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Teks -- John 21:1-25 (NET)

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Konteks
Jesus’ Appearance to the Disciples in Galilee
21:1 After this Jesus revealed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias. Now this is how he did so. 21:2 Simon Peter, Thomas (called Didymus), Nathanael (who was from Cana in Galilee), the sons of Zebedee, and two other disciples of his were together. 21:3 Simon Peter told them, “I am going fishing.” “We will go with you,” they replied. They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing. 21:4 When it was already very early morning, Jesus stood on the beach, but the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. 21:5 So Jesus said to them, “Children, you don’t have any fish, do you?” They replied, “No.” 21:6 He told them, “Throw your net on the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they threw the net, and were not able to pull it in because of the large number of fish. 21:7 Then the disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” So Simon Peter, when he heard that it was the Lord, tucked in his outer garment (for he had nothing on underneath it), and plunged into the sea. 21:8 Meanwhile the other disciples came with the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from land, only about a hundred yards. 21:9 When they got out on the beach, they saw a charcoal fire ready with a fish placed on it, and bread. 21:10 Jesus said, “Bring some of the fish you have just now caught.” 21:11 So Simon Peter went aboard and pulled the net to shore. It was full of large fish, one hundred fifty-three, but although there were so many, the net was not torn. 21:12 “Come, have breakfast,” Jesus said. But none of the disciples dared to ask him, “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord. 21:13 Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. 21:14 This was now the third time Jesus was revealed to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.
Peter’s Restoration
21:15 Then when they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these do?” He replied, “Yes, Lord, you know I love you.” Jesus told him, “Feed my lambs.” 21:16 Jesus said a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” He replied, “Yes, Lord, you know I love you.” Jesus told him, “Shepherd my sheep.” 21:17 Jesus said a third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was distressed that Jesus asked him a third time, “Do you love me?” and said, “Lord, you know everything. You know that I love you.” Jesus replied, “Feed my sheep. 21:18 I tell you the solemn truth, when you were young, you tied your clothes around you and went wherever you wanted, but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and others will tie you up and bring you where you do not want to go.” 21:19 (Now Jesus said this to indicate clearly by what kind of death Peter was going to glorify God.) After he said this, Jesus told Peter, “Follow me.”
Peter and the Disciple Jesus Loved
21:20 Peter turned around and saw the disciple whom Jesus loved following them. (This was the disciple who had leaned back against Jesus’ chest at the meal and asked, “Lord, who is the one who is going to betray you?”) 21:21 So when Peter saw him, he asked Jesus, “Lord, what about him?” 21:22 Jesus replied, “If I want him to live until I come back, what concern is that of yours? You follow me!” 21:23 So the saying circulated among the brothers and sisters that this disciple was not going to die. But Jesus did not say to him that he was not going to die, but rather, “If I want him to live until I come back, what concern is that of yours?”
A Final Note
21:24 This is the disciple who testifies about these things and has written these things, and we know that his testimony is true. 21:25 There are many other things that Jesus did. If every one of them were written down, I suppose the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Cana a town of Galilee 14 kilometers NE of Nazareth
 · Didymus the man who was one of the twelve disciples and became Thomas the apostle
 · Galilee the region of Palestine north of Sameria and west of the upper Jordan River,a region west of Lake Galilee and north of the Jezreel Valley
 · John a son of Zebedee; younger brother of James; the beloved disciple of Christ,a relative of Annas the high priest,a son of Mary the sister of Barnabas, and surnamed Mark,the father of Simon Peter
 · Nathanael a man who was one of the disciples of Christ
 · Peter a man who was a leader among the twelve apostles and wrote the two epistles of Peter
 · Simon a son of Jonas and brother of Andrew; an apostle of Jesus Christ,a man who was one of the apostles of Christ and also called 'the Zealot',a brother of Jesus,a man who was a well-know victim of leprosy who had been healed by Jesus (NIV note),a man from Cyrene who was forced to carry the cross of Jesus,a Pharisee man in whose house Jesus' feet were washed with tears and anointed,the father of Judas Iscariot,a man who was a sorcerer in Samaria and who wanted to buy the gifts of the Spirit,a man who was a tanner at Joppa and with whom Peter was staying when Cornelius sent for him
 · Thomas a man who was one of the twelve apostles also called on three occasions,
 · Tiberias, Sea of a large lake on the western border of the town of Tiberias and the eastern border of Galilee
 · Twin the man who was one of the twelve disciples and became Thomas the apostle
 · Zebedee the father of James and John, who were two of the twelve apostles


