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Teks -- Genesis 26:1-35 (NET)

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Konteks
Isaac and Abimelech
26:1 There was a famine in the land, subsequent to the earlier famine that occurred in the days of Abraham. Isaac went to Abimelech king of the Philistines at Gerar. 26:2 The Lord appeared to Isaac and said, “Do not go down to Egypt; settle down in the land that I will point out to you. 26:3 Stay in this land. Then I will be with you and will bless you, for I will give all these lands to you and to your descendants, and I will fulfill the solemn promise I made to your father Abraham. 26:4 I will multiply your descendants so they will be as numerous as the stars in the sky, and I will give them all these lands. All the nations of the earth will pronounce blessings on one another using the name of your descendants. 26:5 All this will come to pass because Abraham obeyed me and kept my charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws.” 26:6 So Isaac settled in Gerar. 26:7 When the men of that place asked him about his wife, he replied, “She is my sister.” He was afraid to say, “She is my wife,” for he thought to himself, “The men of this place will kill me to get Rebekah because she is very beautiful.” 26:8 After Isaac had been there a long time, Abimelech king of the Philistines happened to look out a window and observed Isaac caressing his wife Rebekah. 26:9 So Abimelech summoned Isaac and said, “She is really your wife! Why did you say, ‘She is my sister’?” Isaac replied, “Because I thought someone might kill me to get her.” 26:10 Then Abimelech exclaimed, “What in the world have you done to us? One of the men might easily have had sexual relations with your wife, and you would have brought guilt on us!” 26:11 So Abimelech commanded all the people, “Whoever touches this man or his wife will surely be put to death.” 26:12 When Isaac planted in that land, he reaped in the same year a hundred times what he had sown, because the Lord blessed him. 26:13 The man became wealthy. His influence continued to grow until he became very prominent. 26:14 He had so many sheep and cattle and such a great household of servants that the Philistines became jealous of him. 26:15 So the Philistines took dirt and filled up all the wells that his father’s servants had dug back in the days of his father Abraham. 26:16 Then Abimelech said to Isaac, “Leave us and go elsewhere, for you have become much more powerful than we are.” 26:17 So Isaac left there and settled in the Gerar Valley. 26:18 Isaac reopened the wells that had been dug back in the days of his father Abraham, for the Philistines had stopped them up after Abraham died. Isaac gave these wells the same names his father had given them. 26:19 When Isaac’s servants dug in the valley and discovered a well with fresh flowing water there, 26:20 the herdsmen of Gerar quarreled with Isaac’s herdsmen, saying, “The water belongs to us!” So Isaac named the well Esek because they argued with him about it. 26:21 His servants dug another well, but they quarreled over it too, so Isaac named it Sitnah. 26:22 Then he moved away from there and dug another well. They did not quarrel over it, so Isaac named it Rehoboth, saying, “For now the Lord has made room for us, and we will prosper in the land.” 26:23 From there Isaac went up to Beer Sheba. 26:24 The Lord appeared to him that night and said, “I am the God of your father Abraham. Do not be afraid, for I am with you. I will bless you and multiply your descendants for the sake of my servant Abraham.” 26:25 Then Isaac built an altar there and worshiped the Lord. He pitched his tent there, and his servants dug a well. 26:26 Now Abimelech had come to him from Gerar along with Ahuzzah his friend and Phicol the commander of his army. 26:27 Isaac asked them, “Why have you come to me? You hate me and sent me away from you.” 26:28 They replied, “We could plainly see that the Lord is with you. So we decided there should be a pact between us– between us and you. Allow us to make a treaty with you 26:29 so that you will not do us any harm, just as we have not harmed you, but have always treated you well before sending you away in peace. Now you are blessed by the Lord.” 26:30 So Isaac held a feast for them and they celebrated. 26:31 Early in the morning the men made a treaty with each other. Isaac sent them off; they separated on good terms. 26:32 That day Isaac’s servants came and told him about the well they had dug. “We’ve found water,” they reported. 26:33 So he named it Shibah; that is why the name of the city has been Beer Sheba to this day. 26:34 When Esau was forty years old, he married Judith the daughter of Beeri the Hittite, as well as Basemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite. 26:35 They caused Isaac and Rebekah great anxiety.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Abimelech priest (Eli Ithamar) of Nob, whom Saul killed; Ahimelech I,a priest, Ahimelech II; son of Abiathar son of Ahimelech I,a man who was part of David's fugitive band; a Hittite
 · Abraham a son of Terah; the father of Isaac; ancestor of the Jewish nation.,the son of Terah of Shem
 · Ahuzzath a man who was advisor to king Abimelech in the time of Isaac
 · Basemath daughter of Elon the Hittite; Esau's second wife,daughter of Ishmael; Esau's third wife and cousin,daughter of Solomon
 · Beer-Sheba a famous well, its town and district in southern Judah
 · Beer-sheba a famous well, its town and district in southern Judah
 · Beeri the Hittite father of Judith, Esau's wife,father of Hosea the prophet
 · Egypt descendants of Mizraim
 · Elon father of Basemath/Adah, the Hittite wife of Esau,son of Zebulun son of Israel,a town in the territory of Dan somewhere west of Jerusalem,a judge of Israel of the tribe of Zebulun
 · Esau a son of Isaac and Rebekah,son of Isaac & Rebekah; Jacob's elder twin brother,a people (and nation) descended from Esau, Jacob's brother
 · Esek son of Eleasah of Benjamin
 · Gerar a town of Judah 15 km SE of Gaza
 · Hittite a person/people living in the land of Syro-Palestine
 · Judith wife of Esau; daughter of Beeri the Hittite
 · Phicol a commander of the Philistine army under Abimelech, king of Gerar, in Abraham's time
 · Philistines a sea people coming from Crete in 1200BC to the coast of Canaan
 · Rebekah daughter of Bethuel, nephew of Abraham
 · Rehoboth a town of Assyria built by Nimrod
 · Shiba name of a well
 · Sitnah name of a well


Topik/Tema Kamus: Abimelech | Gerar | Rebekah | Philistines | Isaac | JACOB (1) | Malice | Afflictions and Adversities | Blessing | BEERSHEBA | Rulers | WELL | Wells | ALLIANCE | Dishonesty | Patience | Covenant | SHEPHERD | PALESTINE, 1 | Alliances | selebihnya
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Wesley: Gen 26:2 - -- The Lord said, go not down into Egypt.

The Lord said, go not down into Egypt.

Wesley: Gen 26:2 - Sojourn in this land There was a famine in Jacob's days, and God bid him go down into Egypt, Gen 46:3-4, a famine in Isaac's days, and God bid him not go down: a famine in...

There was a famine in Jacob's days, and God bid him go down into Egypt, Gen 46:3-4, a famine in Isaac's days, and God bid him not go down: a famine in Abraham's days, and God left him to his liberty, directing him neither way, which (considering that Egypt was always a place of trial to God's people) some ground upon the different characters of these three patriarchs. Abraham was a man of very intimate communion with God, and to him all places and conditions were alike; Isaac a very good man, but not cut out for hardship, therefore he is forbidden to go to Egypt; Jacob inured to difficulties, strong and patient, and therefore he must go down into Egypt, that the trial of his faith might be to praise, and honour, and glory. Thus God proportions his people's trials to their strength.

Wesley: Gen 26:5 - Abraham obeyed my voice Do thou do so too, and the promise shall be sure to thee. A great variety of words is here used to express the Divine Will to which Abraham was obedie...

Do thou do so too, and the promise shall be sure to thee. A great variety of words is here used to express the Divine Will to which Abraham was obedient, my voice, my charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws - Which may intimate, that Abraham's obedience was universal; he obeyed the original laws of nature, the revealed laws of divine worship, particularly that of circumcision, and all the extraordinary precepts God gave him, as that of quitting his country, and that (which some think is more especially referred to) the offering up of his son, which Isaac himself had reason enough to remember. Those only shall have the benefit of God's covenant with their parents, that tread the steps of their obedience.

Wesley: Gen 26:7 - He said, she is my sister So Isaac enters into the same temptation that his father had been once and again surprised and overcome by, viz. to deny his wife, and to give out tha...

So Isaac enters into the same temptation that his father had been once and again surprised and overcome by, viz. to deny his wife, and to give out that she was his sister! It is an unaccountable thing, that both these great and good men should be guilty of so odd a piece of dissimulation, by which they so much exposed both their own and their wives reputation.

Wesley: Gen 26:8 - -- This Abimelech was not the same that was in Abraham's days, Gen. 20:2-18, for this was near an hundred years after, but that was the common name of th...

This Abimelech was not the same that was in Abraham's days, Gen. 20:2-18, for this was near an hundred years after, but that was the common name of the Philistine kings, as Caesar of the Roman emperors.

Wesley: Gen 26:10 - Lightly Perhaps.

Perhaps.

Wesley: Gen 26:12 - Isaac received an hundred fold And there seems to be an emphasis laid upon the time; it was that same year when there was a famine in the land; while others scarce reaped at all, he...

And there seems to be an emphasis laid upon the time; it was that same year when there was a famine in the land; while others scarce reaped at all, he reaped thus plentifully.

Wesley: Gen 26:20 - Esek That is, contention.

That is, contention.

Wesley: Gen 26:21 - Sitnah That is, hatred.

That is, hatred.

Wesley: Gen 26:22 - He digged a well, and for that they strove not Those that follow peace, sooner or later, shall find peace: those that study to be quiet seldom fail of being so.

Those that follow peace, sooner or later, shall find peace: those that study to be quiet seldom fail of being so.

Wesley: Gen 26:22 - This well they called Rehoboth Enlargements, room enough.

Enlargements, room enough.

Wesley: Gen 26:24 - Fear not, I am with thee, and will bless thee Those may remove with comfort that are sure of God's presence with them wherever they go.

Those may remove with comfort that are sure of God's presence with them wherever they go.

Wesley: Gen 26:28 - -- The Lord is with thee, and thou art the blessed of the Lord, q.d. Be persuaded to overlook the injuries offered thee, for God has abundantly made up t...

The Lord is with thee, and thou art the blessed of the Lord, q.d. Be persuaded to overlook the injuries offered thee, for God has abundantly made up to thee the damage thou receivedst. Those whom God blesseth and favours, have reason enough to forgive those that hate them, since the worst enemy they have cannot do them any real hurt.

Wesley: Gen 26:28 - Let there be an oath betwixt us Whatever some of his envious subjects might mean, he and his prime ministers, whom he had now brought with him, designed no other but a cordial friend...

Whatever some of his envious subjects might mean, he and his prime ministers, whom he had now brought with him, designed no other but a cordial friendship. Perhaps Abimelech had received by tradition the warning God gave to his predecessor not to hurt Abraham, Gen 20:7, and that made him stand in such awe of Isaac, who appeared to be as much the favourite of heaven as Abraham was.

Wesley: Gen 26:34 - He took to wife Marrying Canaanites, who were strangers to the blessing of Abraham, and subject to the curse of Noah.

Marrying Canaanites, who were strangers to the blessing of Abraham, and subject to the curse of Noah.

JFB: Gen 26:1 - And there was a famine in the land . . . And Isaac went unto . . . Gerar The pressure of famine in Canaan forced Isaac with his family and flocks to migrate into the land of the Philistines, where he was exposed to personal...

The pressure of famine in Canaan forced Isaac with his family and flocks to migrate into the land of the Philistines, where he was exposed to personal danger, as his father had been on account of his wife's beauty; but through the seasonable interposition of Providence, he was preserved (Psa 105:14-15).

JFB: Gen 26:12 - Then Isaac sowed in that land During his sojourn in that district he farmed a piece of land, which, by the blessing of God on his skill and industry, was very productive (Isa 65:13...

During his sojourn in that district he farmed a piece of land, which, by the blessing of God on his skill and industry, was very productive (Isa 65:13; Psa 37:19); and by his plentiful returns he increased so rapidly in wealth and influence that the Philistines, afraid or envious of his prosperity, obliged him to leave the place (Pro 27:4; Ecc 4:4). This may receive illustration from the fact that many Syrian shepherds at this day settle for a year or two in a place, rent some ground, in the produce of which they trade with the neighboring market, till the owners, through jealousy of their growing substance, refuse to renew their lease and compel them to remove elsewhere.

JFB: Gen 26:15 - all the wells which his father's servants had digged . . . the Philistines had stopped, &c. The same base stratagem for annoying those against whom they have taken an umbrage is practiced still by choking the wells with sand or stones, or def...

The same base stratagem for annoying those against whom they have taken an umbrage is practiced still by choking the wells with sand or stones, or defiling them with putrid carcases.

JFB: Gen 26:17 - valley of Gerar Torrent-bed or wady, a vast undulating plain, unoccupied and affording good pasture.

Torrent-bed or wady, a vast undulating plain, unoccupied and affording good pasture.

JFB: Gen 26:18-22 - Isaac digged again the wells of water The naming of wells by Abraham, and the hereditary right of his family to the property, the change of the names by the Philistines to obliterate the t...

The naming of wells by Abraham, and the hereditary right of his family to the property, the change of the names by the Philistines to obliterate the traces of their origin, the restoration of the names by Isaac, and the contests between the respective shepherds to the exclusive possession of the water, are circumstances that occur among the natives in those regions as frequently in the present day as in the time of Isaac.

JFB: Gen 26:26-33 - Then Abimelech went to him As there was a lapse of ninety years between the visit of Abraham and of Isaac, the Abimelech and Phichol spoken of must have been different persons' ...

As there was a lapse of ninety years between the visit of Abraham and of Isaac, the Abimelech and Phichol spoken of must have been different persons' official titles. Here is another proof of the promise (Gen 12:2) being fulfilled, in an overture of peace being made to him by the king of Gerar. By whatever motive the proposal was dictated--whether fear of his growing power, or regret for the bad usage they had given him, the king and two of his courtiers paid a visit to the tent of Isaac (Pro 16:7). His timid and passive temper had submitted to the annoyances of his rude neighbors; but now that they wish to renew the covenant, he evinces deep feeling at their conduct, and astonishment at their assurance, or artifice, in coming near him. Being, however, of a pacific disposition, Isaac forgave their offense, accepted their proposals, and treated them to the banquet by which the ratification of a covenant was usually crowned.

JFB: Gen 26:34 - Esau . . . took to wife If the pious feelings of Abraham recoiled from the idea of Isaac forming a matrimonial connection with a Canaanitish woman [Gen 24:3], that devout pat...

If the pious feelings of Abraham recoiled from the idea of Isaac forming a matrimonial connection with a Canaanitish woman [Gen 24:3], that devout patriarch himself would be equally opposed to such a union on the part of his children; and we may easily imagine how much his pious heart was wounded, and the family peace destroyed, when his favorite but wayward son brought no less than two idolatrous wives among them--an additional proof that Esau neither desired the blessing nor dreaded the curse of God. These wives never gained the affections of his parents, and this estrangement was overruled by God for keeping the chosen family aloof from the dangers of heathen influence.

Clarke: Gen 26:1 - There was a famine There was a famine - When this happened we cannot tell; it appears to have been after the death of Abraham. Concerning the first famine, see Gen 12:...

There was a famine - When this happened we cannot tell; it appears to have been after the death of Abraham. Concerning the first famine, see Gen 12:10

Clarke: Gen 26:1 - Abimelech Abimelech - As we know not the time when the famine happened, so we cannot tell whether this was the same Abimelech, Phichol, etc., which are mentio...

Abimelech - As we know not the time when the famine happened, so we cannot tell whether this was the same Abimelech, Phichol, etc., which are mentioned Gen 20:1, Gen 20:2, etc., or the sons or other descendants of these persons.

Clarke: Gen 26:2 - Go not down into Egypt Go not down into Egypt - As Abraham had taken refuge in that country, it is probable that Isaac was preparing to go thither also; and God, foreseein...

Go not down into Egypt - As Abraham had taken refuge in that country, it is probable that Isaac was preparing to go thither also; and God, foreseeing that he would there meet with trials, etc., which might prove fatal to his peace or to his piety, warns him not to fulfill his intention.

Clarke: Gen 26:3 - Sojourn in this land Sojourn in this land - In Gerar, whither he had gone, Gen 26:1, and where we find he settled, Gen 26:6, though the land of Canaan in general might b...

Sojourn in this land - In Gerar, whither he had gone, Gen 26:1, and where we find he settled, Gen 26:6, though the land of Canaan in general might be here intended. That there were serious and important reasons why Isaac should not go to Egypt, we may be fully assured, though they be not assigned here; it is probable that even Isaac himself was not informed why he should not go down to Egypt. I have already supposed that God saw trials in his way which he might not have been able to bear. While a man acknowledges God in all his ways, he will direct all his steps, though he may not choose to give him the reasons of the workings of his providence. Abraham might go safely to Egypt, Isaac might not; in firmness and decision of character there was a wide difference between the two men.

Clarke: Gen 26:4 - I will make thy seed - as the stars of heaven I will make thy seed - as the stars of heaven - A promise often repeated to Abraham, and which has been most amply fulfilled both in its literal and...

I will make thy seed - as the stars of heaven - A promise often repeated to Abraham, and which has been most amply fulfilled both in its literal and spiritual sense.

Clarke: Gen 26:5 - Abraham obeyed my voice Abraham obeyed my voice - מימרי meimeri , my Word. See Gen 15:1

Abraham obeyed my voice - מימרי meimeri , my Word. See Gen 15:1

Clarke: Gen 26:5 - My charge My charge - משמרתי mishmarti , from שמר shamar , he kept, observed, etc., the ordinances or appointments of God. These were always of two...

My charge - משמרתי mishmarti , from שמר shamar , he kept, observed, etc., the ordinances or appointments of God. These were always of two kinds

1.    Such as tended to promote moral improvement, the increase of piety, the improvement of the age, etc. An

2.    Such as were typical of the promised seed, and the salvation which was to come by him

For commandments, statutes, etc., the reader is particularly desired to refer to Lev 16:15, etc., where these things are all explained in the alphabetical order of the Hebrew words.

Clarke: Gen 26:7 - He said, She is my sister He said, She is my sister - It is very strange that in the same place, and in similar circumstances, Isaac should have denied his wife, precisely as...

