).

With one accord ( homothumadon ).

Here alone in Paul, but eleven times in Acts (Act 1:14, etc.).

Robertson: Rom 15:6 - With one mouth With one mouth ( en heni stomati ). Vivid outward expression of the unity of feeling.

With one mouth ( en heni stomati ).

Vivid outward expression of the unity of feeling.

Robertson: Rom 15:6 - May glorify May glorify ( doxazēte ). Present active subjunctive of doxazō , final clause with hina "that ye may keep on glorifying."For "the God and Fathe...

May glorify ( doxazēte ).

Present active subjunctive of doxazō , final clause with hina "that ye may keep on glorifying."For "the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ"see note on 2Co 1:3 for discussion; 2Co 11:31. It occurs also in Eph 1:3; 1Pe 1:3.

Robertson: Rom 15:7 - Receive ye Receive ye ( proslambanesthe as in Rom 14:1) , received (proselabeto , here of Christ as in Rom 14:3 of God). The repetition here is addressed to ...

Receive ye ( proslambanesthe as in Rom 14:1)

, received (proselabeto , here of Christ as in Rom 14:3 of God). The repetition here is addressed to both the strong and the weak and the "us"(hēmās ) includes all.

Robertson: Rom 15:8 - A minister of the circumcision A minister of the circumcision ( diakonon peritomēs ). Objective genitive, "a minister to the circumcision."Diakonon is predicate accusative with...

A minister of the circumcision ( diakonon peritomēs ).

Objective genitive, "a minister to the circumcision."Diakonon is predicate accusative with gegenēsthai (perfect passive infinitive of ginomai in indirect assertion after legō , I say) and in apposition with Christon , accusative of general reference with the infinitive. See Gal 4:4.

Robertson: Rom 15:8 - That he might confirm That he might confirm ( eis to bebaiōsai ). Purpose clause with eis to and the infinitive bebaiōsai (first aorist active of bebaioō , to ma...

That he might confirm ( eis to bebaiōsai ).

Purpose clause with eis to and the infinitive bebaiōsai (first aorist active of bebaioō , to make stand).

Robertson: Rom 15:8 - The promises given unto the fathers The promises given unto the fathers ( tas epaggelias tōn paterōn ). No "given"in the Greek, just the objective genitive, "the promises to the fat...

The promises given unto the fathers ( tas epaggelias tōn paterōn ).

No "given"in the Greek, just the objective genitive, "the promises to the fathers."See note on Rom 9:4, Rom 9:5.

Robertson: Rom 15:9 - And that the Gentiles might praise And that the Gentiles might praise ( ta de ethnē doxasai ). Coordinate with bebaiōsai and eis to , to be repeated with ta ethnē , the accusat...

And that the Gentiles might praise ( ta de ethnē doxasai ).

Coordinate with bebaiōsai and eis to , to be repeated with ta ethnē , the accusative of general reference and ton theon the object of doxasai . Thus the Gentiles were called through the promise to the Jews in the covenant with Abraham (Rom 4:11., Rom 4:16.). Salvation is of the Jews. Paul proves his position by a chain of quotations from the O.T., the one in Rom 15:9 from Psa 18:50. For exomologeō , see note on Rom 14:11.

Robertson: Rom 15:9 - I will sing I will sing ( psalō ). Future active of psallō , for which verb see note on 1Co 14:15.

I will sing ( psalō ).

Future active of psallō , for which verb see note on 1Co 14:15.

Robertson: Rom 15:10 - Rejoice, ye Gentiles Rejoice, ye Gentiles ( euphranthēte ). First aorist passive imperative of euphrainō , old word from eu , well and phrēn , mind. See note on Luk...

Rejoice, ye Gentiles ( euphranthēte ).

First aorist passive imperative of euphrainō , old word from eu , well and phrēn , mind. See note on Luk 15:32. Quotation from Deuteronomy 32:43 (lxx).

Robertson: Rom 15:11 - All the Gentiles All the Gentiles ( panta ta ethnē ). From Psa 117:1 with slight variations from the lxx text.

All the Gentiles ( panta ta ethnē ).

From Psa 117:1 with slight variations from the lxx text.

Robertson: Rom 15:12 - The root The root ( hē riza ). Rather here, as in Rev 5:5; Rev 22:16, the sprout from the root. From Isa 11:10.

The root ( hē riza ).

Rather here, as in Rev 5:5; Rev 22:16, the sprout from the root. From Isa 11:10.

Robertson: Rom 15:12 - On him shall the Gentiles hope On him shall the Gentiles hope ( ep' autōi ethnē elpiousin ). Attic future of elpizō for the usual elpisousin .

On him shall the Gentiles hope ( ep' autōi ethnē elpiousin ).

Attic future of elpizō for the usual elpisousin .

Robertson: Rom 15:13 - The God of hope The God of hope ( ho theos tēs elpidos ). Taking up the idea in Rom 15:12 as in Rom 15:5 from Rom 15:4.

The God of hope ( ho theos tēs elpidos ).

Taking up the idea in Rom 15:12 as in Rom 15:5 from Rom 15:4.

Robertson: Rom 15:13 - Fill you Fill you ( plērōsai humas ). Optative (first aorist active of plēroō ) of wish for the future. Cf. dōiē in Rom 15:5.

Fill you ( plērōsai humas ).

Optative (first aorist active of plēroō ) of wish for the future. Cf. dōiē in Rom 15:5.

Robertson: Rom 15:13 - In believing In believing ( en tōi pisteuein ). "In the believing"(en with locative of the articular infinitive, the idiom so common in Luke’ s Gospel).

In believing ( en tōi pisteuein ).

"In the believing"(en with locative of the articular infinitive, the idiom so common in Luke’ s Gospel).

Robertson: Rom 15:13 - That ye may abound That ye may abound ( eis to perisseuein humas ). Purpose clause with eis to , as in Rom 15:8, with perisseuein (present active infinitive of periss...

That ye may abound ( eis to perisseuein humas ).

Purpose clause with eis to , as in Rom 15:8, with perisseuein (present active infinitive of perisseuō , with accusative of general reference, humas ). This verse gathers up the points in the preceding quotations.

Robertson: Rom 15:14 - I myself also I myself also ( kai autos egō ). See note on Rom 7:25 for a like emphasis on himself, here in contrast with "ye yourselves"(kai autoi ). The argum...

I myself also ( kai autos egō ).

See note on Rom 7:25 for a like emphasis on himself, here in contrast with "ye yourselves"(kai autoi ). The argument of the Epistle has been completed both in the main line (chapters 1-8) and the further applications (9:1-15:13). Here begins the Epilogue, the personal matters of importance.

Robertson: Rom 15:14 - Full of goodness Full of goodness ( mestoi agathosunēs ). See note on 2Th 1:11; Gal 5:22 for this lxx and Pauline word (in ecclesiastical writers also) made from th...

Full of goodness ( mestoi agathosunēs ).

See note on 2Th 1:11; Gal 5:22 for this lxx and Pauline word (in ecclesiastical writers also) made from the adjective agathos , good, by adding -sunē (common ending for words like dikaiosunē ). See Rom 1:29 for mestos with genitive and peplērōmenoi (perfect passive participle of plēroō as here), but there with instrumental case after it instead of the genitive. Paul gives the Roman Christians (chiefly Gentiles) high praise. The "all knowledge"is not to be pressed too literally, "our Christian knowledge in its entirety"(Sanday and Headlam).

Robertson: Rom 15:14 - To admonish To admonish ( nouthetein ). To put in mind (from nouthetēs and this from nous and tithēmi ). See note on 1Th 5:12, 1Th 5:14. "Is it laying t...

To admonish ( nouthetein ).

To put in mind (from nouthetēs and this from nous and tithēmi ). See note on 1Th 5:12, 1Th 5:14. "Is it laying too much stress on the language of compliment to suggest that these words give a hint of St. Paul’ s aim in this Epistle?"(Sanday and Headlam). The strategic position of the church in Rome made it a great centre for radiating and echoing the gospel over the world as Thessalonica did for Macedonia (1Th 1:8).

Robertson: Rom 15:15 - I write I write ( egrapsa ). Epistolary aorist.

I write ( egrapsa ).

Epistolary aorist.

Robertson: Rom 15:15 - The more boldly The more boldly ( tolmēroterōs ). Old comparative adverb from tolmērōs . Most MSS. read tolmēroteron . Only here in N.T.

The more boldly ( tolmēroterōs ).

Old comparative adverb from tolmērōs . Most MSS. read tolmēroteron . Only here in N.T.

Robertson: Rom 15:15 - In some measure In some measure ( apo merous ). Perhaps referring to some portions of the Epistle where he has spoken plainly (Rom 6:12, Rom 6:19; Rom 8:9; Rom 11:17...

In some measure ( apo merous ).

Perhaps referring to some portions of the Epistle where he has spoken plainly (Rom 6:12, Rom 6:19; Rom 8:9; Rom 11:17; Rom 14:3, Rom 14:4, Rom 14:10, etc.).

Robertson: Rom 15:15 - As putting you again in remembrance As putting you again in remembrance ( hos epanamimnēskōn humas ). Delicately put with hōs and epi in the verb, "as if calling back to mind ...

As putting you again in remembrance ( hos epanamimnēskōn humas ).

Delicately put with hōs and epi in the verb, "as if calling back to mind again"(epi ). This rare verb is here alone in the N.T.

Robertson: Rom 15:16 - That I should be That I should be ( eis to einai me ). The eis to idiom with the infinitive again (Rom 15:8, Rom 15:13).

That I should be ( eis to einai me ).

The eis to idiom with the infinitive again (Rom 15:8, Rom 15:13).

Robertson: Rom 15:16 - Minister Minister ( leitourgon ). Predicate accusative in apposition with me and see note on Rom 13:6 for the word. "The word here derives from the context ...

Minister ( leitourgon ).

Predicate accusative in apposition with me and see note on Rom 13:6 for the word. "The word here derives from the context the priestly associations which often attach to it in the lxx"(Denney). But this purely metaphorical use does not show that Paul attached a "sacerdotal"character to the ministry.

Robertson: Rom 15:16 - Ministering Ministering ( hierourgounta ). Present active participle of hierourgeō , late verb from hierourgos (hieros , ergō ), in lxx, Philo, and Josep...

Ministering ( hierourgounta ).

Present active participle of hierourgeō , late verb from hierourgos (hieros , ergō ), in lxx, Philo, and Josephus, only here in N.T. It means to work in sacred things, to minister as a priest. Paul had as high a conception of his work as a preacher of the gospel as any priest did.

Robertson: Rom 15:16 - The offering up of the Gentiles The offering up of the Gentiles ( hē prosphora tōn ethnōn ). Genitive of apposition, the Gentiles being the offering. They are Paul’ s off...

The offering up of the Gentiles ( hē prosphora tōn ethnōn ).

Genitive of apposition, the Gentiles being the offering. They are Paul’ s offering. See note on Act 21:26.

Robertson: Rom 15:16 - Acceptable Acceptable ( euprosdektos ). See note on 2Co 6:2; 2Co 8:12. Because "sanctified in the Holy Spirit"(hēgiasmenē en pneumati hagiōi , perfect pas...

Acceptable ( euprosdektos ).

See note on 2Co 6:2; 2Co 8:12. Because "sanctified in the Holy Spirit"(hēgiasmenē en pneumati hagiōi , perfect passive participle of hagiazō ).

Robertson: Rom 15:17 - In things pertaining to God In things pertaining to God ( ta pros ton theon ). Accusative of general reference of the article used with the prepositional phrase, "as to the thin...

In things pertaining to God ( ta pros ton theon ).

Accusative of general reference of the article used with the prepositional phrase, "as to the things relating to (pros , facing) God."

Robertson: Rom 15:18 - Any things save those which Christ wrought through me Any things save those which Christ wrought through me ( ti hōn ou kateirgasato Christos di' emou ). Rather, "any one of those things which Christ d...

Any things save those which Christ wrought through me ( ti hōn ou kateirgasato Christos di' emou ).

Rather, "any one of those things which Christ did not work through me."The antecedent of hōn is the unexpressed toutōn and the accusative relative ha (object of kateirgasato ) is attracted into the genitive case of toutōn after a common idiom.

Robertson: Rom 15:18 - By word and deed By word and deed ( logōi kai ergōi ). Instrumental case with both words. By preaching and life (Luk 24:19; Act 1:1; Act 7:22; 2Co 10:11).

By word and deed ( logōi kai ergōi ).

Instrumental case with both words. By preaching and life (Luk 24:19; Act 1:1; Act 7:22; 2Co 10:11).

Robertson: Rom 15:19 - In power of signs and wonders In power of signs and wonders ( en dunamei sēmeiōn kai teratōn ). Note all three words as in Heb 2:4, only here dunamis is connected with se...

In power of signs and wonders ( en dunamei sēmeiōn kai teratōn ).

Note all three words as in Heb 2:4, only here dunamis is connected with sēmeia and terata . See all three words used of Paul’ s own work in 2Co 12:12 and in 2Th 2:9 of the Man of Sin. See note on 1Th 1:5; 1Co 2:4 for the "power"of the Holy Spirit in Paul’ s preaching. Note repetition of en dunamei here with pneumatos hagiou .

Robertson: Rom 15:19 - So that So that ( hōste ). Result expressed by the perfect active infinitive peplērōkenai (from plēroō ) with the accusative me (general refer...

So that ( hōste ).

Result expressed by the perfect active infinitive peplērōkenai (from plēroō ) with the accusative me (general reference).

Robertson: Rom 15:19 - Round about even unto Illyricum Round about even unto Illyricum ( kuklōi mechri tou Illurikou ). "In a ring"(kuklōi , locative case of kuklos ). Probably a journey during the t...

Round about even unto Illyricum ( kuklōi mechri tou Illurikou ).

"In a ring"(kuklōi , locative case of kuklos ). Probably a journey during the time when Paul left Macedonia and waited for II Corinthians to have its effect before coming to Corinth. If so, see notes on 2Co 13:1-14 and notes on Act 20:1-3. When he did come, the trouble with the Judaizers was over. Illyricum seems to be the name for the region west of Macedonia (Dalmatia). Strabo says that the Egnatian Way passed through it. Arabia and Illyricum would thus be the extreme limits of Paul’ s mission journeys so far.

Robertson: Rom 15:20 - Yea Yea ( houtōs de ). "And so,"introducing a limitation to the preceding statement.

Yea ( houtōs de ).

"And so,"introducing a limitation to the preceding statement.

Robertson: Rom 15:20 - Making it my aim Making it my aim ( philotimoumenon ). Present middle participle (accusative case agreeing with me ) of philotimeomai , old verb, to be fond of honou...

Making it my aim ( philotimoumenon ).

Present middle participle (accusative case agreeing with me ) of philotimeomai , old verb, to be fond of honour (philos , timē ). In N.T. only here and 1Th 4:11; 2Co 5:9. A noble word in itself, quite different in aim from the Latin word for ambition ( ambio , to go on both sides to carry one’ s point).

Robertson: Rom 15:20 - Not where Not where ( ouch hopou ). Paul was a pioneer preacher pushing on to new fields after the manner of Daniel Boone in Kentucky.

Not where ( ouch hopou ).

Paul was a pioneer preacher pushing on to new fields after the manner of Daniel Boone in Kentucky.

Robertson: Rom 15:20 - That I might now build upon another man’ s foundation That I might now build upon another man’ s foundation ( hina mē ep' allotrion themelion oikodomō ). For allotrios (not allos ) see note o...

That I might now build upon another man’ s foundation ( hina mē ep' allotrion themelion oikodomō ).

For allotrios (not allos ) see note on Rom 14:4. For themelion , see notes on Luk 6:48. and note on 1Co 3:11. This noble ambition of Paul’ s is not within the range of some ministers who can only build on another’ s foundation as Apollos did in Corinth. But the pioneer preacher and missionary has a dignity and glory all his own.

Robertson: Rom 15:21 - As it is written As it is written ( kathōs gegraptai ). From Isa 52:15. Paul finds an illustration of his word about his own ambition in the words of Isaiah. Fritzs...

As it is written ( kathōs gegraptai ).

From Isa 52:15. Paul finds an illustration of his word about his own ambition in the words of Isaiah. Fritzsche actually argues that Paul understood Isaiah to be predicting his (Paul’ s) ministry! Some scholars have argued against the genuineness of Rom 15:9-21 on wholly subjective and insufficient grounds.||

Robertson: Rom 15:22 - I was hindered I was hindered ( enekoptomēn ). Imperfect passive (repetition) of enkoptō , late verb, to cut in, to cut off, to interrupt. Seen already in Act 2...

I was hindered ( enekoptomēn ).

Imperfect passive (repetition) of enkoptō , late verb, to cut in, to cut off, to interrupt. Seen already in Act 24:4; 1Th 2:18; Gal 5:7. Cf. modern telephone and radio and automobile.

Robertson: Rom 15:22 - These many times These many times ( ta polla ). "As to the many things."In Rom 1:13 Paul used pollakis (many times) and B D read it here. But Paul’ s work (ta ...

These many times ( ta polla ).

"As to the many things."In Rom 1:13 Paul used pollakis (many times) and B D read it here. But Paul’ s work (ta polla ) had kept him away.

Robertson: Rom 15:22 - From coming to you From coming to you ( tou elthein pros humas ). Ablative case (after the verb of hindering) of the articular infinitive, "from the coming."

From coming to you ( tou elthein pros humas ).

Ablative case (after the verb of hindering) of the articular infinitive, "from the coming."

Robertson: Rom 15:23 - Having no more any place in these regions Having no more any place in these regions ( mēketi topon echōn en tois klimasin ). Surprising frankness that the average preacher would hardly us...

Having no more any place in these regions ( mēketi topon echōn en tois klimasin ).

Surprising frankness that the average preacher would hardly use on such a matter. Paul is now free to come to Rome because there is no demand for him where he is. For klima (from klinō , to incline), slope, then tract of land, region, see already 2Co 11:10; Gal 1:21 (the only N.T. examples).

Robertson: Rom 15:23 - A longing A longing ( epipotheian ). A hapax legomenon , elsewhere epipothēsis (2Co 7:7, 2Co 7:11), from epipotheō as in Rom 1:11.

A longing ( epipotheian ).

A hapax legomenon , elsewhere epipothēsis (2Co 7:7, 2Co 7:11), from epipotheō as in Rom 1:11.

Robertson: Rom 15:23 - These many years These many years ( apo hikanōn etōn ). "From considerable years."So B C, but Aleph A D have pollōn , "from many years."

These many years ( apo hikanōn etōn ).

"From considerable years."So B C, but Aleph A D have pollōn , "from many years."

Robertson: Rom 15:24 - Whensoever I go Whensoever I go ( hōs an poreuōmai ). Indefinite temporal clause with hōs an and the present middle subjunctive (cf. 1Co 11:34; Phi 2:23 with...

Whensoever I go ( hōs an poreuōmai ).

Indefinite temporal clause with hōs an and the present middle subjunctive (cf. 1Co 11:34; Phi 2:23 with aorist subjunctive).

Robertson: Rom 15:24 - Into Spain Into Spain ( eis tēn Spanian ). It was a Roman province with many Jews in it. The Greek name was Iberia , the Latin Hispania . The Textus Receptus...

Into Spain ( eis tēn Spanian ).

It was a Roman province with many Jews in it. The Greek name was Iberia , the Latin Hispania . The Textus Receptus adds here eleusomai pros humas (I shall come to you), but it is not in Aleph A B C D and is not genuine. Without it we have a parenthesis (or anacoluthon) through the rest of Rom 15:24.

Robertson: Rom 15:24 - In my journey In my journey ( diaporeuomenos ). Present middle participle, "passing through."Paul planned only a brief stay in Rome since a strong church already e...

In my journey ( diaporeuomenos ).

Present middle participle, "passing through."Paul planned only a brief stay in Rome since a strong church already existed there.

Robertson: Rom 15:24 - To be brought on my way thitherward To be brought on my way thitherward ( propemphthēnai ekei ). "To be sent forward there."First aorist passive infinitive of propempō , common word...

To be brought on my way thitherward ( propemphthēnai ekei ).

"To be sent forward there."First aorist passive infinitive of propempō , common word for escorting one on a journey (1Co 16:6, 1Co 16:11; 2Co 1:16; Tit 3:13; 2Jo 1:6).

Robertson: Rom 15:24 - If first in some measure I shall have been satisfied with your company If first in some measure I shall have been satisfied with your company ( ean humōn protōn apo merous emplēsthō ). Condition of third class wi...

If first in some measure I shall have been satisfied with your company ( ean humōn protōn apo merous emplēsthō ).

Condition of third class with ean and first aorist passive subjunctive of empimplēmi , old verb, to fill up, to satisfy, to take one’ s fill. See Luk 6:25. Literally, "if I first in part be filled with you"(get my fill of you). delicate compliment for the Roman church.

Robertson: Rom 15:25 - But now But now ( nuni de ). Repeats the very words used in Rom 15:23.

But now ( nuni de ).

Repeats the very words used in Rom 15:23.

Robertson: Rom 15:25 - I go I go ( poreuomai ). Futuristic present as in Joh 14:2.

I go ( poreuomai ).

Futuristic present as in Joh 14:2.

Robertson: Rom 15:25 - Ministering unto the saints Ministering unto the saints ( diakonon tois hagiois ). Present active participle of purpose like eulogounta in Act 3:26. This collection had been o...

Ministering unto the saints ( diakonon tois hagiois ).

Present active participle of purpose like eulogounta in Act 3:26. This collection had been one of Paul’ s chief cares for over a year now (see 2 Corinthians 8; 2Co 9:1-15). See note on 2Co 8:4.

Robertson: Rom 15:26 - For it hath been the good pleasure of Macedonia and Achaia For it hath been the good pleasure of Macedonia and Achaia ( ēudokēsan gar Makedonia kai Achaia ). "For Macedonia and Achaia took pleasure."The u...

For it hath been the good pleasure of Macedonia and Achaia ( ēudokēsan gar Makedonia kai Achaia ).

"For Macedonia and Achaia took pleasure."The use of ēudokēsan (first aorist active indicative of eudokeō ) shows that it was voluntary (2Co 8:4). Paul does not here mention Asia and Galatia.

Robertson: Rom 15:26 - A certain contribution A certain contribution ( Koinéōnian tina ). Put thus because it was unknown to the Romans. For this sense of Koinéōnian , see 2Co 8:4; 2Co 9:13...

A certain contribution ( Koinéōnian tina ).

Put thus because it was unknown to the Romans. For this sense of Koinéōnian , see 2Co 8:4; 2Co 9:13.

Robertson: Rom 15:26 - For the poor among the saints For the poor among the saints ( eis tous ptōchous tōn hagiōn ). Partitive genitive. Not all there were poor, but Acts 4:32-5:11; Act 6:1-6; Act...

For the poor among the saints ( eis tous ptōchous tōn hagiōn ).

Partitive genitive. Not all there were poor, but Acts 4:32-5:11; Act 6:1-6; Act 11:29.; Gal 2:10 prove that many were.

Robertson: Rom 15:27 - Their debtors Their debtors ( opheiletai autōn ). Objective genitive: the Gentiles are debtors to the Jews. See the word opheiletēs in Rom 1:14; Rom 8:12.

Their debtors ( opheiletai autōn ).

Objective genitive: the Gentiles are debtors to the Jews. See the word opheiletēs in Rom 1:14; Rom 8:12.

Robertson: Rom 15:27 - For if For if ( ei gar ). Condition of the first class, assumed as true, first aorist active indicative (eKoinéōnēsan , from Koinéōneō , to share)...

For if ( ei gar ).

Condition of the first class, assumed as true, first aorist active indicative (eKoinéōnēsan , from Koinéōneō , to share) with associative instrumental case (pneumatikois , spiritual things).

Robertson: Rom 15:27 - To minister unto To minister unto ( leitourgēsai , first aorist active infinitive of leitourgeō with dative case autois , to them) , but here certainly with no "...

To minister unto ( leitourgēsai , first aorist active infinitive of leitourgeō with dative case autois , to them)

, but here certainly with no "sacerdotal"functions (cf. Rom 15:16).

Robertson: Rom 15:27 - In carnal things In carnal things ( en tois sarkikois ). Things which belong to the natural life of the flesh (sarx ), not the sinful aspects of the flesh at all.

In carnal things ( en tois sarkikois ).

Things which belong to the natural life of the flesh (sarx ), not the sinful aspects of the flesh at all.

Robertson: Rom 15:28 - Have sealed Have sealed ( sphragisamenos ). First aorist middle participle (antecedent action, having sealed) of sphragizō , old verb from sphragis , a seal (R...

Have sealed ( sphragisamenos ).

First aorist middle participle (antecedent action, having sealed) of sphragizō , old verb from sphragis , a seal (Rom 4:11), to stamp with a seal for security (Mat 27:66) or for confirmation (2Co 1:22) and here in a metaphorical sense. Paul was keenly sensitive that this collection should be actually conveyed to Jerusalem free from all suspicion (2Co 8:18-23).

Robertson: Rom 15:28 - I will go on by you I will go on by you ( apeleusomai di' humōn ). Future middle of aperchomai , to go off or on. Note three prepositions here (ap' from Rome, di' ...

I will go on by you ( apeleusomai di' humōn ).

Future middle of aperchomai , to go off or on. Note three prepositions here (ap' from Rome, di' by means of you or through you, eis unto Spain). He repeats the point of Rom 15:24, his temporary stay in Rome with Spain as the objective. How little we know what is ahead of us and how grateful we should be for our ignorance on this point.

Robertson: Rom 15:29 - When I come When I come ( erchomenos ). Present middle participle of erchomai with the time of the future middle indicative eleusomai (coming I shall come).

When I come ( erchomenos ).

Present middle participle of erchomai with the time of the future middle indicative eleusomai (coming I shall come).

Robertson: Rom 15:29 - In the fulness of the blessing of Christ In the fulness of the blessing of Christ ( en plērōmati eulogias Christou ). On plērōmati , see Rom 11:12. Paul had already (Rom 1:11.) said ...

In the fulness of the blessing of Christ ( en plērōmati eulogias Christou ).

On plērōmati , see Rom 11:12. Paul had already (Rom 1:11.) said that he had a charisma pneumatikon (spiritual blessing) for Rome. He did bring that to them.

Robertson: Rom 15:30 - By By ( dia ). The intermediate agents of the exhortation (the Lord Jesus and the love of the Spirit) as dia is used after parakalō in Rom 12:1.

By ( dia ).

The intermediate agents of the exhortation (the Lord Jesus and the love of the Spirit) as dia is used after parakalō in Rom 12:1.

Robertson: Rom 15:30 - That ye strive together with me That ye strive together with me ( sunagōnisasthai moi ). First aorist middle infinitive of sunagōni zomai , old compound verb, only here in N.T.,...

That ye strive together with me ( sunagōnisasthai moi ).

First aorist middle infinitive of sunagōni zomai , old compound verb, only here in N.T., direct object of parakalō , and with associative instrumental case moi , the simplex agōnizomenos , occurring in Col 4:12 of the prayers of Epaphras. For Christ’ s agony in prayer see Mat 26:42 and note on Luk 22:44.

Robertson: Rom 15:31 - That I may be delivered That I may be delivered ( hina rusthō ). First aorist passive subjunctive of ruomai , old verb to rescue. This use of hina is the sub-final one a...

That I may be delivered ( hina rusthō ).

First aorist passive subjunctive of ruomai , old verb to rescue. This use of hina is the sub-final one after words of beseeching or praying. Paul foresaw trouble all the way to Jerusalem (Act 20:23; Act 21:4, Act 21:13).

Robertson: Rom 15:31 - May be acceptable to the saints May be acceptable to the saints ( euprosdektos tois hagiois genētai ). "May become (second aorist middle subjunctive of ginomai ) acceptable to th...

May be acceptable to the saints ( euprosdektos tois hagiois genētai ).

"May become (second aorist middle subjunctive of ginomai ) acceptable to the saints."The Judaizers would give him trouble. There was peril of a schism in Christianity.

Robertson: Rom 15:32 - That That ( hina ). Second use of hina in this sentence, the first one sub-final (hina rusthō ), this one final with sunanapausōmai , first aorist ...

That ( hina ).

Second use of hina in this sentence, the first one sub-final (hina rusthō ), this one final with sunanapausōmai , first aorist middle subjunctive of the double compound verb sunanapauomai , late verb to rest together with, to refresh (anapauō as in Mat 11:28) one’ s spirit with (sun ), with the associative instrumental case humin (with you), only here in the N.T.

Robertson: Rom 15:33 - The God of peace The God of peace ( ho theos tēs eirēnēs ). One of the characteristics of God that Paul often mentions in benedictions (1Th 5:23; 2Th 3:16; 2Co ...

The God of peace ( ho theos tēs eirēnēs ).

One of the characteristics of God that Paul often mentions in benedictions (1Th 5:23; 2Th 3:16; 2Co 13:11; Phi 4:9; Rom 16:20). Because of the "amen"here some scholars would make this the close of the Epistle and make chapter 16 a separate Epistle to the Ephesians. But the MSS. are against it. There is nothing strange at all in Paul’ s having so many friends in Rome though he had not yet been there himself. Rome was the centre of the world’ s life as Paul realized (Rom 1:15). All men sooner or later hoped to see Rome.

Vincent: Rom 15:1 - Infirmities Infirmities ( ἀσθενήματα ) Only here in the New Testament.

Infirmities ( ἀσθενήματα )

Only here in the New Testament.

Vincent: Rom 15:8 - Of the circumcision Of the circumcision Of those circumcised. See on the election , Rom 11:7.

Of the circumcision

Of those circumcised. See on the election , Rom 11:7.

Vincent: Rom 15:9 - It is written It is written The citations are from Psa 18:50, compare 2Sa 22:50; Deu 32:43; Psa 117:1; Isa 11:10.

It is written

The citations are from Psa 18:50, compare 2Sa 22:50; Deu 32:43; Psa 117:1; Isa 11:10.

Vincent: Rom 15:9 - Confess Confess Rev., give praise . See on Rom 14:11.

Confess

Rev., give praise . See on Rom 14:11.

Vincent: Rom 15:9 - Sing Sing ( ψαλῶ ) See on Jam 5:13.

Sing ( ψαλῶ )

See on Jam 5:13.

Vincent: Rom 15:10 - Rejoice Rejoice ( εὐφράνθητε ) Frequently in the New Testament of merry-making . Luk 12:19; Luk 15:23, Luk 15:24. See on fared sumptuou...

Rejoice ( εὐφράνθητε )

Frequently in the New Testament of merry-making . Luk 12:19; Luk 15:23, Luk 15:24. See on fared sumptuously , Luk 16:19.

Vincent: Rom 15:12 - Root Root See on Nazarene , Mat 2:23. Root is a sprout from the root.

Root

See on Nazarene , Mat 2:23. Root is a sprout from the root.

Vincent: Rom 15:12 - He that shall rise to reign He that shall rise to reign Rev., that ariseth to reign . Literally from the Septuagint. Ariseth to reign is a paraphrase of the Heb...