Topik/Tema Kamus: Peter | John | GALILEE, SEA OF | JOHN, GOSPEL OF | PETER, SIMON | Galilee | Jesus, The Christ | JESUS CHRIST, 4F | BODY, SPIRITUAL | James | Thomas | Fishing, the art of | ANDREW | Fish | FISHING | Jonas | Love | Apostles | Net | Discipleship | selebihnya
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Robertson , Vincent , Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

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Poole , Lightfoot , Haydock , Gill

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Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Barclay , Constable , College , McGarvey , Lapide

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Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Robertson: Joh 21:1 - Manifested himself Manifested himself ( ephanerosen heauton ). First aorist active indicative of phaneroō with the reflexive pronoun (cf. Joh 7:4; Joh 13:4). For th...

Manifested himself ( ephanerosen heauton ).

First aorist active indicative of phaneroō with the reflexive pronoun (cf. Joh 7:4; Joh 13:4). For the passive see Joh 1:31; Joh 21:14. Jesus was only seen during the forty days now and then (Act 1:3), ten instances being recorded. The word phaneroō is often used of Christ on earth (Joh 1:31; Joh 2:11; 1Pe 1:20; 1Jo 1:2), of his works (Joh 3:5), of the second coming (1Jo 2:28), of Christ in glory (Col 3:4; 1Jo 3:2).

Robertson: Joh 21:1 - At At ( epi ). By or upon.

At ( epi ).

By or upon.

Robertson: Joh 21:1 - Of Tiberias Of Tiberias ( tēs Tiberiados ). As in Joh 6:1 instead of the usual "Sea of Galilee."Tiberias, the capital city of Galilee, gave this epithet to the...

Of Tiberias ( tēs Tiberiados ).

As in Joh 6:1 instead of the usual "Sea of Galilee."Tiberias, the capital city of Galilee, gave this epithet to the Sea of Galilee. This is not the appearance in Galilee prearranged by Jesus (Mar 16:7; Mat 28:7, Mat 28:16).

Robertson: Joh 21:2 - There were together There were together ( ēsan homou ). These seven (Peter, Thomas, Nathanael, the sons of Zebedee, and two others). We know that the sons of Zebedee w...

There were together ( ēsan homou ).

These seven (Peter, Thomas, Nathanael, the sons of Zebedee, and two others). We know that the sons of Zebedee were James and John (Mat 4:21), mentioned by name nowhere in John’ s Gospel, apparently because John is the author. We do not know who the "two others of his disciples"were, possibly Andrew and Philip. It seems to me to be crass criticism in spite of Harnack and Bernard to identify the incident here with that in Luk 5:1-11. There are a few points of similarity, but the differences are too great for such identification even with a hypothetical common source.

Robertson: Joh 21:3 - I go a fishing I go a fishing ( hupagō halieuein ). The present active infinitive halieuein expresses purpose as often. It is a late verb from halieus (fisher...

I go a fishing ( hupagō halieuein ).

The present active infinitive halieuein expresses purpose as often. It is a late verb from halieus (fisherman) and occurs in Jer 16:16, in Philo, Plutarch, and one papyrus. Peter’ s proposal was a natural one. He had been a fisherman by practice and they were probably waiting in Galilee for the appointed meeting with Christ on the mountain. Andrew and Peter, James and John were fishermen also. Peter’ s proposition met a ready response from all.

Robertson: Joh 21:3 - They took They took ( epiasan ). First aorist active indicative of piazō , Doric form for piezō , to catch.

They took ( epiasan ).

First aorist active indicative of piazō , Doric form for piezō , to catch.

Robertson: Joh 21:4 - When day was now breaking When day was now breaking ( prōias ēdē ginomenēs ). Genitive absolute and note present middle participle (dawn coming on and still dark). In ...