He said, She is my sister - It is very strange that in the same place, and in similar circumstances, Isaac should have denied his wife, precisely as his father had done before him! It is natural to ask, Did Abraham never mention this circumstance to his son? Probably be did not, as he was justly ashamed of his weakness on the occasion - the only blot in his character; the son, therefore, not being forewarned, was not armed against the temptation. It may not be well in general for parents to tell their children of their former failings or vices, as this might lessen their authority or respect, and the children might make a bad use of it in extenuation of their own sins. But there are certain cases, which, from the nature of their circumstances, may often occur, where a candid acknowledgment, with suitable advice, may prevent those children from repeating the evil; but this should be done with great delicacy and caution, lest even the advice itself should serve as an incentive to the evil. I had not known lust, says St. Paul, if the law had not said, Thou shalt not covet. Isaac could not say of Rebekah, as Abraham had done of Sarah, She is my sister; in the case of Abraham this was literally true; it was not so in the case of Isaac, for Rebekah was only his cousin. Besides, though relatives, in the Jewish forms of speaking, are often called brothers and sisters, and the thing may be perfectly proper when this use of the terms is generally known and allowed, yet nothing of this kind can be pleaded here in behalf of Isaac; for he intended that the Gerarites should understand him in the proper sense of the term, and consequently have no suspicion that she was his wife. We have already seen that the proper definition of a lie is any word spoken with the intention to deceive. See Gen 20:12.

Clarke: Gen 26:8 - Isaac was sporting with Rebekah his wife Isaac was sporting with Rebekah his wife - Whatever may be the precise meaning of the word, it evidently implies that there were liberties taken and...

Isaac was sporting with Rebekah his wife - Whatever may be the precise meaning of the word, it evidently implies that there were liberties taken and freedom used on the occasion, which were not lawful but between man and wife.

Clarke: Gen 26:10 - Thou shouldest have brought guiltiness upon us Thou shouldest have brought guiltiness upon us - It is likely that Abimelech might have had some knowledge of God’ s intentions concerning the ...

Thou shouldest have brought guiltiness upon us - It is likely that Abimelech might have had some knowledge of God’ s intentions concerning the family of Abraham, and that it must be kept free from all impure and alien mixtures; and that consequently, had he or any of his people taken Rebekah, the Divine judgment might have fallen upon the land. Abimelech was a good and holy man; and he appears to have considered adultery as a grievous and destructive crime.

Clarke: Gen 26:11 - He that toucheth He that toucheth - He who injures Isaac or defiles Rebekah shall certainly die for it. Death was the punishment for adultery among the Canaanites, P...

He that toucheth - He who injures Isaac or defiles Rebekah shall certainly die for it. Death was the punishment for adultery among the Canaanites, Philistines, and Hebrews. See Gen 38:24.

Clarke: Gen 26:12 - Isaac sowed in that land Isaac sowed in that land - Being now perfectly free from the fear of evil, he betakes himself to agricultural and pastoral pursuits, in which he has...

Isaac sowed in that land - Being now perfectly free from the fear of evil, he betakes himself to agricultural and pastoral pursuits, in which he has the especial blessing of God, so that his property becomes greatly increased

Clarke: Gen 26:12 - A hundred-fold A hundred-fold - מאה שערים, meah shearim , literally, "A hundred-fold of barley;"and so the Septuagint, ἑκατοστευουσαν κ...

A hundred-fold - מאה שערים, meah shearim , literally, "A hundred-fold of barley;"and so the Septuagint, ἑκατοστευουσαν κριθην . Perhaps such a crop of this grain was a rare occurrence in Gerar. The words, however, may be taken in a general way, as signifying a very great increase; so they are used by our Lord in the parable of the sower.

Clarke: Gen 26:13 - The man waxed great The man waxed great - There is a strange and observable recurrence of the same term in the original: ויגדל האיש וילך הלוך וגדל...

The man waxed great - There is a strange and observable recurrence of the same term in the original: ויגדל האיש וילך הלוך וגדל עד כי גדל מאד vaiyigdal haish vaiyelech haloch vegadel ad ki gadal meod , And the man was Great; and he went, going on, and was Great, until that he was exceeding Great. How simple is this language, and yet how forcible!

Clarke: Gen 26:14 - He had possession of flocks He had possession of flocks - He who blessed him in the increase of his fields blessed him also in the increase of his flocks; and as he had extensi...

He had possession of flocks - He who blessed him in the increase of his fields blessed him also in the increase of his flocks; and as he had extensive possessions, so he must have many hands to manage such concerns: therefore it is added, he had great store of servants - he had many domestics, some born in his house, and others purchased by his money.

Clarke: Gen 26:15 - For all the wells - the Philistines had stopped them For all the wells - the Philistines had stopped them - In such countries a good well was a great acquisition; and hence in predatory wars it was usu...

For all the wells - the Philistines had stopped them - In such countries a good well was a great acquisition; and hence in predatory wars it was usual for either party to fill the wells with earth or sand, in order to distress the enemy. The filling up the wells in this case was a most unprincipled transaction, as they had pledged themselves to Abraham, by a solemn oath, not to injure each other in this or any other respect. See Gen 21:25-31.

Clarke: Gen 26:16 - Go from us; for thou art much mightier than we Go from us; for thou art much mightier than we - This is the first instance on record of what was termed among the Greeks ostracism; i.e., the banis...

Go from us; for thou art much mightier than we - This is the first instance on record of what was termed among the Greeks ostracism; i.e., the banishment of a person from the state, of whose power, influence, or riches, the people were jealous. There is a remarkable saying of Bacon on this subject, which seems to intimate that he had this very circumstance under his eye: "Public envy is an ostracism that eclipseth men when they grow too great."On this same principle Pharaoh oppressed the Israelites. The Philistines appear to have been jealous of Isaac’ s growing prosperity, and to have considered it, not as a due reward of his industry and holiness, but as their individual loss, as though his gain was at their expense; therefore they resolved to drive him out, and take his well-cultivated ground, etc., to themselves, and compelled Abimelech to dismiss him, who gave this reason for it, עצמת ממנו atsamta mimmennu , Thou hast obtained much wealth among us, and my people are envious of thee. Is not this the better translation? for it can hardly be supposed that Isaac was "mightier"than the king of whole tribes.

Clarke: Gen 26:18 - In the days of Abraham In the days of Abraham - Instead of בימי bimey , in the days, Houbigant contends we should read עבדי abdey , servants. Isaac dug again the...

In the days of Abraham - Instead of בימי bimey , in the days, Houbigant contends we should read עבדי abdey , servants. Isaac dug again the wells which the servants of Abraham his father had dug. This reading is supported by the Samaritan, Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate; and it is probably the true one.

Clarke: Gen 26:19 - A well of springing water A well of springing water - באר מים חיים beer mayim chaiyim , A well of living waters. This is the oriental phrase for a spring, and this...

A well of springing water - באר מים חיים beer mayim chaiyim , A well of living waters. This is the oriental phrase for a spring, and this is its meaning both in the Old and New Testaments: Lev 14:5, Lev 14:50; Lev 15:30; Num 19:17; Son 4:15. See also Joh 4:10-14; Joh 7:38; Rev 21:6; Rev 22:1. And by these scriptures we find that an unfailing spring was an emblem of the graces and influences of the Spirit of God.

Clarke: Gen 26:21 - They dug another well They dug another well - Never did any man more implicitly follow the Divine command, Resist not evil, than Isaac; whenever he found that his work wa...

They dug another well - Never did any man more implicitly follow the Divine command, Resist not evil, than Isaac; whenever he found that his work was likely to be a subject of strife and contention, he gave place, and rather chose to suffer wrong than to have his own peace of mind disturbed. Thus he overcame evil with good.

Clarke: Gen 26:24 - The Lord appeared unto him The Lord appeared unto him - He needed especial encouragement when insulted and outraged by the Philistines; for having returned to the place where ...

The Lord appeared unto him - He needed especial encouragement when insulted and outraged by the Philistines; for having returned to the place where his noble father had lately died, the remembrance of his wrongs, and the remembrance of his loss, could not fail to afflict his mind; and God immediately appears to comfort and support him in his trials, by a renewal of all his promises.

Clarke: Gen 26:25 - Builded an altar there Builded an altar there - That he might have a place for God’ s worship, as well as a place for himself and family to dwell in

Builded an altar there - That he might have a place for God’ s worship, as well as a place for himself and family to dwell in

Clarke: Gen 26:25 - And called upon the name of the Lord And called upon the name of the Lord - And invoked in the name of Jehovah. See note on Gen 12:8; See note on Gen 13:15.

And called upon the name of the Lord - And invoked in the name of Jehovah. See note on Gen 12:8; See note on Gen 13:15.

Clarke: Gen 26:26 - Abimelech went to him Abimelech went to him - When a man’ s ways please God, he makes even his enemies to be at peace with him; so Isaac experienced on this occasion...

Abimelech went to him - When a man’ s ways please God, he makes even his enemies to be at peace with him; so Isaac experienced on this occasion. Whether this was the same Abimelech and Phichol mentioned Gen 21:22, we cannot tell, it is possible both might have been now alive, provided we suppose them young in the days of Abraham; but it is more likely that Abimelech was a general name of the Gerarite kings, and that Phichol was a name of office

Clarke: Gen 26:26 - Ahuzzath Ahuzzath - The Targum translates this word a company, not considering it as a proper name: "Abimelech and Phichol came with a company of their frien...

Ahuzzath - The Targum translates this word a company, not considering it as a proper name: "Abimelech and Phichol came with a company of their friends."The Septuagint calls him Οχοζαθ ὁ νυμφαγωγος, Ochozath, the paranymph, he who conducts the bride to the bridegroom’ s house. Could we depend on the correctness of this version, we might draw the following curious conclusions from it

1.    That this was the son of that Abimelech the friend of Abraham

2.    That he had been lately married, and on this journey brings with him his confidential friend, to whom he had lately entrusted the care of his spouse.

Clarke: Gen 26:27 - Seeing ye hate me Seeing ye hate me - He was justified in thinking thus, because if they did not injure him, they had connived at their servants doing it.

Seeing ye hate me - He was justified in thinking thus, because if they did not injure him, they had connived at their servants doing it.

Clarke: Gen 26:28 - Let there be now an oath betwixt us Let there be now an oath betwixt us - Let us make a covenant by which we shall be mutually bound, and let it be ratified in the most solemn manner.

Let there be now an oath betwixt us - Let us make a covenant by which we shall be mutually bound, and let it be ratified in the most solemn manner.

Clarke: Gen 26:30 - He made them a feast He made them a feast - Probably on the sacrifice that was offered on the occasion of making this covenant. This was a common custom.

He made them a feast - Probably on the sacrifice that was offered on the occasion of making this covenant. This was a common custom.

Clarke: Gen 26:31 - They rose up be times They rose up be times - Early rising was general among the primitive inhabitants of the world, and this was one cause which contributed greatly to t...

They rose up be times - Early rising was general among the primitive inhabitants of the world, and this was one cause which contributed greatly to their health and longevity.

Clarke: Gen 26:33 - He called it Shebah He called it Shebah - This was probably the same well which was called Beersheba in the time of Abraham, which the Philistines had filled up, and wh...

He called it Shebah - This was probably the same well which was called Beersheba in the time of Abraham, which the Philistines had filled up, and which the servants of Isaac had reopened. The same name is therefore given to it which it had before, with the addition of the emphatic letter ה he , by which its signification became extended, so that now it signified not merely an oath or full, but satisfaction and abundance

Clarke: Gen 26:33 - The name of the city is Beer-sheba The name of the city is Beer-sheba - This name was given to it a hundred years before this time; but as the well from which it had this name origina...

The name of the city is Beer-sheba - This name was given to it a hundred years before this time; but as the well from which it had this name originally was closed up by the Philistines, probably the name of the place was abolished with the well; when therefore Isaac reopened the well, he restored the ancient name of the place.

Clarke: Gen 26:34 - He took to wife - the daughter, etc. He took to wife - the daughter, etc. - It is very likely that the wives taken by Esau were daughters of chiefs among the Hittites, and by this union...

He took to wife - the daughter, etc. - It is very likely that the wives taken by Esau were daughters of chiefs among the Hittites, and by this union he sought to increase and strengthen his secular power and influence.

Clarke: Gen 26:35 - Which were a grief of mind Which were a grief of mind - Not the marriage, though that was improper, but the persons; they, by their perverse and evil ways, brought bitterness ...

Which were a grief of mind - Not the marriage, though that was improper, but the persons; they, by their perverse and evil ways, brought bitterness into the hearts of Isaac and Rebekah. The Targum of Jonathan ben Uzziel, and that of Jerusalem, say they were addicted to idol worship, and rebelled against and would not hearken to the instructions either of Isaac or Rebekah. From Canaanites a different conduct could not be reasonably expected. Esau was far from being spiritual, and his wives were wholly carnal

The same reflections which were suggested by Abraham’ s conduct in denying his wife in Egypt and Gerar, will apply to that of Isaac; but the case of Isaac was much less excusable than that of Abraham. The latter told no falsity; he only through fear suppressed a part of the truth

1. A good man has a right to expect God’ s blessing on his honest industry. Isaac sowed, and received a hundred-fold, and he had possession of flocks, etc., for the Lord blessed him. Worldly men, if they pray at all, ask for temporal things: "What shall we eat? what shall we drink? and wherewithal shall we be clothed?"Most of the truly religious people go into another extreme; they forget the body, and ask only for the soul! and yet there are "things requisite and necessary as well for the body as the soul,"and things which are only at God’ s disposal. The body lives for the soul’ s sake; its life and comfort are in many respects essentially requisite to the salvation of the soul; and therefore the things necessary for its support should be earnestly asked from the God of all grace, the Father of bounty and providence. Ye have not because ye ask not, may be said to many poor, afflicted religious people; and they are afraid to ask lest it should appear mercenary, or that they sought their portion in this life. They should be better taught. Surely to none of these will God give a stone if they ask bread: he who is so liberal of his heavenly blessings will not withhold earthly ones, which are of infinitely less consequence. Reader, expect God’ s blessing on thy honest industry; pray for it, and believe that God does not love thee less, who hast taken refuge in the same hope, than he loved Isaac. Plead not only his promises, but plead on the precedents he has set before thee. "Lord, thou didst so and so to Abraham, to Isaac, to Jacob, and to others who trusted in thee; bless my field, bless my flocks, prosper my labor, that I may be able to provide things honest in the sight of all men, and have something to dispense to those who are in want."And will not God hear such prayers? Yea, and answer them too, for he does not willingly afflict the children of men. And we may rest assured that there is more affliction and poverty in the world than either the justice or providence of God requires. There are, however, many who owe their poverty to their want of diligence and economy; they sink down into indolence, and forget that word, Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; nor do they consider that by idleness a man is clothed with rags. Be diligent in business and fervent in spirit, and God will withhold from thee no manner of thing that is good

2. From many examples we find that the wealth of the primitive inhabitants of the world did not consist in gold, silver, or precious stones, but principally in flocks of useful cattle, and the produce of the field. With precious metals and precious stones they were not unacquainted, and the former were sometimes used in purchases, as we have already seen in the case of Abraham buying a field from the children of Heth. But the blessings which God promises are such as spring from the soil. Isaac sowed in the land, and had possessions of flocks and herds, and great store of servants, Gen 26:12-14. Commerce, by which nations and individuals so suddenly rise and as suddenly fall, had not been then invented; every man was obliged to acquire property by honest and persevering labor, or be destitute. Lucky hits, fortunate speculations, and adventurous risks, could then have no place; the field must be tilled, the herds watched and fed, and the proper seasons for ploughing, sowing, reaping, and laying up, be carefully regarded and improved. No man, therefore, could grow rich by accident. Isaac waxed great and went forward, and grew until he became very great, Gen 26:13. Speculation was of no use, for it could have no object; and consequently many incitements to knavery and to idleness, that bane of the physical and moral health of the body and soul of man, could not show themselves. Happy times! when every man wrought with his hands, and God particularly blessed his honest industry. As he had no luxuries, he had no unnatural and factitious wants, few diseases, and a long life

O fortunatos nimium, sua si bona norint, Agricolas

O thrice happy husbandmen! did they but know their own mercies

But has not what is termed commerce produced the reverse of all this? A few are speculators, and the many are comparatively slaves; and slaves, not to enrich themselves, (this is impossible), but to enrich the speculators and adventurers by whom they are employed. Even the farmers become, at least partially, commercial men; and the soil, the fruitful parent of natural wealth, is comparatively disregarded: the consequence is, that the misery of the many, and the luxury of the few, increase; and from both these spring, on the one hand, pride, insolence, contempt of the poor, contempt of God’ s holy word and commandments, with the long catalogue of crimes which proceed from pampered appetites and unsubdued passions: and on the other, murmuring, repining, discontent, and often insubordination and revolt, the most fell and most destructive of all the evils that can degrade and curse civil society. Hence wars, fightings, and revolutions of states, and public calamities of all kinds. Bad as the world and the times are, men have made them much worse by their unnatural methods of providing for the support of life. When shall men learn that even this is but a subordinate pursuit; and that the cultivator. of the soul in the knowledge, love, and obedience of God, is essentially necessary, not only to future glory, but to present happiness?

Calvin: Gen 26:1 - And there was a famine 1.And there was a famine. Moses relates that Isaac was tried by nearly the same kind of temptation as that through which his father Abraham had twice...

1.And there was a famine. Moses relates that Isaac was tried by nearly the same kind of temptation as that through which his father Abraham had twice passed. I have before explained how severe and violent was this assault. The condition in which it was the will of God to place his servants, as strangers and pilgrims in the land which he had promised to give them, seemed sufficiently troublesome and hard; but it appears still more intolerable, that he scarcely suffered them to exist (if we may so speak) in this wandering, uncertain, and changeable kind of life, but almost consumed them with hunger. Who would not say that God had forgotten himself, when he did not even supply his own children, — whom he had received into his especial care and trust, — however sparingly and scantily, with food? But God thus tried the holy fathers, that we might be taught, by their example, not to be effeminate and cowardly under temptations. Respecting the terms here used, we may observe, that though there were two seasons of dearth in the time of Abraham, Moses alludes only to the one, of which the remembrance was most recent. 36

Calvin: Gen 26:2 - And the Lord appeared unto him // Dwell in the land 2.And the Lord appeared unto him. I do not doubt but a reason is here given why Isaac rather went to the country of Gerar than to Egypt, which perhap...