He that shall rise to reign

Rev., that ariseth to reign . Literally from the Septuagint. Ariseth to reign is a paraphrase of the Hebrew stands as banner . Bengel says: " There is a pleasant contrast: the root is in the lowest place, the banner rises highest, so as to be seen even by the remotest nations."

Vincent: Rom 15:12 - Shall - hope Shall - hope So Septuagint, which is a free rendering of the Hebrew seek or resort to .

Shall - hope

So Septuagint, which is a free rendering of the Hebrew seek or resort to .

Vincent: Rom 15:14 - Goodness Here the Epilogue of the Epistle begins. Bengel says: " As one street often leads men, leaving a large city, through several gates, so the conclusion...

Here the Epilogue of the Epistle begins. Bengel says: " As one street often leads men, leaving a large city, through several gates, so the conclusion of this Epistle is manifold."

Goodness ( ἀγαθωσύνης )

See on Rom 3:12.

Vincent: Rom 15:14 - To admonish To admonish ( νουθετεῖν ) See on Act 20:31.

To admonish ( νουθετεῖν )

See on Act 20:31.

Vincent: Rom 15:15 - I have written I have written ( ἔγραψα ) Rev., I write . The epistolary aorist. See on 1Jo 2:13.

I have written ( ἔγραψα )

Rev., I write . The epistolary aorist. See on 1Jo 2:13.

Vincent: Rom 15:15 - The more boldly The more boldly ( τολμηρότερον ) Not too boldly , but the more boldly because you are full of goodness.

The more boldly ( τολμηρότερον )

Not too boldly , but the more boldly because you are full of goodness.

Vincent: Rom 15:15 - In some sort In some sort ( ἀπὸ μέρους ) See on Rom 11:25. Rev., in some measure , qualifying I write , and referring to some passage i...

In some sort ( ἀπὸ μέρους )

See on Rom 11:25. Rev., in some measure , qualifying I write , and referring to some passage in which he had spoken with especial plainness; as Rom 6:12, Rom 6:19; Rom 8:9; Rom 11:17; Rom 14:3, Rom 14:4, Rom 14:10, Rom 14:13, Rom 14:15, Rom 14:20, etc.

Vincent: Rom 15:16 - Minister Minister ( λειτουργὸν ) See on Rom 13:6.

Minister ( λειτουργὸν )

See on Rom 13:6.

Vincent: Rom 15:16 - Ministering Ministering ( ἱερουργοῦντα ) Only here in the New Testament. Lit., ministering as a priest .

Ministering ( ἱερουργοῦντα )

Only here in the New Testament. Lit., ministering as a priest .

Vincent: Rom 15:16 - Offering up Offering up ( προσφορὰ ) Lit., the bringing to , i.e., to the altar. Compare doeth service , Joh 16:2.

Offering up ( προσφορὰ )

Lit., the bringing to , i.e., to the altar. Compare doeth service , Joh 16:2.

Vincent: Rom 15:17 - Whereof I may glory Whereof I may glory ( τὴν καύχησιν ) Rather, as Rev., my glorying , denoting the act . The ground of glorying would be κα...

Whereof I may glory ( τὴν καύχησιν )

Rather, as Rev., my glorying , denoting the act . The ground of glorying would be καύχημα as in Rom 4:2; Gal 6:4, etc.

Vincent: Rom 15:17 - Those things which pertain to God Those things which pertain to God ( τὰ πρὸς τὸν Θεόν ) A technical phrase in Jewish liturgical language to denote the functi...

Those things which pertain to God ( τὰ πρὸς τὸν Θεόν )

A technical phrase in Jewish liturgical language to denote the functions of worship (Heb 2:17; Heb 5:1). According with the sacerdotal ideas of the previous verse.

Vincent: Rom 15:19 - Signs - wonders Signs - wonders See on Mat 11:20.

Signs - wonders

See on Mat 11:20.

Vincent: Rom 15:19 - Round about Round about ( κύκλῳ ) Not, in a circuitous track to Illyricum, but Jerusalem and the regions round it. For the phrase, see Mar 3:34; Mar...

Round about ( κύκλῳ )

Not, in a circuitous track to Illyricum, but Jerusalem and the regions round it. For the phrase, see Mar 3:34; Mar 6:6, Mar 6:36; Luk 9:12; Rev 4:6. For the facts , Acts 13, 19.

Vincent: Rom 15:19 - Illyricum Illyricum Lying between Italy, Germany, Macedonia, and Thrace, bounded by the Adriatic and the Danube. The usual Greek name was Illyris. The name...

Illyricum

Lying between Italy, Germany, Macedonia, and Thrace, bounded by the Adriatic and the Danube. The usual Greek name was Illyris. The name Illyria occurs in both Greek and Latin. Though the shore was full of fine harbors and the coast-land fertile, Greek civilization never spread on the coast. Dyrrachium or Epidamnus was almost the only Greek colony, and its history for centuries was a continuous conflict with the barbarous nations. In the time of the Roman Empire the name spread over all the surrounding districts. In the division between the Eastern and Western Empire it was divided into Illyris Barbara, annexed to the Western Empires and Illyris Graeca, to the Eastern, including, Greece, Epirus, and Macedonia. The name gradually disappeared, and the country was divided between the states of Bosnia, Croatia, Servia, Rascia, and Dalmatia. No mention of a visit of Paul occurs in the Acts. It may have taken place in the journey mentioned Act 20:1-3.

Vincent: Rom 15:19 - Fully preached Fully preached ( πεπληρωκέναι ) Lit., fulfilled Some explain, have given the Gospel its fall development so that it has reached e...

Fully preached ( πεπληρωκέναι )

Lit., fulfilled Some explain, have given the Gospel its fall development so that it has reached every quarter.

Vincent: Rom 15:20 - Have I strived Have I strived ( φιλοτιμούμενον ) The verb means originally to be fond of honor , and hence, from a love of honor, to ...

Have I strived ( φιλοτιμούμενον )

The verb means originally to be fond of honor , and hence, from a love of honor, to strive , be ambitious . Compare 2Co 5:9; 1Th 4:11. The correct sense is to prosecute as a point of honor .

Vincent: Rom 15:20 - Foundation Foundation ( θεμέλιον ) See on settle , 1Pe 5:10.

Foundation ( θεμέλιον )

See on settle , 1Pe 5:10.

Vincent: Rom 15:22 - I have been hindered I have been hindered ( ἐνεκοπτόμην ) Imperfect tense, denoting continuousness, and implying a succession of hindrances. Rev., was...

I have been hindered ( ἐνεκοπτόμην )

Imperfect tense, denoting continuousness, and implying a succession of hindrances. Rev., was hindered . Hence these many times .

Vincent: Rom 15:23 - Place Place ( τόπον ) Scope , opportunity . So of Esau, Heb 12:17. Compare Rom 12:19; Eph 4:27.

Place ( τόπον )

Scope , opportunity . So of Esau, Heb 12:17. Compare Rom 12:19; Eph 4:27.

Vincent: Rom 15:23 - Many Many ( ἱκανῶν ) See on worthy , Luk 7:6. The primary meaning is sufficient , and hence comes to be applied to number and quantity; m...

Many ( ἱκανῶν )

See on worthy , Luk 7:6. The primary meaning is sufficient , and hence comes to be applied to number and quantity; many , enough , as Mar 10:46; Luk 8:32; Act 9:23, etc. So, long , of time (Act 8:11; Act 27:9). Worthy , i.e., sufficient for an honor or a place (Mar 1:7; Luk 7:6; 1Co 15:9). Adequate (2Co 2:16; 2Co 3:5). Qualified (2Ti 2:2). Here the sense might be expressed by for years enough .

Vincent: Rom 15:24 - Spain Spain The usual Greek name is Iberia . Paul adopts a modification of the Roman name, Hispania .

Spain

The usual Greek name is Iberia . Paul adopts a modification of the Roman name, Hispania .

Vincent: Rom 15:24 - In my journey In my journey ( διαπορευόμενος ) Lit., journeying through , or as I pass through .

In my journey ( διαπορευόμενος )

Lit., journeying through , or as I pass through .

Vincent: Rom 15:24 - To be brought on my way To be brought on my way ( προπεμφθῆναι ) Escorted. See on Act 15:3.

To be brought on my way ( προπεμφθῆναι )

Escorted. See on Act 15:3.

Vincent: Rom 15:24 - Filled Filled ( ἐμπλησθῶ ) Lit., filled full: satiated. Compare Act 14:17; Luk 1:53. Rev., satisfied .

Filled ( ἐμπλησθῶ )

Lit., filled full: satiated. Compare Act 14:17; Luk 1:53. Rev., satisfied .

Vincent: Rom 15:26 - Contribution Contribution ( κοινωνίαν ) See on fellowship , Act 2:42.

Contribution ( κοινωνίαν )

See on fellowship , Act 2:42.

Vincent: Rom 15:26 - Poor saints Poor saints ( πτωχοὺς τῶν ἁγίων ) More literally, and better, the poor of the saints . Rev., among the saints. ...

Poor saints ( πτωχοὺς τῶν ἁγίων )

More literally, and better, the poor of the saints . Rev., among the saints. All the saints were not poor.

Vincent: Rom 15:27 - To minister To minister ( λειτουργῆσαι ) See on Rom 13:6. By using this word for priestly service, Paul puts the ministry of almsgiving on th...

To minister ( λειτουργῆσαι )

See on Rom 13:6. By using this word for priestly service, Paul puts the ministry of almsgiving on the footing of a sacrificial service. It expresses the worship of giving.

Vincent: Rom 15:28 - Sealed - this fruit Sealed - this fruit Secured to them the product of the contribution. See on Joh 3:33; see on Rev 22:10.

Sealed - this fruit

Secured to them the product of the contribution. See on Joh 3:33; see on Rev 22:10.

Vincent: Rom 15:29 - Gospel Gospel Omit, and read blessing of Christ .

Gospel

Omit, and read blessing of Christ .

Vincent: Rom 15:30 - Strive together Strive together ( συναγωνίσασθαι ) The simple verb is used of contending in the games, and implies strenuous effort. Here earnes...

Strive together ( συναγωνίσασθαι )

The simple verb is used of contending in the games, and implies strenuous effort. Here earnest prayer.

Vincent: Rom 15:31 - Them that do not believe Them that do not believe ( τῶν ἀπειθούντων ) See on Rom 10:21. Better, Rev., them that are disobedient .

Them that do not believe ( τῶν ἀπειθούντων )

See on Rom 10:21. Better, Rev., them that are disobedient .

Vincent: Rom 15:32 - With you be refreshed With you be refreshed ( συναναπαύσωμαι ὑμῖν ) See on give rest , Mat 11:28.

With you be refreshed ( συναναπαύσωμαι ὑμῖν )

See on give rest , Mat 11:28.

Wesley: Rom 15:1 - We who are strong Of a clearer judgment, and free from these scruples.

Of a clearer judgment, and free from these scruples.

Wesley: Rom 15:1 - And not to please ourselves Without any regard to others.

Without any regard to others.

Wesley: Rom 15:2 - For his good This is a general word: edification is one species of good.

This is a general word: edification is one species of good.

Wesley: Rom 15:3 - -- But bore not only the infirmities, but reproaches, of his brethren; and so fulfilled that scripture. Psa 69:9

But bore not only the infirmities, but reproaches, of his brethren; and so fulfilled that scripture. Psa 69:9

Wesley: Rom 15:4 - Aforetime In the Old Testament.

In the Old Testament.

Wesley: Rom 15:4 - That we through patience and consolation of the scriptures may have hope That through the consolation which God gives us by these, we may have patience and a joyful hope.

That through the consolation which God gives us by these, we may have patience and a joyful hope.

Wesley: Rom 15:5 - -- According to the power of Christ Jesus.

According to the power of Christ Jesus.

Wesley: Rom 15:6 - That ye Both Jews and gentiles, believing with one mind, and confessing with one mouth.

Both Jews and gentiles, believing with one mind, and confessing with one mouth.

Wesley: Rom 15:7 - Receive ye one another Weak and strong, with mutual love.

Weak and strong, with mutual love.

Wesley: Rom 15:8 - Now I say The apostle here shows how Christ received us.

The apostle here shows how Christ received us.

Wesley: Rom 15:8 - Christ Jesus Jesus is the name, Christ the surname. The latter was first known to the Jews; the former, to the gentiles. Therefore he is styled Jesus Christ, when ...

Jesus is the name, Christ the surname. The latter was first known to the Jews; the former, to the gentiles. Therefore he is styled Jesus Christ, when the words stand in the common, natural order. When the order is inverted, as here, the office of Christ is more solemnly considered.

Wesley: Rom 15:8 - Was a servant Of his Father.

Of his Father.

Wesley: Rom 15:8 - Of the circumcision For the salvation of the circumcised, the Jews.

For the salvation of the circumcised, the Jews.

Wesley: Rom 15:8 - For the truth of God To manifest the truth and fidelity of God.

To manifest the truth and fidelity of God.

Wesley: Rom 15:9 - As it is written In the eighteenth psalm, here the gentiles and Jews are spoken of as joining in the worship of the God of Israel. Psa 18:49

In the eighteenth psalm, here the gentiles and Jews are spoken of as joining in the worship of the God of Israel. Psa 18:49

Wesley: Rom 15:10 - -- Deu 32:43.

Wesley: Rom 15:11 - -- Psa 117:1.

Wesley: Rom 15:12 - There shall be the root of Jesse That kings and the Messiah should spring from his house, was promised to Jesse before it was to David.

That kings and the Messiah should spring from his house, was promised to Jesse before it was to David.

Wesley: Rom 15:12 - In him shall the gentiles hope Who before had been "without hope," Eph 2:12. Isa 11:10

Who before had been "without hope," Eph 2:12. Isa 11:10

Wesley: Rom 15:13 - Now the God of hope A glorious title of God, but till now unknown to the heathens; for their goddess Hope, like their other idols, was nothing; whose temple at Rome was b...

A glorious title of God, but till now unknown to the heathens; for their goddess Hope, like their other idols, was nothing; whose temple at Rome was burned by lightning. It was, indeed, built again not long after, but was again burned to the ground.

Wesley: Rom 15:14 - -- There are several conclusions of this Epistle. The first begins at this verse; the second, Rom 16:1; the third, Rom 16:17; the fourth, Rom 16:21; ...

There are several conclusions of this Epistle.

The first begins at this verse;

the second, Rom 16:1;

the third, Rom 16:17;

the fourth, Rom 16:21;

and the fifth, Rom 16:25;

Wesley: Rom 15:14 - Ye are full of goodness By being created anew.

By being created anew.

Wesley: Rom 15:14 - And filled with all knowledge By long experience of the things of God.

By long experience of the things of God.

Wesley: Rom 15:14 - To admonish To instruct and confirm.

To instruct and confirm.

Wesley: Rom 15:15 - Because of the grace That is, because I am an apostle of the gentiles.

That is, because I am an apostle of the gentiles.

Wesley: Rom 15:16 - The offering up of the gentiles As living sacrifices.

As living sacrifices.

Wesley: Rom 15:17 - I have whereof to glory through Jesus Christ All my glorying is in and through him.

All my glorying is in and through him.

Wesley: Rom 15:18 - By word By the power of the Spirit.

By the power of the Spirit.

Wesley: Rom 15:18 - By deed Namely, through "mighty signs and wonders."

Namely, through "mighty signs and wonders."

Wesley: Rom 15:20 - Not where Christ had been named These places he generally declined, though not altogether, having an holy ambition (so the Greek word means) to make the first proclamation of the gos...

These places he generally declined, though not altogether, having an holy ambition (so the Greek word means) to make the first proclamation of the gospel in places where it was quite unheard of, in spite of all the difficulty and dangers that attended it.

Wesley: Rom 15:20 - Lest I should only build upon another man's foundation The providence of God seemed in a special manner, generally, to prevent this, though not entirely, lest the enemies of the apostle, who sought every o...

The providence of God seemed in a special manner, generally, to prevent this, though not entirely, lest the enemies of the apostle, who sought every occasion to set light by him, should have had room to say that he was behind other apostles, not being sufficient for planting of churches himself, but only for preaching where others had been already; or that he declined the more difficult part of the ministry

Wesley: Rom 15:21 - -- Isa 52:15.

Wesley: Rom 15:22 - Therefore I have been long hindered from coming to you Among whom Christ had been named.

Among whom Christ had been named.

Wesley: Rom 15:23 - Having no longer place in these parts Where Christ has now been preached in every city.

Where Christ has now been preached in every city.

Wesley: Rom 15:24 - Into Spain Where the gospel had not yet been preached.

Where the gospel had not yet been preached.

Wesley: Rom 15:24 - If first I may be somewhat satisfied with your company How remarkable is the modesty with which he speaks! They might rather desire to be satisfied with his.

How remarkable is the modesty with which he speaks! They might rather desire to be satisfied with his.

Wesley: Rom 15:24 - Somewhat satisfied Intimating the shortness of his stay; or, perhaps, that Christ alone can throughly satisfy the soul.

Intimating the shortness of his stay; or, perhaps, that Christ alone can throughly satisfy the soul.

Wesley: Rom 15:26 - The poor of the saints that are in Jerusalem It can by no means be inferred from this expression, that the community of goods among the Christians was then ceased. All that can be gathered from i...

It can by no means be inferred from this expression, that the community of goods among the Christians was then ceased. All that can be gathered from it is, that in this time of extreme dearth, Act 11:28-29, some of the church in Jerusalem were in want; the rest being barely able to subsist themselves, but not to supply the necessities of their brethren.

Wesley: Rom 15:27 - It hath pleased them; and they are their debtors That is, they are bound to it, in justice as well as mercy.

That is, they are bound to it, in justice as well as mercy.

Wesley: Rom 15:27 - Spiritual things By the preaching of the gospel.

By the preaching of the gospel.

Wesley: Rom 15:27 - Carnal things Things needful for the body.

Things needful for the body.

Wesley: Rom 15:28 - When I have sealed to them this fruit When I have safely delivered to them, as under seal, this fruit of their brethren's love.

When I have safely delivered to them, as under seal, this fruit of their brethren's love.

Wesley: Rom 15:28 - I will go by you into Spain Such was his design; but it does not appear that Paul went into Spain. There are often holy purposes in the minds of good men, which are overruled by ...

Such was his design; but it does not appear that Paul went into Spain. There are often holy purposes in the minds of good men, which are overruled by the providence of God so as never to take effect. And yet they are precious in the sight of God.

Wesley: Rom 15:30 - I beseech you by the love of the Spirit That is, by the love which is the genuine fruit of the Spirit.

That is, by the love which is the genuine fruit of the Spirit.

Wesley: Rom 15:30 - To strive together with me in your prayers He must pray himself, who would have others strive together with him in prayer. Of all the apostles, St. Paul alone is recorded to desire the prayers ...

He must pray himself, who would have others strive together with him in prayer. Of all the apostles, St. Paul alone is recorded to desire the prayers of the faithful for himself. And this he generally does in the conclusions of his Epistles; yet not without making a difference. For he speaks in one manner to them whom he treats as his children, with the gravity or even severity of a father, such as Timothy, Titus, the Corinthians, and Galatians; in another, to them whom he treats rather like equals, such as the Romans, Ephesians, Thessalonians, Colossians, Hebrews.

Wesley: Rom 15:31 - That I may be delivered He is thus urgent from a sense of the importance of his life to the church. Otherwise he would have rejoiced "to depart, and to be with Christ." And t...

He is thus urgent from a sense of the importance of his life to the church. Otherwise he would have rejoiced "to depart, and to be with Christ." And that my service may be acceptable - In spite of all their prejudices; to the end the Jewish and gentile believers may be knit together in tender love.

Wesley: Rom 15:32 - That I may come to you This refers to the former, With joy - To the latter, part of the preceding verse.

This refers to the former, With joy - To the latter, part of the preceding verse.

JFB: Rom 15:1 - We then that are strong On such points as have been discussed, the abolition of the Jewish distinction of meats and days under the Gospel. See on Rom 14:14; Rom 14:20.

On such points as have been discussed, the abolition of the Jewish distinction of meats and days under the Gospel. See on Rom 14:14; Rom 14:20.

JFB: Rom 15:1 - ought . . . not to please ourselves Ought to think less of what we may lawfully do than of how our conduct will affect others.

Ought to think less of what we may lawfully do than of how our conduct will affect others.

JFB: Rom 15:2-3 - Let every one of us Lay himself out to

Lay himself out to

JFB: Rom 15:2-3 - please his neighbour Not indeed for his mere gratification, but

Not indeed for his mere gratification, but

JFB: Rom 15:2-3 - for his good With a view to his edification.

With a view

to his edification.

JFB: Rom 15:3 - For even Christ pleased not Lived not to please

Lived not to please

JFB: Rom 15:3 - himself; but, as it is written (Psa 69:9).

JFB: Rom 15:3 - The reproaches, &c. See Mar 10:42-45.

JFB: Rom 15:4 - For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning "instruction"

"instruction"

JFB: Rom 15:4 - through, &c. "through the comfort and the patience of the Scriptures"

"through the comfort and the patience of the Scriptures"

JFB: Rom 15:4 - might have hope That is, "Think not that because such portions of Scripture relate immediately to Christ, they are inapplicable to you; for though Christ's sufferings...

That is, "Think not that because such portions of Scripture relate immediately to Christ, they are inapplicable to you; for though Christ's sufferings, as a Saviour, were exclusively His own, the motives that prompted them, the spirit in which they were endured, and the general principle involved in His whole work--self-sacrifice for the good of others--furnish our most perfect and beautiful model; and so all Scripture relating to these is for our instruction; and since the duty of forbearance, the strong with the weak, requires 'patience,' and this again needs 'comfort,' all those Scriptures which tell of patience and consolation, particularly of the patience of Christ, and of the consolation which sustained Him under it, are our appointed and appropriate nutriment, ministering to us 'hope' of that blessed day when these shall no more be needed." See on Rom 4:7, Note 7. (For the same connection between "patience and hope" see on Rom 12:12, and 1Th 1:3).

JFB: Rom 15:5-6 - Now the God of patience and consolation Such beautiful names of God are taken from the graces which He inspires: as "the God of hope" (Rom 15:13), "the God of peace" (Rom 15:33).

Such beautiful names of God are taken from the graces which He inspires: as "the God of hope" (Rom 15:13), "the God of peace" (Rom 15:33).

JFB: Rom 15:5-6 - grant you to be likeminded "of the same mind"

"of the same mind"

JFB: Rom 15:5-6 - according to Christ Jesus It is not mere unanimity which the apostle seeks for them; for unanimity in evil is to be deprecated. But it is "according to Christ Jesus"--after the...

It is not mere unanimity which the apostle seeks for them; for unanimity in evil is to be deprecated. But it is "according to Christ Jesus"--after the sublimest model of Him whose all-absorbing desire was to do, "not His own will, but the will of Him that sent Him" (Joh 6:38).

JFB: Rom 15:6 - That, &c. Rather, "that with one accord ye may with one mouth glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ"; the mind and the mouth of all giving harmoni...

Rather, "that with one accord ye may with one mouth glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ"; the mind and the mouth of all giving harmonious glory to His name. What a prayer! And shall this never be realized on earth?

JFB: Rom 15:7 - Wherefore Returning to the point

Returning to the point

JFB: Rom 15:7 - receive ye one another . . . to the glory of God If Christ received us, and bears with all our weaknesses, well may we receive and compassionate one with another, and by so doing God will be glorifie...

If Christ received us, and bears with all our weaknesses, well may we receive and compassionate one with another, and by so doing God will be glorified.

JFB: Rom 15:8-12 - Now "For" is the true reading: the apostle is merely assigning an additional motive to Christian forbearance.

"For" is the true reading: the apostle is merely assigning an additional motive to Christian forbearance.

JFB: Rom 15:8-12 - I say that Jesus Christ was "hath become"

"hath become"

JFB: Rom 15:8-12 - a minister of the circumcision A remarkable expression, meaning "the Father's Servant for the salvation of the circumcision (or, of Israel)."

A remarkable expression, meaning "the Father's Servant for the salvation of the circumcision (or, of Israel)."

JFB: Rom 15:8-12 - for the truth of God To make good the veracity of God towards His ancient people.

To make good the veracity of God towards His ancient people.

JFB: Rom 15:8-12 - to confirm the Messianic

Messianic

JFB: Rom 15:8-12 - promises made unto the fathers To cheer the Jewish believers, whom he might seem to have been disparaging, and to keep down Gentile pride, the apostle holds up Israel's salvation as...

To cheer the Jewish believers, whom he might seem to have been disparaging, and to keep down Gentile pride, the apostle holds up Israel's salvation as the primary end of Christ's mission. But next after this, Christ was sent.

JFB: Rom 15:9 - that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy A number of quotations from the Old Testament here follow, to show that God's plan of mercy embraced, from the first, the Gentiles along with the Jews...

A number of quotations from the Old Testament here follow, to show that God's plan of mercy embraced, from the first, the Gentiles along with the Jews.

JFB: Rom 15:9 - as it is written (Psa 18:49).

JFB: Rom 15:9 - I will confess to That is, glorify thee among the Gentiles.

That is, glorify

thee among the Gentiles.

JFB: Rom 15:10 - And again (Deu 32:43, though there is some difficulty in the Hebrew).

(Deu 32:43, though there is some difficulty in the Hebrew).

JFB: Rom 15:10 - Rejoice, ye Gentiles Along

Along

JFB: Rom 15:10 - with his people Israel.

Israel.

JFB: Rom 15:11 - And again (Psa 117:1).

JFB: Rom 15:11 - Praise the Lord, all ye Gentiles; and laud him, all ye people "peoples"--the various nations outside the pale of Judaism.

"peoples"--the various nations outside the pale of Judaism.

JFB: Rom 15:12 - And again, Esaias saith (Isa 11:10).

JFB: Rom 15:12 - There shall be a "the"

"the"

JFB: Rom 15:12 - root of Jesse Meaning, not "He from whom Jesse sprang," but "He that is sprung from Jesse" (that is, Jesse's son David)--see Rev 22:16.

Meaning, not "He from whom Jesse sprang," but "He that is sprung from Jesse" (that is, Jesse's son David)--see Rev 22:16.

JFB: Rom 15:12 - and he that shall rise, &c. So the Septuagint in substantial, though not verbal, agreement with the original.

So the Septuagint in substantial, though not verbal, agreement with the original.

JFB: Rom 15:13 - Now, &c. This seems a concluding prayer, suggested by the whole preceding subject matter of the epistle.

This seems a concluding prayer, suggested by the whole preceding subject matter of the epistle.

JFB: Rom 15:13 - the God of hope (See on Rom 15:5).

(See on Rom 15:5).

JFB: Rom 15:13 - fill you with all joy and peace in believing The native truth of that faith which is the great theme of this epistle (compare Gal 5:22).

The native truth of that faith which is the great theme of this epistle (compare Gal 5:22).

JFB: Rom 15:13 - that ye may abound in hope "of the glory of God." (See on Rom 5:1).

"of the glory of God." (See on Rom 5:1).

JFB: Rom 15:13 - through the power of the Holy Ghost To whom, in the economy of redemption, it belongs to inspire believers with all gracious affections. On the foregoing portion, Note, (1) No Christian...

To whom, in the economy of redemption, it belongs to inspire believers with all gracious affections.

On the foregoing portion, Note, (1) No Christian is at liberty to regard himself as an isolated disciple of the Lord Jesus, having to decide questions of duty and liberty solely with reference to himself. As Christians are one body in Christ, so the great law of love binds them to act in all things with tenderness and consideration for their brethren in "the common salvation" (Rom 15:1-2). (2) Of this unselfishness CHRIST is the perfect model of all Christians (Rom 15:3). (3) Holy Scripture is the divine storehouse of all furniture for the Christian life, even in its most trying and delicate features (Rom 15:4). (4) The harmonious glorification of the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ by the whole body of the redeemed, as it is the most exalted fruit of the scheme of redemption, so it is the last end of God in it (Rom 15:5-7).

JFB: Rom 15:14-15 - And, &c. Rather, "Now I am persuaded, my brethren, even I myself, concerning you"

Rather, "Now I am persuaded, my brethren, even I myself, concerning you"

JFB: Rom 15:14-15 - that ye also yourselves are full of goodness Of inclination to all I have been enjoining on you

Of inclination to all I have been enjoining on you

JFB: Rom 15:14-15 - filled with all knowledge Of the truth expounded

Of the truth expounded

JFB: Rom 15:14-15 - and able Without my intervention. to admonish one another.

Without my intervention.

to admonish one another.

JFB: Rom 15:15 - Nevertheless, I have written the more boldly unto you in some sort "measure"

"measure"

JFB: Rom 15:15 - as putting you in mind, because of the grace that is given to me of God As an apostle of Jesus Christ.

As an apostle of Jesus Christ.

JFB: Rom 15:16 - that I should be the Rather, "a"

Rather, "a"

JFB: Rom 15:16 - minister The word here used is commonly employed to express the office of the priesthood, from which accordingly the figurative language of the rest of the ver...

The word here used is commonly employed to express the office of the priesthood, from which accordingly the figurative language of the rest of the verse is taken.

JFB: Rom 15:16 - of Jesus Christ "Christ Jesus," according to the true reading.

"Christ Jesus," according to the true reading.

JFB: Rom 15:16 - to the Gentiles A further proof that the Epistle was addressed to a Gentile church. (See on Rom 1:13).

A further proof that the Epistle was addressed to a Gentile church. (See on Rom 1:13).

JFB: Rom 15:16 - ministering the gospel of God As the word here is a still more priestly one, it should be rendered, "ministering as a priest in the Gospel of God."

As the word here is a still more priestly one, it should be rendered, "ministering as a priest in the Gospel of God."

JFB: Rom 15:16 - that the offering up of the Gentiles As an oblation to God, in their converted character.

As an oblation to God, in their converted character.

JFB: Rom 15:16 - might be acceptable, being sanctified by the Holy Ghost The end to which the ancient offerings typically looked.

The end to which the ancient offerings typically looked.

JFB: Rom 15:17 - I have therefore whereof I may glory Or (adding the article, as the reading seems to be), "I have my glorying."

Or (adding the article, as the reading seems to be), "I have my glorying."

JFB: Rom 15:17 - through "in"

"in"

JFB: Rom 15:17 - Christ Jesus in those things which pertain to God The things of the ministry committed to me of God.

The things of the ministry committed to me of God.

JFB: Rom 15:18-22 - For I will not dare to speak of any "to speak aught"

"to speak aught"

JFB: Rom 15:18-22 - of those things which Christ hath not wrought by me A modest, though somewhat obscure form of expression, meaning, "I will not dare to go beyond what Christ hath wrought by me"--in which form accordingl...

A modest, though somewhat obscure form of expression, meaning, "I will not dare to go beyond what Christ hath wrought by me"--in which form accordingly the rest of the passage is expressed. Observe here how Paul ascribes all the success of his labors to the activity of the living Redeemer, working in and by him.

JFB: Rom 15:18-22 - by word and deed By preaching and working; which latter he explains in the next clause.

By preaching and working; which latter he explains in the next clause.

JFB: Rom 15:19 - Through mighty Literally, "in the power of"

Literally, "in the power of"

JFB: Rom 15:19 - signs and wonders That is, glorious miracles.

