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Teks -- Mark 2:1-28 (NET)

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Konteks
Healing and Forgiving a Paralytic
2:1 Now after some days, when he returned to Capernaum, the news spread that he was at home. 2:2 So many gathered that there was no longer any room, not even by the door, and he preached the word to them. 2:3 Some people came bringing to him a paralytic, carried by four of them. 2:4 When they were not able to bring him in because of the crowd, they removed the roof above Jesus. Then, after tearing it out, they lowered the stretcher the paralytic was lying on. 2:5 When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Son, your sins are forgiven.” 2:6 Now some of the experts in the law were sitting there, turning these things over in their minds: 2:7 “Why does this man speak this way? He is blaspheming! Who can forgive sins but God alone?” 2:8 Now immediately, when Jesus realized in his spirit that they were contemplating such thoughts, he said to them, “Why are you thinking such things in your hearts? 2:9 Which is easier, to say to the paralytic, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Stand up, take your stretcher, and walk’? 2:10 But so that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins,”– he said to the paralytic2:11 “I tell you, stand up, take your stretcher, and go home.” 2:12 And immediately the man stood up, took his stretcher, and went out in front of them all. They were all amazed and glorified God, saying, “We have never seen anything like this!”
The Call of Levi; Eating with Sinners
2:13 Jesus went out again by the sea. The whole crowd came to him, and he taught them. 2:14 As he went along, he saw Levi, the son of Alphaeus, sitting at the tax booth. “Follow me,” he said to him. And he got up and followed him. 2:15 As Jesus was having a meal in Levi’s home, many tax collectors and sinners were eating with Jesus and his disciples, for there were many who followed him. 2:16 When the experts in the law and the Pharisees saw that he was eating with sinners and tax collectors, they said to his disciples, “Why does he eat with tax collectors and sinners?” 2:17 When Jesus heard this he said to them, “Those who are healthy don’t need a physician, but those who are sick do. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners.”
The Superiority of the New
2:18 Now John’s disciples and the Pharisees were fasting. So they came to Jesus and said, “Why do the disciples of John and the disciples of the Pharisees fast, but your disciples don’t fast?” 2:19 Jesus said to them, “The wedding guests cannot fast while the bridegroom is with them, can they? As long as they have the bridegroom with them they do not fast. 2:20 But the days are coming when the bridegroom will be taken from them, and at that time they will fast. 2:21 No one sews a patch of unshrunk cloth on an old garment; otherwise, the patch pulls away from it, the new from the old, and the tear becomes worse. 2:22 And no one pours new wine into old wineskins; otherwise, the wine will burst the skins, and both the wine and the skins will be destroyed. Instead new wine is poured into new wineskins.”
Lord of the Sabbath
2:23 Jesus was going through the grain fields on a Sabbath, and his disciples began to pick some heads of wheat as they made their way. 2:24 So the Pharisees said to him, “Look, why are they doing what is against the law on the Sabbath?” 2:25 He said to them, “Have you never read what David did when he was in need and he and his companions were hungry2:26 how he entered the house of God when Abiathar was high priest and ate the sacred bread, which is against the law law for any but the priests to eat, and also gave it to his companions?” companions?” 2:27 Then he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for people, not people for the Sabbath. 2:28 For this reason the Son of Man is lord even of the Sabbath.”
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Abiathar a son of Ahimelech; a high priest and counselor of David,son of Ahimelech (Ahitub I Ithamar Aaron); counselor of David
 · Alphaeus the father of James, one of the twelve,the father of Levi (Matthew), one of the twelve.
 · Capernaum a town located on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee.
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel
 · John a son of Zebedee; younger brother of James; the beloved disciple of Christ,a relative of Annas the high priest,a son of Mary the sister of Barnabas, and surnamed Mark,the father of Simon Peter
 · Levi members of the tribe of Levi
 · Pharisee a religious group or sect of the Jews


Topik/Tema Kamus: Capernaum | Jesus, The Christ | JESUS CHRIST, 4C1 | Miracles | FORGIVENESS | Sabbath | WASHING OF FEET | Palsy | Unbelief | TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE | ABSTINENCE | Salvation | Matthew | MARK, THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO, 1 | MEDIATION; MEDIATOR | Blasphemy | Bottle | Alphaeus | JOY | MAKE, MAKER | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Robertson , Vincent , Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Lightfoot , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Barclay , Constable , College , McGarvey , Lapide

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Robertson: Mar 2:1 - Again into Capernaum after some days Again into Capernaum after some days ( palin eis Kapharnaoum di' hēmerōn ). After the first tour of Galilee when Jesus is back in the city which ...

Again into Capernaum after some days ( palin eis Kapharnaoum di' hēmerōn ).

After the first tour of Galilee when Jesus is back in the city which is now the headquarters for the work in Galilee. The phrase di' hēmerōn means days coming in between (dia , duo , two) the departure and return.

Robertson: Mar 2:1 - In the house In the house ( en oikōi ). More exactly, at home , in the home of Peter, now the home of Jesus. Another picture directly from Peter’ s discou...

In the house ( en oikōi ).

More exactly, at home , in the home of Peter, now the home of Jesus. Another picture directly from Peter’ s discourse. Some of the manuscripts have here eis oikon , illustrating the practical identity in meaning of en and eis (Robertson, Grammar , pp. 591-6).

Robertson: Mar 2:1 - It was noised It was noised ( ēkousthē ). It was heard (first aorist, passive indicative from akouō , to hear). People spread the rumour, "He is at home, he ...

It was noised ( ēkousthē ).

It was heard (first aorist, passive indicative from akouō , to hear). People spread the rumour, "He is at home, he is indoors."

Robertson: Mar 2:2 - So that there was no longer room for them, no, not even about the door So that there was no longer room for them, no, not even about the door ( hōste mēketi chōrein mēde ta pros tēn thuran ). Another graphic Ma...

So that there was no longer room for them, no, not even about the door ( hōste mēketi chōrein mēde ta pros tēn thuran ).

Another graphic Markan detail seen through Peter’ s eyes. The double compound negative in the Greek intensifies the negative. This house door apparently opened into the street, not into a court as in the larger houses. The house was packed inside and there was a jam outside.

Robertson: Mar 2:2 - And he spake the word unto them And he spake the word unto them ( kai elalei autois ton logon ). And he was speaking the word unto them, Mark’ s favourite descriptive imperfect...

And he spake the word unto them ( kai elalei autois ton logon ).

And he was speaking the word unto them, Mark’ s favourite descriptive imperfect tense (elalei ). Note this word laleō about the preaching of Jesus (originally just sounds like the chatter of birds, the prattling of children, but here of the most serious kind of speech. As contrasted with legō (to say) it is rather an onomatopoetic word with some emphasis on the sound and manner of speaking. The word is com- mon in the vernacular papyri examples of social inter-course.

Robertson: Mar 2:3 - And they come And they come ( kai erchontai ). Fine illustration of Mark’ s vivid dramatic historical present preserved by Luk 5:18, but not by Mat 9:2 (imper...

And they come ( kai erchontai ).

Fine illustration of Mark’ s vivid dramatic historical present preserved by Luk 5:18, but not by Mat 9:2 (imperfect).

Robertson: Mar 2:3 - Borne by four Borne by four ( airomenon hupo tessarōn ). Another picturesque Markan detail not in the others.

Borne by four ( airomenon hupo tessarōn ).

Another picturesque Markan detail not in the others.

Robertson: Mar 2:4 - Come nigh Come nigh ( proseggisai ). But Westcott and Hort read prosenegkai , to bring to, after Aleph, B, L, 33, 63 (cf. Joh 5:18).

Come nigh ( proseggisai ).

But Westcott and Hort read prosenegkai , to bring to, after Aleph, B, L, 33, 63 (cf. Joh 5:18).

Robertson: Mar 2:4 - They uncovered the roof They uncovered the roof ( apestegasan tēn stegēn ). They unroofed the roof (note paronomasia in the Greek and cognate accusative). The only insta...

They uncovered the roof ( apestegasan tēn stegēn ).

They unroofed the roof (note paronomasia in the Greek and cognate accusative). The only instance of this verb in the N.T. A rare word in late Greek, no papyrus example given in Moulton and Milligan Vocabulary. They climbed up a stairway on the outside or ladder to the flat tile roof and dug out or broke up (exoruxantes ) the tiles (the roof). There were thus tiles (dia tōn keramōn , Luk 5:19) of laths and plaster and even slabs of stone stuck in for strength that had to be dug out. It is not clear where Jesus was (hopou ēn ), either downstairs, (Holtzmann) or upstairs (Lightfoot), or in the quadrangle ( atrium or compluvium , if the house had one). "A composition of mortar, tar, ashes and sand is spread upon the roofs, and rolled hard, and grass grows in the crevices. On the houses of the poor in the country the grass grows more freely, and goats may be seen on the roofs cropping it"(Vincent).

Robertson: Mar 2:4 - They let down the bed They let down the bed ( chalōsi ton krabatton ) , historical present again, aorist tense in Luk 5:19 (kathēkan ). The verb means to lower from a...

They let down the bed ( chalōsi ton krabatton )

, historical present again, aorist tense in Luk 5:19 (kathēkan ). The verb means to lower from a higher place as from a boat. Probably the four men had a rope fastened to each corner of the pallet or poor man’ s bed (krabatton , Latin grabatus . So one of Mark’ s Latin words). Matthew (Mat 9:2) has klinē , general term for bed. Luke has klinidion (little bed or couch). Mark’ s word is common in the papyri and is spelled also krabbatos , sometimes krabatos , while W, Codex Washingtonius, has it krabbaton .

Robertson: Mar 2:5 - Their faith Their faith ( tēn pistin autōn ). The faith of the four men and of the man himself. There is no reason for excluding his faith. They all had conf...

Their faith ( tēn pistin autōn ).

The faith of the four men and of the man himself. There is no reason for excluding his faith. They all had confidence in the power and willingness of Jesus to heal this desperate case.

Robertson: Mar 2:5 - Are forgiven Are forgiven ( aphientai , aoristic present passive, cf. punctiliar action, Robertson’ s Grammar , pp. 864ff.). So Mat 9:3, but Luk 5:20 has the...

Are forgiven ( aphientai , aoristic present passive, cf. punctiliar action, Robertson’ s Grammar , pp. 864ff.).

So Mat 9:3, but Luk 5:20 has the Doric perfect passive apheōntai . The astonishing thing both to the paralytic and to the four friends is that Jesus forgave his sins instead of healing him. The sins had probably caused the paralysis.

Robertson: Mar 2:6 - Sitting there, and reasoning in their hearts Sitting there, and reasoning in their hearts ( ekei kathēmenoi kai dialogizomenoi en tais kardiais autōn ). Another of Mark’ s pictures thro...

Sitting there, and reasoning in their hearts ( ekei kathēmenoi kai dialogizomenoi en tais kardiais autōn ).

Another of Mark’ s pictures through Peter’ s eyes. These scribes (and Pharisees, Luk 5:21) were there to cause trouble, to pick flaws in the teaching and conduct of Jesus. His popularity and power had aroused their jealousy. There is no evidence that they spoke aloud the murmur in their hearts, "within themselves"(Mat 9:3). It was not necessary, for their looks gave them away and Jesus knew their thoughts (Mat 9:4) and perceived their reasoning (Luk 5:22).

Robertson: Mar 2:6 - Instantly Jesus recognized it in his own spirit Instantly Jesus recognized it in his own spirit ( euthus epignous ho Iēsous tōi pneumati autou , Mar 2:8). The Master at once recognizes the hosti...

Instantly Jesus recognized it in his own spirit ( euthus epignous ho Iēsous tōi pneumati autou , Mar 2:8).

The Master at once recognizes the hostile atmosphere in the house. The debate (dialogizomenoi ) in their hearts was written on their faces. No sound had come, but feeling did.

Robertson: Mar 2:7 - He blasphemeth He blasphemeth ( blasphēmei ). This is the unspoken charge in their hearts which Jesus read like an open book. The correct text here has this verb....

He blasphemeth ( blasphēmei ).

This is the unspoken charge in their hearts which Jesus read like an open book. The correct text here has this verb. They justify the charge with the conviction that God alone has the power (dunatai ) to forgive sins. The word blasphēmeō means injurious speech or slander. It was, they held, blasphemy for Jesus to assume this divine prerogative. Their logic was correct. The only flaw in it was the possibility that Jesus held a peculiar relation to God which justified his claim. So the two forces clash here as now on the deity of Christ Jesus. Knowing full well that he had exercised the prerogative of God in forgiving the man’ s sins he proceeds to justify his claim by healing the man.

Robertson: Mar 2:10 - That ye may know That ye may know ( hina eidēte ). The scribes could have said either of the alternatives in Mar 2:9 with equal futility. Jesus could say either wit...

That ye may know ( hina eidēte ).

The scribes could have said either of the alternatives in Mar 2:9 with equal futility. Jesus could say either with equal effectiveness. In fact Jesus chose the harder first, the forgiveness which they could not see. So he now performs the miracle of healing which all could see, that all could know that (the Son of Man, Christ’ s favourite designation of himself, a claim to be the Messiah in terms that could not be easily attacked) he really had the authority and power (exousian ) to forgive sins. He has the right and power here on earth to forgive sins, here and now without waiting for the day of judgment.

Robertson: Mar 2:10 - He saith to the sick of the palsy He saith to the sick of the palsy ( legei ). This remarkable parenthesis in the middle of the sentence occurs also in Mat 9:6 and Luk 5:24, proof tha...

He saith to the sick of the palsy ( legei ).

This remarkable parenthesis in the middle of the sentence occurs also in Mat 9:6 and Luk 5:24, proof that both Matthew and Luke followed Mark’ s narrative. It is inconceivable that all three writers should independently have injected the same parenthesis at the same place.

Robertson: Mar 2:12 - Before them all Before them all ( emprosthen pantōn ). Luk 5:25 follows Mark in this detail. He picked up (aras ) his pallet and walked and went home as Jesus had...

Before them all ( emprosthen pantōn ).

Luk 5:25 follows Mark in this detail. He picked up (aras ) his pallet and walked and went home as Jesus had commanded him to do (Mar 2:11). It was an amazing proceeding and made it unnecessary for Jesus to refute the scribes further on this occasion. The amazement (existasthai , our ecstasy , as Luk 5:26 has it), was too general and great for words. The people could only say: "We never saw it on this fashion"(Houtōs oudepote eidamen ). Jesus had acted with the power of God and claimed equality with God and had made good his claim. They all marvelled at the paradoxes (paradoxa , Luk 5:26) of that day. For it all they glorified God.

Robertson: Mar 2:13 - By the seaside By the seaside ( para tēn thalassan ). A pretty picture of Jesus walking by the sea and a walk that Jesus loved (Mar 1:16; Mat 4:18). Probably Jesu...

By the seaside ( para tēn thalassan ).

A pretty picture of Jesus walking by the sea and a walk that Jesus loved (Mar 1:16; Mat 4:18). Probably Jesus went out from the crowd in Peter’ s house as soon as he could. It was a joy to get a whiff of fresh air by the sea. But it was not long till all the crowd began to come to Jesus (ērcheto , imperfect) and Jesus was teaching them (edidasken , imperfect). It was the old story over again, but Jesus did not run away.

Robertson: Mar 2:14 - And as he passed by And as he passed by ( kai paragōn ). Present participle active, was passing by. Jesus was constantly on the alert for opportunities to do good. An ...

And as he passed by ( kai paragōn ).

Present participle active, was passing by. Jesus was constantly on the alert for opportunities to do good. An unlikely specimen was Levi (Matthew), son of Alpheus, sitting at the toll-gate (telōnion ) on the Great West Road from Damascus to the Mediterranean. He was a publican (telōnēs ) who collected toll for Herod Antipas. The Jews hated or despised these publicans and classed them with sinners (hamartōloi ). The challenge of Jesus was sudden and sharp, but Levi (Matthew) was ready to respond at once. He had heard of Jesus and quickly decided. Great decisions are often made on a moment’ s notice. Levi is a fine object lesson for business men who put off service to Christ to carry on their business.

Robertson: Mar 2:16 - The scribes of the Pharisees The scribes of the Pharisees ( hoi grammateis tōn Pharisaiōn ). This is the correct text. Cf. "their scribes"in Luk 5:30. Matthew gave a great re...

The scribes of the Pharisees ( hoi grammateis tōn Pharisaiōn ).

This is the correct text. Cf. "their scribes"in Luk 5:30. Matthew gave a great reception (dochēn , Luk 5:29) in his house (Mar 2:15). These publicans and sinners not simply accepted Levi’ s invitation, but they imitated his example "and were following Jesus"(kai ēkolouthoun autōi ). It was a motly crew from the standpoint of these young theologues, scribes of the Pharisees, who were on hand, being invited to pick flaws if they could. It was probably in the long hall of the house where the scribes stood and ridiculed Jesus and the disciples, unless they stood outside, feeling too pious to go into the house of a publican. It was an offence for a Jew to eat with Gentiles as even many of the early Jewish Christians felt (Act 11:3) and publicans and sinners were regarded like Gentiles (1Co 5:11).

Robertson: Mar 2:17 - The righteous The righteous ( dikaious ). Jesus for the sake of argument accepts the claim of the Pharisees to be righteous, though, as a matter of fact, they fell...

The righteous ( dikaious ).

Jesus for the sake of argument accepts the claim of the Pharisees to be righteous, though, as a matter of fact, they fell very far short of it. Elsewhere (Matthew 23) Jesus shows that the Pharisees were extortionate and devoured widows’ houses and wore a cloak of pride and hypocritical respectability. The words "unto repentance"(eis metanoian ) are not genuine in Mark, but are in Luk 5:32. Jesus called men to new spiritual life and away from sin and so to repentance. But this claim stopped their mouths against what Jesus was doing. The well or the strong (ischuontes ) are not those who need the physician in an epidemic.

Robertson: Mar 2:18 - John’ s disciples and the Pharisees were fasting John’ s disciples and the Pharisees were fasting ( ēsan hoi mathētai Iōanou kai hoi Pharisaioi nēsteuontes ). The periphrastic imperfect...

John’ s disciples and the Pharisees were fasting ( ēsan hoi mathētai Iōanou kai hoi Pharisaioi nēsteuontes ).