2.And the Lord appeared unto him. I do not doubt but a reason is here given why Isaac rather went to the country of Gerar than to Egypt, which perhaps would have been more convenient for him; but Moses teaches that he was withheld by a heavenly oracle, so that a free choice was not left him. It may here be asked, why does the Lord prohibit Isaac from going to Egypt, whither he had suffered his father to go? Although Moses does not give the reason, yet we may be allowed to conjecture that the journey would have been more dangerous to the son. The Lord could indeed have endued the son also with the power of his Spirit, as he had done his father Abraham, so that the abundance and delicacies of Egypt should not have corrupted him by their allurements; but since he governs his faithful people with such moderation, that he does not correct all their faults at once, and render them entirely pure, he assists their infirmities, and anticipates, with suitable remedies, those evils by which they might be ensnared. Because, therefore, he knew that there was more infirmity in Isaac than there had been in Abraham, he was unwilling to expose him to danger; for he is faithful, and will not suffer his own people to be tempted beyond what they are able to bear. (1Co 10:13.) Now, as we must be persuaded, that however arduous and burdensome may be the temptations which alight upon us, the Divine help will never fail to renew our strength; so, on the other hand, we must beware lest we rashly rush into dangers; but each should be admonished by his own infirmity to proceed cautiously and with fear.

Dwell in the land. God commands him to settle in the promised land, yet with the understanding that he should dwell there as a stranger. The intimation was thus given, that the time had not yet arrived in which he should exercise dominion over it. God sustains indeed his mind with the hope of the promised inheritance, but requires this honor to be given to his word, that Isaac should remain inwardly at rest, in the midst of outward agitations; and truly we never lean upon a better support than when, disregarding the appearance of things present, we depend entirely upon the word of the Lord, and apprehend by faith that blessing which is not yet apparent. Moreover, he again inculcates the promise previously made, in order to render Isaac more prompt to obey; for so is the Lord wont to awaken his servants from their indolence, that they may fight valiantly for him, while he constantly affirms that their labor shall not he in vain; for although he requires from us a free and unreserved obedience, as a father does from his children, he yet so condescends to the weakness of our capacity, that he invites and encourages us by the prospect of reward.

Calvin: Gen 26:5 - Because that Abraham obeyed my voice 5.Because that Abraham obeyed my voice. Moses does not mean that Abraham’s obedience was the reason why the promise of God was confirmed and ratifi...

5.Because that Abraham obeyed my voice. Moses does not mean that Abraham’s obedience was the reason why the promise of God was confirmed and ratified to him; but from what has been said before, (Gen 22:18,) where we have a similar expression, we learn, that what God freely bestows upon the faithful is sometimes, beyond their desert, ascribed to themselves; that they, knowing their intention to be approved by the Lord, may the more ardently addict and devote themselves entirely to his service: so he now commends the obedience of Abraham, in order that Isaac may be stimulated to an imitation of his example. And although laws, statutes, rites, precepts, and ceremonies, had not yet been written, Moses used these terms, that he might the more clearly show how sedulously Abraham regulated his life according to the will of God alone — how carefully he abstained from all the impurities of the heathen — and how exactly he pursued the straight course of holiness, without turning aside to the right hand or to the left: for the Lord often honors his own law with these titles for the sake of restraining our excesses; as if he should say that it wanted nothing to constitute it a perfect rule, but embraced everything pertaining to absolute holiness. The meaning therefore is, that Abraham, having formed his life in entire accordance with the will of God, walked in his pure service.

Calvin: Gen 26:7 - And the men of the place asked him 7.And the men of the place asked him. Moses relates that Isaac was tempted in the same manner as his father Abraham, in having his wife taken from hi...

7.And the men of the place asked him. Moses relates that Isaac was tempted in the same manner as his father Abraham, in having his wife taken from him; and without doubt he was so led by the example of his father, that he, being instructed by the similarity of the circumstances, might become associated with him in his faith. Nevertheless, on this point he ought rather to have avoided than imitated his father’s fault; for no doubt he well remembered that the chastity of his mother had twice been put in great danger; and although she had been wonderfully rescued by the hand of God, yet both she and her husband paid the penalty of their distrust: therefore the negligence of Isaac is inexcusable, in that he now strikes against the same stone. He does not in express terms deny his wife; but he is to be blamed, first, because, for the sake of preserving his life, he resorts to an evasion not far removed from a lie; and secondly, because, in absolving his wife from conjugal fidelity, he exposes her to prostitution: but he aggravates his fault, principally (as I have said) in not taking warning from domestic examples, but voluntarily casting his wife into manifest danger. Whence it appears how great is the propensity of our nature to distrust, and how easy it is to be devoid of wisdom in affairs of perplexity. Since, therefore, we are surrounded on all sides with so many dangers, we must ask the Lord to confirm us by his Spirit, lest our minds should faint, and be dissolved in fear and trembling; otherwise we shall be frequently engaged in vain enterprises, of which we shall repent soon, and yet too late to remedy the evil.

Calvin: Gen 26:8 - Abimelech, king of the Philistines, looked out at a window 8.Abimelech, king of the Philistines, looked out at a window. Truly admirable is the kind forbearance of God, in not only condescending to pardon the...

8.Abimelech, king of the Philistines, looked out at a window. Truly admirable is the kind forbearance of God, in not only condescending to pardon the twofold fault of his servant, but in stretching forth his hand, and in wonderfully averting, by the application of a speedy remedy, the evil which he would have brought upon himself. God did not suffer — what twice had occurred to Abraham — that his wife should be torn from his bosom; but stirred up a heathen king, mildly, and without occasioning him any trouble, to correct his folly. But although God sets before us such an example of his kindness, that the faithful, if at any time they may have fallen, may confidently hope to find him gentle and propitious; yet we must beware of self-security, when we observe, that the holy woman who was, at that time, the only mother of the Church on earth, was exempted from dishonor, by a special privilege. Meanwhile, we may conjecture, from the judgment of Abimelech, how holy and pure had been the conduct of Isaac, on whom not even a suspicion of evil could fall; and further, how much greater integrity flourished in that age than in our own. For why does he not condemn Isaac as one guilty of fornication, since it was probable that some crime was concealed, when he disingenuously obtruded the name of sister, and tacitly denied her to be his wife? And therefore I have no doubt that his religion, and the integrity of his life, availed to defend his character. By this example we are taught so to cultivate righteousness in our whole life, that men may not be able to suspect anything wicked or dishonorable respecting us; for there is nothing which will more completely vindicate us from every mark of infamy than a life passed in modesty and temperance. We must, however, add, what I have also before alluded to, that lusts were not, at that time, so commonly and so profusely indulged, as to cause an unfavourable suspicion to enter into the mind of the king concerning a sojourner of honest character. Wherefore, he easily persuades himself that Rebekah was a wife and not a harlot. The chastity of that age is further proved from this, that Abimelech takes the familiar sporting of Isaac with Rebekah as an evidence of their marriage. 37 For Moses does not speak about marital intercourse, but about some too free movement, which was a proof of either dissolute exuberance or conjugal love. But now licentiousness has so broken through all bounds, that husbands are compelled to hear in silence of the dissolute conduct of their wives with strangers.

Calvin: Gen 26:10 - What is this thou hast done unto us? 10.What is this thou hast done unto us? The Lord does not chastise Isaac as he deserved, perhaps because he was not so fully endued with patience as ...

10.What is this thou hast done unto us? The Lord does not chastise Isaac as he deserved, perhaps because he was not so fully endued with patience as his father was; and, therefore, lest the seizing of his wife should dishearten him, God mercifully prevents it. Yet, that the censure may produce the deeper shame, God constitutes a heathen his master and his reprover. We may add, that Abimelech chides his folly, not so much with the design of injuring him, as of upbraiding him. It ought, however, deeply to have wounded the mind of the holy man, when he perceived that his offense was obnoxious to the judgment even of the blind. Wherefore, let us remember that we must walk in the light which God has kindled for us, lest even unbelievers, who are wrapped in the darkness of ignorance, should reprove our stupor. And certainly when we neglect to obey the voice of God, we deserve to be sent to oxen and asses for instruction. 38 Abimelech, truly, does not investigate nor prosecute the whole offense of Isaac, but only alludes to one part of it. Yet Isaac, when thus gently admonished by a single word, ought to have condemned himself, seeing that, instead of committing himself and his wife to God, who had promised to be the guardian of them both, he had resorted, through his own unbelief, to an illicit remedy. For faith has this property, that it confines us within divinely prescribed bounds, so that we attempt nothing except with God’s authority or permission. Whence it follows that Isaac’s faith wavered when he swerved from his duty as a husband. We gather, besides, from the words of Abimelech, that all nations have the sentiment impressed upon their minds, that the violation of holy wedlock is a crime worthy of divine vengeance, and have consequently a dread of the judgment of God. For although the minds of men are darkened with dense clouds, so that they are frequently deceived; yet God has caused some power of discrimination between right and wrong to remain, so that each should bear about with him his own condemnation, and that all should be without excuse. If, then, God cites even unbelievers to his tribunal, and does not suffer them to escape just condemnation, how horrible is that punishment which awaits us, if we endeavor to obliterate, by our own wickedness, that knowledge which God has engraven on our consciences?

Calvin: Gen 26:11 - And Abimelech charged all his people 11.And Abimelech charged all his people. In denouncing capital punishment against any who should do injury to this stranger, we may suppose him to ha...

11.And Abimelech charged all his people. In denouncing capital punishment against any who should do injury to this stranger, we may suppose him to have issued this edict as a special privilege; for it isnot customary thus rigidly to avenge every kind of injury. Whence, then, arose this disposition on the part of the king to prefer Isaac to all the native inhabitants of the country, and almost to treat him as an equal, except that some portion of the divine majesty shone forth in him, which secured to him this degree of reverence? God, also, to assist the infirmity of his servant, inclined the mind of the heathen king, in every way, to show him favor. And there is no doubt that his general modesty induced the king thus carefully to protect him; for he, perceiving him to be a timid man, who had been on the point of purchasing his own life by the ruin of his wife, was the more disposed to assist him in his dangers, in order that he might live in security under his own government.

Calvin: Gen 26:12 - Then Isaac sowed 12.Then Isaac sowed. Here Moses proceeds to relate in what manner Isaac reaped the manifest fruit of the blessing promised to him by God; for he says...

12.Then Isaac sowed. Here Moses proceeds to relate in what manner Isaac reaped the manifest fruit of the blessing promised to him by God; for he says, that when he had sowed, the increase was a hundredfold: which was an extraordinary fertility, even in that land. He also adds, that he was rich in cattle, and had a very great household. Moreover, he ascribes the praise of all these things to the blessing of God; as it is also declared in the psalm, that the Lord abundantly supplies what will satisfy his people while they sleep. (Psa 127:2.) It may, however, be asked, how could Isaac sow when God had commanded him to be a stranger all his life? Some suppose that he had bought a field, and so translate the word קנה ( kanah) a possession; but the context corrects their error: for we find soon afterwards, that the holy man was not delayed, by having land to sell, from removing his effects elsewhere: besides, since the purchasing of land was contrary to his peculiar vocation and to the command of God, Moses undoubtedly would not have passed over such a notable offense. To this may be added, that since express mention is immediately made of a tent, we may hence infer, that wherever he might come, he would have to dwell in the precarious condition of a stranger. We must, therefore, maintain, that he sowed in a hired field. For although he had not a foot of land in his own possession, yet, that he might discharge the duty of a good householder, it behaved him to prepare food for his family; and perhaps hunger quickened his care and industry, that he might with the greater diligence make provision for himself against the future. Nevertheless, it is right to keep in mind, what I have lately alluded to, that he received as a divine favor the abundance which he had acquired by his own labor.

Calvin: Gen 26:14 - And the Philistines envied him 14.And the Philistines envied him. We are taught by this history that the blessings of God which pertain to the present earthly life are never pure a...

14.And the Philistines envied him. We are taught by this history that the blessings of God which pertain to the present earthly life are never pure and perfect, but are mixed with some troubles, lest quiet and indulgence should render us negligent. Wherefore, let us all learn not too ardently to desire great wealth. If the rich are harassed by any cause of disquietude, let them know that they are roused by the Lord, lest they should fall fast asleep in the midst of their pleasures; and let the poor enjoy this consolation, that their poverty is not without its advantages. For it is no light good to live free from envy, tumults, and strifes. Should any one raise the objection, that it can by no means be regarded as a favor, that God, in causing Isaac to abound in wealth, exposed him to envy, to contentions, and to many troubles; there is a ready answer, that not all the troubles with which God exercises his people, in any degree prevent the benefits which he bestows upon them from retaining the taste of his paternal love. Finally, he so attempers the favor which he manifests towards his children in this world, that he stirs them up, as with sharp goads, to the consideration of a celestial life. It was not, however, a slight trial, that the simple element of water, which is the common property of all animals, was denied to the holy patriarch; with how much greater patience ought we to bear our less grievous sufferings! If, however, at any time we are angry at being unworthily injured; let us remember that, at least, we are not so cruelly treated as holy Isaac was, when he had to contend for water. Besides, not only was he deprived of the element of water, but the wells which his father Abraham had dug for himself and his posterity were filled up. This, therefore, was the extreme of cruelty, not only to defraud a stranger of every service due to him, but even to take from him what had been obtained by the labor of his own father, and what he possessed without inconvenience to any one.

Calvin: Gen 26:16 - And Abimelech said unto Isaac 16.And Abimelech said unto Isaac. It is uncertain whether the king of Gerar expelled Isaac of his own accord from his kingdom, or whether he commande...

16.And Abimelech said unto Isaac. It is uncertain whether the king of Gerar expelled Isaac of his own accord from his kingdom, or whether he commanded him to settle elsewhere, because he perceived him to be envied by the people. He possibly might, in this manner, advise him as a friend; although it is more probable that his mind had become alienated from Isaac; for at the close of the chapter Moses relates, that the holy man complains strongly of the king as well as of others. But since we can assert nothing with certainty respecting the real feelings of the lying, let it suffice to maintain, what is of more importance, that in consequence of the common wickedness of mankind, they who are the most eminent fall under the suspicion of the common people. Satiety, indeed, produces ferocity. Wherefore there is nothing to which the rich are more prone than proudly to boast, to carry themselves more insolently than they ought, and to stretch every nerve of their power to oppress others. No such suspicion, indeed, could fall upon Isaac; but he had to bear that envy which was the attendant on a common vice. Whence we infer, how much more useful and desirable it often is, for us to be placed in a moderate condition; which is, at least, more peaceful, and which is neither exposed to the storms of envy, nor obnoxious to unjust suspicions. Moreover, how rare and unwonted was the blessing of God in rendering Isaac prosperous, may be inferred from the fact, that his wealth had become formidable both to the king and to the people. A large inheritance truly had descended to him from his father; but Moses shows, that from his first entrance into the land, he had so greatly prospered in a very short time, that it seemed no longer possible for the inhabitants to endure him.

Calvin: Gen 26:18 - And Isaac digged again the wells of water // He called their names 18.And Isaac digged again the wells of water. First, we see that the holy man was so hated by his neighbors, as to be under the necessity of seeking ...

18.And Isaac digged again the wells of water. First, we see that the holy man was so hated by his neighbors, as to be under the necessity of seeking a retreat for himself which was destitute of water; and no habitation is so troublesome and inconvenient for the ordinary purposes of life as that which suffers from scarcity of water. Besides, the abundance of his cattle and the multitude of his servants — who were like a little army — rendered a supply of water very necessary; whence we learn that he was brought into severe straits. But that this last necessity did not instigate him to seek revenge, is a proof of singular forbearance; for we know that lighter injuries will often rack the patience even of humane and moderate men. If any one should object to this view, that he was deficient in strength; I grant, indeed, that he was not able to undertake a regular war; but as his father Abraham had armed four hundred servants, he also certainly had a large troop of domestics, who could easily have repelled any force brought against him by his neighbors. But the hope which he had entertained when he settled in the valley of Gerar, was again suddenly cut off. He knew that his father Abraham had there used wells which were his own, and which he had himself discovered; and although they had been stopped up, yet they were well known to have sufficient springs of water to prevent the labor of digging them again from being misspent. Moreover, the fact that the wells had been obstructed ever since the departure of Abraham, shows how little respect the inhabitants had for their guest; for although their own country would have been benefited by these wells, they chose rather to deprive themselves of this advantage than to have Abraham for a neighbor; for, in order that such a convenience might not attract him to the place, they, by stopping up the wells, did, in a certain sense, intercept his way. It was a custom among the ancients, if they wished to involve any one in ruin, and to cut him off from the society of men, to interdict him from water, and from fire: thus the Philistine, for the purpose of removing Abraham from their vicinity, deprive him of the element of water.

He called their names. He did not give new names to the wells, but restored those which had been assigned them by his father Abraham, that, by this memorial, the ancient possession of them might be renewed. But subsequent violence compelled him to change their names, that at least he might, by some monument, make manifest the injury which had been done by the Philistines, and reprove them on account of it: for whereas he calls one well strife, or contention, another hostility, he denies that the inhabitants possessed that by right, or by any honest title, which they had seized upon as enemies or robbers. Meanwhile, it is right to consider, that in the midst of these strifes he had a contest not less severe with thirst and deficiency of water, whereby the Philistines attempted to destroy him; such is the scope of the history. First, Moses, according to his manner, briefly runs through the summary of the affair: namely, that Isaac intended to apply again to his own purpose the wells which his father had previously found, and to acquire, in the way of recovery, the lost possession of them. He then prosecutes the subject more diffusely, stating that, when he attempted the work, he was unjustly defrauded of his labor; and whereas, in digging the third well, he gives thanks to God, and calls it Room, 39 because, by the favor of God, a more copious supply is now afforded him, he furnishes an example of invincible patience. Therefore, however severely he may have been harassed, yet when, after he had been freed from these troubles, he so placidly returns thanks to God, and celebrates his goodness, he shows that in the midst of trials he has retained a composed and tranquil mind.