That is, glorious miracles.

JFB: Rom 15:19 - by the power of the Spirit of God "the Holy Ghost," as the true reading seems to be. This seems intended to explain the efficacy of the word preached, as well as the working of the mir...

"the Holy Ghost," as the true reading seems to be. This seems intended to explain the efficacy of the word preached, as well as the working of the miracles which attested it.

JFB: Rom 15:19 - so that from Jerusalem, and round about unto "as far as"

"as far as"

JFB: Rom 15:19 - Illyricum To the extreme northwestern boundary of Greece. It corresponds to the modern Croatia and Dalmatia (2Ti 4:10). See Act 20:1-2. I have fully preached ...

To the extreme northwestern boundary of Greece. It corresponds to the modern Croatia and Dalmatia (2Ti 4:10). See Act 20:1-2.

I have fully preached the gospel of Christ.

JFB: Rom 15:20-21 - Yea, &c. Rather, "Yet making it my study (compare 2Co 5:9; 1Th 4:11, Greek) so to preach the Gospel, not where Christ was [already] named, that I might not bui...

Rather, "Yet making it my study (compare 2Co 5:9; 1Th 4:11, Greek) so to preach the Gospel, not where Christ was [already] named, that I might not build upon another man's foundation: but (might act) as it is written, To whom no tidings of Him came, they shall see," &c.

JFB: Rom 15:22 - For which cause "Being so long occupied with this missionary work, I have been much (or, 'for the most part') hindered," &c. (See on Rom 1:9-11.)

"Being so long occupied with this missionary work, I have been much (or, 'for the most part') hindered," &c. (See on Rom 1:9-11.)

JFB: Rom 15:23-24 - But now having no more place "no longer having place"--that is, unbroken ground, where Christ has not been preached.

"no longer having place"--that is, unbroken ground, where Christ has not been preached.

JFB: Rom 15:23-24 - and having a great desire "a longing"

"a longing"

JFB: Rom 15:23-24 - these many years to come unto you (as before, see on Rom 1:9-11).

(as before, see on Rom 1:9-11).

JFB: Rom 15:24 - whensoever I take my journey into Spain Whether this purpose was ever accomplished has been much disputed, as no record of it nor allusion to it anywhere occurs. Those who think our apostle ...

Whether this purpose was ever accomplished has been much disputed, as no record of it nor allusion to it anywhere occurs. Those who think our apostle was never at large after his first imprisonment at Rome will of course hold that it never was; while those who are persuaded, as we are, that he underwent a second imprisonment, prior to which he was at large for a considerable time after his first, incline naturally to the other opinion.

JFB: Rom 15:24 - I will come to you If these words were not originally in the text, and there is weighty evidence against them, they must at least be inserted as a necessary supplement.

If these words were not originally in the text, and there is weighty evidence against them, they must at least be inserted as a necessary supplement.

JFB: Rom 15:24 - in my journey, &c. "as I pass through by you, to be set forward on my journey thither, if first I be somewhat filled with your company": that is, "I should indeed like t...

"as I pass through by you, to be set forward on my journey thither, if first I be somewhat filled with your company": that is, "I should indeed like to stay longer with you than I can hope to do, but I must, to some extent at least, have my fill of your company."

JFB: Rom 15:25-27 - But now I go to Jerusalem to minister "ministering"

"ministering"

JFB: Rom 15:25-27 - to the saints In the sense immediately to be explained.

In the sense immediately to be explained.

JFB: Rom 15:26 - For, &c. Better, "For Macedonia and Achaia have thought good to make a certain contribution for the poor of the saints which are at Jerusalem." (See Act 24:17)...

Better, "For Macedonia and Achaia have thought good to make a certain contribution for the poor of the saints which are at Jerusalem." (See Act 24:17). "They have thought it good; and their debtors verily they are"; that is, "And well they may, considering what the Gentile believers owe to their Jewish brethren."

JFB: Rom 15:27 - For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, their duty is also "they owe it also"

"they owe it also"

JFB: Rom 15:27 - to minister unto them in carnal things (Compare 1Co 9:11; Gal 6:6; and see Luk 7:4; Act 10:2).

(Compare 1Co 9:11; Gal 6:6; and see Luk 7:4; Act 10:2).

JFB: Rom 15:28-29 - When therefore I have . . . sealed That is, delivered over safely

That is, delivered over safely

JFB: Rom 15:28-29 - to them this fruit Of the faith and love of the Gentile converts

Of the faith and love of the Gentile converts

JFB: Rom 15:28-29 - I will come "come back," or "return"

"come back," or "return"

JFB: Rom 15:28-29 - by you into Spain (See on Rom 15:24).

(See on Rom 15:24).

JFB: Rom 15:29 - And I am sure "I know"

"I know"

JFB: Rom 15:29 - that . . . I shall come in the fulness of the blessing of Christ Such, beyond all doubts, is the true reading, the words "of the gospel" being in hardly any manuscripts of antiquity and authority. Nor was the apostl...

Such, beyond all doubts, is the true reading, the words "of the gospel" being in hardly any manuscripts of antiquity and authority. Nor was the apostle mistaken in this confidence, though his visit to Rome was in very different circumstances from what he expected. See Acts 28:16-31.

JFB: Rom 15:30 - Now I beseech you, brethren, for the Lord Jesus Christ's sake, and for the love of the Spirit Or, "by the Lord Jesus Christ, and by the love of the Spirit"--not the love which the Spirit bears to us, but that love which He kindles in the hearts...

Or, "by the Lord Jesus Christ, and by the love of the Spirit"--not the love which the Spirit bears to us, but that love which He kindles in the hearts of believers towards each other; that is "By that Saviour whose name is alike dear to all of us and whose unsearchable riches I live only to proclaim, and by that love one to another which the blessed Spirit diffuses through all the brotherhood, making the labors of Christ's servants a matter of common interest to all--I beseech you."

JFB: Rom 15:30 - that ye strive together with me in your prayers to God for me Implying that he had his grounds for anxious fear in this matter.

Implying that he had his grounds for anxious fear in this matter.

JFB: Rom 15:31 - That I may be delivered from them that do not believe "that do not obey," that is, the truth, by believing it; as in Rom 2:8.

"that do not obey," that is, the truth, by believing it; as in Rom 2:8.

JFB: Rom 15:31 - in Judea He saw the storm that was gathering over him in Judea, which, if at all, would certainly burst upon his head when he reached the capital; and the even...

He saw the storm that was gathering over him in Judea, which, if at all, would certainly burst upon his head when he reached the capital; and the event too clearly showed the correctness of these apprehensions.

JFB: Rom 15:31 - and that my service which I have for Jerusalem (See on Rom 15:25-28).

(See on Rom 15:25-28).

JFB: Rom 15:31 - may be accepted of "prove acceptable to"

"prove acceptable to"

JFB: Rom 15:31 - the saints Nor was he without apprehension lest the opposition he had made to the narrow jealousy of the Jewish converts against the free reception of their Gent...

Nor was he without apprehension lest the opposition he had made to the narrow jealousy of the Jewish converts against the free reception of their Gentile brethren, should make this gift of theirs to the poor saints at Jerusalem less welcome than it ought to be. He would have the Romans therefore to join him in wrestling with God that this gift might be gratefully received, and prove a cement between the two parties. But further.

JFB: Rom 15:32 - That I may come unto you with "in"

"in"

JFB: Rom 15:32 - joy by the will of God (Act 18:21; 1Co 4:19; 1Co 16:7; Heb 6:3; Jam 4:15)

JFB: Rom 15:32 - and may with you be refreshed Rather, "with you refresh myself," after all his labors and anxieties, and so be refitted for future service.

Rather, "with you refresh myself," after all his labors and anxieties, and so be refitted for future service.

JFB: Rom 15:33 - Now the God of peace be with you all. Amen The peace here sought is to be taken in its widest sense: the peace of reconciliation to God, first, "through the blood of the everlasting covenant" (...

The peace here sought is to be taken in its widest sense: the peace of reconciliation to God, first, "through the blood of the everlasting covenant" (Heb 13:20; 1Th 5:23; 2Th 3:16; Phi 4:9); then the peace which that reconciliation diffuses among all the partakers of it (1Co 14:33; 2Co 13:11; and see on Rom 16:20); more widely still, that peace which the children of God, in beautiful imitation of their Father in Heaven, are called and privileged to diffuse far and wide through this sin-distracted and divided world (Rom 12:18; Mat 5:9; Heb 12:14; Jam 3:18).

JFB: Rom 15:33 - Note, (1) Did "the chiefest of the apostles" apologize for writing to a Christian church which he had never seen, and a church that he was persuaded was above the need of it, save to "stir up their pure minds by way of remembrance" (2Pe 1:13; 2Pe 3:1); and did he put even this upon the sole plea of apostolic responsibility (Rom 15:14-16)? What a contrast is thus presented to hierarchical pride, and in particular to the affected humility of the bishop of this very Rome! How close the bond which the one spirit draws between ministers and people How wide the separation produced by the other! (2) There is in the Christian Church no real priesthood, and none but figurative sacrifices. Had it bee...

How wide the separation produced by the other! (2) There is in the Christian Church no real priesthood, and none but figurative sacrifices. Had it been otherwise, it is inconceivable that Rom 15:16 should have been expressed as it is. Paul's only priesthood and sacrificial offerings lay, first, in ministering to them as "the apostle of the Gentiles," not the sacrament with the "real presence" of Christ in it, or the sacrifice of the mass, but "the Gospel of God," and then, when gathered under the wing of Christ, presenting them to God as a grateful offering, "being sanctified [not by sacrificial gifts, but] by the Holy Ghost." (See Heb 13:9-16). (3) Though the debt we owe to those by whom we have been brought to Christ can never be discharged, we should feel it a privilege when we render them any lower benefit in return (Rom 15:26-27). (4) Formidable designs against the truth and the servants of Christ should, above all other ways of counteracting them, be met by combined prayer to Him who rules all hearts and controls all events; and the darker the cloud, the more resolutely should all to whom Christ's cause is dear "strive together in their prayers to God" for the removal of it (Rom 15:30-31). (5) Christian fellowship is so precious that the most eminent servants of Christ, amid the toils and trials of their work, find it refreshing and invigorating; and it is no good sign of any ecclesiastic, that he deems it beneath him to seek and enjoy it even amongst the humblest saints in the Church of Christ (Rom 15:24, Rom 15:32).

Clarke: Rom 15:1 - We then that are strong We then that are strong - The sense of this verse is supposed to be the following: We, Gentile Christians, who perfectly understand the nature of ou...

We then that are strong - The sense of this verse is supposed to be the following: We, Gentile Christians, who perfectly understand the nature of our Gospel liberty, not only lawfully may, but are bound in duty to bear any inconveniences that may arise from the scruples of the weaker brethren, and to ease their consciences by prudently abstaining from such indifferent things as may offend and trouble them; and not take advantage from our superior knowledge to make them submit to our judgment.

Clarke: Rom 15:2 - Let every one of us please his neighbor Let every one of us please his neighbor - For it should be a maxim with each of us to do all in our power to please our brethren; and especially in ...

Let every one of us please his neighbor - For it should be a maxim with each of us to do all in our power to please our brethren; and especially in those things in which their spiritual edification is concerned. Though we should not indulge men in mere whims and caprices, yet we should bear with their ignorance and their weakness, knowing that others had much to bear with from us before we came to our present advanced state of religious knowledge.

Clarke: Rom 15:3 - For even Christ pleased not himself For even Christ pleased not himself - Christ never acted as one who sought his own ease or profit; he not only bore with the weakness, but with the ...

For even Christ pleased not himself - Christ never acted as one who sought his own ease or profit; he not only bore with the weakness, but with the insults, of his creatures; as it is written in Psa 69:9 : The reproaches of them that reproached thee fell on me - I not only bore their insults, but bore the punishment due to them for their vicious and abominable conduct. That this Psalm refers to the Messiah and his sufferings for mankind is evident, not only from the quotation here, but also from Joh 19:28, Joh 19:29, when our Lord’ s receiving the vinegar during his expiatory suffering is said to be a fulfilling of the scripture, viz. of Psa 69:21 of this very Psalm; and his cleansing the temple, Joh 2:15-17, is said to be a fulfillment of Psa 69:9 : For the zeal of thy house hath eaten me up, the former part of which verse the apostle quotes here.

Clarke: Rom 15:4 - For whatsoever things were written aforetime For whatsoever things were written aforetime - This refers not only to the quotation from the 69th Psalm, but to all the Old Testament scriptures; f...

For whatsoever things were written aforetime - This refers not only to the quotation from the 69th Psalm, but to all the Old Testament scriptures; for it can be to no other scriptures that the apostle alludes. And, from what he says here of them, we learn that God had not intended them merely for those generations in which they were first delivered, but for the instruction of all the succeeding generations of mankind. That we, through patience and comfort of the scriptures - that we, through those remarkable examples of patience exhibited by the saints and followers of God, whose history is given in those scriptures, and the comfort which they derived from God in their patient endurance of sufferings brought upon them through their faithful attachment to truth and righteousness, might have hope that we shall be upheld and blessed as they were, and our sufferings become the means of our greater advances in faith and holiness, and consequently our hope of eternal glory be the more confirmed. Some think that the word παρακλησις, which we translate comfort, should be rendered exhortation; but there is certainly no need here to leave the usual acceptation of the term, as the word comfort makes a regular and consistent sense with the rest of the verse.

Clarke: Rom 15:5 - Now the God of patience and consolation Now the God of patience and consolation - May that God who endued them with patience, and gave them the consolation that supported them in all their...

Now the God of patience and consolation - May that God who endued them with patience, and gave them the consolation that supported them in all their trials and afflictions, grant you to be like-minded - give you the same mode of thinking, and the same power of acting towards each other, according to the example of Christ.

Clarke: Rom 15:6 - That ye - Jews and Gentiles - may with one mind That ye - Jews and Gentiles - may with one mind - Thinking the same things, and bearing with each other, after the example of Christ; and one mouth,...

That ye - Jews and Gentiles - may with one mind - Thinking the same things, and bearing with each other, after the example of Christ; and one mouth, in all your religious assemblies, without jarring or contentions, glorify God for calling you into such a state of salvation, and showing himself to be your loving compassionate Father, as he is the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ

It is very likely that the apostle refers here to religious acts in public worship, which might have been greatly interrupted by the dissensions between the converted Jews and the converted Gentiles; these differences he labors to compose; and, after having done all that was necessary in the way of instruction and exhortation, he now pours out his soul to God, who alone could rule and manage the heart, that he would enable them to think the same things, to be of the same judgment, and that all, feeling their obligation to him, might join in the sweetest harmony in every act of religious worship.

Clarke: Rom 15:7 - Wherefore receive ye one another Wherefore receive ye one another - Προσλαμβανεσθε Have the most affectionate regard for each other, and acknowledge each other as th...

Wherefore receive ye one another - Προσλαμβανεσθε Have the most affectionate regard for each other, and acknowledge each other as the servants and children of God Almighty

Clarke: Rom 15:7 - As Christ also received us As Christ also received us - Καθως και ὁ Χριστος προσελαβετο ἡμας· In the same manner, and with the same cor...

As Christ also received us - Καθως και ὁ Χριστος προσελαβετο ἡμας· In the same manner, and with the same cordial affection, as Christ has received us into communion with himself, and has made us partakers of such inestimable blessings, condescending to be present in all our assemblies. And as Christ has received us thus to the glory of God, so should we, Jews and Gentiles, cordially receive each other, that God’ s glory may be promoted by our harmony and brotherly love.

Clarke: Rom 15:8 - Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision - To show the Gentiles the propriety of bearing with the scrupulous Jews, he shows them here that th...

Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision - To show the Gentiles the propriety of bearing with the scrupulous Jews, he shows them here that they were under the greatest obligations to this people; to whom, in the days of his flesh, Jesus Christ confined his ministry; giving the world to see that he allowed the claim of the Jews as having the first right to the blessings of the Gospel. And he confined his ministry thus to the Jews, to confirm the truth of God, contained in the promises made unto the patriarchs; for God had declared that thus it should be; and Jesus Christ, by coming according to the promise, has fulfilled this truth, by making good the promises: therefore, salvation is of the Jews, as a kind of right conveyed to them through the promises made to their fathers. But this salvation was not exclusively designed for the Jewish people; as God by his prophets had repeatedly declared.

Clarke: Rom 15:9 - And that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy And that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy - As the Jews were to glorify God for his truth, so the Gentiles were to glorify God for his m...

And that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy - As the Jews were to glorify God for his truth, so the Gentiles were to glorify God for his mercy. The Jews received the blessings of the Gospel by right of promise, which promise God had most punctually and circumstantially fulfilled. The Gentiles had received the same Gospel as an effect of God’ s mere mercy, having no right in consequence of any promise or engagement made with any of their ancestors, though they were originally included in the covenant made with Abraham; and the prophets had repeatedly declared that they should be made equal partakers of those blessings with the Jews themselves; as the apostle proceeds to prove

Clarke: Rom 15:9 - I will confess to thee among the Gentiles I will confess to thee among the Gentiles - This quotation is taken from Psa 18:49, and shows that the Gentiles had a right to glorify God for his m...

I will confess to thee among the Gentiles - This quotation is taken from Psa 18:49, and shows that the Gentiles had a right to glorify God for his mercy to them; and we shall see the strength of this saying farther, when we consider a maxim of the Jews delivered in Megillah, fol. 14: "From the time that the children of Israel entered into the promised land, no Gentile had any right to sing a hymn of praise to God. But after that the Israelites were led into captivity, then the Gentiles began to have a right to glorify God."Thus the Jews themselves confess that the Gentiles have a right to glorify God; and this on account of being made partakers of his grace and mercy. And if, says Schoettgen, we have a right to glorify God, then it follows that our worship must be pleasing to him; and if it be pleasing to him, then it follows that this worship must be good, otherwise God could not be pleased with it

Dr. Taylor gives a good paraphrase of this and the three following verses: As you Jews glorify God for his truth, so the Gentiles have a right to join with you in glorifying God for his mercy. And you have Scripture authority for admitting them to such fellowship; for instance, David says, Psa 18:49, Therefore will I give thanks unto thee, O Lord, among the Gentiles, and sing praises unto thy name. And again, Moses himself says, Deu 32:43, Rejoice, O ye Gentiles, with his people. And again, it is evident, from Psa 117:1, Psa 117:2, that praise to God is not to be confined to the Jews only, but that all people, as they all share in his goodness, should also join in thanks to their common benefactor: O praise the Lord, all ye nations, (Gentiles), praise him all ye people; for his merciful kindness is great towards us; and the truth of the Lord endureth for ever. Again the Prophet Isaiah expressly and clearly declares, Isa 11:10, There shall be a root of Jesse, (that is, the Messiah), and he shall rise to reign over the Gentiles, and in him shall the Gentiles hope: ελπιουσιν· And thus the apostle proves, both to the Jews and to the Gentiles, who were probably unwilling to join with each other in religious fellowship, that they had both an equal right to glorify God, being equally interested in his mercy, goodness, and truth; and that, from the evidence of the above scriptures, the Gentiles had as much right to hope in Christ, for the full enjoyment of his kingdom, as the Jews had: and, taking occasion from the last word hope, ελπιουσιν, which we improperly translate trust, he pours out his heart in the following affectionate prayer.

Clarke: Rom 15:13 - Now the God of hope, etc. Now the God of hope, etc. - Ὁ δε Θεος της ελπιδος, May the God of this hope - that God who caused both Jews and Gentiles to hope...

Now the God of hope, etc. - Ὁ δε Θεος της ελπιδος, May the God of this hope - that God who caused both Jews and Gentiles to hope that the gracious promises which he made to them should be fulfilled; and who, accordingly, has fulfilled them in the most punctual and circumstantial manner

Clarke: Rom 15:13 - Fill you with all joy Fill you with all joy - Give you true spiritual happiness; peace in your own hearts, and unity among yourselves; in believing not only the promises ...

Fill you with all joy - Give you true spiritual happiness; peace in your own hearts, and unity among yourselves; in believing not only the promises which he has given you, but believing in Christ Jesus, in whom all the promises are yea and amen

Clarke: Rom 15:13 - That ye may abound in hope That ye may abound in hope - That ye may be excited to take more enlarged views of the salvation which God has provided for you, and have all your e...

That ye may abound in hope - That ye may be excited to take more enlarged views of the salvation which God has provided for you, and have all your expectations fulfilled by the power of the Holy Ghost, enabling you to hope and believe; and then sealing the fulfillment of the promises upon your hearts.

Clarke: Rom 15:14 - And I - am persuaded of you And I - am persuaded of you - This is supposed to be an address to the Gentiles; and it is managed with great delicacy: he seems to apologize for th...

And I - am persuaded of you - This is supposed to be an address to the Gentiles; and it is managed with great delicacy: he seems to apologize for the freedom he had used in writing to them; which he gives them to understand proceeded from the authority he had received by his apostolical office, the exercise of which office respected them particularly. So they could not be offended when they found themselves so particularly distinguished

Clarke: Rom 15:14 - Ye - are full of goodness Ye - are full of goodness - Instead of αγαθωσυνης, goodness, some MSS. of good repute have αγαπης, love. In this connection both w...

Ye - are full of goodness - Instead of αγαθωσυνης, goodness, some MSS. of good repute have αγαπης, love. In this connection both words seem to mean nearly the same thing. They were so full of goodness and love that they were disposed, of themselves, to follow any plan that might be devised, in order to bring about the most perfect understanding between them and their Jewish brethren

Clarke: Rom 15:14 - Filled with all knowledge Filled with all knowledge - So completely instructed in the mind and design of God, relative to their calling, and the fruit which they were to brin...

Filled with all knowledge - So completely instructed in the mind and design of God, relative to their calling, and the fruit which they were to bring forth to the glory of God, that they were well qualified to give one another suitable exhortations on every important point

Instead of αλληλους, one another, several MSS. have αλλους, others, which gives a clearer sense: for, if they were all filled with knowledge, there was little occasion for them to admonish one another; but by this they were well qualified to admonish others - to impart the wisdom they had to those who were less instructed.

Clarke: Rom 15:15 - Nevertheless - I have written Nevertheless - I have written - Not withstanding I have this conviction of your extensive knowledge in the things of God, I have made bold to write ...

Nevertheless - I have written - Not withstanding I have this conviction of your extensive knowledge in the things of God, I have made bold to write to you in some sort, απο μερους, to a party among you, as some learned men translate the words, who stand more in need of such instructions than the others; and I do this, because of the grace, δια την χαριν - because of the office which I have received from God, namely, to be the apostle of the Gentiles. This authority gave him full right to say, advise, or enjoin any thing which he judged to be of importance to their spiritual interests. This subject he pursues farther in the following verse.

Clarke: Rom 15:16 - Ministering the Gospel of God Ministering the Gospel of God - Ἱερουργουντα, Acting as a priest. Here is a plain allusion, says Dr. Whitby, to the Jewish sacrifices...

Ministering the Gospel of God - Ἱερουργουντα, Acting as a priest. Here is a plain allusion, says Dr. Whitby, to the Jewish sacrifices offered by the priest, and sanctified or made acceptable by the libamen offered with them; for he compares himself, in preaching the Gospel, to the priest performing his sacred functions - preparing his sacrifice to be offered. The Gentiles, converted by him and dedicated to the service of God, are his sacrifices and oblation. The Holy Spirit is the libamen poured upon this sacrifice, by which it was sanctified and rendered acceptable to God. The words of Isaiah, Isa 66:20, And they shall bring all your brethren for an Offering unto the Lord, out of all Nations, might have suggested the above idea to the mind of the apostle.

Clarke: Rom 15:17 - I here therefore whereof I may glory I here therefore whereof I may glory - Being sent of God on this most honorable and important errand, I have matter of great exultation, not only in...

I here therefore whereof I may glory - Being sent of God on this most honorable and important errand, I have matter of great exultation, not only in the honor which he has conferred upon me, but in the great success with which he has crowned my ministry.

Clarke: Rom 15:18 - For I will not dare to speak For I will not dare to speak - If the thing were not as I have stated it, I would not dare to arrogate to myself honors which did not belong to me. ...

For I will not dare to speak - If the thing were not as I have stated it, I would not dare to arrogate to myself honors which did not belong to me. But God has made me the apostle of the Gentiles; and the conversion of the Gentiles is the fruit of my ministry, Christ having wrought by me for this purpose

Clarke: Rom 15:18 - By word and deed By word and deed - Αογῳ και εργῳ· These words may refer to the doctrines which he taught and to the miracles which he wrought amon...

By word and deed - Αογῳ και εργῳ· These words may refer to the doctrines which he taught and to the miracles which he wrought among them. So they became obedient to the doctrines, on the evidence of the miracles with which they were accompanied.

Clarke: Rom 15:19 - Through mighty signs and wonders Through mighty signs and wonders - This more fully explains the preceding clause: through the power of the Holy Ghost he was enabled to work among t...

Through mighty signs and wonders - This more fully explains the preceding clause: through the power of the Holy Ghost he was enabled to work among the Gentiles mighty signs and wonders; so that they were fully convinced that both his doctrine and mission were Divine; and therefore they cheerfully received the Gospel of the Lord Jesus

Clarke: Rom 15:19 - Round about unto Illyricum Round about unto Illyricum - Among ancient writers this place has gone by a great variety of names, Illyria, Illyrica, Illyricum, Illyris, and Illyr...

Round about unto Illyricum - Among ancient writers this place has gone by a great variety of names, Illyria, Illyrica, Illyricum, Illyris, and Illyrium. It is a country of Europe, extending from the Adriatic gulf to Pannonia: according to Pliny, it extended from the river Arsia to the river Drinius, thus including Liburnia on the west, and Dalmatia on the east. Its precise limits have not been determined by either ancient or modern geographers. It seems, according to an inscription in Gruter, to have been divided by Augustus into two provinces, the upper and lower. It now forms part of Croatia, Bosnia, Istria, and Slavonia. When the apostle says that he preached the Gospel from Jerusalem round about to Illyricum, he intends his land journeys chiefly; and, by looking at the map annexed to the Acts of the Apostles, the reader will see that from Jerusalem the apostle went round the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea, and that he passed through Syria, Phoenicia, Arabia, Cilicia, Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia, Pontus, Paphlagonia, Phrygia, Troas, Asia, Caria, Lycia, Ionia, Lydia, Thrace, Macedonia, Thessaly, and Achaia; besides the isles of Cyprus and Crete. And no doubt he visited many other places which are not mentioned in the New Testament

Clarke: Rom 15:19 - I have fully preached the Gospel I have fully preached the Gospel - Πεπληρωκεναι το ευαγγελιον, I have successfully preached - I have not only proclaimed th...

I have fully preached the Gospel - Πεπληρωκεναι το ευαγγελιον, I have successfully preached - I have not only proclaimed the word, but made converts and founded Churches. See the note on Mat 5:17, where this sense of the word πληρουν is noticed; for it signifies not only fully or perfectly, but also to teach with prosperity and success.

Clarke: Rom 15:20 - So have I strived to preach the Gospel So have I strived to preach the Gospel - Οὑτω δε φιλοτιμουμενον· For I have considered it my honor to preach the Gospel w...

So have I strived to preach the Gospel - Οὑτω δε φιλοτιμουμενον· For I have considered it my honor to preach the Gospel where that Gospel was before unknown. This is the proper import of the word φιλοτιμεισθαι ; from φιλος, a friend, and τιμη, honor. As I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ, so I esteem it an honor to preach it, and especially to proclaim it among the heathen; not building on another man’ s foundation - not watering what another apostle had planted; but cheerfully exposing myself to all kinds of dangers and hardships, in order to found new Churches.

Clarke: Rom 15:21 - But as it is written But as it is written - These words, quoted from Isa 52:15, the apostle applies to his own conduct; not that the words themselves predicted what Paul...

But as it is written - These words, quoted from Isa 52:15, the apostle applies to his own conduct; not that the words themselves predicted what Paul had done, but that he endeavored to fulfill such a declaration by his manner of preaching the Gospel to the heathen.

Clarke: Rom 15:22 - For which cause, etc. For which cause, etc. - My considering it a point of honor to build on no other man’ s foundation; and, finding that the Gospel has been long a...

For which cause, etc. - My considering it a point of honor to build on no other man’ s foundation; and, finding that the Gospel has been long ago planted at Rome, I have been prevented from going thither, purposing rather to spend my time and strength in preaching where Christ has not, as yet, been proclaimed.

Clarke: Rom 15:23 - But - having no more place in these parts But - having no more place in these parts - Having nothing farther at present that I can do - for τοπον εχειν signifies not merely to ha...

But - having no more place in these parts - Having nothing farther at present that I can do - for τοπον εχειν signifies not merely to have a place of residence, or the like, but convenience, opportunity; which is a frequent meaning of the phrase among the best Greek writers - having no large place or city, where Christianity has not yet been planted, in which I can introduce the Gospel. The apostle was then at Corinth; and having evangelized all those parts, he had no opportunity of breaking up any new ground.

Clarke: Rom 15:24 - Whensoever I take my journey into Spain Whensoever I take my journey into Spain - Where it is very likely the Gospel had not yet been planted; though legendary tales inform us that St. Jam...

Whensoever I take my journey into Spain - Where it is very likely the Gospel had not yet been planted; though legendary tales inform us that St. James had planted the Gospel there long before this time, and had founded many bishoprics! But this is as unfounded as it is ridiculous and absurd; for nothing like what is now termed a bishopric, nor even a parish, was founded for many years after this. An itinerant preacher, might, with more propriety, say travelling circuits were formed, rather than bishoprics. Whether the apostle ever fulfilled his design of going to Spain is unknown; but there is no evidence whatever that he did, and the presumption is that he did not undertake this voyage. Antiquity affords no proof that he fulfilled his intention

Clarke: Rom 15:24 - I will come to you I will come to you - Ελευσο μαιπρος ὑμας . These words are wanting in almost every MS. of note, and in the Syriac of Erpen, Copt...

I will come to you - Ελευσο μαιπρος ὑμας . These words are wanting in almost every MS. of note, and in the Syriac of Erpen, Coptic, Vulgate, Ethiopic, Armenian, and Itala. If the first clause of this verse be read in connection with the latter clause of the preceding, it will fully appear that this rejected clause is useless. Having a great desire, these many years to come unto you whensoever I take my journey into Spain: for I trust to see you in my journey, etc

Clarke: Rom 15:24 - Somewhat filled with your company Somewhat filled with your company - The word εμπλησθω, which we translate filled, would be better rendered gratified; for εμπλησθη...

Somewhat filled with your company - The word εμπλησθω, which we translate filled, would be better rendered gratified; for εμπλησθηναι signifies to be satisfied, to be gratified, and to enjoy. Aelian., Hist. Anim., lib. v., c. 21, speaking of the peacock spreading out his beautiful plumage, says: εα γαρ εμπλησθηναι της θεος τον παρεστωτα· "He readily permits the spectator to gratify himself by viewing him."And Maximus Tyrius, Dissert. 41, page 413: "That he may behold the heavens, και εμπλησθη λαμπρου φωτος, and be gratified with the splendor of the light."Homer uses the word in the same sense: -

Ἡ δ εμη ουδε περ υἱος ενιπλησθηναι ακοιτις Οφθαλμοισιν εασε

Odyss., lib. xi., ver. 451

"But my wife never suffered my eyes to be delighted with my son.