The periphrastic imperfect, so common in Mark’ s vivid description. Probably Levi’ s feast happened on one of the weekly fast-days (second and fifth days of the week for the stricter Jews). So there was a clash of standpoints. The disciples of John sided with the Pharisees in the Jewish ceremonial ritualistic observances. John was still a prisoner in Machaerus. John was more of an ascetic than Jesus (Mat 18:1.; Luk 7:33-35), but neither one pleased all the popular critics. These learners (mathētai ) or disciples of John had missed the spirit of their leader when they here lined up with the Pharisees against Jesus. But there was no real congeniality between the formalism of the Pharisees and the asceticism of John the Baptist. The Pharisees hated John who had denounced them as broods of vipers. Here the disciples of John and the disciples of the Pharisees (hoi mathētai Iōanou kai hoi mathētai tōn Pharisaiōn ) join in criticizing Jesus and his disciples. Later we shall see Pharisees, Sadducees, and Herodians, who bitterly detested each other, making com- mon cause against Jesus Christ. So today we find various hostile groups combining against our Lord and Saviour. See notes on Mat 9:14-17 for comments. Matthew has here followed Mark closely.

Robertson: Mar 2:19 - The sons of the bridechamber The sons of the bridechamber ( hoi huioi tou numphōnos ). Not merely the groomsmen, but the guests also, the paranymphs (paranumphoi of the old...

The sons of the bridechamber ( hoi huioi tou numphōnos ).

Not merely the groomsmen, but the guests also, the paranymphs (paranumphoi of the old Greek). Jesus here adopts the Baptist’ s own metaphor (Joh 3:29), changing the friend of the bridegroom (ho philos tou numphiou ) to sons of the bridechamber. Jesus identifies himself with the bridegroom of the O.T. (Hos 2:21), God in his covenant relation with Israel (Swete). Mourning does not suit the wedding feast. Mark, Matthew, and Luke all give the three parables (bridegroom, unfulled cloth, new wineskins) illustrating and defending the conduct of Jesus in feasting with Levi on a Jewish fast-day. Luk 5:36 calls these parables. Jesus here seems iconoclastic to the ecclesiastics and revolutionary in emphasis on the spiritual instead of the ritualistic and ceremonial.

Robertson: Mar 2:21 - Seweth on Seweth on ( epirhaptei ). Here only in the N.T. or elsewhere, though the uncompounded verb rhaptō (to sew) is common enough, sews upon: in Mat ...

Seweth on ( epirhaptei ).

Here only in the N.T. or elsewhere, though the uncompounded verb rhaptō (to sew) is common enough, sews upon: in Mat 9:16 and Luk 5:37 use epiballei , put upon or clap upon.

Robertson: Mar 2:22 - But new wine into fresh wineskins But new wine into fresh wineskins ( alla oinon neon eis askous kainous ). Westcott and Hort bracket this clause as a Western non-interpolation though...

But new wine into fresh wineskins ( alla oinon neon eis askous kainous ).

Westcott and Hort bracket this clause as a Western non-interpolation though omitted only in D and some old Latin MSS. It is genuine in Luk 5:38 and may be so here.

Robertson: Mar 2:23 - Through the cornfields Through the cornfields ( dia tōn sporimōn ). See note on Mat 12:1. So Matthew and Luk 6:1. But Mark uses paraporeuesthai , to go along beside, un...

Through the cornfields ( dia tōn sporimōn ).

See note on Mat 12:1. So Matthew and Luk 6:1. But Mark uses paraporeuesthai , to go along beside, unless diaporeuesthai (BCD) is accepted. Perhaps now on the edge, now within the grain. Mark uses also hodon poiein , to make a way like the Latin iter facere , as if through the standing grain, plucking the ears (tillontes tous stachuas ). Work of preparing food the rabbis called it. The margin of the Revised Version has it correctly: They began to make their way plucking the ears of corn (grain, wheat or barley, we should say). See notes on Mat 12:1-8 for discussion of this passage, parallel also in Luk 6:15.

Robertson: Mar 2:26 - The house of God The house of God ( ton oikon tou theou ). The tent or tabernacle at Nob, not the temple in Jerusalem built by Solomon.

The house of God ( ton oikon tou theou ).

The tent or tabernacle at Nob, not the temple in Jerusalem built by Solomon.

Robertson: Mar 2:26 - When Abiathar was high priest When Abiathar was high priest ( epi Abiathar archiereōs ). Neat Greek idiom, in the time of Abiathar as high priest. There was confusion in the Mas...

When Abiathar was high priest ( epi Abiathar archiereōs ).

Neat Greek idiom, in the time of Abiathar as high priest. There was confusion in the Massoretic text and in the lxx about the difference between Ahimelech (Abimelech) and Abiathar (2Sa 8:17), Ahimelech’ s son and successor (1Sa 21:2; 1Sa 22:20). Apparently Ahimelech, not Abiathar was high priest at this time. It is possible that both father and son bore both names (1Sa 22:20; 2Sa 8:17; 1Ch 18:16), Abiathar mentioned though both involved. Epi may so mean in the passage about Abiathar. Or we may leave it unexplained. They had the most elaborate rules for the preparation of the shewbread (tous artous tēs protheseōs ), the loaves of presentation, the loaves of the face or presence of God. It was renewed on the commencement of the sabbath and the old bread deposited on the golden table in the porch of the Sanctuary. This old bread was eaten by the priests as they came and went. This is what David ate.

Robertson: Mar 2:27 - For man For man ( dia ton anthrōpon ). Mark alone has this profound saying which subordinates the sabbath to man’ s real welfare (mankind, observe, ge...

For man ( dia ton anthrōpon ).

Mark alone has this profound saying which subordinates the sabbath to man’ s real welfare (mankind, observe, generic article with anthrōpos , class from class). Man was not made for the sabbath as the rabbis seemed to think with all their petty rules about eating an egg laid on the sabbath or looking in the glass, et cetera. See 2 Maccabees 5:19 and Mechilta on Exo 31:13 : "The sabbath is delivered unto you and ye are not delivered unto the sabbath."Christianity has had to fight this same battle about institutionalism. The church itself is for man, not man for the church.

Robertson: Mar 2:28 - Even of the sabbath Even of the sabbath ( kai tou sabbatou ). Mark, Matthew (Mat 12:8), and Luke (Luk 6:5) all give this as a climax in the five reasons given by Christ ...

Even of the sabbath ( kai tou sabbatou ).

Mark, Matthew (Mat 12:8), and Luke (Luk 6:5) all give this as a climax in the five reasons given by Christ on the occasion for the conduct of the disciples, but Mark has the little word "even"(kai ) not in the others, showing that Jesus knew that he was making a great claim as the Son of Man, the Representative Man, the Messiah looked at from his human interest, to lordship (kurios ) even of the sabbath. He was not the slave of the sabbath, but the master of it. "Even of the sabbath, so invaluable in your eyes. Lord, not to abolish, but to interpret and keep in its own place, and give it a new name"(Bruce).

Vincent: Mar 2:1 - It was noised It was noised ( ἠκούσθη ) Lit., it was heard.

It was noised ( ἠκούσθη )

Lit., it was heard.

Vincent: Mar 2:1 - That he was in the house That he was in the house ( ὅτι εἰς οἶκόν ἐστιν ) The ὅτι , that, is recitative, introducing the report in ...

That he was in the house ( ὅτι εἰς οἶκόν ἐστιν )

The ὅτι , that, is recitative, introducing the report in the direct form. It was reported - he is in the house! The preposition in is literally into, carrying the idea of the motion preceding the stay in the house. " He has gone into the house, and is there." But the best texts read ἐν οἴκῳ in the house. The account of this rumor is peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 2:1 - He preached He preached ( ἐλάλει ) Lit., spake , as Rev. Imperfect tense. He was speaking when the occurrence which follows took place.

He preached ( ἐλάλει )

Lit., spake , as Rev. Imperfect tense. He was speaking when the occurrence which follows took place.

Vincent: Mar 2:3 - Borne of four Borne of four A detail peculiar to Mark.

Borne of four

A detail peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 2:4 - Come nigh unto him Come nigh unto him ( προσεγγίσαι ) The word does not occur elsewhere in the New Testament. But some read προσενέγκαι , ...

Come nigh unto him ( προσεγγίσαι )

The word does not occur elsewhere in the New Testament. But some read προσενέγκαι , bring him unto him. So Rev., in margin.

Vincent: Mar 2:4 - They uncovered They uncovered ( ἀπεστέγασαν ) The only use of the word in New Testament.

They uncovered ( ἀπεστέγασαν )

The only use of the word in New Testament.

Vincent: Mar 2:4 - Broken it up Broken it up ( ἐξορύξαντες ) Lit., scooped it out. Very graphic and true to fact. A modern roof would be untiled or unshingle...

Broken it up ( ἐξορύξαντες )

Lit., scooped it out. Very graphic and true to fact. A modern roof would be untiled or unshingled ; but an oriental roof would have to be dug to make such an opening as was required. A composition of mortar, tar, ashes, and sand is spread upon the roofs, and rolled hard, and grass grows in the crevices. On the houses of the poor in the country the grass grows more freely, and goats may be seen on the roofs cropping it. In some cases, as in this, stone slabs are laid across the joists. See Luk 5:19, where it is said they let him down through the tiles; so that they would be obliged, not only to dig through the grass and earth, but also to pry up the tiles. Compare Psa 129:6.

Vincent: Mar 2:4 - The bed The bed ( κράβαττον ) One of Mark's Latin words, grabatus , and condemned by the grammarians as inelegant. A rude pallet, merely a th...

The bed ( κράβαττον )

One of Mark's Latin words, grabatus , and condemned by the grammarians as inelegant. A rude pallet, merely a thickly padded quilt or mat, held at the corners, and requiring no cords to let it down. They could easily reach the roof by the steps on the outside, as the roof is low; or they could have gone into an adjoining house and passed along the roofs. Some suppose that the crowd was assembled in an upper chamber, which sometimes extended over the whole area of the house. It is not possible accurately to reproduce the details of the scene. Dr. Thomson says that Jesus probably stood in the lewan or reception-room, a hall which is entered from the court or street by an open arch; or he may have taken his stand in the covered court in front of the house itself, Which usually has open arches on three sides, and the crowd was around and in front of him.

Vincent: Mar 2:6 - Reasoning Reasoning ( διαλογιζόμενοι ) The word dialogue is derived from this, and the meaning literally is, that they held a dialogue ...

Reasoning ( διαλογιζόμενοι )

The word dialogue is derived from this, and the meaning literally is, that they held a dialogue with themselves.

Vincent: Mar 2:8 - Perceived Perceived ( ἐπιγνοὺς ) The preposition ἐπί gives the force of fully . He was not only immediately aware of their thought, ...

Perceived ( ἐπιγνοὺς )

The preposition ἐπί gives the force of fully . He was not only immediately aware of their thought, but clearly and fully aware.

Vincent: Mar 2:9 - Walk Walk ( περιπάτει ). Lit., walk about.

Walk ( περιπάτει ).

Lit., walk about.

Vincent: Mar 2:10 - Power Power ( ἐξουσίαν ) or better, authority, as Rev., in margin. The word is derived from ἔξεστι , it is permitted or ...

Power ( ἐξουσίαν )

or better, authority, as Rev., in margin. The word is derived from ἔξεστι , it is permitted or lawful. It combines the ideas of right and might. Authority or right is the dominant meaning in the New Testament.

Vincent: Mar 2:13 - Resorted - taught Resorted - taught ( ἤρχετο - ἐδίδασκεν ) The imperfects are graphic - kept coming, kept teaching.

Resorted - taught ( ἤρχετο - ἐδίδασκεν )

The imperfects are graphic - kept coming, kept teaching.

Vincent: Mar 2:14 - -- See on Mat 9:9.

See on Mat 9:9.

Vincent: Mar 2:15 - His house His house Levi's. See Luk 5:29.

His house

Levi's. See Luk 5:29.

Vincent: Mar 2:16 - Scribes and Pharisees Scribes and Pharisees But the best texts read γραμματεῖς τῶν Φαρισαίων , scribes of the Pharisees. So Rev. Scribes b...

Scribes and Pharisees

But the best texts read γραμματεῖς τῶν Φαρισαίων , scribes of the Pharisees. So Rev. Scribes belonging to the sect of the Pharisees. They had followed him into the hall where the company were seated. This hall answered to the k)ha3wah of Arabian houses, which is thus described by William Gifford Palgrave: " The k)ha4wah was a long, oblong hall about twenty feet in height, fifty in length, and sixteen or thereabouts in breadth. The walls were covered in a rudely decorative manner with brown and white wash, and sunk here and there into small triangular recesses, destined to the reception of books, lamps, and other such like objects. The roof was of timber, and fiat; the floor was strewn with fine, clean sand, and garnished all round alongside of the walls with long strips of carpet, upon which cushions, covered with faded silk, were disposed at suitable intervals. In poorer houses, felt rugs usually take the place of carpets" (" Central and Eastern Arabia" ).

Vincent: Mar 2:17 - They that are whole They that are whole ( οἱ ἰσχύοντες ) Lit., they that are strong. See on Luk 14:30, was not able; and 2Pe 2:11, power.

They that are whole ( οἱ ἰσχύοντες )

Lit., they that are strong. See on Luk 14:30, was not able; and 2Pe 2:11, power.

Vincent: Mar 2:17 - No need No need The Greek order throws the emphasis on these words: No need have they that are strong of a physician. Wyc., Whole men have no need to ...

No need

The Greek order throws the emphasis on these words: No need have they that are strong of a physician. Wyc., Whole men have no need to a leech, but they that have evil.

Vincent: Mar 2:18 - And of the Pharisees And of the Pharisees But the of is wrong. Read as Rev., John's disciples and the Pharisees.

And of the Pharisees

But the of is wrong. Read as Rev., John's disciples and the Pharisees.

Vincent: Mar 2:18 - Used to fast Used to fast ( ἦσαν νηστεύοντες ) The A. V. refers to the fact as a custom; but Mark means that they were observing a fas...

Used to fast ( ἦσαν νηστεύοντες )

The A. V. refers to the fact as a custom; but Mark means that they were observing a fast at that time. Hence the use of the participle with the finite verb. Rev., correctly, were fasting. The threefold repetition of the word. fast is characteristic of Mark. See Introduction.

Vincent: Mar 2:19 - Children of the bride-chamber Children of the bride-chamber ( υἱοὶ τοῦ νυμφῶνος ) More correctly as Rev., sons. It is noteworthy that Christ twice use...

Children of the bride-chamber ( υἱοὶ τοῦ νυμφῶνος )

More correctly as Rev., sons. It is noteworthy that Christ twice uses a figure drawn from marriage in his allusions to John the Baptist, the ascetic. Compare Joh 3:29. The sons of the bride-chamber are different from the groomsmen. They are the guests invited to the bridal. The scene is laid in Galilee, where groomsmen were not customary, as in Judaea. Hence there is no mention of them in the account of the marriage at Cana. In Judaea there were at every marriage two groomsmen or friends of the bridegroom . See on Joh 3:29.

Vincent: Mar 2:20 - Then - in those days Then - in those days The proper reading is ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ ἡμέρᾳ , in that day. So Rev. Another of Mark's double e...

Then - in those days

The proper reading is ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ ἡμέρᾳ , in that day. So Rev. Another of Mark's double expressions: then - in that day.

Vincent: Mar 2:21 - Seweth Seweth ( ἐπιῤῥάπτει ) A word found in Mark only. Matthew (Mat 9:16) and Luke (Luk 5:36) use ἐπιβάλλει , throweth ...

Seweth ( ἐπιῤῥάπτει )

A word found in Mark only. Matthew (Mat 9:16) and Luke (Luk 5:36) use ἐπιβάλλει , throweth upon, as we speak of clapping a patch upon.

Vincent: Mar 2:23 - He went He went ( αὐτὸν παραπορεύεσθαι ) Lit., went along beside, along the stretches of standing grain. Matthew and Luke use ...

He went ( αὐτὸν παραπορεύεσθαι )

Lit., went along beside, along the stretches of standing grain. Matthew and Luke use διά , through, as Mark does, but not παρά .

Vincent: Mar 2:23 - Began, as they went, to pluck Began, as they went, to pluck ( ἤρξαντο ὁδὸν ποιεῖν τίλλοντες ) Lit., began to make a way plucking the ear...

Began, as they went, to pluck ( ἤρξαντο ὁδὸν ποιεῖν τίλλοντες )

Lit., began to make a way plucking the ears. This does not mean that the disciples broke a way for themselves through the standing corn by plucking the ears, for in that event they would have been compelled to break down the stalks. The:), could not have made a way by plucking the heads of the grain. Mark, who uses Latin forms, probably adopted here the phrase iter facere, to make a way, which is simply to go. The same idiom occurs in the Septuagint, Judges 17:8; ποιῆσαι ὁδὸν αὐτοῦ , as he journeyed. The offence given the Pharisees was the preparation , of food on the Sabbath. Matthew says to eat, stating the motive, and Luke, rubbing with their hands, describing the act. See on Mat 12:2.. The Rev. rightly retains the rendering of the A. V.

Vincent: Mar 2:25 - Had need Had need Mark adds this to the was an hungered, which is in both Matthew and Luke. The analogy lay in the necessity. The had need is generi...

Had need

Mark adds this to the was an hungered, which is in both Matthew and Luke. The analogy lay in the necessity. The had need is generic; the was hungry is specific, describing the peculiar character of the need.

Vincent: Mar 2:26 - The shewbread The shewbread ( τοὺς ἄρτους τῆς προθέσεως ) Lit., the loaves of proposition, i.e., the loaves which were set...

The shewbread ( τοὺς ἄρτους τῆς προθέσεως )

Lit., the loaves of proposition, i.e., the loaves which were set forth before the Lord. The Jews called them the loaves of the face, i.e., of the presence of God. The bread was made of the finest wheaten flour that had been passed through eleven sieves. There were twelve loaves, or cakes, according to the number of tribes, ranged in two piles of six each. Each cake was made of about five pints of wheat. They were anointed in the middle with oil, in the form of a cross. According to tradition, each cake was five hand-breadths broad and ten long, but turned up at either end, two hand-breadths on each side, to resemble in outline the ark of the covenant. The shewbread was prepared on Friday, unless that day happened to be a feast-day that required sabbatical rest; in which case it was prepared on Thursday afternoon. The renewal of the shewbread was the first of the priestly functions on the commencement of the Sabbath. The bread which was taken off was deposited on the golden table in the porch of the sanctuary, and distributed among the outgoing and incoming courses of priests (compare save for the priests ) . It was eaten during the Sabbath, and in the temple itself, but only by such priests as were Levitically pure. This old bread, removed on the Sabbath morning, was that which David ate.