Calvin: Gen 26:23 - And he went up from thence to Beer-sheba 23.And he went up from thence to Beer-sheba. Next follows a more abundant consolation, and one affording effectual refreshment to the mind of the hol...

23.And he went up from thence to Beer-sheba. Next follows a more abundant consolation, and one affording effectual refreshment to the mind of the holy man. In the tranquil enjoyment of the well, he acknowledges the favor which God had showed him: but forasmuch as one word of God weighs more with the faithful than the accumulated mass of all good things, we cannot doubt that Isaac received this oracle more joyfully than if a thousand rivers of nectar had flowed unto him: and truly Moses designedly commemorates in lofty terms this act of favor, that the Lord encouraged him by his own word, (Gen 26:24;) whence we may learn, in ascribing proper honor to each of the other gifts of God, still always to give the palm to that proof of his paternal love which he grants us in his word. Food, clothing, health, peace, and other advantages, afford us a taste of the Divine goodness; but when he addresses us familiarly, and expressly declares himself to be our Father, then indeed it is that he thoroughly refreshes us to satiety. Moses does not explain what had been the cause of Isaac’s removal to Beer-sheba, the ancient dwelling-place of his fathers. It might be that the Philistines ceased not occasionally to annoy him; and thus the holy man, worn out with their implacable malice, removed to a greater distance. It is indeed probable, taking the circumstance of the time into account, that he was sorrowful and anxious; for as soon as he had arrived at that place, God appeared unto him on the very first night. Here, then, something very opportune is noticed. Moreover, as often as Moses before related that God had appeared unto Abraham, he, at the same time, showed that the holy man was either tormented with grievous cares, or was held in suspense under some apprehension, or was plunged in sadness, or, after many distresses, was nearly borne down by fatigue, so as to render it apparent that the hand of God was seasonably stretched out to him as his necessity required, lest he should sink under the evils which surrounded him. So now, as I explain it, he came to Isaac, for the purpose of restoring him, already wearied and broken down by various miseries.

Calvin: Gen 26:24 - And the Lord appeared unto him // I am the God of Abraham // Fear not 24.And the Lord appeared unto him. This vision (as I have elsewhere said) was to prepare him to listen more attentively to God, and to convince him t...

24.And the Lord appeared unto him. This vision (as I have elsewhere said) was to prepare him to listen more attentively to God, and to convince him that it was God with whom he had to deal; for a voice alone would have had less energy. Therefore God appears, in order to produce confidence in and reverence towards his word. In short, visions were a kind of symbols of the Divine presence, designed to remove all doubt from the minds of the holy fathers respecting him who was about to speak. Should it be objected, that such evidence was not sufficiently sure, since Satan often deceives men by similar manifestations, being, as it were, the ape of God; — we must keep in mind what has been said before, that a clear and unambiguous mark was engraven on the visions of God, by which the faithful might certainly distinguish them from those which were fallacious, so that their faith should not be kept in suspense: and certainly, since Satan can only delude us in the dark, God exempts his children from this danger, by illuminating their eyes with the brightness of his countenance. Yet God did not fully manifest his glory to the holy fathers, but assumed a form by means of which they might apprehend him according to the measure of their capacities; for, as the majesty of God is infinite, it cannot be comprehended by the human mind, and by its magnitude it absorbs the whole world. Besides, it follows of necessity that men, on account of their infirmity, must not only faint, but be altogether annihilated in the presence of God. Wherefore, Moses does not mean that God was seen in his true nature and greatness, but in such a manner as Isaac was able to bear the sight. But what we have said, namely, that the vision was a testimony of Deity, for the purpose of giving credibility to the oracle, will more fully appear from the context; for this appearance was not a mute spectre; but the word immediately followed, which confirmed, in the mind of Isaac, faith in gratuitous adoption and salvation.

I am the God of Abraham. This preface is intended to renew the memory of all the promises before given, and to direct the mind of Isaac to the perpetual covenant which had been made with Abraham, and which was to be transmitted, as by tradition, to his posterity. The Lord therefore begins by declaring himself to be the God who had spoken at the first to Abraham, in order that Isaac might not sever the present from the former oracles: for as often as he repeated the testimony of his grace to the faithful, he sustained their faith with fresh supports. Yet he would have that very faith to remain based upon the first covenant by which he had adopted them to himself: and we must always keep this method in mind, in order that we may learn to gather together the promises of God, as they are combined in an inseparable bond. Let this also ever occur to us, as a first principle, that God thus kindly promises us his grace because he has freely adopted us.

Fear not. Since these words are elsewhere expounded, I shall now be the more brief. In the first place, we must observe, that God thus addresses the faithful for the purpose of tranquillizing their minds; for, if his word be withdrawn, they necessarily become torpid through stupidity, or are tormented with disquietude. Whence it follows, that we can receive peace from no other source than from the mouth of the Lord, when he declares himself the author of our salvation; not that we are then free from all fear, but because the confidence of faith is sufficiently efficacious to assuage our perturbations. Afterwards the Lord gives proofs of his love, by its effect, when he promises that he will bless Isaac.

Calvin: Gen 26:25 - And he builded an altar there // And there Isaac’s servants digged a well 25.And he builded an altar there. From other passages we are well aware that Moses here speaks of public worship; for inward invocation of God neithe...

25.And he builded an altar there. From other passages we are well aware that Moses here speaks of public worship; for inward invocation of God neither requires an altar; nor has any special choice of place; and it is certain that the saints, wherever they lived, worshipped. But because religion ought to maintain a testimony before men, Isaac, having erected and consecrated an altar, professes himself a worshipper of the true and only God, and by this method separates himself from the polluted rites of heathens. He also built the altar, not for himself alone, but for his whole family; that there, with all his household, he might offer sacrifices. Moreover, since the altar was built for the external exercises of faith, the expression, he called upon God, implies as much as if Moses had said that Isaac celebrated the name of God, and gave testimony of his own faith. The visible worship of God had also another use; namely, that men, according to their infirmity, may stimulate and exercise themselves in the fear of God. Besides, since we know that sacrifices were then commanded, we must observe that Isaac did not rashly trifle in worshipping God, but adhered to the rule of faith, that he might undertake nothing without the word of God. Whence also we infer how preposterous and erroneous a thing it is to imitate the fathers, unless the Lord join us with them by means of a similar command. Meanwhile, the words of Moses clearly signify, that whatever exercises of piety the faithful undertake are to be directed to this end, namely, that God may be worshipped and invoked. To this point, therefore, all rites and ceremonies ought to have reference. But although it was the custom of the holy fathers to build an altar in whatever place they pitched their tent, we yet gather, from the connection of the words, that after God appeared to his servant Isaac, this altar was built by him in token of his gratitude.

And there Isaac’s servants digged a well. It is remarkable that whereas this place had already received its name from the well which had been dug in it, Isaac should there again have to seek water, especially since Abraham had purchased, for himself and his posterity, the right to the well from the king. Moreover, the digging itself was difficult and labourious; for Moses had a design in saying, that afterwards the servants came and said to him, We have found water. I have, therefore, no doubt, that throughout the whole of that region a conspiracy had been entered into by the inhabitants, for the purpose of expelling the holy man, through want of water; so that this well of Sheba also had been fraudulently stopped up. The context also shows, that the first care of the holy patriarch concerned the worship of God, because Moses relates that an altar was erected, before he speaks of the well. Now it is of importance to observe with what great troubles these holy fathers continually had to contend; which they never would have been able to overcome or to endure, unless they had been far removed from our delicate course of living. For how severely should we feel the loss of water, seeing that we often rage against God if we have not abundance of wine? Therefore, by such examples, let the faithful learn to accustom themselves to patient endurance: and if at any time food and other necessaries of life fail them, let them turn their eyes to Isaac, who wandered, parched with thirst, in the inheritance which had been divinely promised him. 40

Calvin: Gen 26:26 - Then Abimelech went to him 26.Then Abimelech went to him. We have had an exactly similar narrative in Gen 21:22. The Lord, therefore, followed Isaac with the same favor which h...

26.Then Abimelech went to him. We have had an exactly similar narrative in Gen 21:22. The Lord, therefore, followed Isaac with the same favor which he had before shown to his father Abraham. For it was no common blessing, that Abimelech should voluntarily seek his friendship. Besides, he would be relieved from no little care and anxiety, when his neighbors, who had harassed him in so many ways, being now themselves afraid of him, desire to secure his friendship. Therefore the Lord both confers signal honor upon his servant, and provides at the same time for his tranquility. There is not the least doubt that the king was led to this measure, by a secret divine impulse. For, if he was afraid, why did he not resort to some other remedy? Why did he humble himself to supplicate a private man? Why, at least, did he not rather send for him, or command him with authority to do what he wished? But God had so forcibly impressed his mind, that he, forgetting his regal pride, sought for peace and alliance with a man who was neither covetous, nor warlike, nor furnished with a great army. Thus we may learn, that the minds of men are in the hand of God, so that he not only can incline those to gentleness who before were swelling with fury, but can humble them by terror, as often as he pleases.

Calvin: Gen 26:27 - And Isaac said unto them, Wherefore come ye to me? 27.And Isaac said unto them, Wherefore come ye to me? Isaac not only expostulates concerning injuries received, but protests that in future he can ha...

27.And Isaac said unto them, Wherefore come ye to me? Isaac not only expostulates concerning injuries received, but protests that in future he can have no confidence in them, since he had found in them a disposition so hostile to himself. This passage teaches us, that it is lawful for the faithful to complain of their enemies, in order, if possible, to recall them from their purpose of doing injury, and to restrain their force, frauds, and acts of injustice. For liberty is not inconsistent with patience: nor does God require of his own people, that they should silently digest every injury which may be inflicted upon them, but only that they should restrain their minds and hands from revenge. 41 Now, if their minds are pure and well regulated, their tongues will not be virulent in reproaching the faults of others; but their sole purpose will be to restrain the wicked by a sense of shame from iniquity. For where there is no hope of profiting by complaints, it is better to cherish peace by silence; unless, perhaps, for the purpose of rendering those who delight themselves in wickedness inexcusable. We must, indeed, always beware, lest, from a desire of vengeance, our tongues break out in reproaches; and, as Solomon says, hatred stirreth up strifes. (Pro 10:12.)

Calvin: Gen 26:28 - We saw certainly that the Lord was with thee 28.We saw certainly that the Lord was with thee. By this argument they prove that they desired a compact with Isaac, not insidiously, but in good fai...

28.We saw certainly that the Lord was with thee. By this argument they prove that they desired a compact with Isaac, not insidiously, but in good faith, because they acknowledge the favor of God towards him. For it was necessary to purge themselves from this suspicion, seeing that they now presented themselves so courteously to one against whom they had before been unreasonably opposed. This confession of theirs, however, contains very useful instruction. Profane men in calling one, whose affairs all succeed well and prosperously, the blessed of the Lord, bear testimony that God is the author of all good things, and that from him alone flows all prosperity. Exceedingly base, therefore, is our ingratitude, if, when God acts kindly towards us, we pass by his benefits with closed eyes. Again, profane men regard the friendship of one whom God favors, as desirable for themselves; considering that there is no better or holier commendation than the love of God. Perversely blind, therefore, are they, who not only neglect those whom God declares to be dear unto him, but also iniquitously vex them. The Lord proclaims himself ready to execute vengeance on any one who may injure those whom he takes under his protection; but the greater part, unmoved by this most terrible denunciation, still wickedly afflict the good and the simple. We here, however, see that the sense of nature dictated to unbelievers, what we scarcely credit when spoken by the mouth of God himself. Still it is surprising that they should be afraid of an inoffensive man; and should require from him an oath that he would do them no injury. They ought to have concluded, from the favor which God had showed him, that he was a just man, and therefore there could be no danger from him; yet because they form their estimate of him from their own disposition and conduct, they also distrust his probity. Such perturbation commonly agitates unbelievers, so that they are inconsistent with themselves; or at least waver and are tossed between conflicting sentiments, and have nothing fixed and equable. For those principles of right judgment, which spring up in their breasts, are soon smothered by depraved affections. Hence it happens, that what is justly conceived by them vanishes; or is at least corrupted, and does not bring forth good fruit.

Calvin: Gen 26:29 - As we have not touched thee // Thou art now the blessed of the Lord 29.As we have not touched thee. An accusing conscience urges them to desire to hold him closely bound unto them; and therefore they require an oath f...

29.As we have not touched thee. An accusing conscience urges them to desire to hold him closely bound unto them; and therefore they require an oath from him that he will not hurt them. For they knew that he might rightfully avenge himself on them for the sufferings he had endured: but they dissemble on this point, and even make a wonderful boast of their own acts of kindness. At first, indeed, the humanity of the king was remarkable, for he not only entertained Isaac with hospitality, but treated him with peculiar honor; yet he by no means continued to act thus to the end. It accords, however, with the common custom of men, to disguise their own faults by whatever artifice or color they can invent. But if we have committed any offense, it rather becomes us ingenuously to confess our fault, than by denying it, to wound still more deeply the minds of those whom we have injured. Nevertheless Isaac, since he had already sufficiently pierced their consciences, does not press them any further. For strangers are not to be treated by us as domestics; but if they do not receive profit, they are to be left to the judgment of God. Therefore, although Isaac does not extort from them a just confession; yet, that he may not be thought inwardly to cherish any hostility towards them, he does not refuse to strike a covenant with them. Thus we learn from his example, that if any have estranged themselves from us, they are not to be repelled when they again offer themselves to us. For if we are commanded to follow after peace, even when it seems to fly from us, it behoves us far less to be repulsive, when our enemies voluntarily seek reconciliation; especially if there be any hope of amendment in future, although true repentance may not yet appear. And he receives them to a feast, not only for the sake of promoting peace, but also for the sake of showing that he, having laid aside all offense, has become their friend.

Thou art now the blessed of the Lord. This is commonly explained to mean that they court his favor by flatteries, just as persons are accustomed to flatter when they ask favor; but I rather think this expression to have been added in a different sense. Isaac had complained of their injuries in having expelled him through envy: they answer, that there was no reason why any particle of grief should remain in his mind, since the Lord had treated him so kindly and so exactly according to his own wish; as if they had said, What dost thou want? Art thou not content with thy present success? Let us grant that we have not discharged the duty of hospitality towards thee; yet the blessing of God abundantly suffices to obliterate the memory of that time. Perhaps, however, by these words, they again assert that they are acting towards him with good faith, because he is under the guardianship of God.

Calvin: Gen 26:31 - And sware one to another 31.And sware one to another. Isaac does not hesitate to swear; partly, that the Philistines may be the more easily appeased; partly, that he may not ...

31.And sware one to another. Isaac does not hesitate to swear; partly, that the Philistines may be the more easily appeased; partly, that he may not be suspected by them. And this is the legitimate method of swearing, when men mutually bind themselves to the cultivation of peace. A simple promise, indeed, ought to have sufficed; but since dissimulations or inconstancy causes men to be distrustful of each other, the Lord grants them the use of his name, that this more holy confirmation may be added to our covenants; and he does not only permit, he even commands us to swear as often as necessity requires it. (Deu 6:13.) Meanwhile we must beware, lest his name be profaned by rashly swearing.

Calvin: Gen 26:32 - And it came to pass the same day 32.And it came to pass the same day. Hence it appears, (as I have said a little before,) that the waters were not found in a moment of time. If it be...

32.And it came to pass the same day. Hence it appears, (as I have said a little before,) that the waters were not found in a moment of time. If it be asked, whence a supply of water had been obtained for his cattle and his household during the intervening days, I doubt not, indeed, that he either bought it, or was compelled to go to a distance to see if any one would be found from whom he might obtain it by entreaty. With respect to the name, (Sheba,) they are mistaken, in my judgment, who deem it to be any other than that which Abraham had first given to the well. For since the Hebrew word is ambiguous, Abraham alluded to the covenant which he had struck with the king of Gerar; but now Isaac recalling this ancient memorial to mind, joins with it the covenant in which he had himself engaged.

Calvin: Gen 26:34 - And Esau was forty years old 34.And Esau was forty years old. For many reasons Moses relates the marriages of Esau. Inasmuch as he mingled himself with the inhabitants of the lan...

34.And Esau was forty years old. For many reasons Moses relates the marriages of Esau. Inasmuch as he mingled himself with the inhabitants of the land, from whom the holy race of Abraham was separated, and contracted affinities by which he became entangled; this was a kind of prelude of his rejection. It happened also, by the wonderful counsel of God, that these daughters-in-law were grievous and troublesome to the holy patriarch (Isaac) and his wife, in order that they might not by degrees become favorable to that reprobate people. If the manners of the people had been pleasing, and they had had good and obedient daughters, perhaps also, with their consent, Isaac might have taken a wife from among them. But it was not lawful for those to be bound together in marriage, whom God designed to be perpetual enemies. For how would the inheritance of the land be secured to the posterity of Abraham, but by the destruction of those among whom he sojourned for a time? Therefore God cuts off all inducements to these inauspicious marriages, that the disunion which he had established might remain. It appears hence, with what perpetual affection Esau was loved by Isaac; for although the holy man justly regarded his son’s wives with aversion, and his mind was exasperated against them, he never failed to act with the greatest kindness towards his son, as we shall afterwards see. We have elsewhere spoken concerning polygamy. This corruption had so far prevailed in every direction among many people, that the custom, though vicious, had acquired the force of law. It is not, therefore, surprising that a man addicted to the flesh indulged his appetite by taking two wives.

Defender: Gen 26:2 - the Lord appeared This is apparently the first time in over fifty years that God had appeared to Isaac; here He confirmed the covenant made with Abraham and Isaac on Mo...

This is apparently the first time in over fifty years that God had appeared to Isaac; here He confirmed the covenant made with Abraham and Isaac on Mount Moriah. It was also the first famine in the land of promise since Abram had gone down to Egypt over a century earlier. Isaac, unused to such testings, now needed special assurance."