The apostle, though he had not the honor of having planted the Church at Rome, yet expected much gratification from the visit which he intended to pay them.

Clarke: Rom 15:25 - Now I go unto Jerusalem Now I go unto Jerusalem - From this and the two following verses we learn that the object of his journey to Jerusalem was, to carry a contribution m...

Now I go unto Jerusalem - From this and the two following verses we learn that the object of his journey to Jerusalem was, to carry a contribution made among the Gentile Christians of Macedonia and Achaia for the relief of the poor Jewish Christians at Jerusalem. About this affair he had taken great pains, as appears from 1Co 16:1-4; 2 Corinthians 8, and 2Co 9:1-15. His design in this affair is very evident from 2Co 9:12, 2Co 9:13, where he says: The administration of this service not only supplieth the want of the saints, but is abundant also by many thanksgivings unto God; whiles, by the experiment of this ministration, they glorify God for your professed subjection unto the Gospel of Christ, and for your liberal distribution unto them and unto all men. The apostle was in hopes that this liberal contribution, sent by the Gentile Christians who had been converted by St. Paul’ s ministry, would engage the affections of the Jewish Christians, who had been much prejudiced against the reception of the Gentiles into the Church, without being previously obliged to submit to the yoke of the law. He wished to establish a coalition between the converted Jews and Gentiles, being sensible of its great importance to the spread of the Gospel; and his procuring this contribution was one laudable device to accomplish this good end. And this shows why he so earnestly requests the prayers of the Christians at Rome, that his service which he had for Jerusalem might be accepted of the saints. See Dr. Taylor.

Clarke: Rom 15:27 - For if the Gentiles have been made partakers, etc. For if the Gentiles have been made partakers, etc. - It was through and by means of the Jews that the Gentiles were brought to the knowledge of God ...

For if the Gentiles have been made partakers, etc. - It was through and by means of the Jews that the Gentiles were brought to the knowledge of God and the Gospel of Christ. These were the spiritual things which they had received; and the pecuniary contribution was the carnal things which the Gentiles were now returning.

Clarke: Rom 15:28 - When, therefore, I have performed this When, therefore, I have performed this - Service, and have sealed - faithfully delivered up, to them this fruit, of the success of my ministry and o...

When, therefore, I have performed this - Service, and have sealed - faithfully delivered up, to them this fruit, of the success of my ministry and of your conversion to God, I will come by you into Spain: this was in his desire; he had fully purposed it, if God should see meet to permit him; but it does not appear that he ever went. See Rom 15:24.

Clarke: Rom 15:29 - In the fullness of the blessing of the Gospel of Christ In the fullness of the blessing of the Gospel of Christ - The words του ευαγγελιου του, of the Gospel, are wanting in almost every ...

In the fullness of the blessing of the Gospel of Christ - The words του ευαγγελιου του, of the Gospel, are wanting in almost every MS. of importance. Griesbach has left them out of the text. There is no doubt they should be omitted. The fullness of the blessing of Christ is really more than the fullness of the blessing of the Gospel of Christ. He hoped to come to them not only with the blessing of the Gospel, but endued with the gifts and graces of the Lord Jesus himself; which he was now a constant instrument, in the hand of God, to dispense among those who were converted to the Christian faith.

Clarke: Rom 15:30 - For the love of the Spirit For the love of the Spirit - By that love of God which the Holy Spirit sheds abroad in your hearts

For the love of the Spirit - By that love of God which the Holy Spirit sheds abroad in your hearts

Clarke: Rom 15:30 - That ye strive together That ye strive together - Συναγωνισασθαι That ye agonize with me. He felt that much depended on the success of his present mission t...

That ye strive together - Συναγωνισασθαι That ye agonize with me. He felt that much depended on the success of his present mission to the Christians at Jerusalem, and their acceptance of the charitable contribution which he was bringing with him, in order to conciliate them to the reception of the Gentiles into the Church of God without obliging them to submit to circumcision.

Clarke: Rom 15:31 - That I may be delivered from them that do not believe That I may be delivered from them that do not believe - He knew that his countrymen, who had not received the Gospel, lay in wait for his life; and,...

That I may be delivered from them that do not believe - He knew that his countrymen, who had not received the Gospel, lay in wait for his life; and, no doubt, they thought they should do God service by destroying him, not only as an apostate, in their apprehension, from the Jewish religion, but as one who was labouring to subvert and entirely destroy it

Clarke: Rom 15:31 - And that my service And that my service - Διακονια . But several eminent MSS. read δωροφορια, the gift which I bear. This probably was a gloss, which...

And that my service - Διακονια . But several eminent MSS. read δωροφορια, the gift which I bear. This probably was a gloss, which in many MSS. subverted the word in the text; for διακονια, service, in its connection here, could refer to nothing else but the contribution which he was carrying to the poor saints at Jerusalem.

Clarke: Rom 15:32 - That I may come unto you with joy That I may come unto you with joy - That his apprehensions of ill usage were not groundless, and the danger to which his life was exposed, real, we ...

That I may come unto you with joy - That his apprehensions of ill usage were not groundless, and the danger to which his life was exposed, real, we have already seen in the account given of this visit, Acts 21, 22, 23, and 24; and that he had such intimations from the Holy Spirit himself appears from Act 20:23; Act 21:11; Act 20:38. Should his journey to Jerusalem be prosperous, and his service accepted, so that the converted Jews and Gentiles should come to a better understanding, he hoped to see them at Rome with great joy: and if he got his wishes gratified through their prayers, it would be the full proof that this whole business had been conducted according to the will of God.

Clarke: Rom 15:33 - The God of peace be with you The God of peace be with you - The whole object of the epistle is to establish peace between the believing Jews and Gentiles, and to show them their...

The God of peace be with you - The whole object of the epistle is to establish peace between the believing Jews and Gentiles, and to show them their mutual obligations, and the infinite mercy of God to both; and now he concludes with praying that the God of peace - he from whom it comes, and by whom it is preserved - may be for ever with them. The word Amen, at the end, does not appear to have been written by the apostle: it is wanting in some of the most ancient MSS

1.    In the preceding chapters the apostle enjoins a very hard, but a very important and necessary, duty - that of bearing with each other, and endeavoring to think and let think, in those religious matters which are confessedly not essential to the salvation of the soul. Most of the disputes among Christians have been concerning non-essential points. Rites and ceremonies, even in the simple religion of Christ, have contributed their part in promoting those animosities by which Christians have been divided. Forms in worship and sacerdotal garments have not been without their influence in this general disturbance. Each side has been ready to take out of the 14th and 15th chapters of this epistle such expressions as seemed suitable to their own case; but few have been found who have taken up the whole. You believe that a person who holds such and such opinions is wrong: pity him and set him right, lovingly, if possible. He believes you to be wrong because you do not hold those points; he must bear with you. Both of you stand precisely on the same ground, and are mutually indebted to mutual forbearance

2.    Beware of contentions in religion, if you dispute concerning any of its doctrines, let it be to find out truth; not to support a preconceived and pre-established opinion. Avoid all polemical heat and rancour; these prove the absence of the religion of Christ. Whatever does not lead you to love God and man more, is most assuredly from beneath. The God of peace is the author of Christianity; and the Prince of peace, the priest and sacrifice of it: therefore love one another, and leave off contention before it be meddled with. On this subject the advice of the pious Mr. Herbert is good: -

Be calm in arguing; for fierceness make

Error a fault, and truth discourtesy

Why should I feel another man’ s mistake

More than his sickness or his poverty

In love I should; but anger is not love

Nor wisdom neither: - therefore g-e-n-t-l-y m-o-v-e.

Calvin: Rom 15:1 - We then who are strong, etc 1.We then who are strong, etc Lest they who had made more advances than others in the knowledge of God should think it unreasonable, that more burden...

1.We then who are strong, etc Lest they who had made more advances than others in the knowledge of God should think it unreasonable, that more burden was to be laid on them than on others, he shows for what purpose this strength, by which they excelled others, was bestowed on them, even that they might so sustain the weak as to prevent them to fall. For as God has destined those to whom he has granted superior knowledge to convey instruction to the ignorant, so to those whom he makes strong he commits the duty of supporting the weak by their strength; thus ought all gifts to be communicated among all the members of Christ. The stronger then any one is in Christ, the more bound he is to bear with the weak. 437

By saying that a Christian ought not to please himself, he intimates, that he ought not to be bent on satisfying himself, as they are wont to be, who are content with their own judgment, and heedlessly neglect others: and this is indeed an admonition most suitable on the present subject; for nothing impedes and checks acts of kindness more than when any one is too much swallowed up with himself, so that he has no care for others, and follows only his own counsels and feelings.

Calvin: Rom 15:2 - Let indeed 2.Let indeed 438 every one of us, etc. He teaches us here, that we are under obligations to others, and that it is therefore our duty to please and...

2.Let indeed 438 every one of us, etc. He teaches us here, that we are under obligations to others, and that it is therefore our duty to please and to serve them, and that there is no exception in which we ought not to accommodate ourselves to our brethren when we can do so, according to God’s word, to their edification.

There are here two things laid down, — that we are not to be content with our own judgment, nor acquiesce in our own desires, but ought to strive and labor at all times to please our brethren, — and then, that in endeavoring to accommodate ourselves to our brethren, we ought to have regard to God, so that our object may be their edification; for the greater part cannot be pleased except you indulge their humor; so that if you wish to be in favor with most men, their salvation must not be so much regarded, but their folly must be flattered; nor must you look to what is expedient, but to what they seek to their own ruin. You must not then strive to please those to whom nothing is pleasing but evil.

Calvin: Rom 15:3 - For even Christ pleased not himself, etc 3.For even Christ pleased not himself, etc Since it is not right that a servant should refuse what his lord has himself undertaken, it would be very ...

3.For even Christ pleased not himself, etc Since it is not right that a servant should refuse what his lord has himself undertaken, it would be very strange in us to wish an exemption from the duty of bearing the infirmities of others, to which Christ, in whom we glory as our Lord and King, submitted himself; for he having no regard for himself, gave up himself wholly to this service. For in him was really verified what the Prophet declares in Psa 69:9 : and among other things he mentions this, that “zeal for God’s house had eaten him up,” and that “the reproaches of those who reproached God fell on him.” By these words it is intimated, that he burned with so much fervor for God’s glory that he was possessed by such a desire to promote his kingdom, that he forgot himself, and was, as it were, absorbed with this one thought, and that he so devoted himself to the Lord that he was grieved in his soul whenever he perceived his holy name exposed to the slandering of the ungodly. 439

The second part, “the reproaches of God,” may indeed be understood in two ways, — either that he was not less affected by the contumelies which were heaped on God, than if he himself had endured them, — or, that he grieved not otherwise to see the wrong done to God, than if he himself had been the cause. But if Christ reigns in us, as he must necessarily reign in his people, this feeling is also vigorous in our hearts, so that whatever derogates from the glory of God does not otherwise grieve us than if it was done to ourselves. Away then with those whose highest wish is to gain honors from them who treat God’s name with all kinds of reproaches, tread Christ under foot, contumeliously rend, and with the sword and the flame persecute his gospel. It is not indeed safe to be so much honored by those by whom Christ is not only despised but also reproachfully treated.

Calvin: Rom 15:4 - For whatsoever things, etc 4.For whatsoever things, etc This is an application of the example, lest any one should think, that to exhort us to imitate Christ was foreign to his...

4.For whatsoever things, etc This is an application of the example, lest any one should think, that to exhort us to imitate Christ was foreign to his purpose; “Nay,” he says, “there is nothing in Scripture which is not useful for your instruction, and for the direction of your life.” 440

This is an interesting passage, by which we understand that there is nothing vain and unprofitable contained in the oracles of God; and we are at the same time taught that it is by the reading of the Scripture that we make progress in piety and holiness of life. Whatever then is delivered in Scripture we ought to strive to learn; for it were a reproach offered to the Holy Spirit to think, that he has taught anything which it does not concern us to know; let us also know, that whatever is taught us conduces to the advancement of religion. And though he speaks of the Old Testament, the same thing is also true of the writings of the Apostles; for since the Spirit of Christ is everywhere like itself, there is no doubt but that he has adapted his teaching by the Apostles, as formerly by the Prophets, to the edification of his people. Moreover, we find here a most striking condemnation of those fanatics who vaunt that the Old Testament is abolished, and that it belongs not in any degree to Christians; for with what front can they turn away Christians from those things which, as Paul testifies, have been appointed by God for their salvation?

But when he adds, that through the patience and the consolation of the Scriptures we might have hope, 441 he does not include the whole of that benefit which is to be derived from God’s word; but he briefly points out the main end; for the Scriptures are especially serviceable for this purpose — to raise up those who are prepared by patience, and strengthened by consolations, to the hope of eternal life, and to keep them in the contemplation of it. 442 The word consolation some render exhortation; and of this I do not disapprove, only that consolation is more suitable to patience, for this arises from it; because then only we are prepared to bear adversities with patience, when God blends them with consolation. The patience of the faithful is not indeed that hardihood which philosophers recommend, but that meekness, by which we willingly submit to God, while a taste of his goodness and paternal love renders all things sweet to us: this nourishes and sustains hope in us, so that it fails not.

Calvin: Rom 15:5 - And the God of patience, etc 5.And the God of patience, etc God is so called from what he produces; the same thing has been before very fitly ascribed to the Scriptures, but in a...

5.And the God of patience, etc God is so called from what he produces; the same thing has been before very fitly ascribed to the Scriptures, but in a different sense: God alone is doubtless the author of patience and of consolation; for he conveys both to our hearts by his Spirit: yet he employs his word as the instrument; for he first teaches us what is true consolation, and what is true patience; and then he instills and plants this doctrine in our hearts.

But after having admonished and exhorted the Romans as to what they were to do, he turns to pray for them: for he fully understood, that to speak of duty was to no purpose, except God inwardly effected by his Spirit what he spoke by the mouth of man. The sum of his prayer is, — that he would bring their minds to real unanimity, and make them united among themselves: he also shows at the same time what is the bond of unity, for he wished them to agree together according to Christ Jesus Miserable indeed is the union which is unconnected with God, and that is unconnected with him, which alienates us from his truth. 443

And that he might recommend to us an agreement in Christ, he teaches us how necessary it is: for God is not truly glorified by us, unless the hearts of all agree in giving him praise, and their tongues also join in harmony. There is then no reason for any to boast that he will give glory to God after his own manner; for the unity of his servants is so much esteemed by God, that he will not have his glory sounded forth amidst discords and contentions. This one thought ought to be sufficient to check the wanton rage for contention and quarreling, which at this day too much possesses the minds of many.

Calvin: Rom 15:7 - Receive ye then, etc 7.Receive ye then, etc He returns to exhortation; and to strengthen this he still retains the example of Christ. For he, having received, not one or ...

7.Receive ye then, etc He returns to exhortation; and to strengthen this he still retains the example of Christ. For he, having received, not one or two of us, but all together, has thus connected us, so that we ought to cherish one another, if we would indeed continue in his bosom. Only thus then shall we confirm our calling, that is, if we separate not ourselves from those whom the Lord has bound together.

The words, to the glory of God, may be applied to us only, or to Christ, or to him and us together: of the last I mostly approve, and according to this import, — “As Christ has made known the glory of the Father in receiving us into favor, when we stood in need of mercy; so it behooves us, in order to make known also the glory of the same God, to establish and confirm this union which we have in Christ.” 444

Calvin: Rom 15:8 - Now I say, that Jesus Christ, etc 8.Now I say, that Jesus Christ, etc He now shows that Christ has embraced us all, so that he leaves no difference between the Jews and the Gentiles, ...

8.Now I say, that Jesus Christ, etc He now shows that Christ has embraced us all, so that he leaves no difference between the Jews and the Gentiles, except that in the first place he was promised to the Jewish nation, and was in a manner peculiarly destined for them, before he was revealed to the Gentiles. But he shows, that with respect to that which was the seed of all contentions, there was no difference between them; for he had gathered them both from a miserable dispersion, and brought them, when gathered, into the Father’s kingdom, that they might be one flock, in one sheepfold, under one shepherd. It is hence right, he declares, that they should continue united together, and not despise one another; for Christ despised neither of them. 445

He then speaks first of the Jews, and says, that Christ was sent to them, in order to accomplish the truth of God by performing the promises given to the Fathers: and it was no common honor, that Christ, the Lord of heaven and earth, put on flesh, that he might procure salvation for them; for the more he humbled himself for their sake, the greater was the honor he conferred on them. But this point he evidently assumes as a thing indubitable. The more strange it is, that there is such effrontery in some fanatical heads, that they hesitate not to regard the promises of the Old Testament as temporal, and to confine them to the present world. And lest the Gentiles should claim any excellency above the Jews, Paul expressly declares, that the salvation which Christ has brought belonged by covenant to the Jews; for by his coming he fulfilled what the Father had formerly promised to Abraham, and thus he became the minister of that people. It hence follows that the old covenant was in reality spiritual, though it was annexed to earthly types; for the fulfillment, of which Paul now speaks, must necessarily relate to eternal salvation. And further, lest any one should cavil, and say, that so great a salvation was promised to posterity, when the covenant was deposited in the hand of Abraham, he expressly declares that the promises were made to the Fathers. Either then the benefits of Christ must be confined to temporal things, or the covenant made with Abraham must be extended beyond the things of this world.

Calvin: Rom 15:9 - The Gentiles also, 9.The Gentiles also, 446 etc. This is the second point, on proving which he dwells longer, because it was not so evident. The first testimony he qu...

9.The Gentiles also, 446 etc. This is the second point, on proving which he dwells longer, because it was not so evident. The first testimony he quotes is taken from Psa 18:0; which psalm is recorded also in 2Sa 22:0, where no doubt a prophecy is mentioned concerning the kingdom of Christ; and from it Paul proves the calling of the Gentiles, because it is there promised, that a confession to the glory of God should be made among the Gentiles; for we cannot really make God known, except among those who hear his praises while they are sung by us. Hence that God’s name may be known among the Gentiles, they must be favored with the knowledge of him, and come into communion with his people: for you may observe this everywhere in Scripture, that God’s praises cannot be declared, except in the assembly of the faithful, who have ears capable of hearing his praise.

Calvin: Rom 15:10 - Exult, ye Gentiles, with his people 10.Exult, ye Gentiles, with his people This verse is commonly considered as if it was taken from the song of Moses; but with this I cannot agree; for...

10.Exult, ye Gentiles, with his people This verse is commonly considered as if it was taken from the song of Moses; but with this I cannot agree; for Moses’ design there was to terrify the adversaries of Israel by setting forth his greatness, rather than to invite them to a common joy. I hence think that this is quoted from Psa 47:5, where it is written, “Exult and rejoice let the Gentiles, because thou judgest the nations in equity, and the Gentiles on the earth thou guidest.” And Paul adds, with his people, and he did this by way of explanation; for the Prophet in that psalm no doubt connects the Gentiles with Israel, and invites both alike to rejoice; and there is no joy without the knowledge of God. 447

Calvin: Rom 15:11 - Praise God, all ye Gentiles, etc 11.Praise God, all ye Gentiles, etc This passage is not inaptly applied; for how can they, who know not God’s greatness, praise him? They could no ...

11.Praise God, all ye Gentiles, etc This passage is not inaptly applied; for how can they, who know not God’s greatness, praise him? They could no more do this than to call on his name, when unknown. It is then a prophecy most suitable to prove the calling of the Gentiles; and this appears still more evident from the reason which is there added; for he bids them to give thanks for God’s truth and mercy. (Psa 117:1.)

Calvin: Rom 15:12 - And again, Isaiah, etc., 12.And again, Isaiah, etc., This prophecy is the most illustrious of them all: for in that passage, the Prophet, when things were almost past hope, c...

12.And again, Isaiah, etc., This prophecy is the most illustrious of them all: for in that passage, the Prophet, when things were almost past hope, comforted the small remnant of the faithful, even by this, — that there would arise a shoot from the dry and the dying trunk of David’s family, and that a branch would flourish from his despised root, which would restore to God’s people their pristine glory. It is clear from the account there given, that this shoot was Christ, the Redeemer of the world. And then, he added, that he would be raised for a sign to the Gentiles, that might be to them for salvation. The words do indeed differ a little from the Hebrew text; for we read here, arise, while in Hebrew it is stand for a sign, which is the same; for he was to appear conspicuous like a sign. What is here hope, is in Hebrew seek; but according to the most common usage of Scripture, to seek God is nothing else but to hope in him. 448

But twice in this prophecy is the calling of the Gentiles confirmed, — by the expression, that Christ was to be raised up as a sign, and he reigns among the faithful alone, — and by the declaration, that they shall hope in Christ, which cannot take place without the preaching of the word and illumination of the Spirit. With these things corresponds the song of Simeon. It may be further added, that hope in Christ is an evidence of his divinity.

Calvin: Rom 15:13 - And may the God, etc 13.And may the God, etc He now concludes the passage, as before, with prayer; in which he desires the Lord to give them whatever he had commanded. It...

13.And may the God, etc He now concludes the passage, as before, with prayer; in which he desires the Lord to give them whatever he had commanded. It hence appears, that the Lord does in no degree measure his precepts according to our strength or the power of free-will; and that he does not command what we ought to do, that we, relying on our own power, may gird up ourselves to render obedience; but that he commands those things which require the aid of his grace, that he may stimulate us in our attention to prayer.

In saying the God of hope, he had in view the last verse; as though he said, — “May then the God in whom we all hope fill you with joy, that is, with cheerfulness of heart, and also with unity and concord, and this by believing:” 449 for in order that our peace may be approved by God, we must be bound together by real and genuine faith. If any one prefers taking in believing, for, in order to believe, 450 the sense will be, — that they were to cultivate peace for the purpose of believing; for then only are we rightly prepared to believe, when we, being peaceable and unanimous, do willingly embrace what is taught us. It is however preferable, that faith should be connected with peace and joy; for it is the bond of holy and legitimate concord, and the support of godly joy. And though the peace which one has within with God may also be understood, yet the context leads us rather to the former explanation. 451

He further adds, that ye may abound in hope; for in this way also is hope confirmed and increased in us. The words, through the power of the Holy Spirit, intimate that all things are the gifts of the divine bounty: and the word power is intended emphatically to set forth that wonderful energy, by which the Spirit works in us faith, hope, joy, and peace.

Calvin: Rom 15:14 - But even I myself am persuaded, etc // Ye are full of goodness, being filled with knowledge, etc 14.But even I myself am persuaded, etc This was said to anticipate an objection, or it may be deemed a kind of concession, made with the view of paci...

14.But even I myself am persuaded, etc This was said to anticipate an objection, or it may be deemed a kind of concession, made with the view of pacifying the Romans; in case they thought themselves reproved by so many and so urgent admonitions, and thus unjustly treated. He then makes an excuse for having ventured to assume towards them the character of a teacher and of an exhorter; and he says, that he had done so, not because he had any doubt as to their wisdom, or kindness, or perseverance; but because he was constrained by his office. Thus he removed every suspicion of presumption, which especially shows itself when any one thrusts himself into an office which does not belong to him, or speaks of those things which are unsuitable to him. We see in this instance the singular modesty of this holy man, to whom nothing was more acceptable than to be thought of no account, provided the doctrine he preached retained its authority.

There was much pride in the Romans; the name even of their city made the lowest of the people proud; so that they could hardly bear a teacher of another nation, much less a barbarian and a Jew. With this haughtiness Paul would not contend in his own private name: he however subdued it, as it were, by soothing means; for he testified that he undertook to address them on account of his Apostolic office.

Ye are full of goodness, being filled with knowledge, etc Two qualifications are especially necessary for him who gives admonitions: the first is kindness, which disposes his mind to aid his brethren by his advice, and also tempers his countenance and his words with courtesy, — and the second is skill in advice or prudence, which secures authority to him, inasmuch as he is able to benefit the hearers whom he addresses. There is indeed nothing more opposed to brotherly admonitions than malignity and arrogance, which make us disdainfully to despise the erring, and to treat them with ridicule, rather than to set them right. Asperity also, whether it appears in words or in the countenance, deprives our admonitions of their fruit. But however you may excel in the feeling of kindness, as well as in courtesy, you are not yet fit to advise, except you possess wisdom and experience. Hence he ascribes both these qualifications to the Romans, bearing them a testimony, — that they were themselves sufficiently competent, without the help of another, to administer mutual exhortations: for he admits, that they abounded both in kindness and wisdom. It hence follows, that they were able to exhort.

Calvin: Rom 15:15 - The more boldly, however, have I written to you, etc 15.The more boldly, however, have I written to you, etc The excuse follows, and in adducing this, that he might more fully show his modesty, he says,...

15.The more boldly, however, have I written to you, etc The excuse follows, and in adducing this, that he might more fully show his modesty, he says, by way of concession, that he acted boldly in interposing in a matter which they themselves were able to do; but he adds that he was led to be thus bold on account of his office, because he was the minister of the gospel to the Gentiles, and could not therefore pass by them who were also Gentiles. He however thus humbles himself, that he might exalt the excellency of his office; for by mentioning the favor of God, by which he was elevated to that high honor, he shows that he could not suffer what he did according to his apostolic office to be despised. Besides, he denies that he had assumed the part of a teacher, but that of an admonisher, 452

Calvin: Rom 15:16 - Consecrating the gospel, etc 16.Consecrating the gospel, etc This rendering I prefer to that which [Erasmus] in the first place adopts, that is, “Administering;” for nothing ...

16.Consecrating the gospel, etc This rendering I prefer to that which [Erasmus] in the first place adopts, that is, “Administering;” for nothing is more certain than that Paul here alludes to the holy mysteries which were performed by the priest. He then makes himself a chief priest or a priest in the ministration of the gospel, to offer up as a sacrifice the people whom he gained for God, and in this manner he labored in the holy mysteries of the gospel. And doubtless this is the priesthood of the Christian pastor, that is, to sacrifice men, as it were, to God, by bringing them to obey the gospel, and not, as the Papists have hitherto haughtily vaunted, by offering up Christ to reconcile men to God. He does not, however, give here the name of priests to the pastors of the Church simply as a perpetual title, but intending to commend the honor and power of the ministry, Paul availed himself of the opportunity of using this metaphor. Let then the preachers of the gospel have this end in view while discharging their office, even to offer up to God souls purified by faith.

What [Erasmus] afterwards puts down as being more correct, “sacrificing the gospel,” is not only improper but obscures also the meaning; for the gospel is, on the contrary, like a sword, by which the minister sacrifices men as victims to God. 453

He adds that such sacrifices are acceptable to God; which is not only a commendation of the ministry, but also a singular consolation to those who surrender themselves to be thus consecrated. Now as the ancient victims were dedicated to God, having been externally sanctified and washed, so these victims are consecrated to the Lord by the Spirit of holiness, through whose power, inwardly working in them, they are separated from this world. For though the purity of the soul proceeds from faith in the word, yet as the voice of man is in itself inefficacious and lifeless, the work of cleansing really and properly belongs to the Spirit.

Calvin: Rom 15:17 - I have then, etc 17.I have then, etc After having in general commended his own calling, that the Romans might know that he was a true and undoubted apostle of Christ,...

17.I have then, etc After having in general commended his own calling, that the Romans might know that he was a true and undoubted apostle of Christ, he now adds testimonies, by which he proved that he had not only taken upon him the apostolic office conferred on him by God’s appointment, but that he had also eminently adorned it. He at the same time records the fidelity which he had exhibited in discharging his office. It is indeed to little purpose that we are appointed, except we act agreeably to our calling and fulfill our office. He did not make this declaration from a desire to attain glow, but because nothing was to be omitted which might procure favor and authority to his doctrine among the Romans. In God then, not in himself, did he glory; for he had nothing else in view but that the whole praise should redound to God.

And that he speaks only negatively, it is indeed an evidence of his modesty, but it availed also to gain credit to what he was proceeding to announce, as though he said, “The truth itself affords me such cause for glowing, that I have no need to seek false praises, or those of another, I am content with such as are true.” It may be also that he intended to obviate the unfavorable reports which he knew were everywhere scattered by the malevolent, he therefore mentioned beforehand that he would not speak but of things well known.

Calvin: Rom 15:18 - In order to make the Gentiles obedient, etc 18.In order to make the Gentiles obedient, etc These words prove what his object was, even to render his ministry approved by the Romans, that his do...

18.In order to make the Gentiles obedient, etc These words prove what his object was, even to render his ministry approved by the Romans, that his doctrine might not be without fruit. He proves then by evidences that God by the presence of his power had given a testimony to his preaching, and in a manner sealed his apostleship, so that no one ought to have doubted, but, that he was appointed and sent by the Lord. The evidences were word, work, and miracles. It hence appears that the term work includes more than miracles. He at last concludes with this expression, through the power of the Spirit; by which he intimates that these things could not have been done without the Spirit being the author. In short, he declares that with regard to his teaching as well as his doing, he had such strength and energy in preaching Christ, that it was evidently the wonderful power of God, and that miracles were also added, which were seals to render the evidence more certain.

He mentions word and work in the first place, and then he states one kind of work, even the power of performing miracles. The same order is observed by Luke, when he says that Christ was mighty in word and work, (Luk 24:19;) and John says that Christ referred the Jews to his own works for a testimony of his divinity. (Joh 5:36.) Nor does he simply mention miracles, but gives them two designations. But instead of what he says here, the power of signs and of wonders, Peter has “miracles and signs and wonders.” (Act 2:22.) And doubtless they were testimonies of divine power to awaken men, that being struck with God’s power, they might admire and at the same time adore him; nor are they without an especial meaning, but intended to stimulate us, that we may understand what God is.

This is a striking passage respecting the benefit of miracles: they are designed to prepare men to reverence and to obey God. So you read in Mark, that the Lord confirmed the truth by the signs which followed. (Mar 16:20.) Luke declares in the Acts, that the Lord by miracles gave testimony to the word of his grace. (Act 14:3.) It is then evident that those miracles which bring glory to creatures and not to God, which secure credit to lies and not to God’s word, are from the devil. The power of the Spirit, which he mentions in the third place, I apply to both the preceding clauses. 454

Calvin: Rom 15:19 - So that from Jerusalem, etc 19.So that from Jerusalem, etc He joins also a testimony from the effect; for the success which followed his preaching exceeded all the thoughts of m...

19.So that from Jerusalem, etc He joins also a testimony from the effect; for the success which followed his preaching exceeded all the thoughts of men. For who could have gathered so many churches for Christ, without being aided by the power of God? “From Jerusalem,” he says, “I have propagated the gospel as far as Illyricum, and not by hastening to the end of my course by a straight way, but by going all around, and through the intervening countries.” But the verb πεπληρωκέναι , which after others I have rendered filled up or completed, means both to perfect and to supply what is wanting. Hence πλήρωμα in Greek means perfection as well as a supplement. I am disposed to explain it thus, — that he diffused, as it were by filling up, the preaching of the gospel; for others had before begun, but he spread it wider. 455

Calvin: Rom 15:20 - Thus striving to preach the gospel, etc 20.Thus striving to preach the gospel, etc As it was necessary for Paul not only to prove himself to be the servant of Christ and a pastor of the Chr...