Vincent: Mar 2:27 - For man For man ( διά ) On account of, or for the sake of. This saying is given by Mark only.

For man ( διά )

On account of, or for the sake of. This saying is given by Mark only.

Wesley: Mar 2:1 - And again After having been in desert places for some time, he returned privately to the city.

After having been in desert places for some time, he returned privately to the city.

Wesley: Mar 2:1 - In the house In Peter's house.

In Peter's house.

Wesley: Mar 2:2 - And immediately many were gathered together Hitherto continued the general impression on their hearts. Hitherto, even at Capernaum, all who heard received the word with joy.

Hitherto continued the general impression on their hearts. Hitherto, even at Capernaum, all who heard received the word with joy.

Wesley: Mar 2:3 - -- Mat 9:2; Luk 5:18.

Wesley: Mar 2:4 - They uncovered the roof Or, took up the covering, the lattice or trap door, which was on all their houses, (being flat roofed.) And finding it not wide enough, broke the pass...

Or, took up the covering, the lattice or trap door, which was on all their houses, (being flat roofed.) And finding it not wide enough, broke the passage wider, to let down the couch.

Wesley: Mar 2:6 - But certain of the scribes See whence the first offence cometh! As yet not one of the plain unlettered people were offended. They all rejoiced in the light, till these men of le...

See whence the first offence cometh! As yet not one of the plain unlettered people were offended. They all rejoiced in the light, till these men of learning came, to put darkness for light, and light for darkness. Wo to all such blind guides! Good had it been for these if they had never been born. O God, let me never offend one of thy simple ones! Sooner let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!

Wesley: Mar 2:12 - They were all amazed Even the scribes themselves for a time.

Even the scribes themselves for a time.

Wesley: Mar 2:13 - All the multitude came to him Namely, by the sea side. And he as readily taught them there as if they had been in a synagogue.

Namely, by the sea side. And he as readily taught them there as if they had been in a synagogue.

Wesley: Mar 2:14 - -- Mat 9:9; Luk 5:27.

Wesley: Mar 2:15 - Many publicans and notorious sinners sat with Jesus Some of them doubtless invited by Matthew, moved with compassion for his old companions in sin. But the next words, For there were many, and they foll...

Some of them doubtless invited by Matthew, moved with compassion for his old companions in sin. But the next words, For there were many, and they followed him, seem to imply, that the greater part, encouraged by his gracious words and the tenderness of his behaviour, and impatient to hear more, stayed for no invitation, but pressed in after him, and kept as close to him as they could.

Wesley: Mar 2:16 - And the scribes and Pharisees said So now the wise men being joined by the saints of the world, went a little farther in raising prejudices against our Lord. In his answer he uses as ye...

So now the wise men being joined by the saints of the world, went a little farther in raising prejudices against our Lord. In his answer he uses as yet no harshness, but only calm, dispassionate reasoning.

Wesley: Mar 2:17 - I came not to call the righteous Therefore if these were righteous I should not call them. But now, they are the very persons I came to save.

Therefore if these were righteous I should not call them. But now, they are the very persons I came to save.

Wesley: Mar 2:18 - -- Mat 9:14; Luk 5:33.

Wesley: Mar 2:23 - -- Mat 12:1; Luk 6:1.

Wesley: Mar 2:26 - In the days of Abiathar the high priest Abimelech, the father of Abiathar, was high priest then; Abiathar himself not till some time after. This phrase therefore only means, In the time of A...

Abimelech, the father of Abiathar, was high priest then; Abiathar himself not till some time after. This phrase therefore only means, In the time of Abiathar, who was afterward the high priest. 1Sa 21:6.

Wesley: Mar 2:27 - The Sabbath was made for man And therefore must give way to man's necessity.

And therefore must give way to man's necessity.

Wesley: Mar 2:28 - Moreover the Son of man is Lord even of the Sabbath Being the supreme Lawgiver, he hath power to dispense with his own laws; and with this in particular.

Being the supreme Lawgiver, he hath power to dispense with his own laws; and with this in particular.

JFB: Mar 2:1 - And again he entered into Capernaum "His own city" (Mat 9:1).

"His own city" (Mat 9:1).

JFB: Mar 2:1 - and it was noised that he was in the house No doubt of Simon Peter (Mar 1:29).

No doubt of Simon Peter (Mar 1:29).

JFB: Mar 2:2 - And straightway many were gathered together, insomuch that there was no room to receive them, no, not so much as about the door This is one of Mark's graphic touches. No doubt in this case, as the scene occurred at his informant's own door, these details are the vivid recollect...

This is one of Mark's graphic touches. No doubt in this case, as the scene occurred at his informant's own door, these details are the vivid recollections of that honored disciple.

JFB: Mar 2:2 - and he preached the word unto them That is, indoors; but in the hearing, doubtless, of the multitude that pressed around. Had He gone forth, as He naturally would, the paralytic's faith...

That is, indoors; but in the hearing, doubtless, of the multitude that pressed around. Had He gone forth, as He naturally would, the paralytic's faith would have had no such opportunity to display itself. Luke (Luk 5:17) furnishes an additional and very important incident in the scene--as follows: "And it came to pass on a certain day, as He was teaching, that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of every town," or village, "of Galilee, and Judea, and Jerusalem." This was the highest testimony yet borne to our Lord's growing influence, and the necessity increasingly felt by the ecclesiastics throughout the country of coming to some definite judgment regarding Him. "And the power of the Lord was [present] to heal them"--or, "was [efficacious] to heal them," that is, the sick that were brought before Him. So that the miracle that is now to be described was among the most glorious and worthy to be recorded of many then performed; and what made it so was doubtless the faith which was manifested in connection with it, and the proclamation of the forgiveness of the patient's sins that immediately preceded it.

JFB: Mar 2:3 - And they come unto him That is, towards the house where He was.

That is, towards the house where He was.

JFB: Mar 2:3 - bringing one sick of the palsy "lying on a bed" (Mat 9:2).

"lying on a bed" (Mat 9:2).

JFB: Mar 2:3 - which was borne of four A graphic particular of Mark only.

A graphic particular of Mark only.

JFB: Mar 2:4 - And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press Or, as in Luke (Luk 5:19), "when they could not find by what way they might bring him in because of the multitude," they "went upon the housetop"--the...

Or, as in Luke (Luk 5:19), "when they could not find by what way they might bring him in because of the multitude," they "went upon the housetop"--the flat or terrace-roof, universal in Eastern houses.

JFB: Mar 2:4 - they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed Or portable couch

Or portable couch

JFB: Mar 2:4 - wherein the sick of the palsy lay Luke (Luk 5:19) says, they "let him down through the tilling with his couch into the midst before Jesus." Their whole object was to bring the patient ...

Luke (Luk 5:19) says, they "let him down through the tilling with his couch into the midst before Jesus." Their whole object was to bring the patient into the presence of Jesus; and this not being possible in the ordinary way, because of the multitude that surrounded Him, they took the very unusual method here described of accomplishing their object, and succeeded. Several explanations have been given of the way in which this was done; but unless we knew the precise plan of the house, and the part of it from which Jesus taught--which may have been a quadrangle or open court, within the buildings of which Peter's house was one, or a gallery covered by a veranda--it is impossible to determine precisely how the thing was done. One thing, however, is clear, that we have both the accounts from an eye-witness.

JFB: Mar 2:5 - When Jesus saw their faith It is remarkable that all the three narratives call it "their faith" which Jesus saw. That the patient himself had faith, we know from the proclamatio...

It is remarkable that all the three narratives call it "their faith" which Jesus saw. That the patient himself had faith, we know from the proclamation of his forgiveness, which Jesus made before all; and we should have been apt to conclude that his four friends bore him to Jesus merely out of benevolent compliance with the urgent entreaties of the poor sufferer. But here we learn, not only that his bearers had the same faith with himself, but that Jesus marked it as a faith which was not to be defeated--a faith victorious over all difficulties. This was the faith for which He was ever on the watch, and which He never saw without marking, and, in those who needed anything from Him, richly rewarding.

JFB: Mar 2:5 - he said unto the sick of the palsy, Son "be of good cheer" (Mat 9:2).

"be of good cheer" (Mat 9:2).

JFB: Mar 2:5 - thy sins be forgiven thee By the word "be," our translators perhaps meant "are," as in Luke (Luk 5:20). For it is not a command to his sins to depart, but an authoritative proc...

By the word "be," our translators perhaps meant "are," as in Luke (Luk 5:20). For it is not a command to his sins to depart, but an authoritative proclamation of the man's pardoned state as a believer. And yet, as the Pharisees understood our Lord to be dispensing pardon by this saying, and Jesus not only acknowledges that they were right, but founds His whole argument upon the correctness of it, we must regard the saying as a royal proclamation of the man's forgiveness by Him to whom it belonged to dispense it; nor could such a style of address be justified on any lower supposition. (See on Luk 7:41, &c.).

JFB: Mar 2:6 - But there were certain of the scribes "and the Pharisees" (Luk 5:21)

"and the Pharisees" (Luk 5:21)

JFB: Mar 2:6 - sitting there Those Jewish ecclesiastics who, as Luke told us (Luk 5:17), "were come out of every village of Galilee, and Judea, and Jerusalem," to make their obser...

Those Jewish ecclesiastics who, as Luke told us (Luk 5:17), "were come out of every village of Galilee, and Judea, and Jerusalem," to make their observations upon this wonderful Person, in anything but a teachable spirit, though as yet their venomous and murderous feeling had not showed itself.

and reasoning in their hearts.

JFB: Mar 2:7 - Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? who can forgive sins but God only? In this second question they expressed a great truth. (See Isa 43:25; Mic 7:18; Exo 34:6-7, &c.). Nor was their first question altogether unnatural, t...

In this second question they expressed a great truth. (See Isa 43:25; Mic 7:18; Exo 34:6-7, &c.). Nor was their first question altogether unnatural, though in our Lord's sole case it was unfounded. That a man, to all appearances like one of themselves, should claim authority and power to forgive sins, they could not, on the first blush of it, but regard as in the last degree startling; nor were they entitled even to weigh such a claim, as worthy of a hearing, save on supposition of resistless evidence afforded by Him in support of the claim. Accordingly, our Lord deals with them as men entitled to such evidence, and supplies it; at the same time chiding them for rashness, in drawing harsh conclusions regarding Himself.

JFB: Mar 2:8 - Why reason ye these things in your hearts Or, as in Matthew, (Mat 9:4) "Wherefore think ye evil in your hearts?"

Or, as in Matthew, (Mat 9:4) "Wherefore think ye evil in your hearts?"

JFB: Mar 2:9 - Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy, Thy sins be forgiven thee Or "are forgiven thee";

Or "are forgiven thee";

JFB: Mar 2:9 - or to say, Arise, and take up thy bed and walk? "Is it easier to command away disease than to bid away sin? If, then, I do the one which you can see, know thus that I have done the other, which you ...

"Is it easier to command away disease than to bid away sin? If, then, I do the one which you can see, know thus that I have done the other, which you cannot see."

JFB: Mar 2:10 - But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins That forgiving power dwells in the Person of this Man, and is exercised by Him while on this earth and going out and in with you. (he saith to the s...

That forgiving power dwells in the Person of this Man, and is exercised by Him while on this earth and going out and in with you.

(he saith to the sick of the palsy),

JFB: Mar 2:11 - I say unto thee, Arise, and take up thy bed, and go thy way into thine house This taking up the portable couch, and walking home with it, was designed to prove the completeness of the cure.

This taking up the portable couch, and walking home with it, was designed to prove the completeness of the cure.

JFB: Mar 2:12 - And immediately he arose, took up the bed "Sweet saying!" says BENGEL: "The bed had borne the man: now the man bore the bed."

"Sweet saying!" says BENGEL: "The bed had borne the man: now the man bore the bed."

JFB: Mar 2:12 - and went forth before them all Proclaiming by that act to the multitude, whose wondering eyes would follow him as he pressed through them, that He who could work such a glorious mir...

Proclaiming by that act to the multitude, whose wondering eyes would follow him as he pressed through them, that He who could work such a glorious miracle of healing, must indeed "have power on earth to forgive sins."

JFB: Mar 2:12 - We never saw it on this fashion "never saw it thus," or, as we say, "never saw the like." In Luke (Luk 5:26) it is, "We have seen strange [unexpected] things to-day"--referring both ...

"never saw it thus," or, as we say, "never saw the like." In Luke (Luk 5:26) it is, "We have seen strange [unexpected] things to-day"--referring both to the miracles wrought and the forgiveness of sins pronounced by Human Lips. In Matthew (Mat 9:8) it is, "They marvelled, and glorified God, which had given such power unto men." At forgiving power they wondered not, but that a man, to all appearance like one of themselves, should possess it!

Clarke: Mar 2:1 - In the house In the house - The house of Peter, with whom Christ lodged when at Capernaum. See the notes on Mat 4:13; Mat 8:13.

In the house - The house of Peter, with whom Christ lodged when at Capernaum. See the notes on Mat 4:13; Mat 8:13.

Clarke: Mar 2:2 - So much as about the door So much as about the door - Meaning the yard or court before the house

So much as about the door - Meaning the yard or court before the house

Clarke: Mar 2:2 - Preached The Word Preached The Word - Τον λογον . The doctrine of the kingdom of God; for so ὁ λογος is repeatedly used.

Preached The Word - Τον λογον . The doctrine of the kingdom of God; for so ὁ λογος is repeatedly used.

Clarke: Mar 2:3 - One sick of the palsy One sick of the palsy - A paralytic person. See on Mat 9:2 (note), etc

One sick of the palsy - A paralytic person. See on Mat 9:2 (note), etc

Clarke: Mar 2:3 - Borne of four Borne of four - Four men, one at each corner of the sofa or couch on which he lay: this sick man appears to have been too feeble to come himself, an...

Borne of four - Four men, one at each corner of the sofa or couch on which he lay: this sick man appears to have been too feeble to come himself, and too weak to be carried in any other way.

Clarke: Mar 2:4 - They uncovered the roof They uncovered the roof - The houses in the east are generally made flat-roofed, that the inhabitants may have the benefit of taking the air on them...

They uncovered the roof - The houses in the east are generally made flat-roofed, that the inhabitants may have the benefit of taking the air on them; they are also furnished with battlements round about, Deu 22:8; Jdg 16:27; and 2Sa 11:2, to prevent persons from falling off; and have a trap door by which they descend into the house. This door, it appears, was too narrow to let down the sick man and his couch; so they uncovered the roof, removed a part of the tiles; and having broken it up, taken away the laths or timber, to which the tiles had been attached, they then had room to let down the afflicted man. See Luk 5:19, and on Mat 10:27 (note); Mat 24:17 (note).

Clarke: Mar 2:7 - Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? - See this explained Mat 9:3 (note), etc.

Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? - See this explained Mat 9:3 (note), etc.

Clarke: Mar 2:12 - He - took up the bed He - took up the bed - The words of Prosper, on this place, are worthy of notice: - "What is sin but a deplorable fall, a grovelling on the earth, a...

He - took up the bed - The words of Prosper, on this place, are worthy of notice: -

"What is sin but a deplorable fall, a grovelling on the earth, a repose in the creature, often followed by a universal palsy of the soul; namely, an utter inability to help itself, to break off its evil habits, to walk in the ways of God, to rise or to take one good step towards him? Grace can repair all in a moment: because it is nothing but the almighty will of God, who commands and does whatever he commands."

Clarke: Mar 2:14 - Levi Levi - The same as Matthew; he appears to have been a Jew, though employed in the odious office of a tax-gatherer. For an account of his call, see h...

Levi - The same as Matthew; he appears to have been a Jew, though employed in the odious office of a tax-gatherer. For an account of his call, see his Gospel, Mat 9:9, etc.

Clarke: Mar 2:16 - Sinners Sinners - By ἁμαρτωλοι, the Gentiles or heathens are generally to be understood in the Gospels, for this was a term the Jews never appli...

Sinners - By ἁμαρτωλοι, the Gentiles or heathens are generally to be understood in the Gospels, for this was a term the Jews never applied to any of themselves, See the note on Mat 9:10

Clarke: Mar 2:16 - How is it that he eateth How is it that he eateth - Some very good MSS., several versions, with Chrysostom and Augustin, read, Why doth Your Master eat?

How is it that he eateth - Some very good MSS., several versions, with Chrysostom and Augustin, read, Why doth Your Master eat?

Clarke: Mar 2:17 - To repentance To repentance - This is omitted by ABDKL, twenty-seven others; both the Syriac, Persic, Coptic, Ethiopic, Armenian, Gothic, Vulgate; six copies of t...

To repentance - This is omitted by ABDKL, twenty-seven others; both the Syriac, Persic, Coptic, Ethiopic, Armenian, Gothic, Vulgate; six copies of the Itala; Euthymius and Augustin. Griesbach has left it out of the text; Grotius, Mill, and Bengel approve of the omission. See on Mat 9:13 (note). I leave it as in the parallel place above quoted. Properly speaking, the righteous cannot be called to repentance. They have already forsaken sin, mourned for it, and turned to God. In the other parallel place, Luk 5:32, all the MSS. and versions retain μετανοιαν, repentance.

Clarke: Mar 2:18 - Why do the disciples of John and of the Pharisees fast Why do the disciples of John and of the Pharisees fast - See this largely explained on Mat 9:14 (note), etc. The following vices are very common to ...

Why do the disciples of John and of the Pharisees fast - See this largely explained on Mat 9:14 (note), etc. The following vices are very common to Pharisees

1.    They are more busied in censuring the conduct of others than in rectifying their own

2.    They desire that every one should regulate his piety by theirs; and embrace their particular customs and forms of devotion

3.    They speak of and compare themselves with other people, only that they may have an opportunity of distinguishing and exalting themselves

On the nature, times, and duration of fasting, see Mat 6:16; Mat 9:15.

Clarke: Mar 2:19 - Can the children of the bride-chamber fast while the bridegroom is with them? Can the children of the bride-chamber fast while the bridegroom is with them? - Among the Hindoos, large parties of friends, belonging both to the b...