Defender: Gen 26:5 - my laws Long before Moses, there were divine commandments and laws, and Abraham obeyed them. Certain law codes found among the Babylonians, the Hittites and o...

Long before Moses, there were divine commandments and laws, and Abraham obeyed them. Certain law codes found among the Babylonians, the Hittites and others also antedate Moses and agree in many respects with the Mosaic laws, perhaps reflecting a primeval system given by God (possibly only verbally) that disappeared after Babel except for those, like Abraham, who retained and obeyed the truth. Note the same implication in Job 23:12."

Defender: Gen 26:7 - my sister Critics allege that this is merely another version of the story of Abraham's experience in Gerar (Gen 20:1-8). This is not possible; the scribal "reda...

Critics allege that this is merely another version of the story of Abraham's experience in Gerar (Gen 20:1-8). This is not possible; the scribal "redactors" whom these same critics think brought the different components of Genesis together would have been far too shrewd to deliberately create such an obvious barrier to its acceptance by their readers. The event must have taken place as described. Isaac and Rebekah repeated the same fabrication that Abraham and Sarah had attempted over a century earlier for essentially the same reasons and with essentially the same results - human rebuke for their deception, but God's protection in spite of it."

Defender: Gen 26:12 - hundredfold This is the first mention of seed-sowing in the Bible. Seed-sowing in the Bible is commonly symbolic of Christian witnessing, and this aspect is param...

This is the first mention of seed-sowing in the Bible. Seed-sowing in the Bible is commonly symbolic of Christian witnessing, and this aspect is paramount in the first mention of seed-sowing in the New Testament (Mat 13:23). In both cases, it is providentially significant that the good seed brought forth a hundredfold."

Defender: Gen 26:25 - builded an altar According to records, this is the only altar built by Isaac. God appeared to him again after he returned to Beersheba ("well of the covenant") where h...

According to records, this is the only altar built by Isaac. God appeared to him again after he returned to Beersheba ("well of the covenant") where he had lived in his closest fellowship with God. The well had belonged to Abraham, and it was accepted as such by the Philistines (still a relatively small body of settlers that had come from their own homeland in Crete), so Isaac knew he was now justified in staying there. The ancient town of Beer-sheba has been partially excavated, and visitors today are shown a well claimed to be that of Abraham and Isaac."

Defender: Gen 26:35 - grief of mind Here is further proof of God's wisdom in choosing Jacob. Esau disregarded both God's primeval principle of monogamy and principle to marry one who bel...

Here is further proof of God's wisdom in choosing Jacob. Esau disregarded both God's primeval principle of monogamy and principle to marry one who believed in the true God. Instead he married two pagan Hittite women whose idolatry and ungodliness grieved his parents. Even more tragically, Isaac seems to have made no attempt to prevent this and was still resolved to give Esau his patriarchal blessing."

TSK: Gen 26:1 - the first // And Isaac // Abimelech am 2200, bc 1804 the first : Gen 12:10 And Isaac : Gen 25:11 Abimelech : Gen 20:2, Gen 21:22-32

am 2200, bc 1804

the first : Gen 12:10

And Isaac : Gen 25:11

Abimelech : Gen 20:2, Gen 21:22-32

TSK: Gen 26:2 - appeared // dwell appeared : Gen 12:7, Gen 17:1, Gen 18:1, Gen 18:10-20 dwell : Gen 12:1; Psa 37:3

TSK: Gen 26:3 - Sojourn // I will be // unto thee // oath Sojourn : Gen 26:12, Gen 26:14, Gen 20:1; Psa 32:8, Psa 37:1-6, Psa 39:12; Heb 11:9, Heb 11:13-16 I will be : Gen 28:15, Gen 39:2, Gen 39:21; Isa 43:2...

TSK: Gen 26:4 - multiply // seed shall multiply : Gen 13:16, Gen 15:5, Gen 15:18, Gen 17:4-8, Gen 18:18, Gen 22:17; Heb 11:2 seed shall : Gen 12:2, Gen 12:3, Gen 22:18; Psa 72:17; Act 3:25;...

TSK: Gen 26:5 - -- Gen 12:4, Gen 17:23, Gen 18:19, Gen 22:16, Gen 22:18; Psa 112:1, Psa 112:2, Psa 128:1-6; Mat 5:19, Mat 7:24; 1Co 15:58; Gal 5:6; Heb 11:8; Jam 2:21

TSK: Gen 26:6 - Gerar Gerar : Gen 20:1

Gerar : Gen 20:1

TSK: Gen 26:7 - She is my sister // fair She is my sister : Gen 12:13, Gen 20:2, Gen 20:5, Gen 20:12, Gen 20:13; Pro 29:25; Mat 10:28; Eph 5:25; Col 3:9 fair : Gen 24:16

TSK: Gen 26:8 - a window // sporting a window : Jdg 5:28; Pro 7:6; Son 2:9 sporting : Pro 5:18, Pro 5:19; Ecc 9:9; Isa 62:5

TSK: Gen 26:10 - -- Gen 12:18, Gen 12:19, Gen 20:9, Gen 20:10

TSK: Gen 26:11 - toucheth toucheth : Gen 20:6; Psa 105:15; Pro 6:29; Zec 2:8

TSK: Gen 26:12 - sowed // received // an hundredfold // blessed sowed : The author of the "" History of the Piratical States of Barbary ""observes (p. 44), that the Moors of that country are divided into tribes lik...

sowed : The author of the "" History of the Piratical States of Barbary ""observes (p. 44), that the Moors of that country are divided into tribes like the Arabians, and like them dwell in tents, formed into itinerant villages; that ""these wanderers farm lands of the inhabitants of the towns, sow and cultivate them, paying their rent with the produce, such as fruits, corn, wax, etc. They are very skilful in choosing the most advantageous soils for every season, and very careful to avoid the Turkish troops, the violence of the one little suiting the simplicity of the other.""It is natural to suppose, that Isaac possessed the like sagacity, when he sowed in the land of Gerar, and received that year an hundred-fold.

received : Heb. found

an hundredfold : Psa 67:6, Psa 72:16; Ecc 11:6; Zec 8:12; Mat 13:8, Mat 13:23; Mar 4:8; 1Co 3:6; 2Co 9:10, 2Co 9:11; Gal 6:7, Gal 6:8

blessed : Gen 26:3, Gen 26:29, Gen 24:1, Gen 24:35, Gen 30:30; Job 42:12

TSK: Gen 26:13 - And the man waxed great // waxed great // went forward And the man waxed great : Dr. Adam Clarke remarks, that there is a strange and observable occurrence of the same term in the original, which is litera...

And the man waxed great : Dr. Adam Clarke remarks, that there is a strange and observable occurrence of the same term in the original, which is literally, ""And the man was GREAT, and he went, going on, and was GREAT, until that he was exceeding GREAT.""How simple is this language, and yet how forcible!

waxed great : Gen 24:35; Psa 112:3

went forward : Heb. went going

TSK: Gen 26:14 - had possession // servants // envied had possession : Gen 12:16, Gen 13:2; Job 1:3, Job 42:12; Psa 112:3, Psa 144:13, Psa 144:14; Pro 10:22 servants : or, husbandry envied : Gen 37:11; 1S...

TSK: Gen 26:15 - his father’ s // had stopped his father’ s : Gen 21:30 had stopped : In those countries, a well of water was a great acquisition; and hence, this mode of injuring new settler...

his father’ s : Gen 21:30

had stopped : In those countries, a well of water was a great acquisition; and hence, this mode of injuring new settlers, or revenging themselves on their enemies, is still resorted to among the inhabitants.

TSK: Gen 26:16 - Go // mightier Go : Dr. A. Clarke observes, that this is the first instance on record of what was termed among the Greeks, ostracism, i.e., the banishment of person ...

Go : Dr. A. Clarke observes, that this is the first instance on record of what was termed among the Greeks, ostracism, i.e., the banishment of person from the state, of whose power, influence, or riches, the people were jealous.

mightier : Exo 1:9

TSK: Gen 26:18 - in the days // and he in the days : Houbigant contends, that instead of bimey , ""in the days,""we should read, avdey , ""servants;""agreeably to the Samaritan, Septuag...

in the days : Houbigant contends, that instead of bimey , ""in the days,""we should read, avdey , ""servants;""agreeably to the Samaritan, Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate: ""And Isaac digged again the wells of water which the servants of Abraham his father had digged."

and he : Gen 21:31; Num 32:38; Psa 16:4; Hos 2:17; Zec 13:2

TSK: Gen 26:19 - springing water springing water : Heb. living, Son 4:15; Joh 4:10, Joh 4:11, Joh 7:38

springing water : Heb. living, Son 4:15; Joh 4:10, Joh 4:11, Joh 7:38

TSK: Gen 26:20 - did strive // Esek did strive : Gen 21:25 Esek : i.e. Contention

did strive : Gen 21:25

Esek : i.e. Contention

TSK: Gen 26:21 - Sitnah Sitnah : i.e. Hatred, Ezr 4:6

Sitnah : i.e. Hatred, Ezr 4:6

TSK: Gen 26:22 - digged // Rehoboth // the Lord // be fruitful digged : The wells in Arabia are generally dug in the rockcaps1 . tcaps0 heir mouths are about six feet in diameter, and they are from nineteen to tw...

digged : The wells in Arabia are generally dug in the rockcaps1 . tcaps0 heir mouths are about six feet in diameter, and they are from nineteen to twenty feet in depth. But Niebuhr informs us, that many wells are from 160 to 170 feet deep.

Rehoboth : i.e. Room

the Lord : Psa 4:1, Psa 18:19, Psa 118:5

be fruitful : Gen 17:6, Gen 28:3, Gen 41:52; Exo 1:7

TSK: Gen 26:23 - Beersheba Beersheba : Gen 21:31, Gen 46:1; Jdg 20:1

Beersheba : Gen 21:31, Gen 46:1; Jdg 20:1

TSK: Gen 26:24 - I am the // fear I am the : Gen 15:1, Gen 17:7, Gen 24:12, Gen 28:13, Gen 31:5; Exo 3:6; Mat 22:32; Act 7:32 fear : Gen 26:3, Gen 26:4, Gen 13:16, Gen 22:19; Psa 27:1-...

TSK: Gen 26:25 - builded // called builded : Gen 8:20, Gen 12:7, Gen 13:18, Gen 22:9, Gen 33:20, Gen 35:1; Exo 17:15 called : Psa 116:17

TSK: Gen 26:26 - Abimelech // Phichol Abimelech : Gen 20:3, Gen 21:22-32 Phichol : Phichol, as well as Abimelech, ""father king,""seems to have been a name of office or dignity among the P...

Abimelech : Gen 20:3, Gen 21:22-32

Phichol : Phichol, as well as Abimelech, ""father king,""seems to have been a name of office or dignity among the Philistines; for it is not probable that they were the same as are mentioned in the days of Abraham (Gen 21:22, Gen 21:32).

TSK: Gen 26:27 - seeing // sent me seeing : Gen 26:14, Gen 26:16; Jdg 11:7; Act 7:9, Act 7:14, Act 7:27, Act 7:35; Rev 3:9 sent me : Gen 26:16

TSK: Gen 26:28 - We saw certainly // was with // Let there We saw certainly : Heb. Seeing we saw was with : Gen 21:22, Gen 21:23, Gen 39:5; Jos 3:7; 2Ch 1:1; Isa 45:14, Isa 60:14, Isa 61:6, Isa 61:9; Rom 8:31;...

TSK: Gen 26:29 - That thou wilt // not // the blessed That thou wilt : Heb. If thou shalt, etc not : Gen 26:11, Gen 26:14, Gen 26:15 the blessed : Gen 26:12, Gen 12:2, Gen 21:22, Gen 22:17, Gen 24:31; Psa...

That thou wilt : Heb. If thou shalt, etc

not : Gen 26:11, Gen 26:14, Gen 26:15

the blessed : Gen 26:12, Gen 12:2, Gen 21:22, Gen 22:17, Gen 24:31; Psa 115:15

TSK: Gen 26:30 - -- Gen 19:3, Gen 21:8, Gen 31:54; Rom 12:18; Heb 12:14; 1Pe 4:9

TSK: Gen 26:31 - betimes // sware betimes : Gen 19:2, Gen 21:14, Gen 22:3, Gen 31:55 sware : Gen 14:22, Gen 21:23, Gen 21:31, Gen 21:32, Gen 25:33, Gen 31:44; 1Sa 14:24, 1Sa 20:3, 1Sa ...

TSK: Gen 26:32 - We have We have : Gen 26:25; Pro 2:4, Pro 2:5, Pro 10:4, Pro 13:4; Mat 7:7

TSK: Gen 26:33 - Shebah // therefore // Beersheba Shebah : i.e. an oath therefore : Gen 21:31 Beersheba : i.e. the well of the oath, Gen 26:28; This may have been the same city which was called Beer-s...

Shebah : i.e. an oath

therefore : Gen 21:31

Beersheba : i.e. the well of the oath, Gen 26:28; This may have been the same city which was called Beer-sheba a hundred years before this, in the time of Abraham; but as the well, from which it had its name originally, was closed up by the Philistines, the name of the place might have been abolished with the well; when, therefore, Isaac re-opened it, he restored the ancient name of the place.

TSK: Gen 26:34 - And Esau // the daughter // Bashemath am 2208, bc 1796 And Esau : Gen 36:2, Gen 36:5, Gen 36:13 the daughter : Gen 24:3; Exo 34:16; 1Co 7:2; Heb 12:16 Bashemath : Gen 36:2

am 2208, bc 1796

And Esau : Gen 36:2, Gen 36:5, Gen 36:13

the daughter : Gen 24:3; Exo 34:16; 1Co 7:2; Heb 12:16

Bashemath : Gen 36:2

TSK: Gen 26:35 - Which // grief of mind Which : Gen 6:2, Gen 27:46, Gen 28:1, Gen 28:2, Gen 28:8 grief of mind : Heb. bitterness of spirit

Which : Gen 6:2, Gen 27:46, Gen 28:1, Gen 28:2, Gen 28:8

grief of mind : Heb. bitterness of spirit

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Gen 26:2 - -- To Egypt it seems Isaac intended to go, it being a very fruitful place, and being encouraged to do so by his father’ s example upon the same oc...

To Egypt it seems Isaac intended to go, it being a very fruitful place, and being encouraged to do so by his father’ s example upon the same occasion. But God saw good reasons to forbid Isaac to go thither, which it is needless to inquire, and not difficult to conjecture.

Poole: Gen 26:3 - Unto thee, and unto thy seed // I will perform the oath Unto thee, and unto thy seed to thee to enjoy for thy present comfort, and to them to possess as an inheritance. See Poole on "Gen 13:15" , See Poo...

Unto thee, and unto thy seed to thee to enjoy for thy present comfort, and to them to possess as an inheritance. See Poole on "Gen 13:15" , See Poole on "Gen 15:18" .

I will perform the oath i.e. the promises confirmed by oath, Gen 22:16 , &c.

Poole: Gen 26:5 - -- Here was a covenant made between God and Abraham; and as, if Abraham had broken the condition of walking before God required on his part, God had be...

Here was a covenant made between God and Abraham; and as, if Abraham had broken the condition of walking before God required on his part, God had been discharged from the promise made on his part; so contrarily, because Abraham performed his condition, God engageth himself to perform his promise to him, and to his seed. But as that promise and covenant was made by God of mere grace, as is evident and confessed; so the mercies promised and performed to him and his are so great and vast, that it is an idle thing to think they could be merited by so mean a compensation as Abraham’ s obedience, which was a debt that he owed to God, had there been no such covenant or promise made by God, and which also was an effect of God’ s graces to him and in him.

Poole: Gen 26:8 - -- Using more free and familiar carriage than became a brother and sister, but such as was allowable between husband and wife. See Deu 24:5 Pro 5:18,19...

Using more free and familiar carriage than became a brother and sister, but such as was allowable between husband and wife. See Deu 24:5 Pro 5:18,19 . But that this was not the conjugal act, may easily be gathered from the circumstances of the time and place; which was open to Abimelech’ s view; and therefore that was not consistent either with Isaac’ s modesty or with his prudence, because he would not have her thought to be his wife.

Poole: Gen 26:10 - -- The heathens esteemed fornication either no sin, or a very little one; but adultery was heinous and formidable even among the heathens, and especial...

The heathens esteemed fornication either no sin, or a very little one; but adultery was heinous and formidable even among the heathens, and especially here, because it was fresh in memory how sorely God had punished Abimelech, and all his family, only for an intention of adultery, Gen 20:1-18 . Note here, they take it for granted that their ignorance had not been a sufficient excuse for their sin.

Poole: Gen 26:11 - He that He that hurteth or injureth. So that word is used, Gen 26:29 Jos 9:19 Psa 105:15 Zec 2:8 ; and being applied to a woman, it is used for the defiling ...

He that hurteth or injureth. So that word is used, Gen 26:29 Jos 9:19 Psa 105:15 Zec 2:8 ; and being applied to a woman, it is used for the defiling or humbling of her, as Gen 20:6 Pro 6:29 .

Poole: Gen 26:12 - Isaac sowed in that land // An hundredfold Isaac sowed in that land either in the grounds which he had hired of the right owners, or in some grounds which lay neglected, and therefore were fre...

Isaac sowed in that land either in the grounds which he had hired of the right owners, or in some grounds which lay neglected, and therefore were free to the first occupier; which was not strange in that age of the world, when the inhabitants of countries were not so numerous as afterward.

An hundredfold i.e. a hundred times as much as he sowed. The same degree of increase is intimated Mat 13:8 , and affirmed sometimes of other places by heathen writers; but then it was in a better soil and season than this was, for this was a time of famine or scarcity.

Poole: Gen 26:14 - Great store of servants Great store of servants or rather, of husbandry, as this word is elsewhere used; of corn-fields, vineyards, &c.; for he is describing his riches, ...

Great store of servants or rather, of husbandry, as this word is elsewhere used; of corn-fields, vineyards, &c.; for he is describing his riches, which then consisted in the two things here expressed, cattle and lands, which he diligently and successfully managed, Gen 26:12 .

Poole: Gen 26:16 - -- Which breeds envy, and jealousy, and fear among my subjects, and may occasion greater mischiefs; and therefore it is better that we should part frie...