20.Thus striving to preach the gospel, etc As it was necessary for Paul not only to prove himself to be the servant of Christ and a pastor of the Christian Church, but also to show his title to the character and office of an Apostle, that he might gain the attention of the Romans, he mentions here the proper and peculiar distinction of the apostleship; for the work of an Apostle is to propagate the gospel where it had not been preached, according to that command,

“Go ye, preach the gospel to every creature.” (Mar 16:15.)

And this is what we ought carefully to notice, lest we make a general rule of what specially belongs to the Apostolic order: nor ought we to consider it a fault, that a successor was substituted who built up the Church. The Apostles then were the founders as it were of the Church; the pastors who succeeded them, had to strengthen and amplify the building raised up by them. 456 He calls that another’s foundation, which had been laid by the hand of another: otherwise Christ is the only stone on which the Church is founded. See 1Co 3:11; and Eph 2:20

Calvin: Rom 15:21 - But as it is written, etc 21.But as it is written, etc He confirms by the testimony of Isaiah what he had said of the evidence of his apostleship; for in Isa 52:15, speaking...

21.But as it is written, etc He confirms by the testimony of Isaiah what he had said of the evidence of his apostleship; for in Isa 52:15, speaking of the kingdom of Messiah, among other things he predicts, that the knowledge of Christ would be spread among the Gentiles throughout the whole world, that his name would be declared to those by whom it had not been heard of before. It was meet that this should be done by the Apostles, to whom the command was specifically given. Hence the apostleship of Paul was made evident from this circumstance, — that this prophecy was fulfilled in him. 457

It is absurd for any one to attempt to apply what is here said to the pastoral office; for we know that in Churches rightly formed, where the truth of the gospel has been already received, Christ’s name must be constantly preached. Paul then was a preacher of Christ, yet unknown to foreign nations, for this end, — that after his departure the same doctrine should be daily proclaimed in every place by the mouth of the pastors; for it is certain that the Prophet speaks of the commencement of the kingdom of Christ.

Calvin: Rom 15:22 - And on this account, etc 22.And on this account, etc What he had said of his apostleship he applies now to another point, even for the purpose of excusing himself for not hav...

22.And on this account, etc What he had said of his apostleship he applies now to another point, even for the purpose of excusing himself for not having come to them, though he was destined for them as well as for others. He, in passing, then intimates, that in propagating the gospel from Judea as far as to Illyricum, he performed, as it were, a certain course enjoined him by the Lord; which being accomplished, he purposed not to neglect them. And lest they should yet think that they had been neglected, he removes this suspicion by testifying, that there had been for a long time no want of desire. Hence, that he had not done this sooner was owing to a just impediment: he now gives them a hope, as soon as his calling allowed him.

From this passage is drawn a weak argument respecting his going to Spain. It does not indeed immediately follow that he performed this journey, because he intended it: for he speaks only of hope, in which he, as other faithful men, might have been sometimes frustrated. 459

Calvin: Rom 15:24 - For I hope, etc 24.For I hope, etc He refers to the reason why he had for a long time wished to come to them, and now intended to do so, — even that he might see t...

24.For I hope, etc He refers to the reason why he had for a long time wished to come to them, and now intended to do so, — even that he might see them, enjoy an interview and an intercourse with them, and make himself known to them in his official character; for by the coming of the Apostles the gospel also came.

By saying, to be brought on my way thither by you, he intimates how much he expected from their kindness; and this, as we have already observed, is the best way for conciliating favor; for the more confidence any one hears is reposed in him, the stronger are the obligations under which he feels himself; inasmuch as we deem it base and discourteous to disappoint the good opinion formed of us. And by adding, When I shall first be in part filled, etc., he bears witness to the benevolence of his mind towards them; and to convince them of this was very necessary for the interest of the gospel.

Calvin: Rom 15:25 - But I am going now, etc 25.But I am going now, etc Lest they should expect his immediate coming, and think themselves deceived, if he had not come according to their expecta...

25.But I am going now, etc Lest they should expect his immediate coming, and think themselves deceived, if he had not come according to their expectation, he declares to them what business he had then in hand, which prevented him from going soon to them, and that was, — that he was going to Jerusalem to bear the alms which had been gathered in Macedonia and Achaia. Availing himself at the same time of this opportunity, he proceeds to commend that contribution; by which, as by a kind of intimation, he stirs them up to follow this example: for though he does not openly ask them, yet, by saying that Macedonia and Achaia had done what they ought to have done, he intimates, that it was also the duty of the Romans, as they were under the same obligation; and that he had this view, he openly confesses to the Corinthians, —

“I boast,” he says, “of your promptitude to all the Churches, that they may be stirred up by your example.”
(2Co 9:2.)

It was indeed a rare instance of kindness, that the Grecians, having heard that their brethren at Jerusalem were laboring under want, considered not the distance at which they were separated from them; but esteeming those sufficiently nigh, to whom they were united by the bond of faith, they relieved their necessities from their own abundance. The word communication, which is here employed, ought to be noticed; for it well expresses the feeling, by which it behooves us to succor the wants of our brethren, even because there is to be a common and mutual regard on account of the unity of the body. I have not rendered the pronoun τινὰ, because it is often redundant in Greek, and seems to lessen the emphasis of this passage. 461 What we have rendered to minister, is in Greek a participle, ministering; but the former seems more fitted to convey the meaning of Paul: for he excuses himself, that by a lawful occupation he was prevented from going immediately to Rome.

Calvin: Rom 15:27 - And their debtors they are, etc 27.And their debtors they are, etc Every one perceives, that what is said here of obligation, is said not so much for the sake of the Corinthians as ...

27.And their debtors they are, etc Every one perceives, that what is said here of obligation, is said not so much for the sake of the Corinthians as for the Romans themselves; for the Corinthians or the Macedonians were not more indebted to the Jews than the Romans. And he adds the ground of this obligation, — that they had received the gospel from them: and he takes his argument from the comparison of the less with the greater. He employs also the same in another place, that is, that it ought not to have appeared to them an unjust or a grievous compensation to exchange carnal things, which are immensely of less value, for things spiritual. (2Co 9:11.) And it shows the value of the gospel, when he declares, that they were indebted not only to its ministers, but also to the whole nation, from whom they had come forth.

And mark the verb λειτουργὢσαι , to minister; which means to discharge one’s office in the commonwealth, and to undergo the burden of one’s calling: it is also sometimes applied to sacred things. Nor do I doubt but that Paul meant that it is a kind of sacrifice, when the faithful gave of their own to relieve the wants of their brethren; for they thus perform that duty of love which they owe, and offer to God a sacrifice of an acceptable odor. But in this place what he had peculiarly in view was the mutual right of compensation.

Calvin: Rom 15:28 - And sealed to them this fruit, etc 28.And sealed to them this fruit, etc I disapprove not of what some think, that there is here an allusion to a practice among the ancients, who close...

28.And sealed to them this fruit, etc I disapprove not of what some think, that there is here an allusion to a practice among the ancients, who closed up with their seals what they intended to lay up in safety. Thus Paul commends his own faithfulness and integrity; as though he had said, that he was an honest keeper of the money deposited in his hands, no otherwise than if he carried it sealed up. 462 — The word fruit seems to designate the produce, which he had before said returned to the Jews from the propagation of the gospel, in a way similar to the land, which by bringing forth fruit supports its cultivator.

Calvin: Rom 15:29 - And I know, that when I come, etc 29.And I know, that when I come, etc These words may be explained in two ways: the first meaning is, — that he should find a plentiful fruit from t...

29.And I know, that when I come, etc These words may be explained in two ways: the first meaning is, — that he should find a plentiful fruit from the gospel at Rome; for the blessing of the gospel is, when it fructifies by good works: but to confine this to alms, as some do, is not what I approve. The second is, that in order to render his coming to them more an object of desire, he says, that he hopes that it would not be unfruitful, but that it would make a great accession to the gospel; and this he calls fullness of blessing, which signifies a full blessing; by which expression he means great success and increase. But this blessing depended partly on his ministry and partly on their faith. Hence he promises, that his coming to them would not be in vain, as he would not disappoint them of the grace given to him, but would bestow it with the same alacrity with which their minds were prepared to receive the gospel.

The former exposition has been most commonly received, and seems also to me the best; that is, that he hoped that at his coming he would find what he especially wished, even that the gospel flourished among them and prevailed with evident success, — that they were excelling in holiness and in all other virtues. For the reason he gives for his desire is, that he hoped for no common joy in seeing them, as he expected to see them abounding in all the spiritual riches of the gospel. 463

Calvin: Rom 15:30 - Now I beseech you, etc // That ye strive together with me, 30.Now I beseech you, etc It is well known from many passages how much ill-will prevailed against Paul in his own nation on account of false reports,...

30.Now I beseech you, etc It is well known from many passages how much ill-will prevailed against Paul in his own nation on account of false reports, as though he taught a departure from Moses. He knew how much calumnies might avail to oppress the innocent, especially among those who are carried away by inconsiderate zeal. Added also to this, was the testimony of the Spirit, recorded in Act 20:23; by which he was forewarned, that bonds and afflictions awaited him at Jerusalem. The more danger then he perceived, the more he was moved: hence it was, that he was so solicitous to commend his safety to the Churches; nor let us wonder, that he was anxious about his life, in which he knew so much danger to the Church was involved.

He then shows how grieved his godly mind was, by the earnest protestation he makes, in which he adds to the name of the Lord, the love of the Spirit, by which the saints ought to embrace one another. But though in so great a fear, he yet continued to proceed; nor did he so dread danger, but that he was prepared willingly to meet it. At the same time he had recourse to the remedies given him by God; for he solicited the aid of the Church, so that being helped by its prayers, he might find comfort, according to the Lord’s promise, —

“Where two or three shall assemble in my name, there in the midst of them am I,” (Mat 18:20;)

and,

“Whatsoever they agree in on earth, they shall obtain in heaven,” (Mat 18:19.)

And lest no one should think it an unmeaning commendation, he besought them both by Christ and by the love of the Spirit. The love of the Spirit is that by which Christ joins us together; for it is not that of the flesh, nor of the world, but is from his Spirit, who is the bond of our unity.

Since then it is so great a favor from God to be helped by the prayers of the faithful, that even Paul, a most choice instrument of God, did not think it right to neglect this privilege, how great must be our stupidity, if we, who are abject and worthless creatures, disregard it? But to take a handle from such passages for the purpose of maintaining the intercessions of dead saints, is an instance of extreme effrontery. 465

That ye strive together with me, 466 etc. [Erasmus] has not given an unsuitable rendering, “That ye help me laboring:” but, as the Greek word, used by Paul, has more force, I have preferred to give a literal rendering: for by the word strive, or contend, he alludes to the difficulties by which he was oppressed, and by bidding them to assist in this contest, he shows how the godly ought to pray for their brethren, that they are to assume their person, as though they were placed in the same difficulties; and he also intimates the effect which they have; for he who commends his brother to the Lord, by taking to himself a part of his distress, do so far relieve him. And indeed if our strength is derived from prayer to God, we can in no better way confirm our brethren, than by praying to God for them.

Calvin: Rom 15:31 - That my ministration, etc // And the God of peace, 31.That my ministration, etc Slanderers had so prevailed by their accusations, that he even feared that the present would hardly be acceptable, as co...

31.That my ministration, etc Slanderers had so prevailed by their accusations, that he even feared that the present would hardly be acceptable, as coming from his hands, which otherwise, under such a distress, would have been very seasonable. And hence appears his wonderful meekness, for he ceased not to labor for those to whom he doubted whether he would be acceptable. This disposition of mind we ought to imitate, so that we may not cease to do good to those of whose gratitude we are by no means certain. We must also notice that he honors with the name of saints even those by whom he feared he would be suspected, and deemed unwelcome. He also knew that, saints may sometimes be led away by false slanders into unfavorable opinions, and though he knew that they wronged him, he yet ceased not to speak honorably of them.

By adding that I may come to you, he intimates that this prayer would be profitable also to them, and that it concerned them that he should not be killed in Judea. To the same purpose is the expression with joy; for it would be advantageous to the Romans for him to come to them in a cheerful state of mind and free from all grief, that he might in a more lively and strenuous manner labor among them. And by the word refreshed, 467 or satisfied, he again shows how fully persuaded he was of their brotherly love. The words by the will of God remind us how necessary it is to be diligent in prayer, for God alone directs all our ways by his providence.

And the God of peace, 468 etc. From the universal word all, I conclude that he did not simply pray that God would be present with and favor the Romans in a general sense, but that he would rule and guide every one of them. But the word peace refers, I think, to their circumstances at the time, that God, the author of peace, would keep them all united together.

Defender: Rom 15:1 - ought This is a strong verb, meaning "have an obligation.""

This is a strong verb, meaning "have an obligation.""

Defender: Rom 15:3 - as it is written This phrase is from Psa 69:9, the same verse which the disciples applied to Christ when He purged the temple of the money-changers (Joh 2:17). He suff...

This phrase is from Psa 69:9, the same verse which the disciples applied to Christ when He purged the temple of the money-changers (Joh 2:17). He suffered reproach on our behalf; we should be willing to be reproached for His sake (1Pe 4:14)."

Defender: Rom 15:4 - written for our learning The Old Testament Scriptures were all written for our benefit today, as well as for the pre-Christian Israelites. Paul very frequently quotes from the...

The Old Testament Scriptures were all written for our benefit today, as well as for the pre-Christian Israelites. Paul very frequently quotes from the Old Testament as authoritative (as in the preceding verse, for example), and clearly believed all of it to be divinely inspired and in every way profitable for Christians (2Ti 3:15-17). By no means should Christians limit their Bible study to the New Testament."

Defender: Rom 15:5 - God of patience Note the beautiful titles applied to God in this chapter: (1) "the God of patience and consolation" (Rom 15:5); (2) "the God of hope" (Rom 15:13); and...

Note the beautiful titles applied to God in this chapter: (1) "the God of patience and consolation" (Rom 15:5); (2) "the God of hope" (Rom 15:13); and (3) "the God of peace" (Rom 15:33)."

Defender: Rom 15:9 - as it is written Again observe how often Paul quotes from the Old Testament, even from what often seem to be obscure verses. This quote is from Psa 18:49."

Again observe how often Paul quotes from the Old Testament, even from what often seem to be obscure verses. This quote is from Psa 18:49."

Defender: Rom 15:10 - again he saith This quote is from the song of Moses, as he prepared to die (Deu 32:43). He had led Israel to its promised land and now, in the final verse of his gre...

This quote is from the song of Moses, as he prepared to die (Deu 32:43). He had led Israel to its promised land and now, in the final verse of his great song, he exhorted all the nations to rejoice with God's chosen nation, for in Abraham's seed would all nations be blessed. Note also that Paul quotes this exhortation as coming directly from God, even though it was Moses' song, thus confirming the divine inspiration of Moses' writings near the very end of the Pentateuch."

Defender: Rom 15:11 - And again In four straight verses Paul quotes four Scriptures from David, Moses, an unknown psalmist, and Isaiah, respectively. This particular quote is from Ps...

In four straight verses Paul quotes four Scriptures from David, Moses, an unknown psalmist, and Isaiah, respectively. This particular quote is from Psa 117:1. The 117th psalm is the shortest chapter in the Bible, yet one of its two verses is cited by Paul in his letter to Rome."

Defender: Rom 15:12 - again, Esaias saith This reference is taken from the great Messianic promise of Isa 11:10, when Christ ("the root of Jesse," the father of Israel's greatest king, David -...

This reference is taken from the great Messianic promise of Isa 11:10, when Christ ("the root of Jesse," the father of Israel's greatest king, David - hence both "[the] root and the offspring of David," as in His claim in Rev 22:16) will reign over all nations, both Israel and the Gentiles."

Defender: Rom 15:21 - it is written From Isa 52:15, this verse introduces Isaiah's great fifty-third chapter, containing the most complete and poignant exposition in the Bible of the sac...

From Isa 52:15, this verse introduces Isaiah's great fifty-third chapter, containing the most complete and poignant exposition in the Bible of the sacrificial death of Christ. Paul, it must be remembered, was writing for the instruction of both the Jewish Christians and the Gentile Christians at Rome, understanding that both would be reading his letter."

Defender: Rom 15:28 - by you into Spain Paul had intended, after taking the offering collected from the various churches of Greece and Asia back to the needy Christians at Jerusalem, to make...

Paul had intended, after taking the offering collected from the various churches of Greece and Asia back to the needy Christians at Jerusalem, to make his next missionary journey a journey to Rome and then to Spain (Rom 15:24). He did not know he would reach Rome only as a prisoner (Act 28:16) and, as far as the record goes, never get to Spain at all. Nevertheless, his inspired epistles have actually reached every nation, and almost every tribe, on earth."

Defender: Rom 15:33 - Amen Paul normally ended each of his epistles with a benediction such as this. He perhaps intended chapter 16 simply to be something of a postscript. Never...

Paul normally ended each of his epistles with a benediction such as this. He perhaps intended chapter 16 simply to be something of a postscript. Nevertheless, there is much of great (and inspired) value in that final chapter as well."

TSK: Rom 15:1 - strong // ought // please strong : Rom 4:20; 1Co 4:10; 2Co 12:10; Eph 6:10; 2Ti 2:1; 1Jo 2:14 ought : Rom 14:1; 1Co 9:22, 1Co 12:22-24; Gal 6:1, Gal 6:2; 1Th 5:14 please : Rom ...

TSK: Rom 15:2 - -- Rom 14:19; 1Co 9:19-22, 1Co 10:24, 1Co 10:33, 1Co 11:1, 1Co 13:5; Phi 2:4, Phi 2:5; Tit 2:9, Tit 2:10

TSK: Rom 15:3 - Christ // The Christ : Psa 40:6-8; Mat 26:39, Mat 26:42; Joh 4:34, Joh 5:30, Joh 6:38, Joh 8:29, Joh 12:27, Joh 12:28, Joh 14:30; Joh 14:31, Joh 15:10; Phi 2:8 The ...

TSK: Rom 15:4 - whatsoever // for our learning // that whatsoever : Rom 4:23, Rom 4:24; 1Co 9:9, 1Co 9:10, 1Co 10:11; 2Ti 3:16, 2Ti 3:17; 2Pe 1:20,2Pe 1:21 for our learning : Rather, ""for our instruction....

TSK: Rom 15:5 - the God // consolation // grant // according to the God : Rom 15:13; Exo 34:6; Psa 86:5; 1Pe 3:20; 2Pe 3:9, 2Pe 3:15 consolation : 2Co 1:3, 2Co 1:4, 2Co 7:6 grant : Rom 12:16; 2Ch 30:12; Jer 32:39; ...

TSK: Rom 15:6 - with // the with : Rom 15:9-11; Zep 3:9; Zec 13:9; Act 4:24, Act 4:32 the : Joh 10:29, Joh 10:30, Joh 20:17; 2Co 1:3, 2Co 11:31; Eph 1:3; 1Pe 1:3

TSK: Rom 15:7 - receive // as // to receive : Rom 14:1-3; Mat 10:40; Mar 9:37; Luk 9:48 as : Rom 5:2; Mat 11:28-30; Luk 15:2; Joh 6:37, Joh 13:34 to : Rom 15:9; Eph 1:6-8, Eph 1:12, Eph ...

TSK: Rom 15:8 - I say // Jesus // for the // truth I say : Rom 3:26; 1Co 1:12, 1Co 10:19, 1Co 10:29, 1Co 15:50 Jesus : Rom 9:4, Rom 9:5; Mat 15:24, Mat 20:28; Joh 1:11; Act 3:25, Act 3:26, Act 13:46; G...

TSK: Rom 15:9 - For For : 2Sa 22:50; Psa 18:49

TSK: Rom 15:10 - -- Deu 32:43; Psa 66:1-4, Psa 67:3, Psa 67:4, Psa 68:32, Psa 97:1, Psa 98:3, Psa 98:4, Psa 138:4, Psa 138:5; Isa 24:14-16, Isa 42:10-12

TSK: Rom 15:11 - -- Psa 117:1

TSK: Rom 15:12 - There // and he // in him There : Isa 11:1, Isa 11:10; Rev 5:5, Rev 22:16 and he : Gen 49:10; Psa 2:4-12, Psa 22:27, Psa 22:28, Psa 72:8-10,Psa 72:17; Isa 42:1-4, Isa 49:6; Dan...

TSK: Rom 15:13 - the God // fill // abound the God : Rom 15:5; Jer 14:8; Joe 3:16; 1Ti 1:1 fill : Rom 14:17; Isa 55:12; Joh 14:1, Joh 14:27; Gal 5:22; Eph 1:2, Eph 5:18, Eph 5:19; 2Th 2:16, 2Th...

TSK: Rom 15:14 - I // full // filled // able I : Phi 1:7; 2Ti 1:5; Phm 1:21; Heb 6:9; 2Pe 1:12; 1Jo 2:21 full : Phi 1:11; Col 1:8-10; 2Pe 1:5-8 filled : 1Co 8:1, 1Co 8:7, 1Co 8:10 able : Col 3:16...

TSK: Rom 15:15 - I have // as // because I have : Heb 13:22; 1Pe 5:12; 1Jo 2:12-14, 1Jo 5:13; Jud 1:3-5 as : 1Ti 4:6; 2Ti 1:6, 2Ti 2:14; Tit 3:1; 2Pe 1:12-15, 2Pe 3:1, 2Pe 3:2 because : Rom 1...

TSK: Rom 15:16 - I should // ministering // offering up // being I should : Rom 15:18, Rom 11:13; Act 9:15, Act 13:2, Act 22:21, Act 26:17, Act 26:18; 1Co 3:5, 1Co 4:1; 2Co 5:20; 2Co 11:23; Gal 2:7, Gal 2:8; Eph 3:1...

TSK: Rom 15:17 - whereof // in whereof : Rom 4:2; 2Co 2:14-16, 2Co 3:4-6, 2Co 7:4, 2Co 11:16-30, 2Co 12:1, 2Co 12:11-21 in : Heb 5:1

TSK: Rom 15:18 - I will // which // to make // by word I will : Pro 25:14; 2Co 10:13-18, 2Co 11:31, 2Co 12:6; Jud 1:9 which : Mar 16:20; Act 14:27, Act 15:4, Act 15:12, Act 21:19; Gal 2:8; 1Co 3:6-9; 2Co 3...

TSK: Rom 15:19 - mighty // by the // so that // Illyricum // fully mighty : Act 14:10, Act 15:12, Act 16:18, Act 19:11, Act 19:12; 2Co 12:12; Gal 3:5; Heb 2:4 by the : Mat 12:28; Act 1:8; 1Co 12:4-11; 1Pe 1:12 so that...

mighty : Act 14:10, Act 15:12, Act 16:18, Act 19:11, Act 19:12; 2Co 12:12; Gal 3:5; Heb 2:4

by the : Mat 12:28; Act 1:8; 1Co 12:4-11; 1Pe 1:12

so that : Rom 15:24; Act 9:28, Act 9:29, Act 13:4, Act 13:5, Act 13:14, Act 13:51, Act 14:6, Act 14:20,Act 14:25, Act 16:6-12, Act 17:10,Act 17:15; Act 18:1, Act 18:19, Act 19:1, Act 20:2, Act 20:6

Illyricum : Illyricum, or Illyria, was a country of Europe, lying n and nw of Macedonia, on the eastern coast of the Adriatic gulf, opposite Italy. It was distinguished into two parts; Liburnia north, now Croatia; and Dalmatia south, still retaining the same name. The account of Paul’ s second visit to the peninsula of Greece, Act 20:1, Act 20:2, says Dr. Paley, leads us to suppose that, in going over Macedonia, he had passed so far to the west, as to come into those parts of the country which were contiguous to Illyricum, if he did not enter Illyricum itself. The history and the Epistle therefore so far agree; and the agreement is much strengthened by a coincidence of time; for much before the time when this epistle was written, he could not have said so, as his route, in his former journey, confined him to the eastern side of the peninsula, a considerable distance from Illyricum.

fully : Rom 1:14-16; Act 20:20; Col 1:25; 2Ti 4:17

TSK: Rom 15:20 - so // build so : 2Co 10:14-16 build : 1Co 3:9-15; 2Co 10:13-16; Eph 2:20-22

TSK: Rom 15:21 - -- Isa 52:15, Isa 65:1

TSK: Rom 15:22 - I have // much I have : Rom 1:13; 1Th 2:17, 1Th 2:18 much : or, many ways, or, oftentimes

I have : Rom 1:13; 1Th 2:17, 1Th 2:18

much : or, many ways, or, oftentimes

TSK: Rom 15:23 - and and : Rom 15:32, Rom 1:10-12; 1Th 3:10; 2Ti 1:4

TSK: Rom 15:24 - I take // Spain // and to // if // filled // with your company I take : Rom 15:28; Act 19:21 Spain : Spain is a large country in the west of Europe, which anciently comprehended both Spain and Portugal, separated ...

I take : Rom 15:28; Act 19:21

Spain : Spain is a large country in the west of Europe, which anciently comprehended both Spain and Portugal, separated from Gaul or France by the Pyrenees, and bounded on every other side by the sea.

and to : Act 15:3, Act 21:5; 2Co 1:16; 3Jo 1:6

if : Rom 1:12; 1Co 16:5-7

filled : Rather, ""gratified (or enjoy) your society,""as εμπλησθω frequently denotes.

with your company : Gr. with you, Rom 15:32

TSK: Rom 15:25 - -- Rom 15:26-31; Act 18:21, Act 19:21, Act 20:16, Act 20:22, Act 24:17; 1Co 16:1-3; Gal 2:10

TSK: Rom 15:26 - it // the poor it : Act 11:27-30; 2Cor. 8:1-9:15; Gal 6:6-10 the poor : Pro 14:21, Pro 14:31, Pro 17:5; Zec 11:7, Zec 11:11; Mat 25:40, Mat 26:11; Luk 6:20, Luk 14:1...

TSK: Rom 15:27 - and and : Rom 11:17; 1Co 9:11; Gal 6:6; Phm 1:19

TSK: Rom 15:28 - and // I will and : Phi 4:17; Col 1:6 I will : Rom 15:24; Pro 19:21; Lam 3:37; Jam 4:13-15

TSK: Rom 15:29 - -- Rom 1:11, Rom 1:12; Psa 16:11; Eze 34:26; Eph 1:3, Eph 3:8, Eph 3:19, Eph 4:13

TSK: Rom 15:30 - for the // and for // that for the : 2Co 4:5, 2Co 4:11, 2Co 12:10; 1Ti 6:13, 1Ti 6:14; 2Ti 4:1 and for : Psa 143:10; Phi 2:1 that : Gen 32:24-29; 2Co 1:11; Eph 6:19; Col 2:1, Co...

TSK: Rom 15:31 - I may // do not believe // and that // accepted I may : Act 21:27-31, Act 22:24, Act 23:12-24, Act 24:1-9, Act 25:2, Act 25:24; 1Th 2:15; 2Th 3:2 do not believe : or, are disobedient and that : Rom ...

I may : Act 21:27-31, Act 22:24, Act 23:12-24, Act 24:1-9, Act 25:2, Act 25:24; 1Th 2:15; 2Th 3:2

do not believe : or, are disobedient

and that : Rom 15:25; 2Co 8:4, 2Co 9:1

accepted : Act 21:17-26

TSK: Rom 15:32 - I may // by the // and may I may : Rom 15:23, Rom 15:24, Rom 1:10-13; Act 27:1, Act 27:41-43, Act 28:15, Act 28:16, Act 28:30,Act 28:31; Phi 1:12-14 by the : Act 18:21; 1Co 4:19...

TSK: Rom 15:33 - the God // be the God : Rom 16:20; 1Co 14:33; 2Co 5:19, 2Co 5:20, 2Co 13:11; Phi 4:9; 1Th 5:23; 2Th 3:16; Heb 13:20 be : Rom 16:24; Rth 2:4; Mat 1:23, Mat 28:20; 2C...

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Poole: Rom 15:1 - We then that are strong // Ought // To bear the infirmities of the weak // And not to please ourselves Rom 15:1-3 We ought, in condescension to the weak, to give up our own will for our neighbour’ s good, after the example of Christ. Rom 15:4 ...

Rom 15:1-3 We ought, in condescension to the weak, to give up

our own will for our neighbour’ s good, after the

example of Christ.

Rom 15:4 The intent of the Scriptures.

Rom 15:5,6 Paul prayeth for unanimity among Christians.

Rom 15:6-12 Exhorteth to receive one the other, as Christ did

all, both Jews and Gentiles,

Rom 15:13 and wisheth them all joy, peace, and hope.

Rom 15:14-16 He apologizeth for his freedom in admonishing them,

as he was the apostle of the Gentiles,

Rom 15:17-21 and showeth the success and extensiveness of his labours.

Rom 15:23-29 He excuseth his not coming to them before, and

promiseth them, a visit on his return from Jerusalem.

Rom 15:30-33 He requesteth their prayers.

We then that are strong: the particle then showeth, that what followeth is inferred from what went before. By the strong, he means those who have attained to a good measure of knowledge and understanding, that are instructed in the Christian faith, and particularly in the doctrine of Christian liberty. He putteth himself in the number, not out of ambition, but that he may propose himself an example of the following duty.

Ought i.e. we are obliged and bound both by the law of God and nature.

To bear the infirmities of the weak: by the weak, he means those who are weak in faith and knowledge, Rom 14:1 . By their infirmities, he means their ignorance, frowardness, consoriousness, &c. He doth not speak of heresies and manifest enormities; but of such errors in doctrine and life, which proceed from ignorance or common infirmity. When he says, we must bear their infirmities, his meaning is, that we must bear with them, as we do with children or sick persons in their waywardness: though it a great burden to us, yet we must bear it; we must not impatiently contradict them, but prudently instruct them: see Exo 23:5 1Co 9:22 Gal 6:2 .

And not to please ourselves: q.d. We ought not to do what we please in indifferent thing’ s, and to act according to our own sentiments without any regard to others; we should not please ourselves in a proud reflecting upon our own knowledge, and in contemning of others because of their ignorance; we should not stand upon the terms of our liberty and contentment, but rather, for the sake of others, depart a little from our own right.

Poole: Rom 15:2 - -- Having said we must not please ourselves, he immediately subjoins, we must please others, viz. every one his neighbour: he means, that we should c...

Having said we must not please ourselves, he immediately subjoins, we must please others, viz. every one his neighbour: he means, that we should condescend and accommodate ourselves to others, and give them satisfaction in all things; at least so far as may tend to their good and edification. You had a like passage, Rom 14:19 . The apostle exhorts the Corinthians to a practice some what like this, 1Co 10:24 ; and he leads them the way by is own example, 1Co 9:19 1Co 10:33 . There is a pleasing of men which is sinful, and there is a pleasing of men which is lawful; and that is, when it is limited, as in this text.

Poole: Rom 15:3 - For even Christ pleased not himself For even Christ pleased not himself: he backs his exhortation in Rom 14:1 , with an argument taken from the practice of our Lord himself, who is our ...