Can the children of the bride-chamber fast while the bridegroom is with them? - Among the Hindoos, large parties of friends, belonging both to the bride and bridegroom, attend on both during the wedding day; on the following day, when the bridegroom leaves the house of his father-in-law, the attendants are filled with sorrow, especially the near relations. - Ward’ s Customs.

Clarke: Mar 2:20 - In those days In those days - But instead of εν εκειναις ταις ἡμεραις, many of the best MSS. and versions read, εν εκεινῃ τη...

In those days - But instead of εν εκειναις ταις ἡμεραις, many of the best MSS. and versions read, εν εκεινῃ τῃ ἡμερᾳ, in that day; viz. the day in which Jesus Christ should be delivered up to the Jews and Gentiles. Mill and Bengel approve of this reading, and Griesbach adopts it. The former part of the verse seems to vindicate the common reading.

Clarke: Mar 2:21 - No man - seweth No man - seweth - See Mat 9:16. No man seweth a piece of unscoured cloth upon an old garment. In the common editions this verse begins with και,...

No man - seweth - See Mat 9:16. No man seweth a piece of unscoured cloth upon an old garment. In the common editions this verse begins with και, and, but this is omitted by almost every MS. and version of note. The construction of the whole verse is various in the MSS. The translation given here, and in Mat 9:16, is intelligible, and speaks for itself.

Clarke: Mar 2:23 - Went through the corn fields Went through the corn fields - See on Mat 12:1 (note).

Went through the corn fields - See on Mat 12:1 (note).

Clarke: Mar 2:26 - The days of Abiathar the high priest The days of Abiathar the high priest - It appears from 1Sa 21:1, which is the place referred to here, that Ahimelech was then high priest at Nob: an...

The days of Abiathar the high priest - It appears from 1Sa 21:1, which is the place referred to here, that Ahimelech was then high priest at Nob: and from 1Sa 22:20; 1Sa 23:6, and 1Ch 18:16, it appears that Abiathar was the son of Ahimelech. The Persic reads Abimelech instead of Abiathar. Theophylact supposes that Abiathar was the priest, and Ahimelech or Abimelech the high priest, and thus endeavors to reconcile both the sacred historians. Others reconcile the accounts thus: Ahimelech was called Ahimelech Abiathar, אב ab , father, understood; and Abiathar was called Abiathar Ahimelech, בן ben , son, understood. Probably they both officiated in the high priesthood; and the name of the office was indifferently applied to either

Clarke: Mar 2:26 - Shew-bread Shew-bread - See Mat 12:4.

Shew-bread - See Mat 12:4.

Clarke: Mar 2:27 - The Sabbath was made for man The Sabbath was made for man - That he might have the seventh part of his whole time to devote to the purposes of bodily rest and spiritual exercise...

The Sabbath was made for man - That he might have the seventh part of his whole time to devote to the purposes of bodily rest and spiritual exercises. And in these respects it is of infinite use to mankind. Where no Sabbath is observed, there disease, poverty, and profligacy, generally prevail. Had we no Sabbath, we should soon have no religion. This whole verse is wanting in the Codex Bezae, and in five of the Itala.

Clarke: Mar 2:28 - The Son of man is Lord The Son of man is Lord - See on Mat 12:7, Mat 12:8 (note). Some have understood this as applying to men in general, and not to Christ. The Son of ma...

The Son of man is Lord - See on Mat 12:7, Mat 12:8 (note). Some have understood this as applying to men in general, and not to Christ. The Son of man, any man is Lord of the Sabbath; i.e. it was made for him, for his ease, comfort, and use, and to these purposes he is to apply it. But this is a very harsh, and at the same time a very lax, mode of interpretation; for it seems to say that a man may make what use he pleases of the Sabbath; and, were this true, the moral obligation of the Sabbath would soon be annihilated

God ordained the Sabbath not only to be a type of that rest which remains for the people of God, but to be also a mean of promoting the welfare of men in general

The ordinances of religion should be regulated according to their end, which is the honor of God, and the salvation of men. It is the property of the true religion to contain nothing in it but what is beneficial to man. Hereby God plainly shows that it is neither out of indigence or interest that he requires men to worship and obey him; but only out of goodness, and to make them happy. God prohibited work on the Sabbath day, lest servants should be oppressed by their masters, that the laboring beasts might have necessary rest, and that men might have a proper opportunity to attend upon his ordinances, and get their souls saved. To the Sabbath, under God, we owe much of what is requisite and necessary as well for the body as the soul.

Calvin: Mar 2:24 - Why do they on the Sabbath what is not lawful? Mar 2:24.Why do they on the Sabbath what is not lawful? The Pharisees do not blame the disciples of Christ for plucking ears of corn from a field th...

Mar 2:24.Why do they on the Sabbath what is not lawful? The Pharisees do not blame the disciples of Christ for plucking ears of corn from a field that was not their own, but for violating the Sabbath; as if there had been a precept to this effect, that famishing men ought rather to die than to satisfy their hunger. Now the only reason for keeping the Sabbath was, that the people, by sanctifying themselves to God, might be employed in true and spiritual worship; and next, that, being free from all worldly occupations, they might be more at liberty to attend the holy assemblies. The lawful observation of it, therefore, must have a reference to this object; for the Law ought to be interpreted according to the design of the Legislator. But this shows clearly the malicious and implacable nature of superstition, and particularly the proud and cruel dispositions of hypocrites, when ambition is joined to hatred of the person. It was not the mere affectation of pretended holiness, as I have said, that made the Pharisees so stern and rigorous; but as they expressly wished to carp at every thing that Christ said or did, they could not do otherwise than put a wrong meaning in cases where there was nothing to blame, as usually happens with prejudiced interpreters. The accusation was brought—according to Matthew and Mark—against our Lord, and—according to Luke—against his disciples. But there is no inconsistency here; for the disciples were in all probability so harassed, that the charge was directed chiefly against the Master himself. It is even possible that the Pharisees first wrangled with the disciples, and afterwards with Christ, and that, in the rage of their malice, they blamed him for remaining silent, and permitting his disciples to break the Sabbath.

Calvin: Mar 2:27 - The Sabbath was made for man Mar 2:27.The Sabbath was made for man This Fifth argument is related by Mark alone. The general meaning is, that those persons judge amiss who turn ...

Mar 2:27.The Sabbath was made for man This Fifth argument is related by Mark alone. The general meaning is, that those persons judge amiss who turn to man’s destruction, 83 the Sabbath which God appointed for his benefit. The Pharisees saw the disciples of Christ employed in a holy work; they saw them worn out with the fatigue of the journey, and partly with want of food; and yet are offended that, when they are hungry, they take a few grains of corn for the support of their wearied bodies. Is not this a foolish attempt to overturn the purpose of God, when they demand to the injury of men that observation of the Sabbath which he intended to be advantageous? But they are mistaken, I think, who suppose that in this passage the Sabbath is entirely abolished; for Christ simply informs us what is the proper use of it. Though he asserted, a little before, that he is Lord of the Sabbath, yet the full time for its abolition 84 was not yet come, because the veil of the temple was not yet rent, (Mat 27:51.)

Defender: Mar 2:5 - sins be forgiven Indirectly, sin in the world is the root cause of disease. If Jesus, by His own power, can heal, He also can forgive (see note on Mat 9:6)."

Indirectly, sin in the world is the root cause of disease. If Jesus, by His own power, can heal, He also can forgive (see note on Mat 9:6)."

Defender: Mar 2:14 - Levi Levi is the same as Matthew (see note on Mat 9:9)."

Levi is the same as Matthew (see note on Mat 9:9)."

Defender: Mar 2:20 - fast Fasting is appropriate during times of grief or great need, not in times of joy, such as wedding celebrations. Jesus, as the heavenly Bridegroom, was ...

Fasting is appropriate during times of grief or great need, not in times of joy, such as wedding celebrations. Jesus, as the heavenly Bridegroom, was presently with His disciples, but after His ascension their future mission would encounter opposition and persecution, and then they would fast (note Paul's testimony in 2Co 11:27)."

Defender: Mar 2:23 - corn This "corn" was not what we call corn today (actually Indian maize) but wheat or some similar grain."

This "corn" was not what we call corn today (actually Indian maize) but wheat or some similar grain."

Defender: Mar 2:24 - sabbath day With reference to Christ's activities on the Sabbath, see Mat 12:8, note; and Mat 12:13, note. The sabbath had been "made for man" (Mar 2:27) as a ble...

With reference to Christ's activities on the Sabbath, see Mat 12:8, note; and Mat 12:13, note. The sabbath had been "made for man" (Mar 2:27) as a blessing, not as a cruel burden."

Defender: Mar 2:26 - Abiathar the high priest Jesus knew that Abiathar's father Ahimelech was still high priest at this time (1Sa 21:1-6). However, Abiathar was no doubt present at the time, and s...

Jesus knew that Abiathar's father Ahimelech was still high priest at this time (1Sa 21:1-6). However, Abiathar was no doubt present at the time, and soon thereafter became high priest under David. The account here by Mark simply says that this event occurred in the time of Abiathar, not necessarily in the time when he served as high priest."

TSK: Mar 2:1 - again // and it again : Mar 1:45; Mat 9:1; Luk 5:18 and it : Mar 7:24; Luk 18:35-38; Joh 4:47; Act 2:6

TSK: Mar 2:2 - straightway // and he straightway : Mar 2:13, Mar 1:33, Mar 1:37, Mar 1:45, Mar 4:1, Mar 4:2; Luk 5:17, Luk 12:1 and he : Mar 1:14, Mar 6:34; Psa 40:9; Mat 5:2; Luk 8:1, Lu...

TSK: Mar 2:3 - bringing bringing : Mat 9:1, Mat 9:2-8; Luk 5:18-26

TSK: Mar 2:4 - they uncovered they uncovered : Deu 22:8; Luk 5:19

they uncovered : Deu 22:8; Luk 5:19

TSK: Mar 2:5 - saw // he said // Son // sins saw : Gen 22:12; Joh 2:25; Act 11:23, Act 14:9; Eph 2:8; 1Th 1:3, 1Th 1:4; Jam 2:18-22 he said : Mar 2:9, Mar 2:10; Isa 53:11; Mat 9:2; Luk 5:20, Luk ...

saw : Gen 22:12; Joh 2:25; Act 11:23, Act 14:9; Eph 2:8; 1Th 1:3, 1Th 1:4; Jam 2:18-22

he said : Mar 2:9, Mar 2:10; Isa 53:11; Mat 9:2; Luk 5:20, Luk 7:47-50; Act 5:31; 2Co 2:10; Col 3:13

Son : The Jews believed that not only death but all disease was the consequence of sin. ""There is no death without sin, nor any chastisement without iniquity;""and that ""no diseased person could be healed of his disease till his sins were blotted out.""Our Lord, therefore, as usual, appeals to their received opinions, and asserts his high dignity, by first forgiving the sins, and then healing the body of the paralytic. Mar 5:34; Mat 9:22; Luk 8:48

sins : Job 33:17-26; Psa 32:1-5, Psa 90:7-9, Psa 103:3; Isa 38:17; Joh 5:14; 1Co 11:30; Jam 5:15

TSK: Mar 2:6 - and reasoning and reasoning : Mar 8:17; Mat 16:7, Mat 16:8; Luk 5:21, Luk 5:22; 2Co 10:5 *marg.

and reasoning : Mar 8:17; Mat 16:7, Mat 16:8; Luk 5:21, Luk 5:22; 2Co 10:5 *marg.

TSK: Mar 2:7 - speak // who speak : Mar 14:64; Mat 9:3, Mat 26:65; Joh 10:33, Joh 10:36 who : Job 14:4; Psa 130:4; Isa 43:25; Dan 9:9; Mic 7:18; Luk 5:21, Luk 7:49; Joh 20:20-23

TSK: Mar 2:8 - when // Why when : 1Ch 29:17; Mat 9:4; Luk 5:22, Luk 6:8, Luk 7:39, Luk 7:40; Joh 2:24, Joh 2:25, Joh 6:64, Joh 21:17; Heb 4:13; Rev 2:23 Why : Mar 7:21; Psa 139:...

TSK: Mar 2:9 - is it // Thy sins is it : Mat 9:5; Luk 5:22-25 Thy sins : Mar 2:5

is it : Mat 9:5; Luk 5:22-25

Thy sins : Mar 2:5

TSK: Mar 2:10 - -- Dan 7:13, Dan 7:14; Mat 9:6-8, Mat 16:13; Joh 5:20-27; Act 5:31; 1Ti 1:13-16

TSK: Mar 2:11 - -- Mar 1:41; Joh 5:8-10, Joh 6:63

TSK: Mar 2:12 - insomuch // glorified // We never insomuch : Mar 1:27; Mat 9:8, Mat 12:23; Luk 7:16 glorified : Mat 15:31; Luk 5:26, Luk 13:13, Luk 17:15; Act 4:21 We never : Mat 9:33; Joh 7:31, Joh 9...

TSK: Mar 2:13 - by // and all by : Mat 9:9, Mat 13:1 and all : Mar 2:2, Mar 3:7, Mar 3:8, Mar 3:20,Mar 3:21, Mar 4:1; Pro 1:20-22; Luk 19:48, Luk 21:38

TSK: Mar 2:14 - he saw // Alphaeus // receipt of custom // Follow me he saw : Mar 3:18; Mat 9:9; Luk 5:27 Alphaeus : Mar 3:18; Luk 6:15; Act 1:13 receipt of custom : or, place where the custom was received Follow me : M...

he saw : Mar 3:18; Mat 9:9; Luk 5:27

Alphaeus : Mar 3:18; Luk 6:15; Act 1:13

receipt of custom : or, place where the custom was received

Follow me : Mar 1:17-20; Mat 4:19-22

TSK: Mar 2:15 - -- Mat 9:10,Mat 9:11, Mat 21:31, Mat 21:32; Luk 5:29, Luk 5:30, Luk 6:17, Luk 15:1

TSK: Mar 2:16 - How // publicans How : Mar 2:7; Isa 65:5; Luk 15:2-7, Luk 18:11, Luk 19:7, Luk 19:10; 1Co 2:15; Heb 12:3 publicans : Mat 18:17

TSK: Mar 2:17 - They that are whole // I came They that are whole : Mat 9:12, Mat 9:13; Luk 5:31, Luk 5:32, Luk 15:7, Luk 15:29, Luk 16:15; Joh 9:34, Joh 9:40 I came : Isa 1:18, Isa 55:7; Mat 18:1...

TSK: Mar 2:18 - the disciples // Why the disciples : Mat 9:14-17; Luk 5:33-39 Why : Mat 6:16, Mat 6:18, Mat 23:5; Luk 18:12; Rom 10:3

TSK: Mar 2:19 - Can Can : Gen 29:22; Jdg 14:10,Jdg 14:11; Psa 45:14; Son 6:8; Mat 25:1-10

TSK: Mar 2:20 - the bridegroom // be taken // and the bridegroom : Psa 45:11; Son 3:11; Isa 54:5, Isa 62:5; Joh 3:29; 2Co 11:2; Rev 19:7, Rev 21:9 be taken : Zec 13:7; Mat 26:31; Joh 7:33, Joh 7:34, J...

TSK: Mar 2:21 - seweth // new seweth : Psa 103:13-15; Isa 57:16; 1Co 10:13 new : or, raw, or, unwrought, Mat 9:16

seweth : Psa 103:13-15; Isa 57:16; 1Co 10:13

new : or, raw, or, unwrought, Mat 9:16

TSK: Mar 2:22 - bottles bottles : Jos 9:4, Jos 9:13; Job 32:19; Psa 119:80,Psa 119:83; Mat 9:17; Luk 5:37, Luk 5:38

TSK: Mar 2:23 - that // to pluck that : Mat 12:1-8; Luk 6:1-5 to pluck : Deu 23:24, Deu 23:25

that : Mat 12:1-8; Luk 6:1-5

to pluck : Deu 23:24, Deu 23:25

TSK: Mar 2:24 - why // that why : Mar 2:7, Mar 2:16; Mat 7:3-5, Mat 15:2, Mat 15:3, Mat 23:23, Mat 23:24; Heb 12:3 that : Exo 20:10, Exo 31:15, Exo 35:2, Exo 35:3; Num 15:32-36; ...

TSK: Mar 2:25 - Have // what Have : Mar 12:20,Mar 12:26; Mat 19:4, Mat 21:16, Mat 21:42, Mat 22:31; Luk 10:26 what : 1Sa 21:3-6

TSK: Mar 2:26 - Abiathar // which is not lawful Abiathar : It appears from the passage referred to here, that Ahimelech was then high priest at Nob; and from other passages, that Abiathar was his so...

Abiathar : It appears from the passage referred to here, that Ahimelech was then high priest at Nob; and from other passages, that Abiathar was his son. Various conjectures have been formed in order to solve this difficulty; and some, instead of untying, have cut the knot, by pronouncing it an interpolation. The most probable opinion seems to be, that both father and son had two names, the father being also called Abiathar; and this appears almost certain from 2Sa 8:17; 1Ch 18:16, where Ahimelech seems evidently termed Abiathar, while Abiathar is called Ahimelech or Abimelech. (Compare 1Ki 2:26, 1Ki 2:27.) 1Sa 22:20-22, 1Sa 23:6, 1Sa 23:9; 2Sa 8:17, 2Sa 15:24, 2Sa 15:29, 2Sa 15:35, 2Sa 20:25; 1Ki 1:7; 1Ki 2:22, 1Ki 2:26, 1Ki 2:27, 1Ki 4:4

which is not lawful : Exo 29:32, Exo 29:33; Lev 24:5-9

TSK: Mar 2:27 - -- Exo 23:12; Deu 5:14; Neh 9:13, Neh 9:14; Isa 58:13; Eze 20:12, Eze 20:20; Luk 6:9; Joh 7:23; 1Co 3:21, 1Co 3:22; 2Co 4:15; Col 2:16

TSK: Mar 2:28 - -- Mar 3:4; Mat 12:8; Luk 6:5, Luk 13:15, Luk 13:16; Joh 5:9-11, Joh 5:17, Joh 9:5-11, Joh 9:14, Joh 9:16; Eph 1:22; Rev 1:10

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Mar 2:1 - Chapter Summary Chapter Summary Mar 2:1-2 Christ, followed by multitudes, Mar 2:3-12 healeth one sick of the palsy, Mar 2:13-14 calleth Matthew from the rece...