Which breeds envy, and jealousy, and fear among my subjects, and may occasion greater mischiefs; and therefore it is better that we should part friends, than by continuing together be turned into enemies.

Poole: Gen 26:18 - And Isaac digged Though there might be a brook there, probably it was but little, and soon dried up. And Isaac digged those rather than new ones, partly to keep up...

Though there might be a brook there, probably it was but little, and soon dried up.

And Isaac digged those rather than new ones, partly to keep up his father’ s memory, and partly because he had most right to them, and others less cause of quarrel with him about them.

Poole: Gen 26:20 - The water is ours The water is ours because digged in our soil; which was no good argument, because he digged it by their consent or permission at his own charge, and ...

The water is ours because digged in our soil; which was no good argument, because he digged it by their consent or permission at his own charge, and for his own use.

Poole: Gen 26:23 - -- Where he lived before the famine drove him thence.

Where he lived before the famine drove him thence.

Poole: Gen 26:26 - Phichol Phichol may be either, 1. The title of an office; for the word signifies, the mouth of all, or he by whom all the people were to present their ad...

Phichol may be either,

1. The title of an office; for the word signifies, the mouth of all, or he by whom all the people were to present their addresses to the king, and receive the king’ s commands. Or,

2. The name of a man; and then this might be the son of him mentioned Gen 21:32 , called by his father’ s name, as Abimelech also was.

Poole: Gen 26:29 - We have not touched thee // Thou art now the blessed of the Lord We have not touched thee to wit, so as to injure or hurt thee, as above, Gen 26:11 . Thou art now the blessed of the Lord or, O thou who art now t...

We have not touched thee to wit, so as to injure or hurt thee, as above, Gen 26:11 .

Thou art now the blessed of the Lord or, O thou who art now the with blessed of the Lord, whom God hath enriched great and manifold blessings, which we did not take away from thee, as we could easily have done, but thou dost still enjoy them; and now art, as thou wert amongst us, the blessed of the Lord. Or, Seeing God hath blessed thee, it will not become thee to curse us, or to bear any grudge against us for that little unkindness which we expressed to thee. Or it may be a wish: If thou makest this covenant with us, be thou now the blessed of the Lord, we heartily wish thy blessings and prosperity may increase.

Poole: Gen 26:31 - They rose up betimes They rose up betimes partly for the despatch of their journey and business, and partly because then their minds were most vigorous, and sober, and fi...

They rose up betimes partly for the despatch of their journey and business, and partly because then their minds were most vigorous, and sober, and fit to perform so sacred an action as an oath was.

Poole: Gen 26:33 - unto this day This name had been given before, either to this or a neighbouring place, by Abraham, Gen 21:31 ; but was now buried in oblivion, as his wells were; ...

This name had been given before, either to this or a neighbouring place, by Abraham, Gen 21:31 ; but was now buried in oblivion, as his wells were; and the wells being revived, he revives and renews the name, which proved now a lasting name,

unto this day as here follows, which is not added Gen 21:31 , because then the name, though given by Abraham, was soon forgotten and neglected by others.

Poole: Gen 26:34 - -- Both Hittites, the worst of the Canaanites, Eze 16:3 ; which, from his grandfather Abraham’ s severe charge, Gen 24:3 , he must needs know w...

Both Hittites, the worst of the Canaanites, Eze 16:3 ; which, from his grandfather Abraham’ s severe charge, Gen 24:3 , he must needs know would be highly displeasing both to God and to his parents. And as Esau had several names, being called also Edom and Seir; so it seems these women and their parents had, by comparing this with Gen 36:2 , which was usual in those times and places. Or Esau had more wives than these.

Poole: Gen 26:35 - -- Because to their idolatry and other wickedness they added obstinacy and incorrigibleness, despising their persons and godly counsels, whereby they i...

Because to their idolatry and other wickedness they added obstinacy and incorrigibleness, despising their persons and godly counsels, whereby they invited them to repentance.

Haydock: Gen 26:5 - Ceremonies Ceremonies of religion, observed under the law of nature. (Menochius)

Ceremonies of religion, observed under the law of nature. (Menochius)

Haydock: Gen 26:7 - Sister Sister, or niece. Though lawful at that time, it was not very common for people to marry such near relations; and therefore Isaac, by saying Rebecca...

Sister, or niece. Though lawful at that time, it was not very common for people to marry such near relations; and therefore Isaac, by saying Rebecca was his sister, wished the people of Gerara to be ignorant of her being his wife; being under the like apprehension as his father had been twice before. He imitates his example, trusting in the protection of God, which had rescued Abraham from danger, chap. xxi. (Haydock)

Haydock: Gen 26:8 - His wife // Sin His wife; using greater familiarity that a grave and virtuous man, like Isaac, would offer to do with his sister, or with another person's wife. --- ...

His wife; using greater familiarity that a grave and virtuous man, like Isaac, would offer to do with his sister, or with another person's wife. ---

Sin, or punishment, (Menochius) such as Abimelech's father had formerly experienced. (Haydock)

Haydock: Gen 26:11 - Touch Touch, or hurt, by offering to marry, &c. (Haydock) --- Adultery was punished with death among these nations, chap. xxxviii. 24, as it was by the ...

Touch, or hurt, by offering to marry, &c. (Haydock) ---

Adultery was punished with death among these nations, chap. xxxviii. 24, as it was by the law of Moses. (Calmet)

Haydock: Gen 26:12 - And the Lord And the Lord. This is not mentioned as a miracle; for Egypt and many other countries produced 100 fold. Pliny, Natural History xviii. 10, says, som...

And the Lord. This is not mentioned as a miracle; for Egypt and many other countries produced 100 fold. Pliny, Natural History xviii. 10, says, some parts of Africa rendered 150 times as much as was sowed. The famine had now ceased. (Calmet)

Haydock: Gen 26:16 - Depart Depart. Instead of repressing the outrages of his subjects, the king enters into their jealousies, and banishes a wealthy person, (Haydock) as the A...

Depart. Instead of repressing the outrages of his subjects, the king enters into their jealousies, and banishes a wealthy person, (Haydock) as the Athenians so frequently did afterwards with respect to their best citizens. (Aristotle, Polit. iii. 9.) ---

And Pharao used the same pretext, when he persecuted the Hebrews. (Calmet)

Haydock: Gen 26:18 - Servants Servants. So the Septuagint and Syriac versions, and the Samaritan copy against the Hebrew, in the days, which is incorrect. (Kennicott)

Servants. So the Septuagint and Syriac versions, and the Samaritan copy against the Hebrew, in the days, which is incorrect. (Kennicott)

Haydock: Gen 26:19 - Torrent Torrent. That is, a channel where sometimes a torrent, or violent stream had run. (Challoner) --- In this vale of Gerara, a never-failing spring w...

Torrent. That is, a channel where sometimes a torrent, or violent stream had run. (Challoner) ---

In this vale of Gerara, a never-failing spring was found. (Haydock)

Haydock: Gen 26:22 - Latitude Latitude. That is, wideness, or room. (Challoner) --- Hebrew Reheboth, widely extended streams, latitudines . See chap. x. 11.

Latitude. That is, wideness, or room. (Challoner) ---

Hebrew Reheboth, widely extended streams, latitudines . See chap. x. 11.

Haydock: Gen 26:24 - Of Abraham Of Abraham, who still lives before me, and for whom I always testified such affection, though I suffered him to be persecuted: hence, fear not. (H...

Of Abraham, who still lives before me, and for whom I always testified such affection, though I suffered him to be persecuted: hence, fear not. (Haydock)

Haydock: Gen 26:26 - Ochozath Ochozath. This name occurs in the Septuagint, as well as the other two; (chap. xxi. 22.) and means a company of friends . Phicol also signifies t...

Ochozath. This name occurs in the Septuagint, as well as the other two; (chap. xxi. 22.) and means a company of friends . Phicol also signifies the mouth or face of all , being the general of the army, on whom the soldiers must be intent. These are, perhaps, therefore, the names of offices, not of persons; or if they be the same who lived with Abraham, they must have held their high command above 100 years. (Menochius) (Calmet)

Haydock: Gen 26:35 - Offended Offended. They were the daughters of princes of the Heathens, (Josephus) and being brought up in idolatry and pride, refused to give ear to the advi...

Offended. They were the daughters of princes of the Heathens, (Josephus) and being brought up in idolatry and pride, refused to give ear to the advice of Isaac, who never approved of the marriage of his son with them. Esau would not leave the choice of a wife to his father, as Isaac had done at the same age. (Haydock)

Gill: Gen 26:1 - And there was a famine in the land // besides the first famine that was in the days of Abraham // and Isaac went unto Abimelech king of the Philistines, unto Gerar And there was a famine in the land,.... In the land of Canaan, as the Targum of Jonathan expresses it: besides the first famine that was in the day...

And there was a famine in the land,.... In the land of Canaan, as the Targum of Jonathan expresses it:

besides the first famine that was in the days of Abraham; of which see Gen 12:10; which was an hundred years before this:

and Isaac went unto Abimelech king of the Philistines, unto Gerar; where his father Abraham had sojourned before he was born; and therefore the present king of this place can scarce be thought to be the same Abimelech that was king of it in Abraham's time; but it is highly probable that this Abimelech was the son of the former king, and that this was a common name to the kings of Gerar or the Philistines, as Pharaoh was to the kings of Egypt. Isaac came to this place from Lahairoi, where he had dwelt many years, see Gen 24:62; which was at or near Beersheba, and was about eight miles from Gerar a.

Gill: Gen 26:2 - And the Lord appeared unto him // and said, go not down into Egypt // dwell in the land which I shall tell thee of And the Lord appeared unto him,.... In a vision or dream, when he was at Gerar: and said, go not down into Egypt; as his father had done in the lik...

And the Lord appeared unto him,.... In a vision or dream, when he was at Gerar:

and said, go not down into Egypt; as his father had done in the like case, and where Isaac thought to have gone, and the rather, as that was a fruitful country; and so the Targum of Jonathan,"and it was in the heart of Isaac to go down into Egypt, and the Lord appeared unto him, &c.''and charged him not to go thither; partly to try his faith in him, and dependence on his providence for support in this time of famine, and partly lest he should think of continuing there, and be unmindful of the promise of the land of Canaan to Abraham's seed:

dwell in the land which I shall tell thee of; even the land of Canaan, which he was now about to give him on account of the promise of it to Abraham and his seed, and to renew it to him and to his seed.

Gill: Gen 26:3 - Sojourn in this land // and I will be with thee, and I will bless thee // for unto thee, and to thy seed, will I give these countries // and I will perform the oath which I sware unto Abraham thy father Sojourn in this land,.... The land of Canaan, where he now was; either in Gerar, which though in the land of the Philistines was a part of Canaan, the...

Sojourn in this land,.... The land of Canaan, where he now was; either in Gerar, which though in the land of the Philistines was a part of Canaan, the place of his present residence; or in any other part of it he should be directed to: however, by this it appears it was the pleasure of God that he should not go out of that land, and which Abraham his father was careful of, that he should not while he lived; see Gen 24:6,

and I will be with thee, and I will bless thee; with his presence; with protection from all enemies; with a supply of all the necessaries of life; and with all spiritual blessings, and with eternal life and happiness:

for unto thee, and to thy seed, will I give these countries; inhabited at that time by the Philistines, Canaanites, and the several tribes of them:

and I will perform the oath which I sware unto Abraham thy father; concerning the promise of the Messiah from him and his seed, the gift of the land of Canaan to them, and the multiplication of them, Gen 22:16.

Gill: Gen 26:4 - And I will make thy seed to multiply as the stars of heaven // and I will give unto thy seed all these countries // and in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed And I will make thy seed to multiply as the stars of heaven,.... Meaning in the line of Jacob especially, if not only; from whom sprung twelve patriar...

And I will make thy seed to multiply as the stars of heaven,.... Meaning in the line of Jacob especially, if not only; from whom sprung twelve patriarchs, the heads of so many tribes, which in process of time became very numerous, even as the stars of heaven:

and I will give unto thy seed all these countries; which is repeated from Gen 26:3 for the greater confirmation of it:

and in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed; meaning in the Messiah that should spring from him, see Gen 22:18.

Gill: Gen 26:5 - Because that Abraham obeyed my voice // and kept my charge // my commandments, my statutes, and my laws Because that Abraham obeyed my voice,.... In all things, and particularly in offering up his son at his command: and kept my charge; whatever was g...

Because that Abraham obeyed my voice,.... In all things, and particularly in offering up his son at his command:

and kept my charge; whatever was given him in charge to observe; this, as Aben Ezra thinks, is the general, of which the particulars follow:

my commandments, my statutes, and my laws; whether moral, ceremonial, or civil and judicial; all and everyone which God enjoined him, he was careful to observe. Here seems to be something wanting, for the words are not to be joined with the preceding, as if Abraham's obedience was the cause of the above promises made to Isaac, or to himself: but this is mentioned rather as an example to Isaac, and to stir him up to do the like, as if it was said, because or seeing that Abraham thy father did so and so, do thou likewise.

Gill: Gen 26:6 - And Isaac dwelt in Gerar. And Isaac dwelt in Gerar. Continued there; in this he was obedient to the command and will of God.

And Isaac dwelt in Gerar. Continued there; in this he was obedient to the command and will of God.

Gill: Gen 26:7 - And the men of the place asked him of his wife // and he said, she is my sister // for he feared to say, she is my wife // lest, said he // the men of the place should kill me for Rebekah // because she was fair to look upon And the men of the place asked him of his wife,.... The inhabitants of Gerar inquired of Isaac who she was, whether she was his wife or not, or in wh...

And the men of the place asked him of his wife,.... The inhabitants of Gerar inquired of Isaac who she was, whether she was his wife or not, or in what relation she stood in to him; this was not a mere civil inquiry, but what arose from the prevalence of lust in them towards her; and yet it was under some restraint, they being not so abandoned to their lusts as to exercise them upon any; not upon a man's wife, the sin of adultery being detestable to them, though that of fornication was made no account of by them:

and he said, she is my sister; herein imitating his father Abraham in his infirmity and unbelief, who in the same place had made such an answer to a like question concerning Sarah, Gen 20:1; and which if Isaac knew of, as probably he did, one would wonder that he should fall into the same evil, and especially when he had not so much to say to support his assertion as Abraham had; for Rebekah was not so near akin to him as Sarah was to Abraham; and though cousins might be called sisters, yet this was mere dissimulation to call his wife sister, and was done with an intention to deceive, and therefore not justifiable:

for he feared to say, she is my wife; which was the real truth; but the fear of men, which brings a snare, led him to this, and from which good men are not always free:

lest, said he, that is, within himself, in his own mind; and so the Targum of Jonathan, he thought in his heart:

the men of the place should kill me for Rebekah; that they might marry her, one or other of them; for, it seems, they had not so great a sense of the sin of murder, as of adultery:

because she was fair to look upon; which he feared would be a temptation to them, and stir up their impure desires after her, in order to gratify which he was afraid they would kill him; Rebekah retaining her beauty still, though she had been married in all probability forty years or more, see Gen 24:16.

Gill: Gen 26:8 - And it came to pass, when he had been there a long time // that Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out at a window // and saw, and, behold, Isaac was sporting with Rebekah his wife And it came to pass, when he had been there a long time,.... Perhaps some years: for though it is in the original, "when days were prolonged to him th...

And it came to pass, when he had been there a long time,.... Perhaps some years: for though it is in the original, "when days were prolonged to him there" b; yet days are sometimes put for years:

that Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out at a window; in his own palace, near to which, in all likelihood, were the apartments that Isaac and Rebekah dwelt in; and this he did accidentally, and not out of curiosity, or with any intention to observe or pry into the behaviour and conduct of these two persons one towards the other:

and saw, and, behold, Isaac was sporting with Rebekah his wife; laughing and joking with her, which by his motions and gestures, and the airs and freedoms he took, Abimelech could perceive were such as were not usual between brothers and sisters, though honest and lawful between man and wife; such as embracing her in his arms, and frequently kissing her, and the like.

Gill: Gen 26:9 - And Abimelech called Isaac // and said, behold, of a surety she is thy wife // and how saidst thou, she is my sister // and Isaac said unto him // because I said // lest I die for her And Abimelech called Isaac,.... Sent a messenger to desire him to come to him: and said, behold, of a surety she is thy wife: and then perhaps tol...

And Abimelech called Isaac,.... Sent a messenger to desire him to come to him:

and said, behold, of a surety she is thy wife: and then perhaps told him of what he had observed that passed between them; which was a clear proof that they must be man and wife, or he would never have took such liberties with her:

and how saidst thou, she is my sister? what reason hadst thou for it? what could induce thee to say so?

and Isaac said unto him; not alleging, as Abraham did, any relation that was between them before marriage:

because I said; that is, within himself, for, he did not speak it out to others:

lest I die for her; for her sake, that another might have and enjoy her; it was fear of losing his life that led him to take such a step, and give out that she was his sister.

Gill: Gen 26:10 - And Abimelech said, what is this thou hast done unto us // one of the people might lightly have lien with thy wife // and thou shouldest have brought guiltiness upon us And Abimelech said, what is this thou hast done unto us?.... By entertaining suspicions and jealousies of us as bad men, and by exposing us to the tem...

And Abimelech said, what is this thou hast done unto us?.... By entertaining suspicions and jealousies of us as bad men, and by exposing us to the temptation of committing iniquity; why hast thou dealt thus with us, and what have we done, or is in our character, that thou shouldest act after this manner?

one of the people might lightly have lien with thy wife; it is much one or other had not before this time, not looking upon it criminal to have to do with a single woman, when they would not have meddled with another man's wife, Jarchi interprets this of Abimelech himself; and so the Targum of Jonathan, who perhaps had been thinking of taking her to his bed; and was "within a little" c, as the word for "lightly" may be rendered, of accomplishing his design:

and thou shouldest have brought guiltiness upon us: been the occasion of their committing the sin of adultery, which was heinous in the eyes of Heathens, and of bringing on them the punishment due thereunto.