When day was now breaking ( prōias ēdē ginomenēs ).

Genitive absolute and note present middle participle (dawn coming on and still dark). In Mat 27:1 the aorist participle (genomenēs ) means that dawn had come. For "beach"(aigialon ) see Mat 13:2.

Robertson: Joh 21:4 - Was Was ( estin ). Present indicative retained in indirect assertion.

Was ( estin ).

Present indicative retained in indirect assertion.

Robertson: Joh 21:5 - Children Children ( Paidia ). Diminutive of pais and used here alone by Jesus in addressing his disciples. It is a colloquial expression like "my boys."The ...

Children ( Paidia ).

Diminutive of pais and used here alone by Jesus in addressing his disciples. It is a colloquial expression like "my boys."The aged Apostle John uses it in 1Jo 2:13, 1Jo 2:18.

Robertson: Joh 21:5 - Have ye aught to eat? Have ye aught to eat? ( mē ti prosphagion echete ). The negative answer is expected by this polite inquiry as in Joh 4:29. The rare and late word p...

Have ye aught to eat? ( mē ti prosphagion echete ).

The negative answer is expected by this polite inquiry as in Joh 4:29. The rare and late word prosphagion from the root phag (esthiō , to eat) and pros (in addition) was used for a relish with bread and then for fish as here. So in the papyri. Nowhere else in the N.T.

Robertson: Joh 21:6 - The right side The right side ( eis ta dexia merē ). Jesus knew where the fish were. For "net"(diktuon ) see Mat 4:20, here alone in John.

The right side ( eis ta dexia merē ).

Jesus knew where the fish were. For "net"(diktuon ) see Mat 4:20, here alone in John.

Robertson: Joh 21:6 - Were now not able to draw it Were now not able to draw it ( ouketi auto helkusai ischuon ). Imperfect active picturing the disciples tugging at the net.

Were now not able to draw it ( ouketi auto helkusai ischuon ).

Imperfect active picturing the disciples tugging at the net.

Robertson: Joh 21:7 - It is the Lord It is the Lord ( ho kurios estin ). John’ s quick insight appears again.

It is the Lord ( ho kurios estin ).

John’ s quick insight appears again.

Robertson: Joh 21:7 - Girt his coat about him Girt his coat about him ( ton ependutēn diezōsato ). First aorist middle (indirect) indicative with which note diezōsen heauton in Joh 13:4. ...

Girt his coat about him ( ton ependutēn diezōsato ).

First aorist middle (indirect) indicative with which note diezōsen heauton in Joh 13:4. Apparently Peter threw on the upper garment or linen blouse (ependutēn ) worn by fishers over his waistcloth and tucked it under his girdle.

Robertson: Joh 21:8 - In the little boat In the little boat ( tōi ploiariōi ). Locative case of ploiarion (diminutive) for the larger boat (ploion , Joh 21:3, Joh 21:6) could come no c...

In the little boat ( tōi ploiariōi ).

Locative case of ploiarion (diminutive) for the larger boat (ploion , Joh 21:3, Joh 21:6) could come no closer to shore. But the words seem interchangeable in Joh 6:17, Joh 6:19, Joh 6:21, Joh 6:22, Joh 6:24.

Robertson: Joh 21:8 - About two hundred cubits off About two hundred cubits off ( hōs apo pēchōn diakosiōn ). For pēchus , cubit, see Mat 6:27 and for hōs apo see Joh 11:18.

About two hundred cubits off ( hōs apo pēchōn diakosiōn ).

For pēchus , cubit, see Mat 6:27 and for hōs apo see Joh 11:18.

Robertson: Joh 21:8 - Dragging Dragging ( surontes ). Present active participle of surō for which see Act 8:3.

Dragging ( surontes ).

Present active participle of surō for which see Act 8:3.

Robertson: Joh 21:9 - Got out Got out ( apebēsan ). As in Luk 5:2.

Got out ( apebēsan ).

As in Luk 5:2.

Robertson: Joh 21:9 - They see They see ( blepousin ). Vivid historical present.

They see ( blepousin ).

Vivid historical present.