Chapter Summary

Mar 2:1-2 Christ, followed by multitudes,

Mar 2:3-12 healeth one sick of the palsy,

Mar 2:13-14 calleth Matthew from the receipt of custom,

Mar 2:15-17 justifieth himself for eating with publicans and sinners,

Mar 2:18-22 excuses his disciples for not fasting,

Mar 2:23-28 and vindicates them for plucking the ears of corn on the

sabbath day.

Ver. 1-12. We read the history of this miracle in Matthew nine. See Poole on "Mat 9:1" , and following verses to Mat 9:8 , having there taken in those passages in this evangelist’ s relation which Matthew had not, I shall only take notice of some few things not there touched upon.

He preached the word unto them; the word of God, the gospel. There are other words, but that is the word, Mat 13:20 Mar 8:32 Mar 16:20 Luk 1:2 Act 17:11 : the most excellent word, and the only word to be preached.

Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? who can forgive sins but God? So as it was on all hands then received, that none but the creditor could discharge the debt, none but God could forgive sins. But how spite cankers things! Our Saviour did not say till afterward that he forgave him his sins. What blasphemy was there in this saying, Thy sins be forgiven thee? But what if none but God could forgive sins? Could also any but God tell unto men their thoughts? 1Sa 16:7 1Ch 28:9 2Ch 6:30 Psa 7:9 Jer 17:10 . That Christ could tell their thoughts was matter of demonstration to them, Mar 2:6,8 ; why might they not also have allowed him a power to forgive sins? But they could not for this charge him with blasphemy, which was their malicious design.

Poole: Mar 2:13 - -- Still it is said he taught them thereby letting his ministers know what is their great work; and therefore they should be persons apt to teach, ...

Still it is said he taught them thereby letting his ministers know what is their great work; and therefore they should be persons apt to teach, as Paul directeth Timothy, 1Ti 3:2 .

Poole: Mar 2:14-17 - -- Ver. 14-17. We had this piece of history with some addition in Mat 9:9-13 , where he was called Matthew: Mark and Luke both call him Levi: it was...

Ver. 14-17. We had this piece of history with some addition in Mat 9:9-13 , where he was called Matthew: Mark and Luke both call him Levi: it was ordinary with the Jews to have two names. See Poole on "Mat 9:9" .

Poole: Mar 2:16 - -- Ver. 16 . See Poole on "Mar 2:15"

Ver. 16 . See Poole on "Mar 2:15"

Poole: Mar 2:18-22 - -- Ver. 18-22. See Poole on "Mat 9:14" , and following verses to Mat 9:17 . The sum of all teacheth us: 1. That fasting is an exercise suited to affli...

Ver. 18-22. See Poole on "Mat 9:14" , and following verses to Mat 9:17 . The sum of all teacheth us:

1. That fasting is an exercise suited to afflictive dispensations of Providence, and ought to be proportioned to its season.

2. That new converts are not to be discouraged by too severe exercises of religion, but to be trained up to them by degrees.

Poole: Mar 2:22 - -- Ver. 22 .

Ver. 22 .

Poole: Mar 2:23-28 - -- Ver. 23-28. We had also this history in Mat 12:1-8 , in our notes upon which we considered all those passages relating to it which this evangelist ha...

Ver. 23-28. We had also this history in Mat 12:1-8 , in our notes upon which we considered all those passages relating to it which this evangelist hath, for the explication of which I refer my reader thither. See Poole on "Mat 12:1" , and following verses to Mat 12:8 . It refers to a story, 1Sa 21:1 , where Ahimelech is said to have been the high priest. Abiathar was his son, as appeareth by 1Sa 22:20 , who escaped the slaughter of his father’ s family upon the information of Doeg the Edomite, and followed David. It was in the latter end of the priesthood of Ahimelech, and probably Abiathar assisted his father in the execution of the office, and so suddenly succeeded, that Mark calls it the time of his priesthood. Besides that those words, epi ’ Abiayar , do not necessarily signify in the days of Abiathar, as we translate it, no more than epi metoicesiav signifies in the carrying into captivity, but about the time, or near the time; which it was, for Ahimelech was presently after it (possibly within a few days) cut off, as we read, 1Sa 22:17,18 ; and Abiathar was a more noted man than his father Ahimelech, enjoying the priesthood more than forty years, and being the person who was made famous by carrying the ephod to David.

Lightfoot: Mar 2:4 - They uncovered the roof, etc. And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken it up, they let down the...

And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay.   

[They uncovered the roof, etc.] here I recollect that phrase the way of the roof; "When Rabh Houna was dead, his bier could not be carried out through the door," the door being too strait; "therefore they thought good to draw it out and let it down through the roof; or through the way of the roof. But Rabh Chasda said to them, 'Behold, we have learned from him that it redounds to the honour of a wise man to be carried out by the door.'"  

"It is written, 'And they shall eat within thy gates' (Deu 26:12); that is, when the entrance into the house is by the gate, to except the way through the roof." "Does he enter into the house, using the way through the gate, or using the way through the roof?" The place treats of a house, in the lower part of which the owner dwells; but the upper part; is let out to another. It is asked, what way he must enter who dwells in an upper room, whether by the door and the lower parts, where the owner dwells; or whether he must climb up to the roof by the way to the roof; that is, as the Gloss hath it, "That he ascend without the house by a ladder set against it for entrance into the upper room; and so go into the upper room."  

By ladders set up, or perhaps fastened there before, they first draw up the paralytic upon the roof; Luk 5:19. Then seeing there was a door in every roof through which they went up from the lower parts of the house into the roof, and this being too narrow to let down the bed and the sick man in it, they widen that space by pulling off the tiles that lay about it.  

Well, having made a hole through the roof, the paralytic is let down into the upper chamber. There Christ sits, and the Pharisees and the doctors of the law with him, and not in the lower parts of the house. For it was customary for them, when they discoursed of the law or religion, to go up into the upper chamber.  

"These are the traditions which they taught in the upper chamber of Hananiah, Ben Hezekiah, Ben Garon." "The elders went up into an upper chamber in Jericho. They went up also into an upper chamber in Jabneh." "Rabh Jochanan and his disciples went up to an upper chamber; and read and expounded." Compare Mar 14:15; Act 1:13; Act 20:8.

Lightfoot: Mar 2:7 - Who can forgive sins Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? who can forgive sins but God only?   [Who can forgive sins?] "A certain heretic said to Rabh Id...

Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies? who can forgive sins but God only?   

[Who can forgive sins?] "A certain heretic said to Rabh Idith, It is written, 'And he said unto Moses, Come up unto the Lord,' Exo 24:1. It should rather have been said, 'Come up to me.' He answereth, This is Mitatron; whose name is like the name of his Lord, as it is written, 'My name is in him,' Exo 23:21. If it be so, then said the other, he is to be worshipped. To whom Idith replied, It is written properly, Do not embitter or provoke him; but they illy and perversely read, Do not change for him, do not exchange me for him. If that be the sense, said the other, what is the meaning of that, 'He will not forgive your sins?' He answered, True indeed, for we received him not so much as for a messenger." The Gloss is, "'He will not forgive your sins'; that is, He cannot pardon your sins; and then, what advantage is there from him? For he had not the power of pardoning our sins; we therefore rejected him," etc. Ye rejected him, indeed, in whom was the name of Jehovah; but alas! how much to your own mischief!

Lightfoot: Mar 2:9 - Whether is it easier to say, etc. Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and take up thy bed, and walk?   [W...

Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and take up thy bed, and walk?   

[Whether is it easier to say, etc.] he that observes the use of the word it is easy and it is hard; in the Jewish schools (and the schoolmen were now with Christ), cannot think it improper that is it easier should be of the same import with it is easy; which word denotes the thing or the sense plain, smooth, and without scruple; it is hard; denotes the contrary. As if our Saviour had said, "Were not the sense plainer, and more suited to the present business to have said, 'Arise and take up thy bed,' than to say, 'Thy sins are forgiven thee?' But I say thus, that ye may know that the Son of man hath power," etc. He does not speak of the easiness of the pronunciation of the words, but of the easiness of the sense. And I should thus render the words, "It is easier to say to the paralytic, Thy sins are forgiven thee, than to say," etc. 'Whether to say,' as it is vulgarly rendered, hath a sense not to be disapproved of; but, 'than to say,' hath a sense more emphatical. Is not the sense easier as to the present business to say, 'Thy sins are forgiven,' than to say, 'Rise up and walk?'

Lightfoot: Mar 2:12 - He went out before them all And immediately he arose, took up the bed, and went forth before them all; insomuch that they were all amazed, and glorified God, saying, We ne...

And immediately he arose, took up the bed, and went forth before them all; insomuch that they were all amazed, and glorified God, saying, We never saw it on this fashion.   

[He went out before them all.] It is very well rendered, " before them all": and it might truly be rendered " against them all," according to another signification of the word. That is, when the multitude was so crowded that there was no way of going out through it, he, being not only made whole, but strong and lusty, pressed through the press of the multitude, and stoutly made his way with his bed upon his shoulders.

Lightfoot: Mar 2:16 - And sinners And when the scribes and Pharisees saw him eat with publicans and sinners, they said unto his disciples, How is it that he eateth and drinketh with...

And when the scribes and Pharisees saw him eat with publicans and sinners, they said unto his disciples, How is it that he eateth and drinketh with publicans and sinners?   

[And sinners.] Who were they? "Dicers, usurers, plunderers, publicans, shepherds of lesser cattle, those that sell the fruit of the seventh year," etc.

Lightfoot: Mar 2:26 - In the days of Abiathar the high priest How he went into the house of God in the days of Abiathar the high priest, and did eat the showbread, which is not lawful to eat but for the priest...

How he went into the house of God in the days of Abiathar the high priest, and did eat the showbread, which is not lawful to eat but for the priests, and gave also to them which were with him?   

[In the days of Abiathar the high priest.] It is well enough known what is here said in defence of the purity of the text; namely, that Ahimelech the father was called Abiathar; and Abiathar the son was called also Ahimelech. But I suppose that something more was propounded by our Saviour in these words. For it was common to the Jews under Abiathar to understand the Urim and Thummim. Nor without good reason, when it appears, that under the father and the son, both of that name, the mention of inquiring by Urim and Thummim is more frequent than it is ever anywhere else; and, after Abiathar the son, there is scarcely mention of it at all. Christ therefore very properly adds, in the days of Abiathar the high priest; therein speaking according to a very received opinion in the nation: as though he had said, "David ate the shewbread given him by the high priest, who had the oracle by Urim and thummim present with him, and who acted by the divine direction."  

"Ahitophel, that is, a counsellor, Benaiah, the son of Jehoiada, that is, the Sanhedrim; Abiathar, that is, Urim and Thummim."

Haydock: Mar 2:2 - -- Some Greek and Latin copies have, after eight days.

Some Greek and Latin copies have, after eight days.

Haydock: Mar 2:4 - -- Such diligence ought to be used to bring sinners to Christ, by means of the sacraments, as was used to procure for this man, through Christ, the healt...

Such diligence ought to be used to bring sinners to Christ, by means of the sacraments, as was used to procure for this man, through Christ, the health of his body. (Bristow)

Haydock: Mar 2:5 - When Jesus saw their faith When Jesus saw their faith. Our Lord is moved to shew mercy to sinners, by the faith and desires, and prayers of others; for this man was not more h...

When Jesus saw their faith. Our Lord is moved to shew mercy to sinners, by the faith and desires, and prayers of others; for this man was not more helpless in his limbs, than in his soul. From this example, we are taught that in sickness the sacraments and helps of the Church, which are the medicines of the soul, should be called for in the first instance; for Christ first healed the sick man's soul, before he removed his bodily infirmity. We also learn that many diseases originate in sin, and that we are to remove the effect by removing the cause.

Haydock: Mar 2:10 - The Son of man // On earth The Son of man. Jesus Christ here proveth that himself as man, and not as God only, hath power to forgive sins; by this, that he was able to do mira...

The Son of man. Jesus Christ here proveth that himself as man, and not as God only, hath power to forgive sins; by this, that he was able to do miracles, and make the sick man suddenly rise; so the apostles and their successors, though they be not God, may in like manner have authority from God to remit sins, not as God, but as God's ministers, and acting in his name, and vested with his delegated authority. ---

On earth. This power which the Son of man hath to remit sins on earth, was never taken from him, but is perpetuated in his sacraments and ministers, by whom he still remitteth sins in the Church, and not in heaven only. Relative to sin, there is one court of conscience on earth, and another in heaven, and the judgment of heaven followeth and approveth this on earth; as is plain by the words of our Saviour, to Peter first, and then to all the apostles: Whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall by bound also in heaven; and whatsoever thou shalt loose upon earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven. See Matthew xvi. 19. and xviii. 18. Whereupon St. Jerome sayeth: that priests having the keys of the kingdom of heaven, judge in some manner before the day of judgment. (Ep. v. ad Heliod; and St. John Chrysostom, more at large, lib. iii. de Sacerd.)

Haydock: Mar 2:12 - -- This paralytic is not the same as that mentioned in St. John; for that distressed man had no one to assist him, whereas this person had four; the form...

This paralytic is not the same as that mentioned in St. John; for that distressed man had no one to assist him, whereas this person had four; the former was by the side of the Probatica, but the latter in a house at Capharnaum. (Theophylactus)

Haydock: Mar 2:14 - -- To follow Christ, is to imitate him; wherefore this apostle, that he might be able to follow Christ, the model of poverty, not so much by his bodily s...

To follow Christ, is to imitate him; wherefore this apostle, that he might be able to follow Christ, the model of poverty, not so much by his bodily steps, as by the inward affections of his soul, forsook all; he not only forsook his present goods, but despised all danger, which he incurred by leaving his business abruptly, and without rendering any account of it to his employers or governors. (Ven. Bede) ---

The person to whom Christ addresses the words, follow me, was Matthew: see Matthew ix. 9.

Haydock: Mar 2:17 - -- The Greek printed copies, and some manuscripts add to penance, as we read in Luke v. 33.

The Greek printed copies, and some manuscripts add to penance, as we read in Luke v. 33.

Haydock: Mar 2:18 - -- See Matthew ix. 14, and Luke v. 33.

See Matthew ix. 14, and Luke v. 33.

Haydock: Mar 2:20 - -- Jesus Christ here foretelleth that fasting shall be used in his Church, no less than in the old law, or in the time of John the Baptist. See Matthew ...

Jesus Christ here foretelleth that fasting shall be used in his Church, no less than in the old law, or in the time of John the Baptist. See Matthew ix. 15. ---

When first we begin to be converted to God, the spiritual consolations which God infuses into our souls, cause in us an overflowing of spiritual delights, so that we then feast, and are in the midst of delight; but when the Bridegroom shall be taken away, when these spiritual consolations cease, then we fast, and find the commandments difficult. It is then we must prepare ourselves for tribulation. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Mar 2:25 - When he had need When he had need. In necessity many things are done without sin, which in other circumstances it would be unlawful to do. (Bristow)

When he had need. In necessity many things are done without sin, which in other circumstances it would be unlawful to do. (Bristow)

Haydock: Mar 2:26 - Under Abiathar Under Abiathar. The priest from whom David had these loaves, is called Achimelech, 1 Kings xxi. The most probable answer to this difficulty is,...

Under Abiathar. The priest from whom David had these loaves, is called Achimelech, 1 Kings xxi. The most probable answer to this difficulty is, that the priest had both these names of Achimelech and of Abiathar, as also his father had before him. For he that (1 Kings xxii.) is called Abiathar, the son of Achimelech, is called 2 Kings viii. 17, Achimelech, the son of Abiathar. See also 1 Paralipomenon xviii. 16. (Witham) ---

Others say that Abiathar, son of Achimelech, was present, and sanctioned the deed of his father, thus making it his own. (Denis the Carthusian)

Haydock: Mar 2:28 - -- The maker of the law may abrogate or dispense with it when and where, for just cause, it seemeth good to him: thus the Church can dispense with, chang...

The maker of the law may abrogate or dispense with it when and where, for just cause, it seemeth good to him: thus the Church can dispense with, change, or abrogate, for just reasons, the disciplines of the Church founded upon Church authority. This we prove also from the action of David, (ver. 26, above) which the Scripture notices without blaming it, because the observance of the law, prescribed for the utility of man, must yield to the necessities of man.

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Gill: Mar 2:1 - And again he entered into Capernaum after some days And again he entered into Capernaum after some days,.... After he had been preaching in the synagogues throughout Galilee, and after he had spent some...

And again he entered into Capernaum after some days,.... After he had been preaching in the synagogues throughout Galilee, and after he had spent some days in prayer, and private retirement in desert places: and it was noised that he was in, the house; a report was spread throughout the city that he was in the house of Simon and Andrew, where he was before, and where he used to be when in Capernaum.

Gill: Mar 2:2 - And straightway many were gathered together // insomuch that there was no room to receive them // no, not so much as about the door // and he preached the word unto them And straightway many were gathered together,.... From all parts of the city, insomuch that there was no room to receive them; in the house: by whic...

And straightway many were gathered together,.... From all parts of the city,

insomuch that there was no room to receive them; in the house: by which it should seem to be a large one, though not large enough to hold such a numerous company as were got together:

no, not so much as about the door; or the places before the door, the porch, the court, or courtyard. The crowd was so great, that neither the house, nor the out places before, could hold them, nor could they come even near the door;

and he preached the word unto them. The Ethiopic version renders it, "he spake his own word to them that came to him"; he preached the Gospel, the word of grace and truth, of life and salvation, to as many as could come near him, and were within the hearing of him. To me it seems, that our Lord went up into an upper room, and out of the window preached to the people, that were, in great numbers, without doors; and the following narrative seems to confirm this conjecture.

Gill: Mar 2:3 - And they came unto him // bringing one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four And they came unto him,.... A considerable body of people, townsmen, friends, and relations of the person after mentioned: bringing one sick of the...