Gill: Gen 26:11 - And Abimelech charged all his people // saying, he that toucheth this man or his wife // shall surely be put to death And Abimelech charged all his people,.... All his subjects throughout his kingdom, and particularly the inhabitants of Gerar, and more especially his...

And Abimelech charged all his people,.... All his subjects throughout his kingdom, and particularly the inhabitants of Gerar, and more especially his courtiers and servants about him:

saying, he that toucheth this man or his wife; that does any injury to one either by words or deeds, or behaves immodestly to the other, or attempts to ravish her; this being sometimes used as a modest expression carnal knowledge of a woman; or that does either of them any harm or hurt in any respect whatever:

shall surely be put to death; this severe edict he published, in order to deter his subjects from using them ill, to which they might be provoked by Isaac's dissimulation, and by his evil suspicions of them.

Gill: Gen 26:12 - Then, Isaac sowed in that land // and received in the same year an hundred fold // and the Lord blessed him Then, Isaac sowed in that land,.... In the land of Gerar; after matters were settled between him and Abimelech, and he had ordered his servants to do ...

Then, Isaac sowed in that land,.... In the land of Gerar; after matters were settled between him and Abimelech, and he had ordered his servants to do him no hurt, he sowed wheat or barley, or some such grain:

and received in the same year an hundred fold; in which he sowed it, and which many take to be a year of famine; and so it was the more extraordinary, that there should be such a plentiful crop produced on Isaac's ground, when there was such barrenness elsewhere: but it does not seem likely that it should be the same year of famine in which Isaac came to Gerar, since he is said to have been them a "long time", Gen 26:8; before this sowing and plenty upon it were. This increase is far from being incredible; for Pliny d, besides instances he gives of an hundred fold, says, that in a field at Byzacium in Africa one bushel produced one hundred and fifty bushels; and from the same place, the deputy of Augustus there sent him from one grain very few less than four hundred, and to Nero three hundred stalks from, one grain. Herodotus e speaks of a country, near to the place where the Euphrates runs into the Tigris, on which the city Ninus was, which nowhere failed of producing two hundred fold, and the better sort of it even three hundred; see Mat 13:23,

and the Lord blessed him; and prospered and succeeded all his endeavours; and this was the true reason of the fertility of the land he manured and sowed.

Gill: Gen 26:13 - And the man waxed great // and went forward // and grew until he became very great And the man waxed great,.... In substance, as well as in honour and glory, among men: and went forward; in the world, and in the increase of worldl...

And the man waxed great,.... In substance, as well as in honour and glory, among men:

and went forward; in the world, and in the increase of worldly things:

and grew until he became very great: as he must needs be, since Abraham his father left him all that he had, who was very rich in cattle, in gold and silver, and had been increasing ever since; and especially since he came to Gerar, where he was gradually increasing, until he became to be exceeding great indeed, even the greatest man in all the country, yea, greater than King Abimelech himself, as it seems, from Gen 26:16.

Gill: Gen 26:14 - For he had possession of flocks, and possession of herds // and great store of servants // and the Philistines envied him For he had possession of flocks, and possession of herds,.... Many flocks of sheep, and herds of cattle, of oxen, asses and camels, in which the riche...

For he had possession of flocks, and possession of herds,.... Many flocks of sheep, and herds of cattle, of oxen, asses and camels, in which the riches of men in those times and countries chiefly lay:

and great store of servants; to look after his flocks and herds, and fields; or "much husbandry" f; Jarchi interprets it much tillage; as, much land, many farms, fields, and vineyards, and the like; to cultivate which required many servants:

and the Philistines envied him; for his prosperity and success, that his land should bring forth so plentifully, and that he should have such an increase of flocks, and herds, and servants, which made him so very significant great, and honourable.

Gill: Gen 26:15 - For all the wells which his father's servants had digged, in the days of Abraham his father // the Philistines had stopped them, and filled them with earth For all the wells which his father's servants had digged, in the days of Abraham his father,.... For the watering of his flocks and herds, see Gen 21:...

For all the wells which his father's servants had digged, in the days of Abraham his father,.... For the watering of his flocks and herds, see Gen 21:25,

the Philistines had stopped them, and filled them with earth; that they might be of no use; and this they did through envy to him, and is mentioned as a proof of it.

Gill: Gen 26:16 - And Abimelech said unto Isaac, go from us // for thou art much mightier than we And Abimelech said unto Isaac, go from us,.... Which was either said by way of advice, consulting Isaac's good, and the peace of his own kingdom; or e...

And Abimelech said unto Isaac, go from us,.... Which was either said by way of advice, consulting Isaac's good, and the peace of his own kingdom; or else by way of command, enjoining him to depart, having a secret envy to him himself, or at least was jealous of his growing power and wealth:

for thou art much mightier than we; in riches or goods, as the Targum of Jonathan adds; or in number; his family being greatly increased, his servants numerous, many being born of them in his house; Abraham had three hundred and eighteen trained servants in his house, Gen 14:14; how many Isaac had is not certain; they must be a large number for Abimelech to fear anything from them. Some choose to interpret the words, thou hast increased, or thou hast got much from us, and by us; and therefore it is high time for thee to be gone from us.

Gill: Gen 26:17 - And Isaac departed thence // and pitched his tent in the valley of Gerar, and dwelt there And Isaac departed thence,.... At once, peaceably and quietly, though to his loss and disadvantage, without taking himself either to argument or arms,...

And Isaac departed thence,.... At once, peaceably and quietly, though to his loss and disadvantage, without taking himself either to argument or arms, in favour of himself; he departed immediately, as soon as he perceived his abode was disagreeable to the king and his people; which gives us a very agree, able idea of the calm and peaceable disposition of Isaac:

and pitched his tent in the valley of Gerar, and dwelt there; at some distance from the city of Gerar, as Jarchi observes. Josephus g says it was not far from it; but how far is not certain; very probably it was not out of the country, though on the borders of it. Some render it, "the brook of Gerar" h, and interpret it, that he pitched his tent, and dwelt by it; and the word used does signify a brook as well as a valley; and there was a brook of Gerar, which Sozomen i makes mention of.

Gill: Gen 26:18 - And Isaac digged again the wells of water, which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father // for the Philistines had stopped them after the death of Abraham // and he called their names after the names by which his father had called them And Isaac digged again the wells of water, which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father,.... This seems to refer to the same wells made men...

And Isaac digged again the wells of water, which they had digged in the days of Abraham his father,.... This seems to refer to the same wells made mention of in Gen 26:15, since it follows:

for the Philistines had stopped them after the death of Abraham; these were what Abraham's servants had dug, when he lived at Gerar, and which the Philistines durst not stop during his life; but when he was dead and particularly out of envy to Isaac his son, whom they observed to prosper much, they stopped them up, that he might have no benefit by them; for otherwise they would scarcely have stopped them, if he had not been upon the spot, but would have made use of them themselves. The opening of them again by Isaac seems to be done, as Jarchi observes, before he removed from Gerar to the valley, though it is here related; unless it can be thought that Abraham dwelt in the valley also, and had dug wells there, which the Philistines stopped up after his death, and Isaac opened when he came there; and if so one would think he should have had no occasion to have dug other new wells, as we find he afterwards did; besides, this seems to be out of the jurisdiction of the Philistines, and not in their power to have stopped them here; it seems therefore most probable that these were Abraham's wells at Gerar, and not in the valley. Origen k makes mention of wonderful wells being dug in the land of the Philistines by righteous men, meaning Abraham and Isaac; and particularly in Askelon which, according to some, is the same with Gerar; See Gill on Gen 20:1,

and he called their names after the names by which his father had called them; which he did out of respect to his father, to preserve the memory of his name, as well as to make his title and claim to them the more dear and certain.

Gill: Gen 26:19 - And Isaac's servants digged in the valley // and found there a well of springing water And Isaac's servants digged in the valley,.... In the valley of Gerar, as the Septuagint version expresses it: and found there a well of springing ...

And Isaac's servants digged in the valley,.... In the valley of Gerar, as the Septuagint version expresses it:

and found there a well of springing water; or "living water" l, which continually flows, as Aben Ezra rightly interprets it: hence this phrase is used of the perpetual and ever living graces of the Spirit of God, Joh 4:10.

Gill: Gen 26:20 - And the herdmen of Gerar did strive with Isaac's herdmen // saying, the water is ours // and he called the name of the well Esek // because they strove with him And the herdmen of Gerar did strive with Isaac's herdmen,.... About the well which was dug in the valley; and this shows it was near Gerar or at least...

And the herdmen of Gerar did strive with Isaac's herdmen,.... About the well which was dug in the valley; and this shows it was near Gerar or at least was upon the border of the country, and so it was a disputable point to whom it belonged:

saying, the water is ours; though the well was dug by Isaac's servants, yet they laid claim to the water, pretending it was their ground, being on their borders:

and he called the name of the well Esek: which signifies "contention": the reason of the name follows:

because they strove with him; wrangled, contended, and disputed with him about whose right it was.

Gill: Gen 26:21 - And they digged another well // and strove for that also // and he called the name of it Sitnah And they digged another well,.... That is, Isaac's servants: and strove for that also; the herdsmen of Gerar disputed their right to that also, and...

And they digged another well,.... That is, Isaac's servants:

and strove for that also; the herdsmen of Gerar disputed their right to that also, and strove to get it from them:

and he called the name of it Sitnah; which signifies "hatred", it being out of hatred and malice to him that they gave him so much trouble; from this word Satan has his name, and these men were of a diabolical spirit, envious, spiteful, and malicious.

Gill: Gen 26:22 - And he removed from thence // and digged another well // and for that they strove not // and he called the name of it Rehoboth // for now hath the Lord made room for us // and we shall be fruitful in the land And he removed from thence,.... A little further from their border, to cut off all pretence, and put a stop to all dispute and controversy for the fut...

And he removed from thence,.... A little further from their border, to cut off all pretence, and put a stop to all dispute and controversy for the future:

and digged another well; in the place he removed to:

and for that they strove not; it being at such a distance from their border, they could not have the face to claim any right to it:

and he called the name of it Rehoboth; which signifies broad and spacious, places, enlargements:

for now hath the Lord made room for us; for himself, his family, his herds, and flocks, and freed them, from those difficulties under which they laboured, and the straits into which they were brought through the contention of the herdsmen of Gerar:

and we shall be fruitful in the land; his flocks and his herds increase, having good pasturage and watering for them, and so he and his family be in prosperous circumstances.

Gill: Gen 26:23 - And he went up from thence to Beersheba. And he went up from thence to Beersheba. From the place he last, removed unto Beersheba; the famine being over, he returns to the place where he and h...

And he went up from thence to Beersheba. From the place he last, removed unto Beersheba; the famine being over, he returns to the place where he and his rather formerly lived, Gen 21:33.

Gill: Gen 26:24 - And the Lord appeared to him in the same night // and said, I am the God of Abraham thy father // fear not // for I am with thee, and will bless thee // and multiply thy seed, for my servant Abraham's sake And the Lord appeared to him in the same night,.... The first night he came to Beersheba, in a dream or vision, in which the Lord was represented as s...

And the Lord appeared to him in the same night,.... The first night he came to Beersheba, in a dream or vision, in which the Lord was represented as speaking to him:

and said, I am the God of Abraham thy father; though he was dead, he remembered the covenant he made with him, and the promises he made unto him: and besides, though Abraham was dead as to his body, yet alive in his soul; for God is not the God of the dead, but of the living, Mat 22:32,

fear not; any future famine, nor want of any good things, nor any enemies, the Philistines his neighbours, who had driven him from their country, and had harassed him from place to place:

for I am with thee, and will bless thee; and if God is with his people, they have nothing to fear from men; and if he blesses them, they are blessed, and no curse can light upon them:

and multiply thy seed, for my servant Abraham's sake; who was a faithful, diligent, servant of his; whose service was, not forgotten by him, but would be rewarded in a way of grace, though not of debt.

Gill: Gen 26:25 - And he builded an altar there // and called upon the name of the Lord // and pitched his tent there // and there Isaac's servants digged a well And he builded an altar there,.... At Beersheba, where his father Abraham had planted a grove before, and very probably had built an altar also, thoug...

And he builded an altar there,.... At Beersheba, where his father Abraham had planted a grove before, and very probably had built an altar also, though it might not be now standing, Gen 21:33,

and called upon the name of the Lord; and gave him thanks for all his mercies to him; for the care he had taken of him, and provision he had made for him and his during the time of famine; and for the protection and preservation of him in Gerar; and for his deliverance of him out of the hands of envious, malicious, and unreasonable men; as well as prayed unto him for present and future mercies, for providential care of him and his; and for communications of special grace, and for meetness for eternal glory; all which every good man daily prays to God for:

and pitched his tent there: intending to take up his abode and settle there:

and there Isaac's servants digged a well; in order to find water for the family, and for the flocks and herds; and which was necessary to be done, as they perceived their master designed to fix his habitation here; wells of water being of great moment and consequence in those hot and desert countries, as the above contentions about them abundantly show.

Gill: Gen 26:26 - Then Abimelech went to him from Gerar // Ahuzzath one of his friends // and Phichol the chief captain of his army Then Abimelech went to him from Gerar,.... After Isaac was settled at Beersheba, and was still increasing in his family and substance, of which Abimel...

Then Abimelech went to him from Gerar,.... After Isaac was settled at Beersheba, and was still increasing in his family and substance, of which Abimelech very probably was informed; and fearing lest he should resent his being sent out of his country by him, and the ill treatment he met with afterwards from the herdmen of Gerar in the valley about the wells, and should employ his riches and power against him, and fall upon him, and take his kingdom from him, he took a journey from Gerar to Beersheba, to pay Isaac a visit, and make a covenant with him: and

Ahuzzath one of his friends; Jarchi and Jonathan take Ahuzzath for an appellative, and interpret it of a collection or company of his friends, which the king took along with him to attend him in his journey: but it seems rather to be the proper name of a man, who was very intimate and familiar with the king, and always kept him company, and so went along with him to Beersheba:

and Phichol the chief captain of his army; his general, as the other was his principal counsellor or prime minister. There was one of this name, and in the same office, in the days of Abraham, and who attended the then present king, who also was called Abimelech on a like account as here, Gen 21:22; but as the one affair was at the distance of an hundred years or more from the other, it is probable, that as this Abimelech might be the son of that Abimelech that lived in the times of Abraham, so this Phichol might be the son of him that lived then, and who succeeded his father in his office; though some think that Phichol is the name of an office, and signifies "the mouth of all", by whom the addresses of the people were made to the king; but this is not likely, since he is described by his office as general of the army; which is very different from the master of the ceremonies, or anything of that kind, and plainly shows it to be the name of a man.

Gill: Gen 26:27 - And Isaac said unto them, wherefore come ye to me // seeing ye hate me, and have sent me away from you And Isaac said unto them, wherefore come ye to me,.... What is the meaning of this visit? what has brought you hither? it cannot be from affection and...

And Isaac said unto them, wherefore come ye to me,.... What is the meaning of this visit? what has brought you hither? it cannot be from affection and friendship to me:

seeing ye hate me, and have sent me away from you? the latter he mentions as a proof of the former; they envied his prosperity, and hated him on that account, and therefore expelled him their country, or at least would not suffer him to dwell among them; and still more glaring proofs were given of the hatred of the men of Gerar to him, not only by stopping up his father's wells, but by striving and contending with him about those he dug in the valley after he was gone from them; one of which he called "Sitnah", from their hatred of him.

Gill: Gen 26:28 - And they said, we saw certainly that the Lord was with thee // and we said // let there now be an oath betwixt us, even betwixt us and thee // and let us make a covenant with thee And they said, we saw certainly that the Lord was with thee,.... Not only while he was among them, by the fruitfulness of the land he sowed, by the in...

And they said, we saw certainly that the Lord was with thee,.... Not only while he was among them, by the fruitfulness of the land he sowed, by the increase of his family, his flocks and herds, but also since he was gone from them, in the valley of Gerar, and now in Beersheba:

and we said; one to another, assembled in privy council, in which this affair was talked over and debated:

let there now be an oath betwixt us, even betwixt us and thee: what was between us and thy father, or between thine ancestors and ours, let it be renewed and confirmed before us; so Onkelos and Jarchi; see Gen 21:23,

and let us make a covenant with thee; the articles of which follow.

Gill: Gen 26:29 - That thou wilt do us no hurt // as we have not touched thee // and as we have done unto thee, nothing but good // and have sent thee away in peace // thou art now blessed of the Lord That thou wilt do us no hurt,.... Neither to our persons nor properties, to our kingdom and subjects, by invading our land, and seizing on our kingdom...

That thou wilt do us no hurt,.... Neither to our persons nor properties, to our kingdom and subjects, by invading our land, and seizing on our kingdom, all which was feared from Isaac's growing wealth and power:

as we have not touched thee; not done the least injury to him, to his person, family, and substance, but suffered him to go away with all he had untouched:

and as we have done unto thee, nothing but good; by royal authority, or by the command and direction of the king and his nobles; for as for the stopping up the wells his father's servants had dug, and the controversy that was about those in the vale, and the trouble Isaac had on that account, these things were not by the order of the king and council, and perhaps without their knowledge:

and have sent thee away in peace; no one being suffered to do any injury to him, or molest him in carrying off everything that belonged unto him:

thou art now blessed of the Lord; so it appeared by the prosperity he was attended with, and by the Lord's protection of him, and the constant and continual favours he was bestowing on him; and this induced Abimelech and his nobles to seek to cultivate friendship, and be on good terms with him. De Dieu gives a different sense of these words, and considers them in the form of an oath or imprecation,"if thou shouldest do us any hurt, seeing we have not touched thee, &c. be thou now accursed of the Lord,''taking the word used in a contrary sense, as in Job 1:5 1Ki 21:10.

Gill: Gen 26:30 - And he made them a feast // and they did eat and drink And he made them a feast,.... Made a feast like a king, for the king and his grandees; he treated them in a generous way, according to their dignity, ...