Robertson: Joh 21:9 - A fire of coals A fire of coals ( anthrakian ). See Joh 18:18 for this word. Cf. our "anthracite."

A fire of coals ( anthrakian ).

See Joh 18:18 for this word. Cf. our "anthracite."

Robertson: Joh 21:9 - There There ( keimenēn ). Lying as placed, present middle participle of keimai .

There ( keimenēn ).

Lying as placed, present middle participle of keimai .

Robertson: Joh 21:9 - Fish Fish ( opsarion ). As in Joh 6:9, Joh 6:11, like prosphagion above.

Fish ( opsarion ).

As in Joh 6:9, Joh 6:11, like prosphagion above.

Robertson: Joh 21:9 - Laid thereon Laid thereon ( epikeimenon ). So broiling with bread ready (toast).

Laid thereon ( epikeimenon ).

So broiling with bread ready (toast).

Robertson: Joh 21:10 - Which Which ( hōn ). Ablative case by attraction from ha to agree with opsariōn . They had caught the fish by Christ’ s direction.

Which ( hōn ).

Ablative case by attraction from ha to agree with opsariōn . They had caught the fish by Christ’ s direction.

Robertson: Joh 21:11 - Went up Went up ( anebē ). Into the little boat or dinghy.

Went up ( anebē ).

Into the little boat or dinghy.

Robertson: Joh 21:11 - Drew Drew ( heilkusen ). Same verb as helkusai in Joh 21:6. Peter now did what they had failed to do.

Drew ( heilkusen ).

Same verb as helkusai in Joh 21:6. Peter now did what they had failed to do.

Robertson: Joh 21:11 - Three Three ( triōn ). The addition "three"to the "hundred and fifty"looks as if they were actually counted these "large"(megalōn ) fish. It was a gre...

Three ( triōn ).

The addition "three"to the "hundred and fifty"looks as if they were actually counted these "large"(megalōn ) fish. It was a great fish story that John recalls vividly.

Robertson: Joh 21:11 - Was not rent Was not rent ( ouk eschisthē ). First aorist passive indicative of schizō , to split (our word "schism").

Was not rent ( ouk eschisthē ).

First aorist passive indicative of schizō , to split (our word "schism").

Robertson: Joh 21:12 - Break your fast Break your fast ( aristēsate ). First aorist active imperative of aristaō from ariston , first to breakfast, as here and then later to dine as ...

Break your fast ( aristēsate ).

First aorist active imperative of aristaō from ariston , first to breakfast, as here and then later to dine as in Luk 11:37. What a delightful breakfast of fresh broiled fish just caught (Joh 21:10) with the hush of joyful surprise in the presence of the Risen Lord.

Robertson: Joh 21:12 - Durst Durst ( etolma ) Imperfect active of tolmaō . The restraint of silence continued.

Durst ( etolma )

Imperfect active of tolmaō . The restraint of silence continued.

Robertson: Joh 21:13 - Taketh the bread, and giveth them Taketh the bread, and giveth them ( lambanei ton arton kai didōsin autois ). Vivid presents again. Jesus acts as host at this early breakfast, his ...

Taketh the bread, and giveth them ( lambanei ton arton kai didōsin autois ).

Vivid presents again. Jesus acts as host at this early breakfast, his last meal with these seven faithful followers.

Robertson: Joh 21:14 - Now the third time Now the third time ( to ēdē triton ). "To the disciples"(apostles) John says, the two others being told by him (Joh 20:19, Joh 20:26) on the two ...

Now the third time ( to ēdē triton ).

"To the disciples"(apostles) John says, the two others being told by him (Joh 20:19, Joh 20:26) on the two Sunday evenings. There were four other appearances already (to Mary Magdalene, to the group of women, to the two on the way to Emmaus, to Peter).

Robertson: Joh 21:15 - Lovest thou me more than these? Lovest thou me more than these? ( agapāis me pleon toutōn ). Ablative case of comparison toutōn (disciples) after pleon . Peter had even boas...

Lovest thou me more than these? ( agapāis me pleon toutōn ).