And they came unto him,.... A considerable body of people, townsmen, friends, and relations of the person after mentioned:

bringing one sick of the palsy, which was borne of four; carried by four men upon their shoulders, as if he was a dead carcass; so weak and enfeebled was he by his disease, that he could not walk, or be otherwise brought; or rather upon a bed, which four men, at the four comers of it, carried in their hands; and so the Ethiopic version renders it, "four men carried him on a bed"; and certain it is, by what follows, that he was brought upon a bed. This man's case appears to be a very bad one, and what seems to be incurable by the art of medicine: it was not a slight touch of the palsy, but a general one, which had deprived him of motion and sensation. The palsy is a disease, whereby the body, or some of its parts, lose their motion, and sometimes their sensation or feeling: the causes of it are an impeded influx of the nervous spirits into the villi, or the muscles, or of the arterious blood into their vessels; which may happen from some fault either in the brain, the nerves, muscles, or their vessels. The palsy is said to be "perfect", or complete, when there is a privation of motion and sensation at the same time; "imperfect", when one of the two is destroyed, the other remaining. The palsy again is either "universal, lateral", or "partial". The "universal" palsy, called also "paraplegia", or "paraplexia", is a general immobility of all the muscles that receive nerves from the cerebrum, or cerebellum, except those of the head--its cause is usually supposed to reside in the ventricles of the brain, or in the root of the spinal marrow.--The "lateral" palsy, called also "hemiplegia", is the same disease with the "paraplegia", only that it affects but one side of the body. Its cause is the same, only restrained to one side of the brain, or spinal marrow. The "partial" palsy is where some particular part, or member, alone is affected; as, for instance, where the motion of the arm, or leg, is destroyed z. Now this man's disease seems to be the perfect and general palsy, which affects the whole body, or the "paraplegia", which reaches every part but the head; whereby all sense, as well as motion, are destroyed, and sometimes only one of them: but in this case it seems as if both of them were lost: that he was motionless, is clear from his being carried by four persons; and it looks as if he had lost his feeling, since he is not said to be grievously tormented, as the centurion's servant is said to be, Mat 8:6, whose disease seems to have been of the partial or imperfect kind; or however, though it deprived him of motion, yet not of sensation; his might be a kind of scorbutic palsy. This man is an emblem of a sinner in a state of nature, who is insensible of his condition, of the exceeding sinfulness of sin, of his danger and misery to which he is exposed, of his lost and undone state, of the necessity of the new birth, and of the need of salvation by Jesus Christ; and who, as he is destitute of spiritual life, can have no spiritual motion to come to Christ for life and salvation, or any spiritual strength and activity to move in, or perform any thing that is spiritually good: and as the friends of this man took him, and brought him to Christ, and laid him down before him, hoping he might receive a cure from him, though from what appears, it was unasked by him, as he did; so it becomes the friends and relations of unregenerate persons, who have received the grace of God themselves, and are in a sound and safe estate, to be concerned for them; to bring them under the means of grace, where they may be brought to a sense of their sins, and to a comfortable view of the free and full forgiveness of them, as this man: and this should be done, even though there may be difficulties in the accomplishment of it, as there were in this case, as is manifest from what follows.

Gill: Mar 2:4 - And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press // they uncovered the roof where he was // and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press,.... To the room where Jesus was, nor into the house, nor even to the door, the crowd about i...

And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press,.... To the room where Jesus was, nor into the house, nor even to the door, the crowd about it was so great,

they uncovered the roof where he was. The Arabic version reads it, "they went up to the roof"; and the Persic thus, "they carried him up upon the roof". The place where Christ was, seems to be an upper room; for in such an one the Jewish doctors used to meet, and discourse together about religious matters; see Act 1:13. Though some think this was a mean house in which Christ was, and had no upper room, but the ground floor was open to the roof, through which the man, sick of the palsy, was let down on his bed to Christ; and the rather, because the people crowded about the door to get in, and there was no room to receive them, no not about it: but even from this circumstance it seems most reasonable, that there was an upper room in which Christ was, and at a window in which he might preach to the people, with much more convenience, than at, or about the door, where they were pressing: for, certain it is, that he did preach the word to them, Mar 2:2, and many instances may be given of the above mentioned doctors, whose usages, when indifferent, and not sinful, might be complied with by Christ, as these were, of their meeting and conversing together in upper rooms. Instead of many, take the few following a:

"It happened to Rabban Gamaliel, and the elders, who were sitting בעלייה, "in an upper room in Jericho", that they brought them dates, and they did eat, &c,''

Again b,

"these are some of the traditions which they taught, בעליית, "in the upper chamber" of Hananiah ben Hezekiah, ben Garon.''

So it is likewise said c, that

"R. Tarphon, or Tryphon, and the elders, were sitting "in the chamber" of the house of Nithzah, in Lydda, and this question was asked before them, is doctrine greatest, or practice greatest?''

Once more d,

"the elders of the house of Shammai, and the elders of the house of Hillell, went up, לעליית, "to the upper chamber" of Jochanan ben Bethira, and said, that the Tzitzith, or fringes, had no measure, &c.''

Now, over this upper room, was a flat roof, with battlements about it; for so the Jews were obliged to build their houses, Deu 22:8, to which they had a way of going to and from, both within and without side their houses; See Gill on Mat 24:17. Hence we so often read e of דרך גגות, "the way of the roofs", in distinction from דרך פתחים "the way of the doors"; by which they entered into their houses, and by which means, things might be carried from a court to a roof, and from a roof to a court; about which the doctors dispute, saying, that on a sabbath day f,

"it is forbidden to ascend and descend from the roofs to the court, and from the court to the roofs; and the vessels, whose abode is in the court, it is lawful to move them in the court, and which are in the roofs, it is lawful to move them in the roofs.--Says Rabbi, when we were learning the law with R. Simeon at Tekoah, we brought up oil, and a confection of old wine, water, and balsam, from roof to roof, and from roof to court, and from court to court, and from the court to a close, and from one close to another, till we came to the fountains, in which they washed. Says R. Judah, it happened in a time of danger, and we brought the book of the law from court to roof, and from roof to court, and from court to a close, to read in it.''

Now, in these roofs, there was a door, which they call, פתח גגות, "the door of the roofs" g; now when they had brought up the sick man to the roof of the house, by a ladder fastened on the outside, which was common h; they took up this door, and let him down in his bed into the room where Jesus was: and because they wrenched the roof door open with violence, therefore it is said,

and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay: opening the door, and perhaps taking up the frame of it, and removing some tiles about it, to make the way wider, they let down with ropes, the bed, and the man on it, together. The Persic version thus renders it, "and the paralytic man being put upon a bed, at the four corners of the bed so many ropes being fastened, they let him down through a window to Jesus, into the place where he was sitting"; which is rather a paraphrase, or exposition of the words, than a translation.

Gill: Mar 2:5 - When Jesus saw their faith // He said unto the sick of the palsy, son, thy sins be forgiven thee When Jesus saw their faith,.... The faith of the sick man, and his friends, who seemed confident, that could they get at Christ, a cure would be wroug...

When Jesus saw their faith,.... The faith of the sick man, and his friends, who seemed confident, that could they get at Christ, a cure would be wrought: the faith of the one appears in suffering himself to be brought in such a manner, under so much weakness; and with so much trouble; and of the other in bringing him, and breaking through so many difficulties to get him to Christ.

He said unto the sick of the palsy, son, thy sins be forgiven thee; pointing and striking at the root of his disorder, his sins. Christ calls him son, though, in this afflicted condition a person may be a child of God, and yet greatly afflicted by him; afflictions are not arguments against, but rather for sonship: "for what son is he whom the Father chasteneth not?" He scourgeth every son whom he receiveth, and by chastising them, dealeth with them as with sons; and such as are without chastisement are bastards, and not sons, Heb 12:6, yea he calls him a son, though a sinful creature, and who had not, as yet, until these words were spoken by Christ, any discovery and application of pardoning grace unto him: he was a son of God by divine predestination, being predestinated to the adoption of children: he was a son by virtue of the covenant of grace, he was interested in, as appears by his enjoying pardon of sin, a blessing of it; which runs thus, "I will be their Father, and they shall be my sons and daughters", 2Co 6:18. He was one of the children which were given to Christ as in such a relation: and for the sake of whom Christ was now a partaker of flesh and blood, and in a little time was to die for them, in order to gather them together, who were scattered abroad. The blessing Christ conferred on this poor man is of the greatest consequence and importance, forgiveness of sin: it is what springs from the grace and mercy of God; it is provided in a promise in the covenant of grace; Christ was sent to shed his blood to procure it, in a way consistent with the holiness and justice of God; and this being done, it is published in the Gospel, and is a most considerable article in it, and than which, nothing can be more desirable to a sensible sinner: and blessed are they that are partakers of it, their sins will never be imputed to them; they will never be remembered more; they are blotted out of God's book of debts; they are covered out of his sight, and are removed as far as the east is from the west, even all their sins, original and actual, secret or open, of omission, or commission; See Gill on Mat 9:2.

Gill: Mar 2:6 - But there were certain of the Scribes sitting there // and reasoning in their hearts But there were certain of the Scribes sitting there,.... In the upper room where Jesus was, to watch and observe what he said:, and did: and reason...

But there were certain of the Scribes sitting there,.... In the upper room where Jesus was, to watch and observe what he said:, and did:

and reasoning in their hearts; upon the above words of Christ, in the following manner.

Gill: Mar 2:7 - Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies // who can forgive sins but God only Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies?.... They took Christ to be a mere man, and reasoned with themselves, that he must be a blasphemer, in assumi...

Why doth this man thus speak blasphemies?.... They took Christ to be a mere man, and reasoned with themselves, that he must be a blasphemer, in assuming that to himself, which was peculiar to God: they seem astonished at his words, and wonder at his arrogance, and to be filled with indignation and resentment at him; saying,

who can forgive sins but God only? this was a generally received maxim with them, and a very just one. The Chaldee paraphrase of Job 14:4, runs thus;

"who can give a pure man out of a man that is defiled with sins, but God, who alone is he, די ישבוק ליה, "that can pardon him?"''

They even deny that Metatron, so they call the angel in Exo 23:20, of whom they say, that his name is as the name of his master, has a power of forgiving sins; for which reason the Israelites rejected him as a messenger i. They were right in saying, that none but God could forgive sin, against whom it is committed; but wrong in charging Christ with blasphemy on this account; because he is truly God, as well as man, as his omniscience and omnipotence hereafter manifested, did abundantly show. That no mere creature can forgive sin, is certain: good men may, and ought to forgive one another, and even their very enemies; but then they can only forgive sin as an injury done to themselves, not as committed against God. The ministers of the Gospel may be said to remit sins ministerially, or declaratively, by preaching the doctrine of pardon, declaring, that such as believe in Christ shall receive the remission of sins; but for any man to assume such a power to himself, as to grant pardons and indulgences, to absolve from sins, is anti-christian, as the pope of Rome does; in which he takes that to himself, which is peculiar to God; so that he, as God, sitteth in the temple of God, showing himself that he is God, 2Th 2:4. Nor can any man procure the forgiveness of his sins by any thing he has, or can do; not by his riches, which will not profit in a day of wrath, they being not a sufficient ransom price for a man's self, or any of his brethren and friends; nor by his repentance, for though this, and remission of sins, go together in grace and experience, yet repentance is not the cause of remission of sins, but rather the effect of remission applied; nor by his faith, for faith does not procure, but receives this blessing: and much less by good works, for then the forgiveness of sins would not be according to the riches of grace; and a man would be saved by his works, since a principal part of salvation lies in the pardon of sin; and besides the blood of Christ would be shed in vain. That God only can forgive sin, is evident, because it is against him, and him only, that men sin: sin is a transgression of his law, a contrariety to his nature, and a contradiction of his will, an affront to his justice and holiness, a contempt of him, who is the lawgiver, that is able to save and to destroy; it is of the nature of a debt, which he only can loose from. Moreover, if there were any besides himself that could forgive sin, he would have one equal with him, and like unto him; whereas, "who is a God like unto thee, that pardoneth iniquity?" Mic 7:18. This is a prerogative peculiar to him, which he challenges to himself: "I even I am he that blotteth out thy transgressions", Isa 43:25, but then this is common to all the three divine persons in the Godhead, Father, Son, and Spirit. The Father, he has prepared this grace in his own heart; for the moving cause of it, is his sovereign grace and mercy; he has promised and secured it in the covenant of his grace; he set forth, and sent forth his Son to obtain it, by the shedding of his blood, that so his justice might he satisfied; and it is for Christ's sake he forgives all trespasses. The Son of God is concerned in it: as man, his blood was, shed for it; and that being the blood, not of a mere man, but of him that is God, as well as man, it was effectual to that purpose; it is in his name that it is preached, and he is exalted as a Saviour to give it; and as the advocate of his people he calls for it, and requires it; and as he is truly and properly God, he has equal power to bestow it, and apply it as his Father. The holy Spirit, as he makes men sensible of their need of it, he shows it to them, and their interest in it; he sprinkles the blood of Christ upon their consciences, and declares them pardoned through it; he bears witness of the truth of it to them, and seals it up unto them; so that it is wholly of God.

Gill: Mar 2:8 - And immediately, when Jesus perceived in his Spirit // that they so reasoned within themselves; he said unto them, why reason ye these things in your hearts And immediately, when Jesus perceived in his Spirit,.... "His own Spirit", as the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions read; not his h...

And immediately, when Jesus perceived in his Spirit,.... "His own Spirit", as the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions read; not his human soul, nor the holy Spirit of God, though both may be said to be his Spirit; but his divine nature, in and by which he knew all things, even the most sacred thoughts of men's hearts: and as soon as ever the above thoughts were conceived in the minds of the Scribes and Pharisees, they were perceived by him, and told to them,

that they so reasoned within themselves; he said unto them, why reason ye these things in your hearts? thereby reproving them, not for reasoning and concluding in their own minds, that none but God can forgive sins; but for imputing blasphemy to him, for pronouncing this man's sins pardoned; he being God, as well as man, of which his knowing the thoughts and reasonings of their minds might have been a convincing proof.

Gill: Mar 2:9 - Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy // thy sins be forgiven thee, or to say arise, and take up thy bed, and walk Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy,.... This question was put to them by Christ, in order to prove his deity, and clear himself from...

Whether is it easier to say to the sick of the palsy,.... This question was put to them by Christ, in order to prove his deity, and clear himself from the charge of blasphemy; for he that could cure the sick of the palsy, by a word speaking, had power to forgive him his sins: and therefore proposes it to them, which was easiest to say,

thy sins be forgiven thee, or to say arise, and take up thy bed, and walk? Both of them were easy to say, but not with power and effect: they were both instances of divine power, and proofs of deity; and only he that could do the one, could do the other, and the one was as easy to be performed, by a divine person, as the other: and though it may be hard to say which is the greatest instance of power, or the strongest proof of deity, to pardon a sinner, or to cure a paralytic by a word speaking; perhaps forgiveness of sin may be the greatest evidence of divine power and goodness; however, it is certain, it is a greater blessing to be pardoned, than to be cured of a palsy; yet curing of a palsy, in the manner in which Christ did it, was a more sensible proof of his deity to the Scribes and Pharisees, than pronouncing a man's sins forgiven; because this was visible, and could not be denied; whereas the other, though pronounced, they might question whether it had its effect: but by the one, which they would see done before their eyes, there would be left no room for them to doubt of the reality of the other; See Gill on Mat 9:5.

Gill: Mar 2:10 - But that ye may know that the son of man // hath power on earth to forgive sins // he saith to the sick of the palsy But that ye may know that the son of man,.... Meaning himself, who was really man, and the true Messiah, in which sense this phrase had been used in t...

But that ye may know that the son of man,.... Meaning himself, who was really man, and the true Messiah, in which sense this phrase had been used in the writings of the Old Testament; see Psa 80:17, and though by reason of his outward form; and mean appearance, he might be thought by them to be but a mere man, and had no right, nor authority, to say what he had; in order to convince them; he affirms, that he

hath power on earth to forgive sins. As there is an emphasis lies on the phrase, "the son of man", suggesting, that his being so was no contradiction to his deity, nor any hindrance to the exertion of his power; so there is another on those words, "upon earth"; intimating, that though he was upon earth, in a very low estate, in a state of humiliation, yet he had the same power to forgive sin as in heaven; his humbling himself in human nature did not strip him of his perfections, power, and prerogative as God: and if he had power on earth to forgive sin, there can be no room to doubt of it now he is in heaven; since as mediator, he is "exalted to be a prince, and a Saviour, to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins", Act 5:31, And that it might appear he had such a power on earth,

he saith to the sick of the palsy; turning to, and addressing him in the following words, with great majesty, authority, and power; See Gill on Mat 9:6.

Gill: Mar 2:11 - I say unto thee, arise, and take up thy bed // and go thy way into thine house I say unto thee, arise, and take up thy bed,.... He bid him, in an authoritative way to arise from his bed, in which he was brought, and on which he l...

I say unto thee, arise, and take up thy bed,.... He bid him, in an authoritative way to arise from his bed, in which he was brought, and on which he lay before him, and take it up upon his shoulders, directly, and in the face of all the people, carry it away:

and go thy way into thine house; to show himself whole to his family and friends, and go about his business; See Gill on Mat 9:6,

Gill: Mar 2:12 - And immediately he arose // and took up his bed // and went forth before them all // insomuch that they were all amazed // and glorified God, saying, we never saw it on this fashion And immediately he arose,.... Power going along with the words of Christ, he found himself perfectly well; and at once sprung up from off his bed, ...

And immediately he arose,.... Power going along with the words of Christ, he found himself perfectly well; and at once sprung up from off his bed,

and took up his bed, upon his shoulders, with all the ease imaginable:

and went forth before them all: the Scribes and Pharisees, and the whole multitude of the people, who were eyewitnesses of this wonderful cure: or "against them all"; for being strong and robust, he made his way through the crowd, with his bed on his back;

insomuch that they were all amazed; at the power of Christ, and the strength of the man:

and glorified God, saying, we never saw it on this fashion; or any thing like this in our days. They easily perceived it was a preternatural action, and what could never be done by any mere man; they therefore attribute it to God, and give him the glory of it; they celebrated the perfections of God, particularly his power, and his goodness, which were very visible in this instance; they praised him and his works, and gave thanks to him for this wonderful cure, which was wrought; and that he had given such power to Christ, who they looked upon to be but a man; though they might have concluded from hence that he was God, to perform such mighty works: and these that glorified God, and expressed their thankfulness for this instance of his kindness to men, were not the Scribes and Pharisees, who had charged Christ with blasphemy; for the miracles of Christ rarely, if ever, had such an effect upon them, as to acknowledge that they were from God, and that Christ performed them by a divine power, but rather by a diabolical influence. We never read of their praising God, and glorifying him for any thing that was done by Christ; but generally went away, after a miracle, hardened, and full of spite and malice, going and consulting together how to take away his life. But these were the "multitude", as Matthew says, who attended on the ministry of Christ, and followed him from place to place, and had a high opinion of him, as a great and good man; though they did not believe in him as the Messiah, and did not know him to be the Son of God; See Gill on Mat 9:8,

Gill: Mar 2:13 - And he went forth again by the sea side // and all the multitude resorted unto him // and he taught them And he went forth again by the sea side,.... The sea of Galilee, where he had met with, and called Peter and Andrew, James and John; and not far from ...