For even Christ pleased not himself: he backs his exhortation in Rom 14:1 , with an argument taken from the practice of our Lord himself, who is our perfect pattern, and hath left us an example, that we should follow his steps: see Joh 13:15,34 1Pe 2:21 1Jo 2:6 4:17 . By Christ’ s not pleasing himself, is meant his not indulging or sparing himself; he did not seek his own ease, nor to satisfy inclination of the human nature, which abhorreth pain, and the destruction of itself. He took such a course all along as sufficiently demonstrated that he respected our benefit, and not his own.

But; here is an ellipsis, something must he supplied to fill up the sense: either the meaning is, he pleased not himself, but others; or, he pleased not himself, but bore our infirmities and reproaches: or else, he pleased not himself, but it happened to him; or he so carried himself that it might be truly applied to him, which is written, &c.

As it is written; viz. in Psa 69:9 . That David uttered these words in the person of Christ, or as a type of him, may appear from Joh 2:17 . Interpreters are divided about accommodating this testimony to the occasion for which it is brought. Either the meaning is, that Christ did willingly expose himself to all the reproaches and contumelies of men, in obedience to his Father’ s will; or else, that he and the same concernments with God the Father, so that what befell God did also befall him; he was as tender of the Father’ s honour as of his own: or else, that the sins of men, which are things that cast reproach upon God, were taken by Christ upon himself, and he bore them in his body upon a tree. Seeing then that Christ hath done so much for our sakes, and hath not sought his own ease and benefit, we ought also to seek the good of others, and to deny ourselves: see Phi 2:6-8 .

Poole: Rom 15:4 - That we through patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope // the patience and comfort of the Scriptures Lest any should think, that the testimony before alleged concerneth only David or Christ, he showeth that it belongeth also unto us; that we may lea...

Lest any should think, that the testimony before alleged concerneth only David or Christ, he showeth that it belongeth also unto us; that we may learn by their example to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Yea, he takes occasion from hence to inform us of the general use of the Scriptures, that whatsoever is written, in this or any other place, is written for our learning and instruction; we are concerned not only by all the precepts, but in all the promises, Heb 13:5 , menaces, Act 13:40,41 , rewards, Rom 4:24 , and punishments, 1Co 10:11 , therein mentioned and declared: and though this passage is more especially to be understood of the Scriptures of the Old Testament, yet it is true also of the Scriptures of the New Testament; they, being written by the same Spirit, are profitable for the same ends: see 2Ti 3:16 .

That we through patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope he proceeds to show more particularly the use and benefit of the Holy Scripture, which is, to confirm our hope and assurance of eternal life; see 1Jo 5:13 . He saith,

the patience and comfort of the Scriptures because they are both wrought in us by means thereof: see Rev 3:10 . We are armed with patience, and finished with consolations, from the examples and promises contained therein. It may be, the hope he here speaks of is to be understood not only of eternal life, but of salvalion and deliverance in this life: q.d. One principal use of the Scriptures is this, that by the examples we find there of the patience of holy men, and of God’ s relieving and comforting them in their distresses, we might be confident that God will relieve and comfort us also in due time.

Poole: Rom 15:5 - Now the God of patience and consolation // Grant you to be like-minded one towards another // According to Christ Jesus Now the God of patience and consolation: he is called, the God of all grace, 1Pe 5:10 , the God of hope, Rom 15:13 , the God of peace, Rom 15:33 ,...

Now the God of patience and consolation: he is called, the God of all grace, 1Pe 5:10 , the God of hope, Rom 15:13 , the God of peace, Rom 15:33 , the God of love and peace, 2Co 13:11 , and here, the God of patience and consolation: the meaning is, he is the author and worker thereof. You read in the former verse of the patience and comfort of the Scriptures; and here he showeth that the Scriptures do not work these of themselves, but God doth it in and by them.

Grant you to be like-minded one towards another this is that to which he had exhorted them, Rom 12:16 . See the like, 1Co 1:10 2Co 13:11 Eph 4:3 Phi 2:2 . God is the author, as of patience and consolation, so of peace and concord: the grace of unity and charity is his gift; he maketh men of one mind and of one heart, and for this he should be inquired of by his saints and people to do it for them.

According to Christ Jesus i.e. according to his doctrine, command, or example.

Poole: Rom 15:6 - That ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God // that ye may with one mouth glorify God // Even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ That ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God: q.d. I further pray, that you may not only be like-minded one towards another, but that ye may ...

That ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God: q.d. I further pray, that you may not only be like-minded one towards another, but

that ye may with one mouth glorify God that whether you be Gentiles or Jews, strong or weak in the faith, you may agree and be unanimous in his worship and service; that not only with one mind, but with one mouth, or as if you had all but one mouth. you may pray unto God and praise him: that is one way of glorifying God, Psa 50:23 , and it seems to be chiefly intended in this place. See Act 4:32 , what accord and unanimity there was among the primitive Christians.

Even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ a usual periphrasis of God in the New Testament: see 2Co 1:3 11:31 Eph 1:3 Col 1:3 1Pe 1:3 . God is the Father of Christ, first, as he is the Son of God; so he begat him by an eternal and ineffable generation, Joh 3:16 1Jo 4:9 . Secondly, as he is man: so he created him, Luk 1:35 . Thirdly, as he is Mediator; so he appointed him to and qualified him for that office, Psa 40:8 Joh 20:17 . This compellation of God includes all our comfort and happiness, for he is our Father because he is the Father of Jesus Christ. It is added here by way of limitation, to distinguish the true God from the false gods of the earth; and by way of explanation, to show how God will be glorified and worshipped under the gospel, viz. as the God and Father of onr Lord Jesus Christ.

Poole: Rom 15:7 - Wherefore receive ye one another // As Christ also received us // To the glory of God Wherefore receive ye one another: see Rom 14:1,3 . He ends this discourse with the same terms in which he began it. Before, the strong only were char...

Wherefore receive ye one another: see Rom 14:1,3 . He ends this discourse with the same terms in which he began it. Before, the strong only were charged to receive the weak, but here both are charged alike; the strong must receive the weak, and the weak the strong; they must all have communion one with another, continuing in brotherly love, accounting one another for brethren, exercising mutual forbearance and long-suffering.

As Christ also received us i.e. after the example of Christ, who beareth with the infirmities of his followers, putting no difference betwixt Jews and Gentiles. The particle as noteth quality, not equality; there is no proportion betwixt the infinite love of Christ and the scanty charity of man. See the like, Mat 5:48 Eph 5:2 .

To the glory of God some join this with the former clause, that we should receive one another to the glory of God: God is glorified by that brotherly love and concord that is amongst his people. Others join it with the latter clause, that Christ hath

received us to the glory of God i.e. to make us partakers of the glory of God, or to declare and manifest the glory of God’ s truth to the Jews, and mercy to the Gentiles, as he showeth in the following verses.

Poole: Rom 15:8 - For the truth of God // To confirm the promises made to the fathers He explains himself, and declares more at large, how Christ received both Jews and Gentiles, thereby to admonish them to receive one another. As for...

He explains himself, and declares more at large, how Christ received both Jews and Gentiles, thereby to admonish them to receive one another. As for the Jews, whom he calls here the circumcision, see Rom 3:30 4:9,12 , he saith, Christ became a minister unto them; see Mat 20:28 . He exercised his ministry in the days of his flesh amongst them only, Mat 15:24 . He went indeed now and then into the coasts of Samaria to make way for the calling of the Gentiles, but his chief abode was in Jewry.

For the truth of God or, because of the truth of God, that his truth or faithfulness might not fail.

To confirm the promises made to the fathers i.e. the promises of the Messiah, made first to Adam, then to Abraham and to David, that the Messiah should come of their loins, that in their seed all the nations of the earth should be blessed.

Poole: Rom 15:9 - that the Gentiles // As it is written Here he proves the second part, that Christ hath also received the Gentiles. There is a plain ellipsis in the words; this is understood, that there ...

Here he proves the second part, that Christ hath also received the Gentiles. There is a plain ellipsis in the words; this is understood, that there were promises made of or to the Gentiles, and Christ came to confirm them also. The sum of these promises was this,

that the Gentiles should glorify God for his mercy Some have observed how the truth of God is spoken of in the foregoing verse with respect to the Jews, and the mercy of God with respect to the Gentiles; not that the one was without the other; for the salvation of the Jews, as it was of truth, so of mercy also, Mic 7:20 ; and the vocation of the Gentiles, as it was of mercy, so also of truth; for there were many promises of God concerning that matter, but mercy is predicated of the Gentiles, because that attribute of God appeared more eminently in their conversion and calling. You had the like distribution and difference in Rom 4:25 10:10 .

As it is written: because the Jews were hardly persuaded of the mercy of God to the Gentiles, therefore he proves it by divers Scripture testimonies. This first is taken out of Psa 18:49 : See Poole on "Psa 18:49" . David speaks this in the person of Christ. In the Psalm it is: I will give thanks to thee; but here, according to the LXX., I will confess to thee, or celebrate thee among the Gentiles. They then are received to mercy, forasmuch as it was foretold they should celebrate or praise God for his mercy.

Poole: Rom 15:10 - -- This is taken out of Deu 32:43 . Here it is evidently implied, that the Gentiles should become the people of God, and join with the Jews in his wors...

This is taken out of Deu 32:43 . Here it is evidently implied, that the Gentiles should become the people of God, and join with the Jews in his worship and service, and rejoice in the sense of his goodness and mercy to them. The partition wall is now taken away, and they both became one sheepfold under one Shepherd.

Poole: Rom 15:11 - -- This is found in Psa 117:1 . There the Gentiles are willed to praise God, which they could not do unless they knew him aright, and had obtained merc...

This is found in Psa 117:1 . There the Gentiles are willed to praise God, which they could not do unless they knew him aright, and had obtained mercy from him.

Poole: Rom 15:12 - And again, Esaias saith And again, Esaias saith viz. in Isa 11:10 : see the notes there. This is a plain prophecy of the conversion of the Gentiles; their being received to ...

And again, Esaias saith viz. in Isa 11:10 : see the notes there. This is a plain prophecy of the conversion of the Gentiles; their being received to mercy is implied in the former testimonies, but here it is expressed. The Son of David (the Savionr) shall rise and spring out of Jesse’ s root, and reign over the Gentiles by his word and Spirit. He shall gather them by the preaching of his cross, as by an ensign, and they, as it is in the prophet, shall seek to him; or, as it is here, shall trust or hope in him. The apostle, as he is wont, doth follow the LXX., which makes some little variation from the Hebrew text; but it is rather in sound than in sense. You have other prophecies and promises of the Gentiles’ mercy, as Isa 42:1,6 Isa 49:22 60:3,5 ; but the apostle thought, that these he had mentioned were sufficient for his purpose.

Poole: Rom 15:13 - The God of hope // With all joy and peace in believing // That ye may abound in hope through the power of the Holy Ghost He finisheth here his long discourse about brotherly love and concord with a short and pithy prayer. Having said before, that the Gentiles should ho...

He finisheth here his long discourse about brotherly love and concord with a short and pithy prayer. Having said before, that the Gentiles should hope in God, he takes occasion from hence to style him,

The God of hope He is so, both objective, as being the only object of our hope, see Psa 146:5 Jer 17:7 1Ti 6:17 ; and effective, as being the only author of it, 1Pe 1:3 .

With all joy and peace in believing i.e. with much inward joy and peace, which riseth in the heart through a lively faith in Christ; or else, with all comfort and concord in the Christian faith. In this he prays they may abound; instead of those contentions that had been amongst them, he desires they may be filled with those things, wherein he told them, Rom 14:17 , the kingdom of God consisted.

That ye may abound in hope through the power of the Holy Ghost he doth not say, that you may have hope, but that you may abound therein, that you may arrive to a plerophory or full assurance of hope, as it is in Heb 6:11 . Such hope as may be like an anchor to the soul, to keep it safe and steady in the midst of storms and tempests. This hope is wrought in us by no less power and virtue than that of the Holy Ghost. See before.

Poole: Rom 15:14 - -- Here begins the epilogue or conclusion of this excellent Epistle, wherein the apostle makes an apology, first for his manner of writing to them, and...

Here begins the epilogue or conclusion of this excellent Epistle, wherein the apostle makes an apology, first for his manner of writing to them, and then for his not coming to them himself. His first apology is ushered in with a singular commendation of the Christians at Rome; he began with their commendation, Rom 1:8 , and he ends with the same. There are three things which he commends them for. The first is their goodness; thus it is numbered among the fruits of the Spirit, Gal 5:22 . It may be taken more largely, and so it comprehends all grace and virtue; or else more strictly, and so it is put for kindness, gentleness, and charity, in forbearing and forgiving others. The second is all knowledge; i.e. in things necessary, or in matters relating to Christian liberly; or, by all knowledge, he means a large measure and proportion of it. The third is ability to admonish one another, to inform others in things about which they were ignorant, or it reprehend others for things about which they were negligent. Though there were many weak and ignorant persons among them, yet there were others of whom he was persuaded and fully assured they were thus qualified: see 1Co 1:5 .

Poole: Rom 15:15 - in some sort // because of the grace that q.d. Though I am thus persuaded of you, or of many of you, yet I thought good to write to you in some sort or in part, or a little the more boldly...

q.d. Though I am thus persuaded of you, or of many of you, yet I thought good to write to you

in some sort or in part, or a little the more boldly and freely, that I may stir you up to the practise of that which you know already: see 2Pe 1:12,13 3:1 . This he speaks to allay the sharpness of his former reprehensions, and that what he had written might be the better digested; for all men more easily endure to be noted of negligence, than of malice or ignorance. And further he tells them, he could do no less,

because of the grace that was given him of God i.e. because of his apostolical office and authority: see Rom 1:5 12:3 .

Poole: Rom 15:16 - The minister of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles // Ministering the gospel of God // That the offering up of the Gentiles might be acceptable // Being sanctified by the Holy Ghost He proceeds to speak more particularly of his office and calling, which he had mentioned more generally in the foregoing words. The minister of Jes...

He proceeds to speak more particularly of his office and calling, which he had mentioned more generally in the foregoing words.

The minister of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles: see the notes on Rom 11:13 . See also Gal 2:7,8 2Ti 1:11 .

Ministering the gospel of God i.e. preaching of it. Some read it consecrating, or working, in the holy service of the gospel of God. It is an allusion to the work or office of the priests under the law. The Jews and Gentiles, they both boasted of their priesthood and sacrifices: the apostle therefore showeth, that its ministry was far more excellent, being not occupied in sacrificing of beasts, but in offering up living men to be a holy sacrifice to God.

That the offering up of the Gentiles might be acceptable: some understand it actively, that the Gentiles might, offer up themselves, as it is in Rom 12:1 ; or that they might offer up acceptable sacrifices to God, according to Mal 1:11 . But it is better understood passively, that the apostle, converting them by his ministry, might present or offer them to God, as an acceptable oblation: see Isa 66:20 .

Being sanctified by the Holy Ghost not by any priest on earth, but even by the Holy Ghost himself; as the oblations of old had their external and legal purifyings, so this oblation is purified or

sanctified by the Holy Ghost

Poole: Rom 15:17 - through Jesus Christ q.d. Having received this grace of apostleship, anti having had great success in my labours, multitudes being converted by my ministry: I have wher...

q.d. Having received this grace of apostleship, anti having had great success in my labours, multitudes being converted by my ministry: I have whereof to glory, or, I have matter of glorying and rejoicing. But then he adds, that this glorying of his was not in himself, but in and

through Jesus Christ by whose grace he did what he did: see 1Co 15:10 . And also, that it was not in any thing that concerned himself, but in things pertaining to God, which concerned his worship and service, and wherein his ministry consisted. In the foregoing verse he described his apostleship in terms that were borrowed from the Levitical priesthood: and here, contriving the same metaphor, he calleth the execution of his function, a performing of things pertaining to God. which is that for which the priests of old were ordained, Heb 5:1 .

Poole: Rom 15:18 - By word and deed q.d. I dare not speak of more than is true, or of any thing that was not really done by me: or else the meaning is, I dare not speak of any thing th...

q.d. I dare not speak of more than is true, or of any thing that was not really done by me: or else the meaning is, I dare not speak of any thing that I have done of myself, I acknowledge that, whatever good hath come to the Gentiles by my means, it was wrought by Christ, whose instrument I have only been: see 1Co 3:5 .

By word and deed: some join these words to the obedience of the Gentiles; by the preaching of the gospel they were made obedient in word and deed. But they are better joined with the former words; Christ wrought in and by the apostle Paul, believed word and deed. By word is understood his public preaching, and private instruction; and by deed, the example of his good works, or godly life: or else, by deed ye may understand the miracles that he wrought, and the labour and travail that he underwent; of which in the following verse.

Poole: Rom 15:19 - Through mighty signs and wonders // By the power of the Spirit of God // So that from Jerusalem, and round about unto Illyricum // I have fully preached the gospel of Christ Through mighty signs and wonders or, by the power of signs and wonders, which served to confirm my commission from God, and the truth of what I preac...

Through mighty signs and wonders or, by the power of signs and wonders, which served to confirm my commission from God, and the truth of what I preached, and so helped forward the obedience and conversion of the Gentiles: see 2Co 12:12 . If there be any difference betwixt

signs and wonders it is only gradual. I find them often conjoined in Scripture, Mat 24:24 Joh 4:48 Act 2:43 5:12 Act 7:36 14:3 .

By the power of the Spirit of God which blessed the words, deeds, and miracles of the apostle, and wrought effectually by them in the Gentiles. The word dunamiv , power, or virtue, is twice used in this verse; it is first applied to signs and wonders, to show their efficacy; and then to the Spirit of God, to show that he was the efficient cause of that efficacy.

So that from Jerusalem, and round about unto Illyricum: this showeth the pains and travail of the apostle, to bring the Gentiles to the obedience of faith. Illyricum is said to be in the utmost parts of Greece, bordering upon the sea, which is thereupon called Illyricum Mare. It is thought to be the country now called Sclavonia, and that is distant from Jerusalem about three hundred and fifty German miles, which make above a thousand English miles; yet it seems he did not travel in a direct and straight line, but round about, or in a circle, as the word imports, fetching a circuit. Some writers have given us out of the Acts a particular history of his peregrination from Damascus, where he began his ministry: he went into Arabia, and after three years returned to Damascus, and from thence to Jerusalem; from Jerusalem he went to Caesarea, and so to Tarsus; from Tarsus Barnabas brought him to Antioch, and from thence to Jerusalem, to carry relief to the Jews. From Jerusalem they returned to Antioch; from Antioch he and Barnabas went to Seleucia, then to Cyprus, and to some cities of Pamphylia, and so to another Antioch in Pisidia; from thence to Lycaonia, and then returned to Antioch, from whence they had been recommended by the church. From Antioch they were sent to Jerusalem about the question of the circumcision, and returned to Antioch with the apostles’ decree. From thence he went through Syria and Cilicia, visiting the churches. Then he went through Phrygia, Galatia, and Mysia; then to Troas, where by a vision he was called unto Macedonia, and so came into the parts of Europe; first to Philippi in Macedonia, then to Thessalonica; from thence to Athens, and then to Corinth; from thence to Ephesus; and going to visit the churches of Galatia and Phrygia, returned to Ephesus. From Ephesus he went again to Macedonia; from thence to Troas and Miletus; and thence, by Tyrus and Caesarea, and other cities, he came to Jerusalem, where he was taken and put in bonds. Thus you have an account of the apostle’ s travels, which he abridgeth here, when he says, that it was from Jerusalem round about unto Illyricum.

I have fully preached the gospel of Christ i.e. I have filled all these countries with the gospel of Christ. The word signifieth to fulfil; see Col 4:17 . This he calleth the finishing his ministry, Act 20:24 .

Poole: Rom 15:20-21 - build upon another man’ s foundation Ver. 20,21. He gives a reason why he chose to preach the gospel in these places, because Christ had not been named or preached there before; this, he...

Ver. 20,21. He gives a reason why he chose to preach the gospel in these places, because Christ had not been named or preached there before; this, he saith, was his ambition, and a thing that he greatly coveted; he was unwilling to

build upon another man’ s foundation to put his sickle into another’ s harvest, to derive the glory to himself which would be due to others, 2Co 10:15,16 . Again, another reason why he preached the gospel where Christ had not been named, was this, that so by him, as an apostle of Christ, and in his ministry, that scriptnre might be fulfilled, which you have in Isa 52:15 , To whom he was not spoken of, they shall see, & c. See Poole on "Isa 52:15" .

Poole: Rom 15:22 - -- Hitherto he hath excused his manner of writing, now he makes an apology for his not coming unto them. They at Rome might be ready to say: If he had ...

Hitherto he hath excused his manner of writing, now he makes an apology for his not coming unto them. They at Rome might be ready to say: If he had travelled into so many countries, why could he not all this while give us a visit? To this he answers, it was not from any want of respect or good will to them, but for another cause, which he had already assigned, and that was, the preaching of Christ where he had not been named; for this cause, he says, he had been much hindered: he looked upon that as the more necessary work; the planting of churches is more than the watering of them. He told them, Rom 1:13 , of his being hindered from coming to them, and now he acquaints them lnore particularly with the reason, which he concealed before. The word (ta polla ) rendered much, signifieth many; and it implies that he was many times hindered, and many ways; but this was the chief.

Poole: Rom 15:23 - -- Having given the reason why he came not to them hitherto, in the following words he assures them he would do it hereafter. And here he saith he was ...

Having given the reason why he came not to them hitherto, in the following words he assures them he would do it hereafter. And here he saith he was the more inclined so to do, first: Because he had no more place in those parts, i.e. as before, in those places where Christ had not been named, or his gospel preached, he had no new churches there to found, and he had ordained elders in every city to build upon his foundation. The word rendered parts, signifies climates; i.e. places which he on divers elevations of the pole. And then, secondly: Because he had long longed so to do, he had desired it for many years, Rom 1:10,11 .

Poole: Rom 15:24 - And to be brought on my way thitherward by you // If first I be somewhat filled with your company Here he sets down the time when he would visit them, i.e. when he took his journey into Spain. He saith, he trusted he should see them then; he was ...

Here he sets down the time when he would visit them, i.e. when he took his journey into Spain. He saith, he trusted he should see them then; he was not assured of it, he had no revelation from God concerning it, he could make no absolute promise. See Rom 15:28 .

And to be brought on my way thitherward by you i.e. by some of you; this he did promise himself from them, and indeed it was usually done by the churches he visited; see Act 17:15 : not that he affected any train or pomp, but it was done for his guidance and safety, as he travelled through unknown and dangerous ways.

If first I be somewhat filled with your company: this he adds, lest they should think he meant to make no stay with them; he gives them to understand, that he did not intend to leave them, till they were mutually filled and satisfied with one another’ s company and society.

Poole: Rom 15:25 - -- Some might be ready to say: If Paul hath no more place in those parts where he is, and hath such a longing desire to see us, why then doth he not pr...

Some might be ready to say: If Paul hath no more place in those parts where he is, and hath such a longing desire to see us, why then doth he not presently come to us? To this he answers, that for the present he could not come, because he had a weighty affair upon his hands, which was to go up to Jerusalem to minister to the saints; i.e. to carry thither certain collections and contributions from the Gentile churches for their relief. He useth a participle of the present tense in the original, to show that this work is now in hand, and it would not stay or hold him long. Though indeed his work was to preach the gospel, and not to serve tables; yet it seems likely that the churches of the Gentiles, who were moved by him to this contribution, had committed the same to his care, 2Co 8:4 .

Poole: Rom 15:26 - -- For the understanding of these words, you need only to read 2Co 8:1 , and 2Co 9:2 . When he saith, it hath pleased them, it is implied, that it...

For the understanding of these words, you need only to read 2Co 8:1 , and 2Co 9:2 . When he saith, it hath pleased them, it is implied, that it was not extorted or squeezed out of them; but that it proceeded from a ready and willing mind, and that they took delight therein. The word here rendered contribution, properly signifieth communication, which implieth a mutual exchange or intercourse between the givers and the receivers; the one contributing alms, the other prayers and intercessions to God. He speaks elsewhere of communicating concerning giving and receiving, Phi 4:15 .

Poole: Rom 15:27 - It hath pleased them verily // And their debtors they are // For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, their duty is also to minister unto them in carnal things It hath pleased them verily he makes this repetition, as to commend the Grecians, so also to admonish the Romans to the like benevolence. And their ...

It hath pleased them verily he makes this repetition, as to commend the Grecians, so also to admonish the Romans to the like benevolence.

And their debtors they are i.e. the Gentiles are debtors to the Jews; though what they sent them was a gift, yet it was also a debt, it was due by the law of charity, Rom 13:8 , and by the law of gratitude and equity; they had received from them, and they were obliged in some sort to make returns to them.

For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, their duty is also to minister unto them in carnal things: by the spiritual things of the Jews, of which the Gentiles were made partakers, you may understand all those things of which mention is made, Rom 9:4,5 ; more particularly, the gospel, with the ministry and ordinances thereof: the gospel was first preached to the Jews, and from Jerusalem it was spread abroad among the Gentiles: see Luk 24:47 Act 1:4,8 . By the carnal things of the Gentiles, you may understand their gold and silver, with all things needful for the sustentation of the body: you have a parallel place in 1Co 9:7 .

Poole: Rom 15:28 - When therefore I have performed this, and have sealed to them this fruit // I will come by you into Spain When therefore I have performed this, and have sealed to them this fruit i.e. After that I have despatched this business, and safely delivered the al...

When therefore I have performed this, and have sealed to them this fruit i.e. After that I have despatched this business, and safely delivered the alms of the Greek churches to the Jews, wherewith I am intrusted; it is put into my hands as a treasure sealed in a bag or chest, that it may not be diminished or embezzled: he calls it fruit, because it proceeded from their faith and love, and because it would abound to their account, Phi 4:17 ; it would benefit them that received it, but much more them that gave it.

I will come by you into Spain i.e. I will take you, or your city, in my way thither. He told them as much before, Rom 15:24 . This he really intended, but it is generally concluded that he was prevented, that he never went this journey into Spain. The purposes of men are ruled and overruled by the providence of God, Pro 16:9 .

Poole: Rom 15:29 - the blessings of the gospel of Christ i.e. As some expound it, I shall find you furnished with all spiritual and gospel blessings: this sense agrees with Rom 15:14 . But others rather th...

i.e. As some expound it, I shall find you furnished with all spiritual and gospel blessings: this sense agrees with Rom 15:14 . But others rather think, that he speaks of what he should bring with him, and not of what he should find there: therefore it may better be expounded by Rom 1:11,12 . He assures himself he should impart unto them much knowledge, grace, and comfort; that he should enrich and fill them with all

the blessings of the gospel of Christ

Poole: Rom 15:30 - I beseech you, brethren, for the Lord Jesus Christ’ s sake // And for the love of the Spirit // That ye strive together with me in your prayers to God for me In the conclusion, he commends himself to their prayers. This is usual with him in his other Epistles: see Eph 6:18-20 Col 4:3 2Th 3:1 Heb 13:18 . ...

In the conclusion, he commends himself to their prayers. This is usual with him in his other Epistles: see Eph 6:18-20 Col 4:3 2Th 3:1 Heb 13:18 .

I beseech you, brethren, for the Lord Jesus Christ’ s sake: q.d. If not for my sake, yet for his sake, who is most dear to you.

And for the love of the Spirit: q.d. If you love the Spirit of God; or rather, if the grace of love be wrought in you by the Spirit, show it in this thing. This pathetical way of speaking is frequent with this apostle: see Rom 12:1 Phi 2:1 .

That ye strive together with me in your prayers to God for me that you strive as those that be in an agony; it is a military word: he bespeaks their earnest and importunate prayers in his behalf. Jacob prayed after this manner; so did Elijah, and Epaphras, Col 4:12 . He prayed himself, and he desired them to join with him, and help him, as Aaron and Hur helped Moses.

Poole: Rom 15:31 - -- Here are two things more particularly, which he desires them to beg of God in his behalf. First: That ye may be delivered from them that did not be...

Here are two things more particularly, which he desires them to beg of God in his behalf.

First: That ye may be delivered from them that did not believe, or were disobedient and refractory, in Judea. He knew the Jews were incensed against him; that troubles did abide him or wait for him in Judea, thither he was going; see Act 20:23 . And it happened accordingly, for the Jews went about to kill him, Act 21:31 . Therefore it is that he desires their prayers, that he might be delivered from them; see 2Th 3:2 .

Secondly: That the alms he brought the poor saints at Jerusalem might be taken by them in good part; that they might be reconciled, both to the Gentile churches that sent it, and to him that brought it. It detracts greatly from a gift, when it comes, either from one, or by one, against whom we are prejudiced.

Poole: Rom 15:32 - That I may come unto you with joy by the will of God // And may with you be refreshed That I may come unto you with joy by the will of God: q.d. This would be a means to make me come unto you with the more comfort, if God will, or if G...

That I may come unto you with joy by the will of God: q.d. This would be a means to make me come unto you with the more comfort, if God will, or if God grant it to our prayers. This condition, if God will, he had before inserted upon this very occasion, Rom 1:10 . See the like, 1Co 4:19 Jam 4:13,15 . This he did to free himself from the suspicion of inconstancy, in case it should fall out otherwise; as also to show, that always, and in all things, he referred himself to the good pleasure and providence of God.

And may with you be refreshed i.e. with your company and converse. This hath the same sense with Rom 1:12 : see the notes there.

Poole: Rom 15:33 - The God of peace // Be with you all // Amen The God of peace this is a frequent title of God in Scripture; he is called the God of peace, Rom 16:20 2Co 13:11 Phi 4:9 1Th 5:23 2Th 3:16 Heb 13:2...

The God of peace this is a frequent title of God in Scripture; he is called the God of peace, Rom 16:20 2Co 13:11 Phi 4:9 1Th 5:23 2Th 3:16 Heb 13:20 . Here it fits his great argument, which was to persuade the believing Romans to be at peace amongst themselves, and not to contend about indifferent things.

Be with you all: three times in this chapter doth the apostle lift up a prayer for the believing Romans; see Rom 16:5,13 ; and this is more comprehensive than the other two. If God be with us, no good thing can be wanting to us. God’ s presence is inclusive of all good, and exclusive of all evil.

Amen: see Rom 16:27 .

PBC: Rom 15:3 - -- See PB: Mt 3:17

See PB: Mt 3:17

Haydock: Rom 15:1 - We that are stronger We that are stronger, &c. The apostle goes on with his exhortation not to scandalize, or offend such as are weak, and not well instructed in faith...

We that are stronger, &c. The apostle goes on with his exhortation not to scandalize, or offend such as are weak, and not well instructed in faith. He brings the example of Christ, who pleased not himself, who submitted himself to the law of circumcision, when he was above the law, who bore with the weakness and sins of others, their reproaches, their blasphemies, which he could not but hate, but this to gain their souls. (Witham)

Haydock: Rom 15:7 - Receive one another Receive one another, in the spirit of charity, peace, patience, as Christ also hath received you, and bore with your infirmities. (Witham) --- Mut...