Ablative case of comparison toutōn (disciples) after pleon . Peter had even boasted that he would stand by Christ though all men forsook him (Mar 14:29). We do not know what passed between Jesus and Peter when Jesus first appeared to him (Luk 24:34). But here Christ probes the inmost recesses of Peter’ s heart to secure the humility necessary for service.

Robertson: Joh 21:15 - I love thee I love thee ( philō su ). Peter makes no claim here to superior love and passes by the "more than these"and does not even use Christ’ s word a...

I love thee ( philō su ).

Peter makes no claim here to superior love and passes by the "more than these"and does not even use Christ’ s word agapaō for high and devoted love, but the humbler word phileō for love as a friend. He insists that Christ knows this in spite of his conduct.

Robertson: Joh 21:15 - Feed my lambs Feed my lambs ( Boske ta arnia mou ). For the old word boskō (to feed as a herdsman) see Mat 8:33. Present active imperative here. Arnia is a d...

Feed my lambs ( Boske ta arnia mou ).

For the old word boskō (to feed as a herdsman) see Mat 8:33. Present active imperative here. Arnia is a diminutive of arnos (lamb).

Robertson: Joh 21:16 - Lovest thou me? Lovest thou me? ( agapāis me ). This time Jesus drops the pleon toutōn and challenges Peter’ s own statement. Peter repeats the same words...

Lovest thou me? ( agapāis me ).

This time Jesus drops the pleon toutōn and challenges Peter’ s own statement. Peter repeats the same words in reply.

Robertson: Joh 21:16 - Tend my sheep Tend my sheep ( poimaine ta probatia ). Present active imperative of poimainō , old verb from poimēn (shepherd), "shepherd my lambs"(probatia ,...

Tend my sheep ( poimaine ta probatia ).

Present active imperative of poimainō , old verb from poimēn (shepherd), "shepherd my lambs"(probatia , diminutive of probaton , sheep).

Robertson: Joh 21:17 - Lovest thou me? Lovest thou me? ( phileis me ). This time Jesus picks up the word phileō used by Peter and challenges that. These two words are often interchange...

Lovest thou me? ( phileis me ).

This time Jesus picks up the word phileō used by Peter and challenges that. These two words are often interchanged in the N.T., but here the distinction is preserved. Peter was cut to the heart (elupēthē , first aorist passive of lupeō , to grieve) because Jesus challenges this very verb, and no doubt the third question vividly reminds him of the three denials in the early morning by the fire. He repeats his love for Jesus with the plea: "Thou knowest all things."

Robertson: Joh 21:17 - Feed my sheep Feed my sheep ( boske ta probatia ). Many MSS. both here and in Joh 21:16 read probata (sheep) instead of probatia (little sheep or lambs).

Feed my sheep ( boske ta probatia ).

Many MSS. both here and in Joh 21:16 read probata (sheep) instead of probatia (little sheep or lambs).

Robertson: Joh 21:18 - Thou girdest thyself Thou girdest thyself ( ezōnnues seauton ). Imperfect active of customary action of zōnnuō , old verb, in N.T. only here and Act 12:8. So as to ...

Thou girdest thyself ( ezōnnues seauton ).

Imperfect active of customary action of zōnnuō , old verb, in N.T. only here and Act 12:8. So as to periepateis (walkedst) and ētheles (wouldest), two other imperfects of customary action.

Robertson: Joh 21:18 - When thou shalt be old When thou shalt be old ( hotan gērasēis ). Indefinite temporal clause with hotan and the first aorist active subjunctive of gēraskō , old v...

When thou shalt be old ( hotan gērasēis ).

Indefinite temporal clause with hotan and the first aorist active subjunctive of gēraskō , old verb to grow old, in N.T. only here and Heb 8:13, "whenever thou growest old."

Robertson: Joh 21:19 - By what manner of death By what manner of death ( poiōi thanatōi ). Undoubtedly John, who is writing long after Peter’ s death, seems to mean that Peter was to die ...

By what manner of death ( poiōi thanatōi ).

Undoubtedly John, who is writing long after Peter’ s death, seems to mean that Peter was to die (and did die) a martyr’ s death. "Whither thou wouldest not."There is a tradition that Peter met death by crucifixion and asked to be crucified head downwards, but that is not made plain here.