And he went forth again by the sea side,.... The sea of Galilee, where he had met with, and called Peter and Andrew, James and John; and not far from which were the solitary place, and the desert places, where he was before he entered into Capernaum:

and all the multitude resorted unto him; who had been with him at Peter's house, and about the door, and those who could not get near him:

and he taught them; the word of God, the Gospel, and the doctrines of it.

Gill: Mar 2:14 - And as he passed by // he saw Levi, the son of Alphaeus // sitting at the receipt of custom // and said unto him, follow me; and he arose, and followed him And as he passed by,.... As he went from Simon's house, and from the city of Capernaum, to go to the sea side: he saw Levi, the son of Alphaeus; th...

And as he passed by,.... As he went from Simon's house, and from the city of Capernaum, to go to the sea side:

he saw Levi, the son of Alphaeus; the same with Matthew, Mat 9:9, and son to the same Alphaeus as James was, Mat 10:3, Beza's most ancient copy reads "James", instead of "Levi", very wrongly; but he was the brother of James, and also of Simon and Jude; so that there were four brothers of them apostles: and if Joses, called Barsabas, was the same Joses that was brother to these, as seems probable, a fifth was put up for an apostle, though the lot fell on Matthias. James, and Joses, and Simon, and Jude, are mentioned together, Mat 13:55, because they lived together, and were men of religion and seriousness, and known by their neighbours; but Matthew, or Levi, is not mentioned: it is thought, by some, probable, that he was a loose, extravagant young man, and so might depart from his father's family, and enter into this scandalous employment of a publican; and herein went contrary to his father's will, Cleophas, or Alphaeus, who was the husband of the sister of Mary, the mother of our Lord:

sitting at the receipt of custom; the toll booth, or custom house, where he sat to take toll of passengers that came, or went in ships or boats, The Syriac version renders it, "sitting among the toll gatherers"; and the Persic, "among publicans"; not only signifying the business in which he was, but the company he was among; which makes the grace of Christ the more illustrious and distinguishing, in looking upon him, and calling him:

and said unto him, follow me; and he arose, and followed him. Christ, the great shepherd of the sheep, who came to seek, in order to save that which was lost, was now locking up his lost sheep; and Matthew, or Levi, being one of them, he finds him, and calls him by his grace. Christ is always first with his people; he first seeks them, and then they seek him; he first finds them, and then they find him; yea, he is found of them that sought him not. Levi took no notice of him, inquired not about him, and had no thought of leaving his employ; and going after him, but Christ knew him: his eye was upon him as he passed by him, and his time was a time of love, and so a time of life; he looked upon him, and said unto him, live; quickening power went along with his words, and he arose, and left all, and followed him: Christ, as the good shepherd, went before; and Levi, through the grace that was now given him, as one of his sheep, heard and knew his voice, and, without the least hesitation or reluctance, quitted his business, and became a follower of him. How powerful is efficacious grace! what is it, it can not do! it turns the heart of a sinner at once, inclines it to Christ, and causes it to leave all for his sake; it at once fills the soul with love to Christ, faith in him, and obedience to him; it works powerfully, and yet freely; it always obtains, and effects what it designs, yet puts no force upon the will: Levi, under the drawings of divine grace, followed Christ most willingly and cheerfully; See Gill on Mat 9:9.

Gill: Mar 2:15 - And it came to pass, that as Jesus sat at meat in his house // many publicans and sinners sat also together, with Jesus, and his disciples // for there were many, and they followed him And it came to pass, that as Jesus sat at meat in his house,.... In the house of Levi; not in the custom house, or toll booth, for that he left; but i...

And it came to pass, that as Jesus sat at meat in his house,.... In the house of Levi; not in the custom house, or toll booth, for that he left; but in his house in the city of Capernaum, where he had him, and made an entertainment for him, in token of gratitude, for the high favour bestowed on him:

many publicans and sinners sat also together, with Jesus, and his disciples; being invited by Levi, and not objected to by Christ; See Gill on Mat 9:10.

for there were many, and they followed him; either Christ whom they had observed to have called Matthew, and had heard preach by the sea side; or else Matthew; and so the Persic version renders it, "for many followed Matthew". The Ethiopic version reads the words, "and they were many", that is, publicans and sinners, "and the Scribes and Pharisees followed him"; mentioned in the next verse, from whence it seems to be taken; though true it is, that not only a large number of publicans and sinners followed Christ, but also many of the Scribes and Pharisees; yet with a different view from the former, not to get any advantage to themselves, but, if they could, an advantage against Christ.

Gill: Mar 2:16 - And when the Scribes and Pharisees saw him eat // with publicans and sinners // they said unto his disciples, how is it that he eateth and drinketh with publicans and sinners And when the Scribes and Pharisees saw him eat,.... They were offended at his eating and drinking, though it was in moderation; because he did not fas...

And when the Scribes and Pharisees saw him eat,.... They were offended at his eating and drinking, though it was in moderation; because he did not fast as they, and their disciples did; and especially, that he eat

with publicans and sinners; men of very infamous characters, and bad lives, with whom the Pharisees disdained to keep company:

they said unto his disciples, how is it that he eateth and drinketh with publicans and sinners? The Vulgate Latin, Arabic, Persic, and Ethiopic versions read, "your master"; see Gill on Mat 9:11; so some Greek copies here.

Gill: Mar 2:17 - When Jesus heard it, he saith to them // they that are whole, have no need of the physician, but they that are sick // I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance When Jesus heard it, he saith to them,.... Christ either overheard what they said to his disciples, or he heard it from the relation of the disciples;...

When Jesus heard it, he saith to them,.... Christ either overheard what they said to his disciples, or he heard it from the relation of the disciples; and when he did, he turned to the Scribes and Pharisees, and spoke to them the following words:

they that are whole, have no need of the physician, but they that are sick; which seems to be a proverbial expression, signifying that he was a physician; that these publicans and sinners were sick persons, and needed his company and assistance; but that they, the Scribes and Pharisees, were whole, and in good health, in their own esteem, and so wanted no relief; and therefore ought not to take it amiss, that he attended the one, and not the other. These words give a general view of mankind, in their different sentiments of themselves and of Christ; and of the usefulness of Christ to one sort, and not another. There are some that cry up the power of man's freewill, and plead for the strength and purity of human, nature, and extol its excellencies and abilities; and it is no wonder that these see no need of Christ, either for themselves or others: hence preachers of this complexion leave Christ out of their ministry for the most part; and generally speaking, lessen the glory and dignity of his person, depreciate his offices, reject his righteousness, and deny his satisfaction and atonement: and such reckon themselves the favourites of heaven, and are ready to say, whom shall God delight to honour, but us, who are so pure and holy? they therefore trust in their own righteousness, and despise others, and submit not to the righteousness of Christ; they make their own works their saviours, and so neglect the great salvation by Christ. There are others that are sick, and are quite sick of themselves; they see the impurity of their nature, how unsound and unhealthful they are; that from the crown of the head to the sole of the foot, there is no soundness in them, nothing but wounds, bruises, and putrefying sores: their loins are filled with the loathsome disease of sin; they are sensible of their inability to cure themselves, and that no mere creature can help them; and that all besides Christ, are physicians of no value: and therefore they apply to him, whose blood is a balm for every wound, and a medicine for every sickness and disease, and which cleanses from all sin: and whereas such, and such only, see their need of Christ as a physician, these only does he attend under this character; See Gill on Mat 9:12. Adding this as a reason,

I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. These words explain, what is more obscurely and figuratively expressed in the former; it appears from hence, that by "the whole" are meant, "righteous" persons; not such who are made righteous, by the righteousness of Christ imputed to them, but such who were outwardly righteous before men, who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, depended on their own righteousness, and fancied themselves, with respect to the righteousness of the law, blameless; and so, in their own apprehensions, stood in no need of Christ and his righteousness: yea, even needed not repentance, according to their own thoughts of things, and therefore were not called to it, but were left to their own stupidity and blindness; these were the Scribes and Pharisees; and by the "sick", are meant "sinners"; such who are made sensible of sin, and so of their need of Christ as a Saviour; and who have evangelical repentance given them, and are called to the exercise and profession of it: and Christ's calling sinners to repentance, and bestowing that grace, together with the remission of sins, which goes along with it, is doing his work and office as a "physician". This evangelist makes no mention of the passage in Hos 6:6, with which these words are introduced in Matthew. The last words, to "repentance", are omitted by the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Persic, and Ethiopic versions, and are wanting in some ancient copies; but are retained in the Arabic version, and in most copies, as in Mat 9:13. See Gill on Mat 9:13.

Gill: Mar 2:18 - And the disciples of John and of the Pharisees used to fast // and they came // and say unto him, why do the disciples of John and of the Pharisees fast, but thy disciples fast not And the disciples of John and of the Pharisees used to fast,.... Or "were fasting"; perhaps that very day, and so were the more displeased at this ent...

And the disciples of John and of the Pharisees used to fast,.... Or "were fasting"; perhaps that very day, and so were the more displeased at this entertainment, Matthew had made for Christ and his disciples, and at their being at it; or fasting was usual with them: they fasted often, both John's disciples, and the disciples of the Pharisees, or the Pharisees themselves; so the Vulgate Latin reads: of their frequent fasting; see Gill on Mat 9:14,

and they came: both the disciples of John, Mat 9:14, and the Scribes and Pharisees, Luk 5:30,

and say unto him, why do the disciples of John and of the Pharisees fast, but thy disciples fast not? See Gill on Mat 9:14.

Gill: Mar 2:19 - And Jesus said unto them // can the children of the bride chamber fast, while the bridegroom is with them // as long as they have the bridegroom with them, they cannot fast And Jesus said unto them,.... Both to John's disciples and the Pharisees, can the children of the bride chamber fast, while the bridegroom is with ...

And Jesus said unto them,.... Both to John's disciples and the Pharisees,

can the children of the bride chamber fast, while the bridegroom is with them? Suggesting that he was the bridegroom, as John their master had called him, Joh 3:29, and that his disciples were the children of the bride chamber; and that it was very unsuitable for them, and very unreasonable to desire them to fast at such a time, and under such a character: wherefore the answer returned by Christ himself to the question is,

as long as they have the bridegroom with them, they cannot fast: all which the Syriac version expresses by לא, "no": see Gill on Mat 9:15.

Gill: Mar 2:20 - But the days will come // when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them, and then shall they fast in those days But the days will come,.... As they were in some sense now come to the disciples of John, their master being taken up by Herod, and confined in prison...

But the days will come,.... As they were in some sense now come to the disciples of John, their master being taken up by Herod, and confined in prison, and so it was a mourning time with them:

when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them, and then shall they fast in those days: referring to the time of the sufferings and death of Christ, which would be, and was a sorrowful season to his disciples.

Gill: Mar 2:21 - No man also seweth a piece of new cloth // On an old garment // else the new piece that filled it up, taketh away from the old, and the rent is made worse No man also seweth a piece of new cloth, The traditions of the elders are meant, particularly concerning eating and drinking, and fasting, things befo...

No man also seweth a piece of new cloth, The traditions of the elders are meant, particularly concerning eating and drinking, and fasting, things before spoken of; and which occasioned this parable, and which were new things in comparison of the commands of God: some of them were of very short standing, devised in, that age; and most, if not all of them, were since the times of Ezra.

On an old garment; the moral and ceremonial righteousness of the Jews, in obedience to the law of God; signifying, that the former were not to be joined with these, to make up a justifying righteousness before God; which were not sufficient for such a purpose, either singly, or both together:

else the new piece that filled it up, taketh away from the old, and the rent is made worse; for by attendance to the traditions of the elders, the Jews were taken off from, and neglected the commandments of God; nay, oftentimes the commands of God were made void by these traditions, so that the old garment of their own righteousness, which was very ragged and imperfect of itself, instead of being purer and more perfect, became much the worse, even for the purpose for which it was intended; See Gill on Mat 9:16.

Gill: Mar 2:22 - And no man putteth new wine into old bottles // else the new wine doth burst the bottles, and the wine is spilled, and the bottles will be marred // but new wine must be put into new bottles And no man putteth new wine into old bottles,.... By "old bottles" are meant, the Scribes and Pharisees, the whole, which needed not a physician, and ...

And no man putteth new wine into old bottles,.... By "old bottles" are meant, the Scribes and Pharisees, the whole, which needed not a physician, and the righteous, Christ came not to call; and by new wine, either the love of God, which is not shed abroad in the hearts of such persons; or the blessings of the new covenant, which are not bestowed upon them; or the Gospel, which brings an account of both, which is not received by carnal men:

else the new wine doth burst the bottles, and the wine is spilled, and the bottles will be marred: the Gospel will only fill them with rage and fury, and they will despise it, and let it go; which will be an aggravation of their sin and misery, and so will prove the savour of death unto death unto them:

but new wine must be put into new bottles; into the hearts of sinners, who are called to repentance, and are renewed in the Spirit of their minds; are newborn babes, that desire the sincere milk of the word, and wine of the Gospel; in these the love of God is exceeding abundant, and it comes in with full flows into their souls; all grace is made to abound towards them, and the word of Christ richly dwells in them; in whom these things remain and abide, and they themselves are saved with an everlasting salvation; See Gill on Mat 9:17.

Gill: Mar 2:23 - And it came to pass // that he went through the corn fields on the sabbath day, and his disciples began, as they went, to pluck the ears of corn And it came to pass,.... The Vulgate Latin adds, "again"; and so Beza says it was read in one of his copies: that he went through the corn fields o...

And it came to pass,.... The Vulgate Latin adds, "again"; and so Beza says it was read in one of his copies:

that he went through the corn fields on the sabbath day, and his disciples began, as they went, to pluck the ears of corn, and to rub them, and get the grain out of them, and eat them; See Gill on Mat 12:1.

Gill: Mar 2:24 - And the Pharisees said unto him // Behold, why do they on the sabbath day, that which is not lawful And the Pharisees said unto him,.... To Christ, the same they said to his disciples, Luk 6:2. Behold, why do they on the sabbath day, that which is...

And the Pharisees said unto him,.... To Christ, the same they said to his disciples, Luk 6:2.

Behold, why do they on the sabbath day, that which is not lawful? see how they pluck the ears of corn and rub them, and eat things, which by the law, especially by the traditions of the elders, were not lawful to be done on the sabbath day; See Gill on Mat 12:2.

Gill: Mar 2:25 - And he said unto them // have ye never read what David did // when he had need // and was an hungered, he, and they that were with him And he said unto them,.... By way of answer to their question, and which was a full one, and enough to silence them: have ye never read what David ...

And he said unto them,.... By way of answer to their question, and which was a full one, and enough to silence them:

have ye never read what David did; referring to the history in 1Sa 21:1.

when he had need: of bread, was in great necessity, and in the utmost distress:

and was an hungered, he, and they that were with him? which was a justifiable reason for what he and his company did; as it was for the action of the disciples; being in a like case, and therefore very appropriate to the purpose; See Gill on Mat 12:3.

Gill: Mar 2:26 - How he went into the house of God // In the days or Abiathar the high priest // And did eat the showbread, which is not lawful to eat, but for the priests, and gave also to them which were with him How he went into the house of God,.... The tabernacle; for the temple was not yet built: thither David went to get bread for himself and his men, bein...

How he went into the house of God,.... The tabernacle; for the temple was not yet built: thither David went to get bread for himself and his men, being hungry: so in a spiritual sense, where should such go, who are hungering and thirsting after righteousness, but into the house of God? Here is bread enough, and to spare; here is a table furnished with excellent provisions; here the Gospel is dispensed, which is milk for babes, and meat for strong men; here Christ, the bread of life, is set forth, whose flesh is meat indeed, and whose blood is drink indeed; here the ordinances are administered, which are breasts of consolation to the children of God; here is a feast of fat things, all things are ready, and souls are welcome, and therefore it must be right to attend here. And this was on the sabbath day that David went into the house of God: when the showbread loaves were removed, and divided, among the priests, and new ones were placed in their room: and so under the Gospel dispensation, on the Lord's day, the day set apart for public worship, it becomes the saints to go up to the house of the Lord, and feed upon the provisions of it: they are a royal priesthood, they are priests, as well as kings to God; and their business is in the house of the Lord, to offer up spiritual sacrifices to him; and as the goodness and fulness of his house appertains to them, they do well to attend and partake thereof.

In the days or Abiathar the high priest: and yet from the history it is clear, that it was in the days of Ahimelech the high priest, the father of Abiathar; wherefore the Jew charges k Mark with an error, and Matthew and Luke too: whereas the two last make no mention of the name of any high priest; and it might be observed, that in the Persic version of Mark it is rendered, "under Abimelech the high priest"; and in an ancient copy of Beza's, the whole clause is omitted; though it must be owned, that so it is read in other Greek copies, and in the ancient versions, the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Arabic, and others: wherefore let it be further observed, that the fact referred to was done in the days of Abiathar, though it was before he was an high priest; and the particle επι may be so rendered, about, or "before Abiathar was high priest", as it is in Mat 1:11. Besides, Abiathar was the son of an high priest, and succeeded his father in the office: and might be at this time his deputy, who acted for him, or he by has advice; and according to a rule the Jews l themselves give,

"the son of an high priest, who is deputed by his father in his stead, הרי כהן גדול אמור, "lo! he is called an high priest".''