And he made them a feast,.... Made a feast like a king, for the king and his grandees; he treated them in a generous way, according to their dignity, and agreeable to his own disposition and substance:

and they did eat and drink; freely, cheerfully, and in a friendly manner; for both having spoken their minds, they agreed to bury all former things oblivion, and live in peace and friendship; though this feast was not on account of the covenant made between them, as is observed by some interpreters, but as an hospitable act, and a token of good will; for the covenant and the oath confirming it seem to be made next morning, as follows:

Gill: Gen 26:31 - And they rose up betimes in the morning // and swore one to another // and Isaac sent them away, and they departed from him in peace And they rose up betimes in the morning,.... Abimelech and his friends, in order to return home, and Isaac to take his leave of them, and both to make...

And they rose up betimes in the morning,.... Abimelech and his friends, in order to return home, and Isaac to take his leave of them, and both to make the covenant between them in form, and confirm it by an oath, for which the morning was the fitter time; when the mind is quite free and composed, and attentive to what is done, as so solemn a transaction should be performed with the utmost attention and seriousness:

and swore one to another; to live in amity and friendship, and not distress and disturb each other:

and Isaac sent them away, and they departed from him in peace; he took his leave of them in a friendly manner, and they departed well pleased with the reception they had met with, and the success they had had, having agreed on and settled articles of peace to mutual satisfaction.

Gill: Gen 26:32 - And it came to pass the same day // that Isaac's servants came, and told him concerning the well which they had digged // and said unto him, we have found water And it came to pass the same day,.... That the above things were transacted: that Isaac's servants came, and told him concerning the well which the...

And it came to pass the same day,.... That the above things were transacted:

that Isaac's servants came, and told him concerning the well which they had digged; they had dug it before Abimelech came to Isaac, but they had not had an opportunity of acquainting him with it until he was gone, and then they came to give him an account of it, what sort of a well it was, and how it answered their expectations and wishes; and which in those countries was a very great blessing, and served very much to recommend a place to dwell in:

and said unto him, we have found water; not only had dug a well, but they had found plenty of water, and that which was good; or otherwise it would not have been worth while to have troubled Isaac with the account of it.

Gill: Gen 26:33 - And he called it Sheba // therefore the name of the city is Beersheba unto this day And he called it Sheba,.... Which, according to Jerom, signifies "fulness", as if it had its name from the abundance of water in it; but rather it sig...

And he called it Sheba,.... Which, according to Jerom, signifies "fulness", as if it had its name from the abundance of water in it; but rather it signifies an "oath", and was so called from the oath, which he and Abimelech had just took to one another; and these circumstances meeting together, the taking of the oath, and the account of the well:

therefore the name of the city is Beersheba unto this day; that is, the well of the oath: it had been so called by Abraham an hundred years ago or more; but now upon this occasion it was renewed and confirmed, and so continued until the times of Moses, and many ages after.

Gill: Gen 26:34 - And Esau was forty years old // when he took to wife Judith, the daughter of Beeri the Hittite // and Bashemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite And Esau was forty years old,.... The same age his father was of when he married, Gen 25:20, when he took to wife Judith, the daughter of Beeri the...

And Esau was forty years old,.... The same age his father was of when he married, Gen 25:20,

when he took to wife Judith, the daughter of Beeri the Hittite; Josephus m makes her to be the same with Aholibamah; but her father's name was Zibeon, and an Hivite, and must therefore be another person, not only the name being different, but the tribe, Gen 36:2,

and Bashemath the daughter of Elon the Hittite; whom Aben Ezra takes to be the same with Adah, and so does Josephus; and in this they may be right, since the name of her father, and his nation or tribe, agree, Gen 36:2. The fathers of these two women are represented by Josephus as men of great power and authority among the Canaanites, as very probably they were. Esau had another wife of the same name with this last, but she was daughter of Ishmael, and sister of Nebajoth, Gen 36:3; for he had more wives than those; these were his two first, who very probably were not taken together, but one after another, though it may be but at a short distance from each other.

Gill: Gen 26:35 - Which were a grief of mind unto Isaac, and to Rebekah. Which were a grief of mind unto Isaac, and to Rebekah. The marriage of them itself was a trouble to them, it being contrary to their will that any of ...

Which were a grief of mind unto Isaac, and to Rebekah. The marriage of them itself was a trouble to them, it being contrary to their will that any of their children should marry with the Canaanites, and those the worst sort of them, the Hittites; it having been the care of Abraham, the father of Isaac, that his son should not marry with them, and laid a strict injunction on his servant not to take a wife for his son from among them; and which was an example to be followed in later times, and which Esau very likely was not ignorant of: and besides this, the women themselves he took for wives were very disagreeable on all accounts, partly because of their religion, being idolaters, and partly by reason of their temper and behaviour, being proud, haughty, and disobedient; as all the three Targums intimate.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Gen 26:1 This account is parallel to two similar stories about Abraham (see Gen 12:10-20; 20:1-18). Many scholars do not believe there were three similar incid...

NET Notes: Gen 26:2 Heb “say to you.”

NET Notes: Gen 26:3 The solemn promise I made. See Gen 15:18-20; 22:16-18.

NET Notes: Gen 26:4 Traditionally the verb is taken as passive (“will be blessed”) here, as if Abraham’s descendants were going to be a channel or sourc...

NET Notes: Gen 26:5 My charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws. The language of this verse is clearly interpretive, for Abraham did not have all these laws. The...

NET Notes: Gen 26:7 Heb “kill me on account of.”

NET Notes: Gen 26:8 The Hebrew word מְצַחֵק (mÿtsakheq), from the root צָחַק (tsakhaq, “...

NET Notes: Gen 26:9 Heb “Because I said, ‘Lest I die on account of her.’” Since the verb “said” probably means “said to myself&#...

NET Notes: Gen 26:10 The Hebrew verb means “to lie down.” Here the expression “lie with” or “sleep with” is euphemistic for “have...

NET Notes: Gen 26:11 The use of the infinitive absolute before the imperfect makes the construction emphatic.

NET Notes: Gen 26:12 This final clause explains why Isaac had such a bountiful harvest.

NET Notes: Gen 26:13 Heb “and he went, going and becoming great.” The construction stresses that his growth in possessions and power continued steadily.

NET Notes: Gen 26:14 The Hebrew verb translated “became jealous” refers here to intense jealousy or envy that leads to hostile action (see v. 15).

NET Notes: Gen 26:15 Heb “and the Philistines stopped them up and filled them with dirt.”

NET Notes: Gen 26:16 You have become much more powerful. This explanation for the expulsion of Isaac from Philistine territory foreshadows the words used later by the Egyp...

NET Notes: Gen 26:17 This valley was actually a wadi (a dry river bed where the water would flow in the rainy season, but this would have been rare in the Negev). The wate...

NET Notes: Gen 26:18 Heb “called names to them according to the names that his father called them.”

NET Notes: Gen 26:19 Heb “living.” This expression refers to a well supplied by subterranean streams (see Song 4:15).

NET Notes: Gen 26:20 The words “about it” are supplied in the translation for stylistic reasons.

NET Notes: Gen 26:21 The name Sitnah (שִׂטְנָה, sitnah) is derived from a Hebrew verbal root meaning “to oppose; to b...

NET Notes: Gen 26:22 The name Rehoboth (רְהֹבוֹת, rehovot) is derived from a verbal root meaning “to make room.”...

NET Notes: Gen 26:23 Heb “and he went up from there”; the referent (Isaac) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Gen 26:25 Heb “and they dug there, the servants of Isaac, a well.”

NET Notes: Gen 26:26 Many modern translations render the Hebrew term מֵרֵעַ (merea’) as “councillor” or “advise...

NET Notes: Gen 26:27 The disjunctive clause is circumstantial, expressing the reason for his question.

NET Notes: Gen 26:28 The translation assumes that the cohortative expresses their request. Another option is to understand the cohortative as indicating resolve: “We...

NET Notes: Gen 26:29 The Philistine leaders are making an observation, not pronouncing a blessing, so the translation reads “you are blessed” rather than ̶...

NET Notes: Gen 26:30 Heb “and they ate and drank.”

NET Notes: Gen 26:31 Heb “and they went from him in peace.”

NET Notes: Gen 26:32 Heb “and they said to him, ‘We have found water.’” The order of the introductory clause and the direct discourse has been rear...

NET Notes: Gen 26:33 The name Beer Sheba (בְּאֵר שָׁבַע, bÿ’er shava’) means ̶...

NET Notes: Gen 26:34 Heb “took as a wife.”

NET Notes: Gen 26:35 Heb “And they were [a source of ] bitterness in spirit to Isaac and to Rebekah.”

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:1 And there was a famine in the ( a ) land, beside the first famine that was in the days of Abraham. And Isaac went unto Abimelech king of the Philistin...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:2 And the LORD appeared unto him, and said, ( b ) Go not down into Egypt; dwell in the land which I shall tell thee of: ( b ) God's providence always w...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:5 Because that Abraham ( c ) obeyed my voice, and kept my charge, my commandments, my statutes, and my laws. ( c ) He commends Abraham's obedience, bec...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:7 And the men of the place asked [him] of his wife; and he said, She [is] my sister: ( d ) for he feared to say, [She is] my wife; lest, [said he], the ...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:8 And it came to pass, when he had been there a long time, that Abimelech king of the Philistines looked out at a window, and saw, and, behold, Isaac [w...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:10 And Abimelech said, What [is] this thou hast done unto us? one of the people might lightly have lien with thy wife, and thou shouldest have brought ( ...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:14 For he had possession of flocks, and possession of herds, and great store of servants: and the Philistines ( g ) envied him. ( g ) The malicious alwa...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:17 And Isaac departed thence, and pitched his tent in the ( k ) valley of Gerar, and dwelt there. ( k ) The Hebrew word signifies a flood, or valley, wh...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:24 And the LORD appeared unto him the same night, and said, I [am] the God ( i ) of Abraham thy father: fear not, for I [am] with thee, and will bless th...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:25 And he builded an ( x ) altar there, and called upon the name of the LORD, and pitched his tent there: and there Isaac's servants digged a well. ( x ...

Geneva Bible: Gen 26:29 ( l ) That thou wilt do us no hurt, as we have not touched thee, and as we have done unto thee nothing but good, and have sent thee away in peace: tho...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Gen 26:12-25 - The First Apostle Of Peace At Any Price Genesis 26:12-25 The salient feature of Isaac's life is that it has no salient features. He lived out his hundred and eighty years in quiet, with litt...

MHCC: Gen 26:1-5 - --Isaac had been trained up in a believing dependence upon the Divine grant of the land of Canaan to him and his heirs; and now that there is a famine i...

MHCC: Gen 26:6-11 - --There is nothing in Isaac's denial of his wife to be imitated, nor even excused. The temptation of Isaac is the same as that which overcame his father...

MHCC: Gen 26:12-17 - --God blessed Isaac. Be it observed, for the encouragement of poor tenants who occupy other people's lands, and are honest and industrious, that God ble...

MHCC: Gen 26:18-25 - --Isaac met with much opposition in digging wells. Two were called Contention and Hatred. See the nature of worldly things; they make quarrels, and are ...

MHCC: Gen 26:26-33 - --When a man's ways please the Lord, he maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him, Pro 16:7. Kings' hearts are in his hands, and when he pleases, ...

MHCC: Gen 26:34-35 - --Esau was foolish in marrying two wives together, and still more in marrying Canaanites, strangers to the blessing of Abraham, and subject to the curse...

Matthew Henry: Gen 26:1-5 - -- Here, I. God tried Isaac by his providence. Isaac had been trained up in a believing dependence upon the divine grant of the land of Canaan to him a...

Matthew Henry: Gen 26:6-11 - -- Isaac had now laid aside all thoughts of going to Egypt, and, in obedience to the heavenly vision, sets up his staff in Gerar, the country in which ...

Matthew Henry: Gen 26:12-25 - -- Here we have, I. The tokens of God's good-will to Isaac. He blessed him, and prospered him, and made all that he had to thrive under his hands. 1....

Matthew Henry: Gen 26:26-33 - -- We have here the contests that had been between Isaac and the Philistines issuing in a happy peace and reconciliation. I. Abimelech pays a friendly ...

Matthew Henry: Gen 26:34-35 - -- Here is, 1. Esau's foolish marriage - foolish, some think, in marrying two wives together, for which perhaps he is called a fornicator (Heb 12:16)...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 26:1-5 - -- Renewal of the Promise. - A famine " in the land "(i.e., Canaan, to which he had therefore returned from Hagar's well; Gen 25:11), compelled Isaac t...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 26:6-11 - -- Protection of Rebekah at Gerar. - As Abraham had declared his wife to be his sister both in Egypt and at Gerar, so did Isaac also in the latter plac...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 26:12-17 - -- Isaac's Increasing Wealth. - As Isaac had experienced the promised protection ("I will be with thee,"Gen 26:3) in the safety of his wife, so did he ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 26:18-22 - -- Reopening and Discovery of Wells. - In this valley Isaac dug open the old wells which had existed from Abraham's time, and gave them the old names. ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 26:23-25 - -- Isaac's Journey to Beersheba. - Here, where Abraham had spent a long time (Gen 21:33.), Jehovah appeared to him during the night and renewed the pr...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 26:26-33 - -- Abimelech's Treaty with Isaac. - The conclusion of this alliance was substantially only a repetition of renewal of the alliance entered into with Ab...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 26:34-35 - -- Esau's Marriage. - To the various troubles which the Philistines prepared for Isaac, but which, through the blessing of God, only contributed to the...

Constable: Gen 11:27--Exo 1:1 - --II. PATRIARCHAL NARRATIVES 11:27--50:26 One of the significant changes in the emphasis that occurs at this point...

Constable: Gen 25:19--36:1 - --C. What became of Isaac 25:19-35:29 A new toledot begins with 25:19. Its theme is "the acquisition of th...

Constable: Gen 26:1-11 - --3. Isaac and Abimelech 26:1-11 God prevented Isaac from leaving the Promised Land and renewed the covenant with him, but then He had to protect Rebeka...

Constable: Gen 26:12-33 - --4. Isaac's wells 26:12-33 26:12-17 This section of verses shows God's faithfulness in blessing Isaac as He had promised (cf. v. 3; 24:1; 25:11). Isaac...

Constable: Gen 26:34--28:10 - --5. Jacob's deception for Isaac's blessing 26:34-28:9 Reacting to Isaac's disobedient plan to ble...

Constable: Gen 26:34-35 - --Esau's marriage 26:34-35 We can identify three purposes for this brief section. ...

Guzik: Gen 26:1-35 - Isaac Sins Like Abraham Genesis 26 - Isaac Sins Like Abraham A. Isaac repeats Abraham's mistakes. 1. (1-5) God proclaims the covenant to Isaac. There was a famine in the ...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Bible Query: Gen 26:2 Q: In Gen 26:2, were the Israelites supposed to go down to Egypt, or not? A: Isaac was told not to go down to Egypt in Genesis 26:2. Jacob, not Isaa...

Bible Query: Gen 26:3-5 Q: In Gen 26:3-5, Gen 12:1; Gen 17:1, 9-14; and Gen 22:16 did God bless Abraham because of Abraham’s works? A: No. For either Abraham or people in...

Bible Query: Gen 26:6-7 Q: In Gen 26:6-7, why is Isaac a role-model for us, since Isaac lied here? A: No. See the answer to Genesis 12:10-20.

Bible Query: Gen 26:8-9 Q: In Gen 26:8-9, was this the same Abimelech of Gerar as in Gen 20:2-3? A: Based on the name, probably not. Abimelech means "Father is king", and 7...

Bible Query: Gen 26:33 Q: In Gen 26:33, did Abraham name the town of Beersheba, or did Isaac? A: In Genesis 21:31, it was called Beersheba in Abraham’s time because of t...

Bible Query: Gen 26:34 Q: In Gen 26:34 and Gen 36:2-3, who were Esau’s four wives? A: Wives 1-2: At 40, Esau married two Hittites, Judith and Basemath daughter of Elon ...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) GENESIS, the book of the origin or production of all things, consists of two parts: the first, comprehended in the first through eleventh chapters, gi...

JFB: Genesis (Garis Besar) THE CREATION OF HEAVEN AND EARTH. (Gen 1:1-2) THE FIRST DAY. (Gen 1:3-5) SECOND DAY. (Gen 1:6-8) THIRD DAY. (Gen 1:9-13) FOURTH DAY. (Gen 1:14-19) FI...

TSK: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Book of Genesis is the most ancient record in the world; including the History of two grand and stupendous subjects, Creation and Providence; of e...

TSK: Genesis 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Gen 26:1, Isaac, because of famine, sojourns in Gerar, and the Lord instructs and blesses him; Gen 26:7, He is reproved by Abimelech for ...

Poole: Genesis 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 26 A famine in the land; Isaac goes to Gerar, Gen 26:1 . God directs him to abide there, and promises to be with him: the covenant with Abr...

MHCC: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) Genesis is a name taken from the Greek, and signifies " the book of generation or production;" it is properly so called, as containing an account of ...

MHCC: Genesis 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Gen 26:1-5) Isaac, because of famine, goes to Gerar. (Gen 26:6-11) He denies his wife and is reproved by Abimelech. (Gen 26:12-17) Isaac grows rich...

Matthew Henry: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The First Book of Moses, Called Genesis We have now before us the holy Bible, or book, for so bible ...

Matthew Henry: Genesis 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) In this chapter we have, I. Isaac in adversity, by reason of a famine in the land, which, 1. Obliges him to change his quarters (Gen 26:1). But, ...

Constable: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title Each book of the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Old Testam...

Constable: Genesis (Garis Besar) Outline The structure of Genesis is very clear. The phrase "the generations of" (toledot in Hebrew, from yalad m...

Constable: Genesis Bibliography Aalders, Gerhard Charles. Genesis. The Bible Student's Commentary series. 2 vols. Translated by William Hey...

Haydock: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF GENESIS. INTRODUCTION. The Hebrews now entitle all the Five Books of Moses, from the initial words, which originally were written li...

Gill: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO GENESIS This book, in the Hebrew copies of the Bible, and by the Jewish writers, is generally called Bereshith, which signifies "in...

Gill: Genesis 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO GENESIS 26 This chapter treats of Isaac's removal to Gerar, occasioned by a famine, Gen 26:1; of the Lord's appearance to him there...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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