Robertson: Joh 21:20 - Turning about Turning about ( epistrapheis ). Second aorist passive participle of epistrephō , old verb, here a sudden turning round (ingressive aorist). For the...

Turning about ( epistrapheis ).

Second aorist passive participle of epistrephō , old verb, here a sudden turning round (ingressive aorist). For the simplex verb strephō see Joh 20:14, Joh 20:16.

Robertson: Joh 21:20 - Following Following ( akolouthounta ). Following both Jesus and Peter, perhaps having heard the graphic dialogue above.

Following ( akolouthounta ).

Following both Jesus and Peter, perhaps having heard the graphic dialogue above.

Robertson: Joh 21:21 - And what shall this man do? And what shall this man do? ( houtos de ti ). Literally, "But this one ... what?"The abrupt ellipsis is intelligible.

And what shall this man do? ( houtos de ti ).

Literally, "But this one ... what?"The abrupt ellipsis is intelligible.

Robertson: Joh 21:22 - If I will If I will ( ean thelō ). Condition of the third class with ean and the present active subjunctive of thelō .

If I will ( ean thelō ).

Condition of the third class with ean and the present active subjunctive of thelō .

Robertson: Joh 21:22 - Till I come Till I come ( heōs erchomai ). Literally, "while I am coming"(heōs and the present indicative, not heōs elthō (second aorist active subju...

Till I come ( heōs erchomai ).

Literally, "while I am coming"(heōs and the present indicative, not heōs elthō (second aorist active subjunctive).

Robertson: Joh 21:22 - What is that to thee? What is that to thee? ( ti pros se ). A sharp rebuke to Peter’ s keen curiosity.

What is that to thee? ( ti pros se ).

A sharp rebuke to Peter’ s keen curiosity.

Robertson: Joh 21:22 - Follow thou me Follow thou me ( su moi akolouthei ). "Do thou me keep on following."That lesson Peter needed.

Follow thou me ( su moi akolouthei ).

"Do thou me keep on following."That lesson Peter needed.

Robertson: Joh 21:23 - That that disciple should not die That that disciple should not die ( hoti ho mathētēs ekeinos ouk apothnēskei ) (present active indicative), because Peter or others misundersto...

That that disciple should not die ( hoti ho mathētēs ekeinos ouk apothnēskei )

(present active indicative), because Peter or others misunderstood what Jesus meant as John now carefully explains. He was rebuking Peter’ s curiosity, not affirming that John would live on till the Master returned. John is anxious to set this matter right.

Robertson: Joh 21:24 - That is That is ( houtos estin ). The one just mentioned in Joh 21:20, "the disciple whom Jesus loved."

That is ( houtos estin ).

The one just mentioned in Joh 21:20, "the disciple whom Jesus loved."

Robertson: Joh 21:24 - And wrote these things And wrote these things ( kai ho grapsas tauta ). Here there is a definite statement that the Beloved Disciple wrote this book.

And wrote these things ( kai ho grapsas tauta ).

Here there is a definite statement that the Beloved Disciple wrote this book.

Robertson: Joh 21:24 - We know We know ( oidamen ). The plural here seems intentional as the identification and endorsement of a group of disciples who know the author and wish to ...

We know ( oidamen ).

The plural here seems intentional as the identification and endorsement of a group of disciples who know the author and wish to vouch for his identity and for the truthfulness of his witness. Probably we see here a verse added by a group of elders in Ephesus where John had long laboured.

Robertson: Joh 21:25 - If they should be written every one If they should be written every one ( ean graphētai kath' hen ). Condition of the third class with ean and present passive subjunctive of grapho...

If they should be written every one ( ean graphētai kath' hen ).

Condition of the third class with ean and present passive subjunctive of graphō , "If they should be written one by one"(in full detail).

Robertson: Joh 21:25 - I suppose I suppose ( oimai ). Note change back to the first person singular by the author.

I suppose ( oimai ).

Note change back to the first person singular by the author.

Robertson: Joh 21:25 - Would not contain Would not contain ( oud' auton ton kosmon chōrēsein ). Future active infinitive in indirect discourse after oimai . This is, of course, natural h...