So that Abiathar might at this time be called the high priest; and is the rather mentioned, because he was the more eminent and famous man; and whom the Jews call m Urim and Thummim, because there was much inquiry made by them; in his and his father's days, and very little after: to which may be added, that the names of the father and the son are sometimes changed; Ahimelech is called Abiathar, and this Abiathar is called Ahimelech, the son of Abiathar, 2Sa 8:17, and Abimelech the son of Abiathar, 1Ch 18:16. And it seems as if both father and son had two names, and were sometimes called by the one, and sometimes by the other: for as the father is sometimes called Abiathar, the son is called Ahimelech, or Abimelech, as in the places mentioned; and which refer to the times when David was king of Israel, and long after the death of Saul, and consequently long after Ahimelech, and the rest of the priests at Nob, were killed by the order of Saul: wherefore Ahimelech, or Abimelech, in the said places, must be the son of Abiathar; and who afterwards was thrust out of the priesthood by Solomon, for joining with Adonijah in his usurpation, 1Ki 1:25. And from whence it appears, that his father was called Abiathar also, and which some take to be their family name; and if so, then there is no difficulty, and the evangelist rightly says, that this affair was in the days of Abiathar: but be it that he intends the son, what has been before observed is a sufficient solution of this difficulty; for the evangelist does not say that Abiathar was high priest, when David came and eat the showbread; he only says, "it was in the days of Abiathar the high priest": for certain it is, that this happened in his days; and as certain, that he was an high priest; and Mark might with great propriety call him so, though he was not strictly one, till after this business was over: besides, he was not only the son of an high priest, and it may be his deputy, and some have thought officiated at this time, his father being sick or infirm through old age; but inasmuch as his father was directly killed by the order of Saul, he narrowly escaping, immediately succeeded him in the office of the high priesthood; and therefore his being an high priest so very near the time of this action, without any impropriety and impertinence, and especially without incurring the charge of falsehood, the evangelist might express himself as he does.

And did eat the showbread, which is not lawful to eat, but for the priests, and gave also to them which were with him? Who not only ate the showbread, which was set before the Lord, and was sacred, and which none but the priests might eat of, after it was removed from the table; but he did this on the sabbath day; and he not only eat of it himself, but the soldiers that were with him: and all this with the knowledge and leave of the high priest: for the Jews n have no reason to charge this evangelist and the others with an error, that others besides David ate of the showbread, urging that he came alone to Ahimelech; since it is evident from 1Sa 21:2,

that David had servants in company with him when he fled, though they did not attend him when he went to the high priest; and that he asked bread, and it was given him, not only for himself, but for the young men that he had appointed to be at such a place: and therefore, if this was allowed to David and his men, when hungry, it ought not to be charged as an evil upon the disciples, for plucking and rubbing a few ears of corn to satisfy their hunger, though on a sabbath day; and especially when he, who was Lord of the sabbath, was present, and admitted of it; See Gill on Mat 12:4.

Gill: Mar 2:27 - And he said unto them // the sabbath was made for man // And not man for the sabbath And he said unto them,.... Continuing his answer to them, and adding, in confirmation of what he had said, and for the further vindication of his disc...

And he said unto them,.... Continuing his answer to them, and adding, in confirmation of what he had said, and for the further vindication of his disciples,

the sabbath was made for man; for his good, and not for his hurt; both for the good of his soul, that he might have an opportunity of attending divine worship, both in public and private; and for the good of his body, that he might have rest from his labour; and this was the end of the original institution and appointment of it; and therefore works of necessity are not forbidden on this day; such as are for the necessary comfort, support, and preservation of life; or otherwise it would be apparent, that the sabbath was not appointed for the good, but for the hurt of men. By "man", is not meant all mankind; for the sabbath was never appointed for all mankind, nor binding upon all; only the Jews, who are emphatically called "man", or "men"; see Eze 34:30, upon which the Jewish writers remark o, that

"they are called, אדם, "man"; but the idolatrous Gentiles, and nations of the World, are not called "men";''

but dogs, beasts, &c. Our Lord may here be thought to speak in their language, as he does in Mat_. 15:26; see Gill on Mat 15:26. And that the observation of the seventh day, was only designed for the children of Israel, seems manifest from Exo 31:16, "wherefore the children of Israel shall keep the sabbath, to observe the sabbath throughout their generations, for a perpetual covenant; it is a sign between me and the children of Israel"; and not between him and the rest of the world: and in Exo 31:14, "ye shall keep the sabbath, for it is holy unto you": on which the Jews p make this remark, עממין לכם ולא לשאר, "to you, and not to the rest of the nations": nor did they ever think that the Gentiles were obliged to observe their sabbath, only such who became proselytes to their religion; even those who were proselytes of righteousness: for a proselyte of the gate, was not bound to observe it; for so says q Maimonides,

"those who take upon them the seven commandments of Noah only, lo! they are as a proselyte of the gate, and they are free to do work on the sabbath day for themselves, openly, as an Israelite on a common day.''

Yea, they not only say, they were not obliged to keep the sabbath, but that it was not lawful for them to observe it; and that it was even punishable with death them to regard it; for so they say r,

"a Gentile that keeps the sabbath before he is circumcised, is guilty of death, because it is not commanded him.''

They judged them unworthy of having this precept enjoined them, as being not men, but beasts, and worse than they, and had not the privilege the ass has: hence one of their commentators s says,

"concerning the rest of an ass, thou (O Israelite!) art commanded; but concerning the rest of a Gentile, thou art not commanded.''

And not man for the sabbath; who was in being long before that was appointed and enjoined.

Gill: Mar 2:28 - Therefore the son of man is Lord also of the sabbath. Therefore the son of man is Lord also of the sabbath. Meaning himself, who had a power not only to dispense with it, but to abrogate it as he did, wit...

Therefore the son of man is Lord also of the sabbath. Meaning himself, who had a power not only to dispense with it, but to abrogate it as he did, with the rest of the rituals of the ceremonial law; See Gill on Mat 12:8. So that it did not become them to find fault with what his disciples did, with his leave and approbation.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Mar 2:1 Grk “it was heard.”

NET Notes: Mar 2:2 Some translations (e.g., NIV, NLT) take the preposition πρός (pro"), which indicates proximity, to mean “outside the do...

NET Notes: Mar 2:3 The redundancy in this verse is characteristic of the author’s rougher style.

NET Notes: Mar 2:4 Grk “And.” Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the n...

NET Notes: Mar 2:5 The passive voice here is a divine passive (ExSyn 437). It is clear that God does the forgiving.

NET Notes: Mar 2:6 Grk “Reasoning within their hearts.”

NET Notes: Mar 2:7 Blaspheming meant to say something that dishonored God. To claim divine prerogatives or claim to speak for God when one really does not would be such ...

NET Notes: Mar 2:8 Grk “Why are you reasoning these things in your hearts?”

NET Notes: Mar 2:9 Which is easier is a reflective kind of question. On the one hand to declare sins are forgiven is easier, since one does not need to see it, unlike te...

NET Notes: Mar 2:10 Jesus did not finish his sentence with words but with action, that is, healing the paralytic with an accompanying pronouncement to him directly.

NET Notes: Mar 2:11 Grk “to your house.”

NET Notes: Mar 2:12 Grk “he”; the referent (the man who was healed) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Mar 2:13 Grk “He”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Mar 2:14 The tax booth was a booth located on the edge of a city or town to collect taxes for trade. There was a tax booth in Capernaum, which was on the trade...

NET Notes: Mar 2:15 The tax collectors would bid to collect taxes for the Roman government and then add a surcharge, which they kept. Since tax collectors worked for Rome...

NET Notes: Mar 2:16 The issue here is inappropriate associations. Jews were very careful about personal associations and contact as a matter of ritual cleanliness. Their ...

NET Notes: Mar 2:17 Jesus’ point is that he associates with those who are sick because they have the need and will respond to the offer of help. A person who is hea...

NET Notes: Mar 2:18 Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Mar 2:19 Questions prefaced with μή (mh) in Greek anticipate a negative answer. This can sometimes be indicated by using a “tag” at the ...

NET Notes: Mar 2:20 Grk “then on that day.”

NET Notes: Mar 2:22 The meaning of the saying new wine is poured into new skins is that the presence and teaching of Jesus was something new and signaled the passing of t...

NET Notes: Mar 2:23 Or “heads of grain.” While the generic term στάχυς (stacus) can refer to the cluster of seeds at the top of ...

NET Notes: Mar 2:24 See the note on Pharisees in 2:16.

NET Notes: Mar 2:26 See 1 Sam 21:1-6.

NET Notes: Mar 2:27 The Greek term ἄνθρωπος (anqrwpos) is used twice in this verse in a generic sense, referring to both men and ...

NET Notes: Mar 2:28 A second point in Jesus’ defense of his disciples’ actions was that his authority as Son of Man also allowed it, since as Son of Man he wa...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:1 And ( 1 ) again he entered into Capernaum after [some] days; and it was noised that he was in the ( a ) house. ( 1 ) By healing this man who was sick...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:2 And straightway many were gathered together, insomuch that there was no room to receive [them], no, not so much as ( b ) about the door: and he preach...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:4 And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken [it] up, they ( c ) let down ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:6 But there were certain of the scribes sitting there, and ( e ) reasoning in their hearts, ( e ) In their minds disputing upon the matter, arguing bot...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:12 And immediately he arose, took up the bed, and went forth before them all; insomuch that they were all ( f ) amazed, and glorified God, saying, We nev...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:13 ( 2 ) And he went forth again by the sea side; and all the multitude resorted unto him, and he taught them. ( 2 ) The gospel offends the proud and sa...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:14 And as he passed by, he saw ( g ) Levi the [son] of Alphaeus sitting at the receipt of custom, and said unto him, Follow me. And he arose and followed...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:18 ( 3 ) And the disciples of John and of the Pharisees used to fast: and they come and say unto him, Why do the disciples of John and of the Pharisees f...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:23 ( 4 ) And it came to pass, that he went through the corn fields on the ( h ) sabbath day; and his disciples began, as they went, to pluck the ears of ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:26 How he went into the house of God in the days of ( i ) Abiathar the high priest, and did eat the shewbread, which is not lawful to eat but for the pri...

Geneva Bible: Mar 2:28 Therefore the Son of man is Lord also of the ( k ) sabbath. ( k ) Has the sabbath day in his power, and may rule it as he desires.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Mar 2:1-12 - A Libation To Jehovah Christs Authority To Forgive And again He entered into Capernaum after some days: and it was noised that He was in the house. 2. And straightway many...

Maclaren: Mar 2:13-22 - A Libation To Jehovah The Publicans' Friend And He went forth again by the sea side; and all the multitude resorted unto Him, and He taught them. 14 And as He passed by, h...

Maclaren: Mar 2:19 - A Libation To Jehovah The Secret Of Gladness And Jesus said unto them, Can the children of the bridechamber fast, while the bridegroom is with them? '--Mark 2:19. THIS is ...

Maclaren: Mar 2:23-28 - A Libation To Jehovah Works Which Hallow The Sabbath And it came to pass, that He went through the corn fields on the Sabbath day! and His disciples began, as they went, t...

MHCC: Mar 2:1-12 - --It was this man's misery that he needed to be so carried, and shows the suffering state of human life; it was kind of those who so carried him, and te...

MHCC: Mar 2:13-17 - --Matthew was not a good character, or else, being a Jew, he would never have been a publican, that is, a tax-gatherer for the Romans. However, Christ c...

MHCC: Mar 2:18-22 - --Strict professors are apt to blame all that do not fully come up to their own views. Christ did not escape slanders; we should be willing to bear them...

MHCC: Mar 2:23-28 - --The sabbath is a sacred and Divine institution; a privilege and benefit, not a task and drudgery. God never designed it to be a burden to us, therefor...

Matthew Henry: Mar 2:1-12 - -- Christ, having been for some time preaching about in the country, here returns to Capernaum his head-quarters, and makes his appearance there, in ho...

Matthew Henry: Mar 2:13-17 - -- Here is, I. Christ preaching by the sea-side (Mar 2:13), whither he went for room, because he found, upon second trial, no house or street large...

Matthew Henry: Mar 2:18-28 - -- Christ had been put to justify himself in conversing with publicans and sinners: here he is put to justify his disciples; and in what they do ac...

Barclay: Mar 2:1-6 - "A FAITH THAT WOULD NOT BE DENIED" After Jesus had completed his tour of the synagogues he returned to Capernaum. The news of his coming immediately spread abroad. Life in Palestine w...

Barclay: Mar 2:7-12 - "THE UNANSWERABLE ARGUMENT" Jesus, as we have seen, had already attracted the crowds. Because of that he had attracted the notice of the official leaders of the Jews. The San...

Barclay: Mar 2:13-14 - "THE CALL OF THE MAN WHOM ALL MEN HATED" Steadily and inexorably the synagogue door was shutting on Jesus. Between him and the guardians of Jewish orthodoxy war had been declared. Now he wa...

Barclay: Mar 2:15-17 - "WHERE THE NEED IS GREATEST" Once again Jesus is flinging down the gauntlet of defiance. When Matthew had yielded himself to Jesus, he invited him to his house. Naturally, havi...

Barclay: Mar 2:18-20 - "THE JOYOUS COMPANY" With the stricter Jews fasting was a regular practice. In the Jewish religion there was only one day in all the year that was a compulsory fast, and...

Barclay: Mar 2:21-22 - "THE NECESSITY OF STAYING YOUNG IN MIND" Jesus knew quite well that he was coming with a message which was startlingly new; and he also knew that his way of life was shatteringly different f...

Barclay: Mar 2:23-28 - "PIETY, REAL AND FALSE" Once again Jesus cut right across the scribal rules and regulations. When he and his disciples were going through the corn fields one Sabbath day, h...

Constable: Mar 1:14--3:7 - --II. The Servant's early Galilean ministry 1:14--3:6 Mark omitted Jesus' year of early Judean ministry (John 1:15...

Constable: Mar 2:1--3:7 - --D. Jesus' initial conflict with the religious leaders 2:1-3:6 Mark next recorded five instances in which...

Constable: Mar 2:1-12 - --1. The healing and forgiveness of a paralytic 2:1-12 (cf. Matt. 9:1-8; Luke 5:17-26) 2:1-2 These two verses are an introduction to what follows. Mark ...

Constable: Mar 2:13-17 - --2. The call of Levi and his feast 2:13-17 (cf. Matt. 9:13; Luke 5:27-32) The call of Levi as one of Jesus' disciples was the setting for the second in...

Constable: Mar 2:18-22 - --3. The religious leaders' question about fasting 2:18-22 (cf. Matt. 9:14-17; Luke 5:33-39) The third objection the religious leaders voiced arose from...

Constable: Mar 2:23--3:7 - --4. The controversies about Sabbath observance 2:23-3:6 The remaining two instances of opposition...

Constable: Mar 2:23-28 - --Picking grain on the Sabbath 2:23-28 (cf. Matt. 12:1-8; Luke 6:1-5) 2:23-24 Jesus' disciples did something that the Mosaic Law permitted when they plu...

College: Mar 2:1-28 - --MARK 2 G. STORIES OF CONTROVERSY BETWEEN JESUS AND THE RELIGIOUS AUTHORITIES (2:1-3:6) In 2:1-3:6 Mark provides five stories of controversy between...

McGarvey: Mar 2:1-12 - -- XXXV. JESUS HEALS A PARALYTIC AT CAPERNAUM. aMATT. IX. 2-8; bMARK II. 1-12; cLUKE V. 17-26.    c17 And it came to pass on one of thos...

McGarvey: Mar 2:14 - -- XXXVI. THE CALL OF MATTHEW. (At or near Capernaum.) aMATT. IX. 9; bMARK II. 13, 14; cLUKE V. 27, 28.    c27 And after these thingsa [...

McGarvey: Mar 2:15-22 - -- LVII. MATTHEW'S FEAST. DISCOURSE ON FASTING. (Capernaum.) aMATT. IX. 10-17; bMARK II. 15-22; cLUKE V. 29-39.    c29 And Levi [another...

McGarvey: Mar 2:23-28 - -- XXXVIII. JESUS DEFENDS DISCIPLES WHO PLUCK GRAIN ON THE SABBATH. (Probably while on the way from Jerusalem to Galilee.) aMATT. XII. 1-8; bMARK II. 23...

Lapide: Mar 2:1-28 - --CHAPTER 2 1 Christ healeth one sick of the palsy, 14 calleth Matthew from the receipt of custom, 15 eateth with publicans and sinners, 18 excuse...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Mar 2:2 " In my preaching of the Word, I took special notice of this one thing, namely, that the Lord did lead me to begin where His Word begins with sinners;...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

Robertson: Mark (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MARK By Way of Introduction One of the clearest results of modern critical study of the Gospels is the early date of Mark...

JFB: Mark (Pendahuluan Kitab) THAT the Second Gospel was written by Mark is universally agreed, though by what Mark, not so. The great majority of critics take the writer to be "Jo...

JFB: Mark (Garis Besar) THE PREACHING AND BAPTISM OF JOHN. ( = Mat 3:1-12; Luke 3:1-18). (Mar 1:1-8) HEALING OF A DEMONIAC IN THE SYNAGOGUE OF CAPERNAUM AND THEREAFTER OF SI...

TSK: Mark 2 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Mar 2:1, Christ followed by multitudes, Mar 2:3, heals one sick of the palsy; Mar 2:13, calls Matthew from the receipt of custom; Mar 2:1...

MHCC: Mark (Pendahuluan Kitab) Mark was a sister's son to Barnabas, Col 4:10; and Act 12:12 shows that he was the son of Mary, a pious woman of Jerusalem, at whose house the apostle...

MHCC: Mark 2 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Mar 2:1-12) Christ heals one sick of the palsy. (Mar 2:13-17) Levi's call, and the entertainment given to Jesus. (Mar 2:18-22) Why Christ's discipl...

Matthew Henry: Mark (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Gospel According to St. Mark We have heard the evidence given in by the first witness to the doctri...

Matthew Henry: Mark 2 (Pendahuluan Pasal) In this chapter, we have, I. Christ's healing a man that was sick of a palsy (Mar 2:1-12). II. His calling of Matthew from the receipt of custom,...

Barclay: Mark (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO SAINT MARK The Synoptic Gospels The first three gospels, Matthew, Mark and Luke, are always known as the s...

Barclay: Mark 2 (Pendahuluan Pasal) A Faith That Would Not Be Denied (Mar_2:1-6) The Unanswerable Argument (Mar_2:7-12) The Call Of The Man Whom All Men Hated (Mar_2:13; Mar_2:14) W...

Constable: Mark (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Writer The writer did not identify himself as the writer anywhere in this...

Constable: Mark (Garis Besar) Outline I. Introduction 1:1-13 A. The title of the book 1:1 B. Jesus' pr...