Receive one another, in the spirit of charity, peace, patience, as Christ also hath received you, and bore with your infirmities. (Witham) ---

Mutually support each other for the glory of God: learn to practise a grand lesson of Christian morality, to bear and to forbear. (Haydock)

Haydock: Rom 15:8 - Christ Jesus was minister of the circumcision Christ Jesus was minister of the circumcision, who came both for the salvation of the Jews, and of the Gentiles, who preached and would have his gosp...

Christ Jesus was minister of the circumcision, who came both for the salvation of the Jews, and of the Gentiles, who preached and would have his gospel first preached to the Jews, for the truth of God to confirm the promises made to the fathers, that he, the Messias, should be sent for their salvation; but at the same time also for the salvation and conversion of the Gentiles, which he confirms by divers evident testimonies of the holy Scriptures. (Witham) ---

He calls our Saviour the minister of circumcision, that is, of the Jews, because he appeared amongst them, dwelt amongst them, and himself preached amongst them. This was a privilege which the Gentiles did no enjoy, having never seen, nor heard Jesus Christ, since he confined his preaching to the strayed sheep of the house of Israel; and this, to accomplish the promises made to their fathers. (Calmet)

Haydock: Rom 15:15 - I have written to you, brethren, more boldly // Sanctifying the gospel of God // For I dare not I have written to you, brethren, more boldly, &c. St. John Chrysostom admires with what mildness he addresses himself to them, yet puts them in mind...

I have written to you, brethren, more boldly, &c. St. John Chrysostom admires with what mildness he addresses himself to them, yet puts them in mind, that he is the minister, and the apostle of the Gentiles, in which he may have reason to glory, or boast. ---

Sanctifying the gospel of God, preaching it in a holy manner, that the Gentiles may be sanctified by it. (Witham) ---

To be the minister of Jesus Christ among the nations, exercising in their regard the rite of sacrifice, as we read in the Greek, ierourgounta. ---

For I dare not, I shall forbear to speak of any thing but my labours: I need not mention the power of miracles and wonders, which the Holy Ghost hath done by me in many places, from Jerusalem to Illyricum, in places where Christ had not been preached by others. And now having no more place, nor occasion to preach in these countries, when I begin my journey to Spain, &c. by which, it appears, he designed at least to go into Spain. (Witham)

Haydock: Rom 15:20 - -- St. Paul does not mean to say, that he never preached where the gospel had before been announced; this would not have been true, for he preached at Da...

St. Paul does not mean to say, that he never preached where the gospel had before been announced; this would not have been true, for he preached at Damascus, where there were already Christians, whom he formerly wished to take in chains to Jerusalem; and again in this epistle he announces the truths of the gospel to the Romans already converted by the preaching of St. Peter. But he means to say, that on these occasions he acts not as an apostle, whose office it is to preach to infidels; but as one that waters, confirms, comforts, as he says in the beginning of this epistle: and this he did as occasion offered, as the subsequent verses shew, where he tells us his design in calling on the Romans, in his journey to Spain. (Estius)

Haydock: Rom 15:24 - -- It is a matter of dispute, whether St. Paul ever executed this his design of visiting Spain. The proofs of the Spaniards, who consider it as certain,...

It is a matter of dispute, whether St. Paul ever executed this his design of visiting Spain. The proofs of the Spaniards, who consider it as certain, are by no means unanswerable. There remain no certain monuments of this journey of his. The proof taken from the words of St. Clement, who lived at Rome in the time of St. Paul, is not certain, since he only says, that St. Paul came to the very extremities of the west. It is a subject on which commentators appear pretty equally divided. (Calmet) ---

There is an old tradition that St. Paul, in his journey to Spain, left three of his disciples in Gaul; Trophimus at Arles, Crescentius at Vienne, and Paul at Narbonne; but this very tradition is disputed. (Bible de Vence)

Haydock: Rom 15:25-28 - But I shall go to Jerusalem But I shall go to Jerusalem, &c. By this St. Paul is thought to have written this epistle at Corinth, where he was about to set forward for Jerusale...

But I shall go to Jerusalem, &c. By this St. Paul is thought to have written this epistle at Corinth, where he was about to set forward for Jerusalem, with the charities collected in Achaia and Macedonia, for the poor Christians in Judea. This he calls to minister to the poor saints, or to be serviceable to them. And to exhort others to the like charitable contributions, he says, (ver. 27.) they are their debtors; that the converted Gentiles are debtors to the converts, who had been Jews, as having been made partakers of the promises, particularly made to the people of the Jews, and sharers of those spiritual blessings, which Christ promised to the Jews, but were also conferred upon the Gentiles. He looks upon it, therefore, reasonable, that they relieve the Jews in their temporal wants. The apostle says, he goes to consign to them this fruit, to deliver to them their contributions. (Witham)

Haydock: Rom 15:29 - I know I know, by the Spirit of God revealing it to me, that God will give a blessing to my labours, when I come to you. That I may be delivered from t...

I know, by the Spirit of God revealing it to me, that God will give a blessing to my labours, when I come to you. That I may be delivered from the unbelievers in Judea, from the unbelieving Jews, foreseeing the persecution he should there meet with. That I may be refreshed with you, have comfort by finding peace and union among you. (Witham)

Haydock: Rom 15:32 - -- The word in the original signifies to combat with another, to teach us, that to beg the prayers of our friends will be of little assistance to us, if ...

The word in the original signifies to combat with another, to teach us, that to beg the prayers of our friends will be of little assistance to us, if we do not join our prayer also, and labour, on our part, to the best of our power. (Calmet)

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Gill: Rom 15:1 - We then that are strong // ought to bear the infirmities of the weak // and not please ourselves We then that are strong,.... Meaning not only ministers of the Gospel, who are men of strong parts, great abilities, mighty in the Scriptures, valiant...

We then that are strong,.... Meaning not only ministers of the Gospel, who are men of strong parts, great abilities, mighty in the Scriptures, valiant for the truth on earth, and pillars in God's house; for though the apostle includes himself, yet not merely as such, but as expressing it to be his duty in common with other Christians; and the rather he does this, to engage them to the practice of it: but the stronger and more knowing part of private Christians are here intended; the Apostle John's young men, who are strong, in distinction from little children, or new born babes, that are at present weaklings; and from fathers who are on the decline of life, and just going off the stage; see 1Jo 2:12; when these young men are in the bloom and flower of a profession, in the prime of their judgment, and exercise of grace; who are strong in Christ, and not in themselves, in the grace that is in him, out of which they continually receive; who are strong in the grace of faith, and are established and settled in the doctrine of it; and have a large and extensive knowledge of the several truths of the Gospel; and, among the rest, of that of Christian liberty:

ought to bear the infirmities of the weak; of them that are weak in faith and knowledge, particularly in the knowledge of their freedom from Mosaical observances: their "infirmities" are partly their ignorance, mistakes, and errors, about things indifferent; which they consider and insist on, and would impose upon others, as necessary and obliging; and partly the peevishness and moroseness which they show, the hard words they give, and the rash judgment and rigid censures they pass on their brethren, that differ from them: such persons and their infirmities are to be borne with; they are not to be despised for their weakness; and if in the church, are not to be excluded for their mistakes; and if not members, are not to be refused on account of them; since they arise from weakness, and are not subversive of the fundamental doctrines of the Gospel: they are not to be treated as wicked men, but as weak brethren; and their peevish tempers, morose dispositions and conduct, their hard speeches and censorious expressions, are patiently to be endured; they should be considered as from whence they arise, not from malice and ill will, from a malignant spirit, but from weakness and misguided zeal, for what they take to be in force, when it is abolished: moreover, they are to be complied with in cases not sinful, as the apostle did in circumcising Timothy, Act 16:3, and purifying himself according to the law, Act 21:26; and so to the weak he became weak, to gain some, 1Co 9:22, and therefore could urge this exhortation by his own example with greater force; and which he represents, not only as what would be honourable, and a point of good nature, and as doing a kind action, but as what "ought" to be; what the law of love obliges to, and what the grace of love, which "bears all things", 1Co 13:7, constrains unto; and which indeed if not done, they that are strong do not answer one end of their having that spiritual strength they have; and it is but complying with the golden rule of Christ, to do as we would be done by, Mat 7:12,

and not please ourselves: either entertain pleasing thoughts of, and make pleasing reflections on their stronger faith, greater degree of knowledge, superior light and understanding; which being indulged, are apt to excite and encourage spiritual pride and vanity, and generally issue in the contempt of weaker brethren; nor do those things, which are pleasing and grateful to themselves, to the offence and detriment of others; for instance, and which is what the apostle has reference to, to gratify their appetite, by eating such meat as is forbidden by the law of Moses, to the grieving of the weak brethren, wounding their consciences, and destroying their peace; these things should not be done; stronger Christians should deny themselves the use of their Christian liberty in things indifferent, when they cannot make use of it without offence.

Gill: Rom 15:2 - Let everyone of us please his neighbour // For his good // to edification Let everyone of us please his neighbour,.... Every man, particularly his Christian friend and brother, whom he should seek to please in all things, an...

Let everyone of us please his neighbour,.... Every man, particularly his Christian friend and brother, whom he should seek to please in all things, and by all means lawful; he should carry it affably and courteously, should make himself agreeable to him; should condescend and accommodate himself to his weakness, and bear his infirmities, and deny himself rather than displease him. The Vulgate Latin version and some copies read, "let everyone of you"; but the other reading is preferable, and best agrees with the context, Rom 15:1.

For his good; or as the Syriac renders it, בטבתא, "in good things"; for he is not to be pleased, gratified, and indulged, in any thing that is evil: we are not to please any man in anything that is contrary to the Gospel of Christ, for then we should not be faithful servants of his; nor in anything repugnant to the commands of God, and ordinances of Christ, who are to be obeyed and pleased, rather than men; nor in anything that is of an immoral nature, we are not to comply with, though it may be to the displeasure of the dearest relation and friend; but in everything that is naturally, civilly, morally, or evangelically good, we should study to please them; and in whatsoever may be for their good, temporal, spiritual, or eternal: and

to edification: of our neighbour, brother, and Christian friend, for the establishment of his peace, the increase of his spiritual light, and the building of him up in his most holy faith; and also of the whole community, or church, to which each belong, whose peace and edification should be consulted, and everything done, which may promote and secure it; and among which this is one, every man to please his neighbour, in things lawful and laudable.

Gill: Rom 15:3 - For even Christ pleased not himself // but as it is written // the reproaches of them that reproached thee fell on me For even Christ pleased not himself,.... He sought not his own ease, pleasure, profit, honour, and glory, but to do his Father's will and work, Joh 4:...

For even Christ pleased not himself,.... He sought not his own ease, pleasure, profit, honour, and glory, but to do his Father's will and work, Joh 4:34; and he always did the things which pleased him, in his obedience, sufferings, and death; and sought not his own, but his glory: moreover, what he did and suffered were not for himself, but for us; he became incarnate for us; he obeyed, suffered, and died for us; he came not to be ministered to, to be attended upon as an earthly prince, enjoying his own ease and pleasure, things grateful to nature, but to minister to others, Mat 20:28; hence he appeared in the form of a servant, did the work of one in life, and at last became obedient to death, even the death of the cross, Phi 2:7, not but that he was well pleased in doing and suffering all this; it was his delight to do the will of God: it was his meat and drink to finish his work; yea, that part of it which was most disagreeable to flesh and blood, was most earnestly desired by him, even the baptism of his sufferings; and in the view of the salvation of his people, and of enjoying their company with him to all eternity, he endured the cross patiently, and despised the shame with pleasure, Heb 12:2, but then he met with many things which were far from being grateful to human nature; such as the hardness and unbelief of the Jews, with which he was grieved, their scoffs and insults, reproaches and jeers; the ignorance, frowardness, and moroseness of his own disciples, whose infirmities he bore; and at last the sufferings of death, that bitter cup, which he as man desired might pass from him; but, however, he submitted to his Father's will, Mat 26:39; all which prove what the apostle here affirms. This instance of Christ, the man of God's right hand, the son of man, whom he has made strong for himself, the head of the church, the leader and commander of the people, bearing the infirmities of the weak, and not pleasing himself, is very pertinently produced, to enforce the above exhortations; who is an example to his people in the exercise of every grace, and the discharge of every duty; as in beneficence, forgiving of injuries, mutual love, meekness and humility, suffering of afflictions, and patience. The proof of it follows,

but as it is written, in Psa 69:9;

the reproaches of them that reproached thee fell on me; which are the words of Christ unto his Father, as the whole psalm is to be understood not of David, but of the Messiah, as is clear from the citations out of it, and references to it in the New Testament; see Joh 2:17, compared with Psa 69:9, and the meaning of them is, either that the reproaches which were cast on the house, worship, and ordinances of God, affected Christ as much as if they had been cast upon himself; which stirred up his zeal to take the method he did, to show his resentment at such indignities; see Joh 2:15, or that the same persons by whom the name of God was blasphemed, his sanctuary polluted, and his ordinances reproached, also reproached him; and he bore in his bosom the reproach of all the mighty people, which were in great plenty poured upon him; they reproached him with being a glutton, a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners, Mat 11:19; they said he was a Samaritan, and had a devil, Joh 8:48, charged him with blasphemy and sedition, Mat 26:65; and when on the cross, mocked, reviled, and wagged their heads at him, Mat 27:39; all which he bore patiently, and reviled not again: moreover, by "reproaches" may be meant the sins of his people, by which the name of God was blasphemed, his law trampled upon with contempt, and the perfections of his nature, as his justice and holiness, dishonoured; and which fell upon Christ, not by chance, but by the appointment of God, and according to his own voluntary agreement; and which he bore in his own body, and made satisfaction for; which though he did willingly, in order to obtain some valuable ends, the salvation of his people, and the glorifying of the divine perfections, the honouring of the law, and satisfying of justice, yet the bearing of them, in itself, could not be grateful to him as such; neither the charge of sin, nor the weight of punishment; and in this respect he pleased not himself, or did that which was grateful to his pure and holy nature.

Gill: Rom 15:4 - For whatsoever things were written aforetime // were written for our learning // that we, through patience and comfort of the Scriptures, might have hope For whatsoever things were written aforetime,.... In the books of the Old Testament; the apostle says this, to vindicate the pertinency of the above c...

For whatsoever things were written aforetime,.... In the books of the Old Testament; the apostle says this, to vindicate the pertinency of the above citation, and to prevent any objection that might be made against it; since whatsoever was written in that psalm did not belong personally to David, but to Christ; and what is written concerning him, is designed for the use and instruction of his people; yea, whatever is written anywhere in the sacred Scriptures,

were written for our learning; to instruct in the knowledge of Christ, of his person, offices, grace, righteousness, obedience, sufferings, death, resurrection, and ascension; and of the great salvation and redemption he came to obtain, and has obtained; and to teach us the doctrines of grace, of pardon through the blood of Christ, atonement by his sacrifice, justification by his righteousness, acceptance in his person, and eternal life through him; as also to inform us of our duty, and how we ought to behave both towards God and men:

that we, through patience and comfort of the Scriptures, might have hope; the Scriptures are not only written for our present instruction, but for the ingenerating, encouraging, and establishing, an hope of eternal Life in another world; which they are the means of, under the influence of divine grace; since they give us a clear account of eternal life; of the promise of it in Christ; of its being procured by him, and secured in him; of the means of enjoying it, through his blood and righteousness; of the declarations of God's free grace and mercy to sinners, and of the various instances of persons who have been made partakers of it; all which encourage to hope in the Lord, and to rejoice in hope of the glory of God; believing we also may have and enjoy the thing hoped for, "through patience and comfort of the Scriptures"; both which are encouraged thereby: the "patience of the Scriptures" is not a stoical apathy, a stupid indolence; and is of a different kind from that patience the writings of the Heathen philosophers define and recommend: the Scripture gives an account of the true nature of patience, in bearing all sorts of evils for Christ's sake; of the excellency and usefulness of it; and do strongly exhort unto it upon the best principles, and with the best motives; and are full of promises to the exercise of it, and furnish out the best examples of suffering affliction, and patience: "the comfort of the Scriptures" is such as is not to be met with elsewhere. These writings abound with exceeding great and precious promises, and excellent doctrines, big with consolation to the saints; and both serve much to cherish, support, and maintain an hope of eternal happiness; all which prove the divine authority, excellency, and usefulness of the sacred writings, and recommend the reading of them by us, and the hearing of them explained by others.

Gill: Rom 15:5 - Now the God of patience and consolation // grant you to be like minded one towards another // according to Christ Jesus Now the God of patience and consolation,.... These titles and characters of God are manifestly used on account of what is before said concerning the S...

Now the God of patience and consolation,.... These titles and characters of God are manifestly used on account of what is before said concerning the Scriptures, and to show, that the efficacy and usefulness of them, in producing and promoting patience and comfort, entirely depend upon God the author of them: from exhorting, the apostle proceeds to petitioning; well knowing that all his exhortations would be of no avail without the power of divine grace accompanying them. The words are a prayer. The object addressed is described as "the God of patience", because he is the author and giver of that grace: it is a fruit of his Spirit, produced by the means of his word, called the word of his patience. The Heathens themselves were so sensible that this is a divine blessing, that they call patience θεων ευρημα, "the invention of the gods" w. God is the great pattern and exemplar of patience; he is patient himself, and bears much and long with the children of men; with wicked men, whose patient forbearance and longsuffering being despised by them, will be an aggravation of their damnation; but his longsuffering towards his elect issues in their salvation: he waits to be gracious to them before conversion, and after it bears with their infirmities, heals their backslidings, forgives their iniquities, patiently hears their cues, requests, and complaints, relieves and supports them, and carries them even to hoary hairs; and is in all a pattern to be imitated by his people. He is also the object of this grace; he it is on whom and for whom saints should and do patiently wait, until he is pleased to manifest himself, and communicate to them for the supply of their wants of every sort; and upon whose account and for whose sake they patiently suffer reproach and persecution; the exercise of patience is what he requires, and calls for, and is very grateful and well pleasing to him; to all which add, that he it is who strengthens to the exercise of it, and increases it; and which he does sometimes by tribulation; faith and other graces, being thereby tried, produce patience; and which at length, through divine grace, has its perfect work. Moreover, the object of prayer is described, as "the God of consolation"; all true, real, solid comfort springs from him, which he communicates by his son, the consolation of Israel; by his Spirit, the comforter; by his word, the doctrines and promises of which afford strong consolation to the heirs of promise, sensible sinners and afflicted souls; by the ordinances of the Gospel, which are breasts of consolation; and by the faithful ministers of Christ, who are "Barnabases", sons of consolation, Act 4:36. The petition follows,

grant you to be like minded one towards another; which does not respect sameness of judgment in the doctrines of faith; though this is very necessary to an honourable and comfortable walking together in church fellowship; much less an agreement in things indifferent: the apostle's meaning is not, that they should all abstain from meats forbidden by the law of Moses, or that they should all eat every sort of food without distinction; nor that they should all observe any Jewish day, or that they should all observe none; rather, that everyone should enjoy his own sentiment, and practise as he believed: but this request regards a likeness of affection, the sameness of mutual love, that they be of one heart, and one soul; that notwithstanding their different sentiments about things of a ceremonious kind, yet that they should love one another, and cease either to despise or judge each other; but think as well and as highly of them that differ from them, as of themselves, and of those of their own sentiments, without preferring in affection one to another; but studying and devising to promote and maintain, as the Syriac here reads it, שויותא, "an equality" among them; showing the same equal affection and respect to one as to the other, and to one another; the Jew to the Gentile, and the Gentile to the Jew; the strong to the weak, and the weak to the strong. This is what is greatly desirable. It is grateful to God; it is earnestly wished for by the ministers of the Gospel: and is pleasant and delightful to all good men; but it is God alone that can give and continue such a Spirit: this the apostle knew, and therefore prays that he would "grant" it: and for which request there is a foundation for faith and hope concerning it; since God has promised he will give his people one heart, and one way, as to fear him, so to love one another. The rule or pattern, according to which this is desired, is next expressed,

according to Christ Jesus; according to the doctrine of Christ, which teaches, directs, and engages, as to sameness of judgment and practice, so to mutual love and affection; and according to the new commandment of Christ, which obliges to love one another; and according to the example of Christ, who is the great pattern of patience and forbearance, of meekness and humility, of condescension and goodness, and of equal love and affection to all his members.

Gill: Rom 15:6 - That ye may with one mind and one mouth // glorify God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ That ye may with one mind and one mouth;.... This is the end for which the above request is made, and shows, that a cordial and sincere affection for ...

That ye may with one mind and one mouth;.... This is the end for which the above request is made, and shows, that a cordial and sincere affection for one another is necessary to the worshipping of God with one consent, to a joining together in acts of religious service, both in praying to God, and in praising of him, which latter seems here chiefly designed; for how should there be an agreement of heart and voice, of mind and mouth, in praising God, unless there is a singleness of heart, and oneness of affection? This is necessary in order to

glorify God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. The Syriac and Arabic versions read, God "the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ"; leaving out, the copulative, which we translate "even", but may as well be rendered "and"; and be read, as by some, "the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ". God is the God of Christ, as Christ is man; who prepared the human nature for him, anointed it with the Holy Spirit, supported it in life, in sufferings and death, and glorified it at his own right hand; and in which nature Christ exercised every grace on him, as faith, hope, and love; discharged every duty to him, worshipped him, prayed unto him, and was in all things obedient to his will: and God is the Father of Christ, as Christ is God; for as man he had no father. Now he is "glorified" when the perfections of his nature are ascribed unto him; when notice is taken of the works of his hands, and the glory of his majesty, which appears in them; when praise is offered up, and thanks given for all mercies, temporal and spiritual, he bestows on his people; when they join together in the solemn worship of him, presenting their bodies, and giving up their hearts unto him; when they unite in praying to him, and singing his praise; and when their lives and conversations are agreeable to their profession of him.

Gill: Rom 15:7 - Wherefore receive ye one another // as Christ also received us // to the glory of God Wherefore receive ye one another,.... Into your hearts and affections; embrace one another cordially, the Jew the Gentile, the Gentile the Jew, the st...

Wherefore receive ye one another,.... Into your hearts and affections; embrace one another cordially, the Jew the Gentile, the Gentile the Jew, the strong brother the weak, the weak the strong:

as Christ also received us. The Alexandrian copy, the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Arabic versions, read "you". Both Jews and Gentiles, as appears from the following verses. Christ received all the chosen ones into his heart's love and affection from eternity; he received them in the council of peace, and when the covenant of grace was made at his Father's hands, in the most tender manner, in order to take the care of them, preserve and save them; he assumed their nature, took upon him their sins, and sustained their persons in time, when he became incarnate, and suffered and died for them; and he receives them in the effectual calling on their coming to him, which he encourages by assuring them, that he will in no wise cast them out; so far is he from it, that he embraces them with open arms, and in the most affectionate manner receives them, though sinners, and eats with them; and notwithstanding all their unworthiness, sins, and transgressions:

to the glory of God: that is, either in order to bring them to the enjoyment of eternal life and happiness; which is sometimes so called, because of the glory that shall be beheld by the saints, be revealed in them, and put upon them, both in soul and body; and which is all of God's preparing and bestowing, and will lie in the vision and enjoyment of him: for this they were chosen in Christ, given to him, and received by him before the world began; and that they might enjoy it, Christ came into this world, took on him their persons, and died in their stead; and to this they are called by his grace with an holy calling; and when he has guided them with his counsel through this world, he will receive them to this glory: or else by "the glory of God" is meant the glorifying of God, the perfections of God, as his wisdom, power, faithfulness, truth, justice, holiness, love, grace, and mercy, and the like; which is done by Christ's becoming the surety, and Mediator of the new covenant, Heb 7:22, by his assumption of human nature, by his obedience, sufferings, and death, and by obtaining redemption for his people: and the force of the apostle's exhortation and argument is, that as Christ has received his people both in eternity and time, in so tender a manner, though unworthy, whereby he has glorified God, which was the principal end in view, and next to that the glorifying of them; so it becomes them to be like minded to one another, Rom 15:5, and affectionately receive and embrace each other, that so they may join together in glorifying the God and Father of Christ also, Rom 15:6.

Gill: Rom 15:8 - Now I say // that Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision // for the truth of God // and to confirm the promises made unto the fathers Now I say,.... Or affirm that Christ has received both Jews and Gentiles: that he has received the Jews, and therefore they are not to be despised, th...

Now I say,.... Or affirm that Christ has received both Jews and Gentiles: that he has received the Jews, and therefore they are not to be despised, though they are weak, appears from hence,

that Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision; he is rightly called a minister, for this was the end of his coming into the world, and the whole of his work in it was not to be ministered unto, but to minister to others, Mat 20:28, both in life and at death. This character agrees with him in all his offices; as King he ministers judgment to the people; and as priest he is the minister of the true tabernacle of the human nature, Heb 8:2, in which he offered himself a sacrifice for the sins of his people, and now in it makes intercession for them; but here it is expressive of his prophetic office, in which he is such a minister as never was before, or since, or ever will be; if we consider the dignity of his person, being the Son of God; the greatness of his qualifications, having the Spirit without measure; the nature of his doctrines, which were amazing words of grace and truth; and the manner of his delivery, which was with authority; and that all other ministers receive their mission, qualifications, doctrine and success from him: he is styled a minister of "the circumcision", not literally considered, as if he administered circumcision to any, which he did not; he was indeed subject to it as a son of Abraham, as a Jew by birth, as under the law, and in order to fulfil all righteousness, Mat 3:15, and to show that he was truly man, and that he had regard to the people and ordinances of the Old Testament, as he showed by baptism he had to those of the New, and to signify our cleansing and atonement by his blood; but circumcision is either to be understood in a spiritual sense of circumcision in the Spirit, and not in the flesh, with which the true circumcision, or believers in Christ, are circumcised in him, through his circumcision; or rather the word here is to be taken metonymically, for the uncircumcised Jews, as it often is in this epistle; see Rom 2:26. So that the meaning is, that Christ was their minister and preacher, just as Peter is said to have the apostleship of the circumcision, Gal 2:8, or to be the apostle of the Jews; as Paul was of the Gentiles, Rom 11:13, and to have the Gospel of the circumcision committed to him, it being his province to preach it to them, Gal 2:7, Christ as a minister or preacher in the personal discharge of his prophetic office, was sent only to the Jews; among them he lived, and to them he only preached; nor did he allow his apostles to preach to any other till after his resurrection; and which is a manifest proof that he received the Jews, and took them under his care, and showed a particular regard unto them: the ends of his being a minister to them were,

for the truth of God; to preach the Gospel of salvation, the word of truth unto them, for which he was promised and sent; and in doing of which he declared the righteousness, faithfulness, loving kindness, and truth of God unto them:

and to confirm the promises made unto the fathers; the fathers of the world, Adam, Noah, &c. or rather the Jewish fathers, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, David, and others; concerning the Messiah's being the seed of the woman, and of Abraham, and of David; concerning the coming of Shiloh, the raising up of the great prophet among the Jews, &c. all which promises are yea and amen in Christ, ratified and fulfilled in him.

Gill: Rom 15:9 - And that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy // as it is written // for this cause I will confess to thee among the Gentiles, and sing unto thy name And that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy,.... In choosing them in Christ as vessels of mercy, and in redeeming them by Christ as well as ...

And that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy,.... In choosing them in Christ as vessels of mercy, and in redeeming them by Christ as well as the Jews, and in regenerating and calling them by his abundant grace; and which as they clearly show that Christ has received them, and therefore are not to be censured and judged as irreligious persons, because of the use of their Christian liberty; so these things lay them under obligations to glorify God, to show forth his praise both by lip and life, since what they enjoy is not by promise, as the Jews, but of mere mercy; not but that promises arise from grace and mercy, though the accomplishment of them is owing to truth and faithfulness; but the Gentiles had no promises made to them, and yet obtained mercy, though there were many promises made concerning them, and many oracles and predictions in favour of them stood on divine record; some of which the apostle here produces to prove what he had asserted, that Christ had received them, and they were bound to glorify God on that account:

as it is written, in Psa 18:49;

for this cause I will confess to thee among the Gentiles, and sing unto thy name; which words are not spoken unto God by David, literally, considered, but as representing the Messiah; for David when he penned this Psalm, was in the decline of life; the next account after this is of his last dying words, 2Sa 23:1; nor could he hope to praise God among the Gentiles, nor did he in person, but in his Son the Messiah. These words are the words of Christ unto his Father, who in the title of the psalm is called "the servant of God", he being the Mediator eminently; he is represented as encompassed with the sorrows and snares of death and the grave, which agree with Jesus when in the garden, and on the cross. God is all along in it spoken as his helper and deliverer, as he was to Christ in his human nature, having promised to be so, and on which he depended; and the person, the subject of the psalm, is a victorious person, one that has got the conquest over all enemies, which is in the fullest sense true of the Messiah, who has overcome the world, made an end of sin, destroyed Satan, spoiled principalities and powers, and abolished death; and particularly is said to be the head of the Heathen, and they to be voluntary subjects to him, Psa 18:43, which is expressed in much the same language as the like things are in Isa 55:4; which is so manifest a prophecy of the Messiah; add to all which, that the Lord's anointed, the King Messiah, and who is called David, is expressly mentioned in the words following these that are cited, and which are applied by the Jews x themselves to the Messiah; as is Psa 18:32 paraphrased of him, by the Targumist upon it: what is here said by the Messiah to God, is that he would "confess to him among the Gentiles"; which is to be understood not of confession of sin, or of a confession of faith in him; but of praise and thanksgiving, a celebration of his perfections, particularly his, race, mercy, and goodness; ascribing honour and glory to him, either for the conversion of the Gentiles, as he did in the believing Jews, Act 11:18, or by the mouth of the Gentiles, for what God had done in bringing the Gospel to them, Act 13:48, or among them, by his apostles and ministers of the Gospel being made very successful among them, and made to triumph in Christ, whilst they diffused the savour of his knowledge in every place. The word "Lord" is omitted in this citation, though it appears in the Vulgate Latin and Arabic versions, and in the Complutensian edition, and two of Stephens's copies: "and sing unto thy name"; psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to the glory of his grace, as in all the churches of the Gentiles, to which they are directed by the Spirit of Christ, Eph 5:19.

Gill: Rom 15:10 - And again he saith // rejoice ye Gentiles with his people And again he saith,.... God or Christ, in Deu 32:43; rejoice ye Gentiles with his people; which from the Hebrew text are by some rendered, "rejoice...

And again he saith,.... God or Christ, in Deu 32:43;

rejoice ye Gentiles with his people; which from the Hebrew text are by some rendered, "rejoice his people O ye Gentiles"; to which agree the Targums of Onkelos and Jonathan, who render it, "praise O ye nations his people"; or as some copies of the former, "the judgment of his people"; and the latter adds, the house of Israel. The note of R. Sol. Jarchi on the text is,

"at that time the nations shall praise Israel; see what is the praise of this people that cleave unto the Lord, &c.''

But the design of this song is to praise God, and not the people of Israel; who in it are severely reproved for their many iniquities, and especially their very great ingratitude to God, and are threatened with the heaviest judgments. This is seen by other Jewish writers, who interpret the words accordingly, as R. Aben Ezra does, whose note is

"then shall they praise him, when God shall avenge their blood;''

and to this sense is the Jerusalem Targum,

"praise before him O ye people, praise him O his people of the house of Israel;''

but the words may be better translated either thus, "rejoice O ye nations, his people"; that is, ye Gentiles who are his people, whom God has taken into his covenant, and whom he will declare as such in his own time, which time was now come, and therefore had reason to rejoice; see 1Pe 2:9; or thus, "rejoice ye Gentiles, and his people"; let both Jews and Gentiles rejoice; let them rejoice together when they come to be fellow heirs, and of the same body, and partakers of the same promises and privileges; when they shall be together in one fold, under one shepherd; and especially when the fulness of each of them is brought in, and God has avenged himself of his and their enemies; and which agrees with the apostle's sense, and whose version is supported by the Septuagint interpreters; and his supplement is to be justified, there only wanting a copulative in the Hebrew text, which is often the case in that language, and which may easily be supplied by "and" or "with"; as it is with the latter by the apostle, in perfect agreement with the sense of the words.

Gill: Rom 15:11 - And again // praise the Lord all ye Gentiles, and laud him all ye people And again,.... It is written in Psa 117:1, praise the Lord all ye Gentiles, and laud him all ye people; that is, praise him both Jews and Gentiles,...

And again,.... It is written in Psa 117:1,

praise the Lord all ye Gentiles, and laud him all ye people; that is, praise him both Jews and Gentiles, for his merciful kindness and truth, as in Rom 15:2; the Gentiles for his mercy in choosing, redeeming, and calling them, as before; and the Jews for his truth and faithfulness in the fulfilment of his praises. R. David Kimchi on this psalm observes, that

"it consists of two verses only, and that it belongs לימות המשיח, "to the days of the Messiah"; and intimates, by the composition of it in two verses only, that all people shall be divided into two parts, or be on two sides, Israel shall be in their law, and all the nations in seven precepts,''

i.e. of Noah.

Gill: Rom 15:12 - And again Esaias saith // there shall be a root of Jesse // And he that shall rise to reign over the Gentiles // In him shall the Gentiles trust And again Esaias saith,.... In Isa 11:10; there shall be a root of Jesse. This prophecy is applied to the Messiah by the Jews y, who say, "that ...

And again Esaias saith,.... In Isa 11:10;

there shall be a root of Jesse. This prophecy is applied to the Messiah by the Jews y, who say,

"that when the King Messiah is revealed, there shall be gathered to him all the nations of the world, so that that Scripture shall be fulfilled which is written, "there shall be a root of Jesse", &c.''

This character, "the root of Jesse", may be understood of Christ with respect to his divine nature, who, as God, was before Jesse, and the author of his being, as of all creatures; just in such sense as he is called "the root and offspring of David", Rev 5:5; the root of David, as he is God, and the offspring of David, as he is man; unless both are to be interpreted of his human nature, as the phrase here also may be, and denote his descent from Jesse as man; and so the Jewish writers interpret it as well as some Christian ones. This is R. David Kimchi's comment;

""and there shall be a root of Jesse"; the meaning is, היוצא משרש ישי, "which goes out from the root of Jesse", according to Isa 11:1, for "Jesse" is the root. And so the Targum of Jonathan, בר בריה דישי, "the son's son of Jesse";''

that is, David's son, the King Messiah, who sprung from Jesse's family, when that family was very low and mean, like to a tree cut down to, its roots, and to a root in a dry ground; out of which sprung the man the branch, David's son and Lord. This character may be applied to Christ as Mediator, who as a root is unseen and unknown to carnal men, and mean, abject, and of no account in the eyes of the world; the root that not only bears Jesse, David, and other good men, but all the branches of God's elect, from whom they have their beings, both in a natural and spiritual sense; which communicates life and nourishment to them; in whom their life is hid, and is safe when scarcely to be discerned in them; and from whom they have all their fruitfulness, and to whom is owing their perseverance in faith and holiness.

And he that shall rise to reign over the Gentiles; or, as the Syriac version, "and he that shall rise shall be a prince unto the Gentiles"; or, as the Arabic, "and he that shall rise out of it", the root, "shall rule over the Gentiles". In the Hebrew text in Isaiah, this is said of the root, and to be read thus, "which shall stand for an ensign of the people", Isa 11:10; because mention is made of a root, the apostle expresses the standing of it by rising out of it, which signifies both the incarnation and exaltation of Christ; and because an ensign is a token of power and government, therefore he has rendered it to "reign", agreeably enough to the sense; since upon Christ's exaltation, and setting up his ensign or standard, the Gospel, in the Gentile world, multitudes became voluntary subjects to him, and still do; over whom he rules by his grace and Spirit, and will more largely and manifestly in the latter day, when the kingdoms of this world shall be his. In like manner R. Aben. Ezra explains the words of the Messiah.

"Says he, this may be understood, for all the whole world shall be תחת רשותו, "under his power", or government.''

And so the Targum of Jonathan paraphrases them, "and kingdoms shall obey him"; so that the Jew can have no reason to complain of the apostle's version.

In him shall the Gentiles trust, or "hope"; this in the Hebrew text is, "to him shall the Gentiles seek"; which cannot be truly done without faith and hope; see Heb 11:6; for the hope and faith of enjoying what is sought for, put persons upon seeking: so that the apostle here gives us the true sense of the words, and most fully describes the affection of the Gentiles to Christ; who having some knowledge of him, seek unto him for life and salvation, prostrate themselves at his feet, venture upon him, commit themselves to him, and hope and trust in him. This part of the prophecy is by the Jews understood of the Messiah.

"All the Gentiles (says R. David Kimchi on the text) shall seek אל המשיח, "to the Messiah", and shall go after him to do what he commands; all of them shall obey him.''

But why no mention made of the Israelites seeking to the Messiah? hear what they say, and which still confirms the sense of these words z.

"The Israelites will have no need of the doctrine of the King Messiah in future time, as it is said, "to him shall the Gentiles seek", and not the Israelites.''

True enough! The apostle dwells on the proof of this point, it not being so easy of belief with the Jews, but makes it clear from the law, psalms, and prophets, which is the threefold division of the writings of the Old Testament; see Luk 24:44.

Gill: Rom 15:13 - Now the God of hope // fill you with all joy and peace in believing // that ye may abound in hope through the power of the Holy Ghost Now the God of hope,.... This character is taken from the latter part of Rom 15:12, and is occasioned by it, "in him shall the Gentiles trust", or "ho...

Now the God of hope,.... This character is taken from the latter part of Rom 15:12, and is occasioned by it, "in him shall the Gentiles trust", or "hope"; and is proper to God as he is the author and giver of this grace; for naturally men are without it; that which is a good hope is the gift of God, and through his grace, and is wrought in the heart in regeneration; for to this are the children of God begotten again. Moreover, God is the object of it; not wealth and riches, nor works of righteousness, but Jehovah, Father, Son, and Spirit, particularly Christ, is called the believer's hope; that is, the object of it, in whom the Gentiles hope and trust. Likewise, it is God that encourages to the exercise of it by the proclamations of his grace, and mercy, and plenteous redemption; by the discoveries of his love, and views of interest in him; and by bringing to mind the past experiences of his goodness: he preserves and maintains this grace useful and lively, firm and steadfast, at least in being, which sometimes seems almost perished and gone; he increases it, and causes his people to abound in the exercise of it, and continues it even unto death. The Ethiopic version reads, "the God of our promises", which are what hope has respect unto, and builds upon:

fill you with all joy and peace in believing. This is a petition to the God of hope. The apostle has recourse again to prayer, knowing that all his exhortations would be useless, without the grace of God accompanying them: and it is observable, that he prays for the same things mentioned in the above prophecies and promises, as joy, peace, and hope; for though God has promised ever so great things concerning his people, he will be inquired of by them to do them for them. One part of this petition is, that God would "fill them with all joy"; not with every kind of joy; not with worldly joy, or with the joy of hypocrites, who rejoice in sin, or in their own boastings, which is evil; but with spiritual joy, joy in God as a covenant God and Father; in Christ, in his person, righteousness, and salvation; and in the Holy Ghost, the author of it, whose fruit it is; and in the Gospel, doctrines, blessings, and promises of it; and in the view and hope of the heavenly glory, amidst various afflictions and tribulations: and it designs an abundance of it, even a fulness thereof; though the petition implies, that as yet it is not full; it is frequently interrupted and broke in upon by the corruption of nature, and falls into sin, by the temptations of Satan, through divine desertions, and various trials and exercises; yet it supposes it may be increased, as by the renewed discoveries of the love of God, of interest in Christ, and through the gracious influences of the Spirit; and even made full and complete, though not in this, yet in the other world: another branch of the petition is, that God would fill with "peace", with a sense of their peace with him, made by the blood of Christ; with a conscience peace in their own breasts, arising from a view of their justification by the righteousness of Christ, and from the sprinklings of his blood upon them; and also with peace one among another, which was much wanting, and the apostle was very desirous of: and all this he asks, that it might come to them "in believing"; in the way of faith, and the exercise of that grace; for joy comes this way; faith and joy go together; where one is, the other is also; and as the one increases, so does the other; a believing view of interest in Christ is attended with joy unspeakable, and full of glory: and so peace comes in at the door of faith: there is no true peace till a soul is brought to believe in Christ; and that is promoted and increased by repeated acts of faith on Christ, or by a constant living by faith on him; see Isa 26:3. The end for which this petition is made is,

that ye may abound in hope through the power of the Holy Ghost. By hope is meant that grace which God is the author, object, and promoter of; and the Syriac version reads it, בסברה, "in his hope", or "the hope of him"; of enjoying him, of meeting with him, and having communion with him in his house and ordinances; of having fresh supplies of grace from him, and of being favoured with all the blessings of grace laid up in an everlasting covenant, and at last with eternal life and glory: to "abound" herein, is to be in the free and frequent exercise of this grace, being encouraged by the grace of God, and an enlarged experience of it, and supported by faith, the substance of things hoped for: and this "through the power of the Holy Ghost"; not by might or power of man, but by that same divine power which first began the good work, and must fulfil it; which at first implanted the grace of hope, and must perform the work of that, as of faith. The same power is requisite to cause grace to abound, or saints to abound in the exercise of it, as was to the first production of it. The Vulgate Latin reads, "that ye may abound in hope, and in the power of the Holy Ghost"; but there is no copulative in the Greek text.

Gill: Rom 15:14 - And I myself also am persuaded of you // my brethren // that ye also are full of goodness // Filled with all knowledge // able also to admonish one another And I myself also am persuaded of you,.... This is said by way of prevention to an objection that might he made to the apostle's prayers and exhortati...

And I myself also am persuaded of you,.... This is said by way of prevention to an objection that might he made to the apostle's prayers and exhortations by the Romans. What does the apostle mean by all this? what does he think of us, or take us to be? men that live in malice to one another, devoid of all humanity, and mutual respect? a parcel of fools and ignorant men, that know nothing of divine things? and though there may be some that are much to be blamed for their conduct and carriage to their fellow Christians, what, are there none among us fit to give advice and admonition? To which the apostle replies, that he was far from entertaining such thoughts of them; that though he had not seen them in person, yet he had had such an account of their faith and practice, which were famous throughout the world, that he was thoroughly persuaded of better things of them, though he thus spake; and therefore, to mollify them, and abate their resentment, he adds,

my brethren; testifying his affection to them, owning the spiritual relation they stood in to him, and declaring the great esteem he had for them, and the high opinion he had of them: saying,

that ye also are full of goodness; not naturally, for there is no good thing in men by nature, but what they had was from the Spirit of God, whose fruit is "goodness": and by which may be meant, either the good gifts of the Spirit of God, or rather his graces, even the good work of grace in general, and which is goodness itself: it comes from a good cause, the good Spirit of God; is good in its own nature, not having the least mixture or tincture of evil in it; and good in its effects, since it makes and denominates a man a good man; now these saints might be said to be full of this, to denote the abundance, the superabundance of grace in this work: or particularly beneficence, humanity, and sympathy to fellow Christians, may be intended. The Vulgate Latin version reads, "full of love": but the copies and eastern versions read as we do.

Filled with all knowledge; not with every sort of knowledge, with the knowledge of all languages, or of all the arts and sciences, of all things, natural and political; but with all spiritual knowledge relating to God, his nature and perfections, his mind and will; to Christ and the work of redemption by him; to the Spirit, and the operations of his grace; to the Gospel, and the doctrines of it; to their duty to God, fellow creatures, and fellow Christians; in short, with all knowledge necessary to salvation, though as yet not perfect, and which will not be in this world, but in another:

able also to admonish one another; as they must be, since they were both good and knowing; goodness and knowledge are necessary to admonition, and qualify persons for it: if a man is not a good man himself, he is not fit to admonish another; and if he has not knowledge, he will not be able to do it as it should be; and without humanity and tenderness, he will not perform it aright, and with success; but all this being in these persons, they were able and fit for it. Some copies read it, "able also to admonish others"; so the Syriac version renders; which makes the expression still stronger, and enlarges their praise and commendation.

Gill: Rom 15:15 - Nevertheless, brethren, I have written the more boldly unto you // in some sort // as putting you in mind // because of the grace that is given to me of God Nevertheless, brethren, I have written the more boldly unto you,.... Or freely, in taking notice of their party contentions and ill usage of each othe...

Nevertheless, brethren, I have written the more boldly unto you,.... Or freely, in taking notice of their party contentions and ill usage of each other, and in reproving, advising, and exhorting them; and which he excuses by observing, that it was,

in some sort, or "in part" only; meaning either that it was only in some part of the epistle he had took such a liberty, which is the sense of the Arabic version, which renders it, "in some parts of the oration"; or else that he had regard not to all of them, but to some only, to a part of the church who were most culpable; and did not design a charge against them all, and that what he said should be applied to the whole body; or rather that the boldness and freedom he had taken was bat in some sort, it was but in part: this he says to mitigate it, and that it might not be thought to be so large as it might appear at first; it was but "a little more boldly", that he wrote unto them, as the Syriac renders it; for this clause is not to be read in connection with the word "written", as if the apostle had only wrote of the doctrines of grace in some sort, or in part, for he declared the whole counsel of God, and never kept back anything profitable to the churches: he adds,

as putting you in mind; which is also said to excuse his writing, and the manner of it; he did not take upon him to be their teacher and instructor, to inform them of things they knew nothing of; only to be their monitor, to put them in mind of and refresh their memories with what they had been well instructed and established in before; see 2Pe 1:12;

because of the grace that is given to me of God; meaning not the doctrine of "grace, concerning" which, as the Ethiopic version renders it, he was putting them in mind; nor the internal grace of the Spirit, by which he was inclined and assisted to write unto them; but the grace of apostleship, or that high office, which, by the grace of God, and not because of any merits of his, he was called unto: this he mentions also to excuse the freedom of his writing; since what he did was in consequence of, pursuant and agreeably to, his office as an apostle; and therefore could not have answered it to God, or them, if he had not done it; wherefore he hoped it would be took well by them.

Gill: Rom 15:16 - That I should be the minister of Jesus Christ // to the Gentiles // ministering the Gospel of God // that the offering up of the Gentiles // might be acceptable // being sanctified by the Holy Ghost That I should be the minister of Jesus Christ,.... The office of apostleship is here amplified and enlarged on, and the ends shown for which that grac...

That I should be the minister of Jesus Christ,.... The office of apostleship is here amplified and enlarged on, and the ends shown for which that grace was given to him, that he should be a minister; not in holy things about the temple, as the priests and Levites were; or a teacher of the law, some were fond of; but a minister of Christ, one that was made so by him, was qualified and sent forth to minister in his name to men; and who was a preacher of him; Jesus Christ, and him crucified, was the grand subject of his ministrations; he adds,

to the Gentiles; for to them, though not to the exclusion of the Jews, was he appointed a minister by Christ, and sent by him to them; among them he chiefly ministered, and was particularly and eminently useful to them; and this is another reason why the Romans ought to bear with a little boldness and freedom in writing to them, since he was the apostle of the Gentiles:

ministering the Gospel of God; not the service of the temple, nor the traditions of the elders, nor the law of Moses, nor the morality of the Heathens; but the Gospel, of which God is the author, whose grace is the subject, and whose glory is the end; and is good news from him to the chief of sinners; to the preaching of which the apostle was separated by him:

that the offering up of the Gentiles; not the offering the Gentiles offered up, their prayers, praises, or good works, though these are acceptable to God through Christ; but the Gentiles themselves, by the offering up of whom is meant their conversion; which was the end of the apostle's ministering the Gospel among them, and in which he was the happy instrument. The allusion is to the priests slaying and offering up sacrifices under the law. The apostle was a priest in a figurative and improper sense; the sacrifices he offered up were not slain beasts, but men, the Gentiles, cut to the heart by the sword of the Spirit, the ministry of the Gospel; whose inside being laid open to them, and they brought to a sense of their lost condition, and need of Christ, were, through the power of divine grace attending the word, made willing to offer, or give up themselves to the Lord, to be saved by him, and him only: this the apostle, as an instrument, was concerned in; and all his view was, that it

might be acceptable; that is, to God, as nothing is more so to him than a broken and a contrite heart, or souls brought to a sense of themselves; and to believe in Christ, and submit to his righteousness; and then both ministers and converts are unto God, a sweet savour of Christ:

being sanctified by the Holy Ghost; this is said in allusion to the washing of the sacrifices under the law; and intimates, that the Gentiles, though unclean by nature and practice, yet being sanctified by the Spirit of God, whose proper work it is to sanctify, become an acceptable, being an holy sacrifice to an holy God.

Gill: Rom 15:17 - I have therefore whereof I may glory // through Jesus Christ // in those things which pertain to God I have therefore whereof I may glory,.... Not in himself, for he that taught others not to glory in men, would not glory in himself; not in his carnal...

I have therefore whereof I may glory,.... Not in himself, for he that taught others not to glory in men, would not glory in himself; not in his carnal descent and fleshly privileges; nor in his knowledge of, and compliance with, the ceremonies of the law; nor in his legal, moral, and civil righteousness before God; nor in his gifts and attainments, as merited and procured by himself; nor in his labours in the ministry, and the success of it, as of himself: but

through Jesus Christ; or "in Jesus Christ", as read the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Arabic versions; in what Christ was unto him, wisdom, righteousness, sanctification, and redemption: he could boast of what he had from him, and through him, even of all spiritual blessings in him; and of a large measure of grace he had received from him; and of great and eminent gifts Christ had bestowed on him; he gloried in his cross, and boasted of a crucified Jesus, whom others despised; and whom he made the subject of his ministry, and took delight in preaching: and freely owned that all he did was through Christ strengthening him; and that all his success in his work was owing to him, and of this he had to glory: and which was

in those things which pertain to God; not "with God", as the Syriac reads it; for though in some cases it may be lawful to glory before men, yet not before God, or in his presence: nor is it anything a man may glory in, not in his own things, but in the things of God; in things relating to the Gospel of God, to the pure preaching of it, to the furtherance and spread of it, and the recommending of it to others; to the worship and ordinances of God, and a spiritual attendance on them; to the grace of God, and the magnifying of that in the business of salvation; and to the glory of God, which ought to be the chief end of all actions, natural, moral, and religious, and whether private or public. The apostle has chiefly reference to his ministerial function, and the things of God relating to that, in which he was employed; see Heb 5:1.

Gill: Rom 15:18 - For I will not dare to speak of any of those things // which Christ hath not wrought by me // to make the Gentiles obedient // by word and deed For I will not dare to speak of any of those things,.... He suggests that the false teachers did speak of things which were not done by them at all, a...

For I will not dare to speak of any of those things,.... He suggests that the false teachers did speak of things which were not done by them at all, and much less were what Christ had done by them; and signifies that he was a conscientious man, and could speak nothing but what was truth; his conscience would not suffer him, nor could he allow himself to make mention of anything, that was not done by him, as if it was; nor of anything that was done by himself, nor of anything that was done, as if it was done by himself, but as it was wrought by Christ; nor had he any need to speak of any other things which he had wrought himself, as he could not of what he had not wrought at all; or, as he says,

which Christ hath not wrought by me: signifying that what he had wrought, and which he could with good conscience speak of to the honour of Christ, and the glory of his grace, were not wrought by himself, but what Christ wrought by him; he was only the instrument, Christ was the efficient cause: as a Christian, it was not he that lived, but Christ lived in him; as a minister, it was not he that spoke, but Christ spoke in him; nor was it he that laboured, but the grace of Christ that was with him; much less was it he that converted souls, but Christ did it by him:

to make the Gentiles obedient; the nations of the world, who had been brought up in blindness and ignorance of God, in rebellion and disobedience to him. The Gospel was sent among them, and was blessed unto them, to make them, of disobedient, obedient ones; not to men, but to God; not to magistrates and ministers, though they were taught to be so to both, but to Christ; to him as a priest, by being made willing to be saved by him, and him only, renouncing their own works, and disclaiming all other ways of salvation; and to submit to his righteousness for their justification before God, and acceptance with him; and to deal with his precious blood for pardon and cleansing; to rely on his sacrifice for the atonement of their sins, and to make use of him as the new and living way to the Father, as their one and only mediator, advocate, and intercessor; and to him as a prophet, to the faith of the Gospel, and the doctrines of it; not barely by hearing it, and notionally assenting to it, but by embracing it heartily, and professing it publicly and sincerely; and to him as a King, by owning him as such, and as theirs; and by subjecting to his ordinances, and obeying his commands in faith and fear, and from love to him: the means whereby these persons were brought to the obedience of Christ, and of faith, are

by word and deed; or "deeds", as the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Ethiopic versions read: by the former is meant, the word of the Gospel and the preaching of it, being sent unto them, and coming with power, and not as the word of man, but as the word of God; and by the latter, either the labour of the apostle, the pains he took, the hardships he endured, in ministering: the Gospel to them; or his agreeable life and conversation, which were a means of recommending the word, and of engaging an attention to it; or rather the miraculous works and mighty deeds which were wrought by the apostle, in confirmation of the doctrine he preached, as it seems to be explained in Rom 15:19.

Gill: Rom 15:19 - Through mighty signs and wonders // by the power of the Spirit of God // so that from Jerusalem, and round about unto Illyricum, I have fully preached the Gospel of Christ Through mighty signs and wonders,.... Or "in", or "through the power of signs and wonders", as the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Arabic versions render t...

Through mighty signs and wonders,.... Or "in", or "through the power of signs and wonders", as the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Arabic versions render the words. These carrying along with them evidence and conviction of the truth of what was delivered, wrought wonderfully and powerfully on the minds of the Gentiles to embrace the Gospel, and submit to the ordinances of it; though all would have been insufficient, had it not been for what follows,

by the power of the Spirit of God: the Alexandrian copy and one of Stephens's read, "by the power of the Holy Spirit", and so does the Vulgate Latin version; meaning, either that the mighty signs and wonders in healing the sick, giving sight to the blind, raising the dead, &c. were performed not by the efficacy and working of Satan, as the signs and lying wonders of antichristian men, but by the Spirit of God, by whom Christ and all his apostles wrought the miracles they did; or that the ministration of the word in which the apostle laboured, was by the power of the Spirit of God; it was he that imparted all spiritual gifts to him, qualifying him for this service; it was he that assisted him in it, and enabled him to go through it; it was in demonstration of the Spirit and of power that he performed it; and that not in words which man's wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth: or else that the obedience of the Gentiles to the faith of Christ, through the preaching of the Gospel, and the wonderful works that attended it as means, were purely owing to the power of the Spirit of God, as the efficient cause; it was not by might, or power of the preacher; nor merely by the power of signs and wonders; but by the powerful and efficacious grace of the Spirit of God, who took away the stony, stubborn, and disobedient heart, and gave them an heart of flesh, a tender, flexible, and obedient one; and caused them to walk in and observe the commandments and ordinances of the Lord:

so that from Jerusalem, and round about unto Illyricum, I have fully preached the Gospel of Christ; that which Christ, as God, is the author of; as man, was a preacher and minister of; and, as Mediator, is the subject matter of: this the apostle "preached fully" and completely, every part and branch of it, kept back nothing of it, but faithfully declared the whole; and so fulfilled it, as the word may be rendered, and his ministry; or he filled the Gospel, the net of the Gospel, which he spread in every place; or rather he diffused the knowledge of it everywhere; he filled all places with it wherever he came, even "from Jerusalem" round about unto Illyricum: not that he began to preach at Jerusalem, but at Damascus; from whence he went to Arabia, and after that to Jerusalem; but inasmuch as he was of Jerusalem, and had preached there, from whence the Gospel originally came, and this was the boundary of his ministry one way, he makes mention of it; as Illyricum was the boundary of it another way, which was on the extreme part of Macedonia: it is now called Sclavonia, and is an European nation; part of it is Dalmatia, mentioned 2Ti 4:10. Apollonia was in it, according to Mela z, where the apostle is said to pass through, Act 17:1, it has on the south the gulf of Venice, on the north the Danube, on the west Germany, and on the east Thracia and Macedonia: according to Ptolomy a, Illyris, or Illyricum, was bounded on the north with upper and lower Pannonia, now called Hungary and Austria; on the east with upper Mysia, now Servia; and on the south with part of Macedonia; it lies over against Italy, the Adriatic sea being between them; its length, from the river Drinus to Arsa, is reckoned about 480 miles, and its breadth, from the mountains of Croatia to the sea, is computed to be about 120: it is by some divided into Slavonia, Dalmatia, and Albania; Slavonia is the western part, Albania the eastern, and Dalmatia between them; according to others, it includes Slavonia, Croatia, Bosnia, and Dalmatia; and had its name of Illyricum, from Illyrius, the son of Cadmus; or as others, from Illyrius, the son of Celta: here the Gospel was preached by the Apostle Paul, and no doubt with success; and churches were planted here, and which remained for several ages: in the "second" century there was a church in Illyricum, and Eleutherius was bishop, who is said to be a famous teacher; he was born at Rome, and his mother Anthia is reported to be converted by the Apostle Paul; in the same age lived one Quirinus, first a tribune, and then a bishop of Illyricum, who became a martyr under Trajan: in the "third" century there were churches in Illyricum, though devastations were made in it by the Goths; in the "fourth" century, frequent mention is made of the churches in Illyricum; and the bishops convened at Rome under Damascus in the times of Constantius wrote with great respect to the brethren in Illyricum; in Siscia, a city in this country, Quirinus a bishop suffered martyrdom; here a synod met against the Arians, and yet many in this country were infected with that heresy, by Valens and Ursatius; in this age Hilary, of Poictiers in France, spread the Gospel in this country; and he and Eusebius of Vercelli, in Piedmont, visited the churches, and corrected what was amiss: in the "fifth" century there was a church in Illyricum, and in Salo, a city of Dalmatia, Glycerius was bishop: in the "sixth" century there were also churches here, as appears from the letter of Symmachus to the bishops of them, and to their people; and in this age also Gregory wrote to all the bishops in Illyricum, to receive such bishops as were banished: in the "eighth" century, the bishops of Illyricum were in the Nycene synod, and Boniface gathered a church in Slavonia b; thus far Christianity may be traced in this country: hither the apostle went, not in a direct line, but round about, and took many countries, cities, and towns in his way, as the history of his journeys and travels in the Acts of the Apostles shows, and as he here suggests.

Gill: Rom 15:20 - Yea, so have I strived to preach the Gospel // not where Christ was named // lest I should build on another man's foundation Yea, so have I strived to preach the Gospel,.... The sense is, not barely that he strove to preach the Gospel and not the law, the pure Gospel, and, n...

Yea, so have I strived to preach the Gospel,.... The sense is, not barely that he strove to preach the Gospel and not the law, the pure Gospel, and, not a mixed one; nor only that he endeavoured to preach it fully, and leave out nothing; but that he had an holy ambition to preach it,

not where Christ was named; as in Judea, where he had been for many ages spoken of and expected, and where he had lately appeared, lived, suffered, and died, and where his Gospel had been preached by all the apostles; as also in such parts of the Gentile world, where others of the apostles had been, and had made mention of his name, and published the glad tidings of salvation by him; but he chose rather to go to such Heathen nations, as were wholly without any knowledge of him; who had only the dim light of nature to guide them; had had no promises nor prophecies of the Messiah, nor so much as any hints, at least very distant ones, concerning him; and where as yet the sound of the Gospel bad not reached:

lest I should build on another man's foundation; meaning not the law of Moses, nor the doctrines of the false teachers, but the foundation of the true apostles, and which was no other than the foundation Christ, he himself laid; but he chose not to go where they had laid the foundation by preaching Christ and his Gospel, that he might not take another man's crown, or boast in another man's line, or of other men's labours; but rather to go where others had never been, that he might first lay the foundation himself, by preaching Christ, and him crucified, and so the more act up to his character as an apostle, and as the apostle to the Gentiles.

Gill: Rom 15:21 - But as it is written // to whom he was not spoken of, they shall see, and they that have not heard shall understand But as it is written,.... In Isa 52:15; to whom he was not spoken of, they shall see, and they that have not heard shall understand; for the Messia...

But as it is written,.... In Isa 52:15;

to whom he was not spoken of, they shall see, and they that have not heard shall understand; for the Messiah was not spoken of to the Gentiles; they were strangers to the covenants of promise; the oracles of God were committed to the Jews; God gave his word and statutes to them, and not to any other nation: and yet, according to this prophecy, the Gentiles were to see him whom they had no account of; not in the flesh with their bodily eyes, in which sense only, or at least chiefly, the Jews saw him; but with the eyes of their understanding, by faith, as exhibited and evidently set forth before them as crucified, in the Gospel and the ordinances of it: and though they had heard nothing of him, having for many hundreds of years been left in ignorance, and suffered to walk in their own ways, until the apostles were sent among them; whose sound went into all the earth, and their words to the end of the world; yet when this would be the case, according to these words, they would understand the mind and will of God, the mysteries of his grace, the nature of the person and offices of Christ, the design of his coming into the world, and the way of salvation by him; all which was greatly brought about and accomplished, in the ministry of the Apostle Paul among them. The passage is very pertinently cited and applied by the apostle. The whole paragraph is to be understood of the Messiah, from whence it is taken, as it is owned, and accordingly interpreted by many Jewish writers, both ancient b and modern c; and these words particularly respect the kings and nations of the world, who are represented as struck with silence and wonder, when, upon the preaching and hearing of the Messiah, they should see him by faith, and spiritually understand what is declared concerning him. The difference between the apostle's version of these words, which is the same with the Septuagint, and the text in Isaiah, is very inconsiderable. The first clause of the Hebrew text may be literally rendered thus, "for him, who was not spoken of to them, they shall see"; and the apostle's Greek in this manner, to whom "it was not spoken of concerning him, they shall see"; the sense is the same, and person intended Christ: the latter clause, which we from the Hebrew text render, "and that which they had not heard, shall they consider"; and here, "they that have not heard, shall understand", has nothing material in it, in which they differ; for in the former part of it both design the Messiah, and the things concerning him, the Gentiles had not heard of; and the latter is rendered and explained by the Targum, and by R. Sol Jarchi, as by the apostle, אסתכלו, "they shall understand"; and which fitly expresses the sense of the Hebrew word used by the prophet.