Would not contain ( oud' auton ton kosmon chōrēsein ).

Future active infinitive in indirect discourse after oimai . This is, of course, natural hyperbole, but graphically pictures for us the vastness of the work and words of Jesus from which the author has made a small selection (Joh 20:30.) and by which he has produced what is, all things considered, the greatest of all the books produced by man, the eternal gospel from the eagle who soars to the very heavens and gives us a glimpse of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

Vincent: Joh 21:1 - Shewed Shewed ( ἐφανέρωσεν ) This rendering might easily convey merely the sense of appearing; but its meaning is much deeper. Occurring...

Shewed ( ἐφανέρωσεν )

This rendering might easily convey merely the sense of appearing; but its meaning is much deeper. Occurring frequently in the New Testament, it is used most frequently of God and Christ, or of men in their relation to these. Thus, of Christ in person while upon earth (Mar 16:12, Mar 16:14; Joh 1:31; Joh 2:11; 1Pe 1:20; 1Jo 1:2). Of the works of Christ (Joh 2:11; Joh 9:3; 1Jo 3:5). Of Christ in redemption (1Jo 3:5). Of Christ in His second coming (1Jo 2:28). Of Christ in glory (1Jo 3:2; Col 3:4). It is used of God. Of His revelation to men of the knowledge of Himself (Rom 1:19). Of His manifestation in Christ (1Ti 3:16). Of His righteousness (Rom 3:21). Of His love (1Jo 4:9). It is used of men. As epistles manifesting the character and spirit of Christ (2Co 3:3; 2Co 5:11). In the judgment (2Co 5:10). In all these cases the appearing is not merely an appeal to sense, but is addressed to spiritual perception, and contemplates a moral and spiritual effect. It is the setting forth of the law or will or character of God; of the person or work of Christ; of the character or deeds of men, with a view to the disclosure of their quality and to the producing of a moral impression. Rev., manifested .

Vincent: Joh 21:1 - Sea Sea See on Mat 4:18.

Sea

See on Mat 4:18.

Vincent: Joh 21:1 - Of Tiberias Of Tiberias Not elsewhere in the Gospels. The Synoptists say, Sea of Galilee or Lake of Gennesaret .

Of Tiberias

Not elsewhere in the Gospels. The Synoptists say, Sea of Galilee or Lake of Gennesaret .

Vincent: Joh 21:3 - A ship A ship ( τὸ πλοῖον ) Rev., the boat; restoring the article, which indicates a familiar implement. See on Luk 5:2.

A ship ( τὸ πλοῖον )

Rev., the boat; restoring the article, which indicates a familiar implement. See on Luk 5:2.

Vincent: Joh 21:3 - Immediately Immediately Omit.

Immediately

Omit.

Vincent: Joh 21:3 - That night That night The emphatic pronoun that (ἐκείνῃ ) may indicate that their ill success was unusual.

That night

The emphatic pronoun that (ἐκείνῃ ) may indicate that their ill success was unusual.

Vincent: Joh 21:3 - Caught Caught ( ἐπίασαν ) So Joh 21:10. The verb means to lay hold of , and is nowhere else used in the New Testament of taking fish. El...

Caught ( ἐπίασαν )

So Joh 21:10. The verb means to lay hold of , and is nowhere else used in the New Testament of taking fish. Elsewhere in this Gospel always of the seizure of Christ by the authorities (Joh 7:30, Joh 7:39, Joh 7:44; Joh 8:20; Joh 10:39; Joh 11:57). Of apprehending Peter and Paul (Act 12:4; 2Co 11:32). Of the taking of the beast (Rev 19:20). Of taking by the hand (Act 3:7).

Vincent: Joh 21:4 - Was come Was come ( γενομένης ) The best texts read the present participle, γινομένης , is coming . Rev., when day was now...

Was come ( γενομένης )

The best texts read the present participle, γινομένης , is coming . Rev., when day was now breaking . The A.V. does not agree so well with the fact that Jesus was not at once recognized by the disciples, owing in part, perhaps, to the imperfect light.

Vincent: Joh 21:4 - On the shore On the shore ( εἰς τὸν αἰγιαλόν ) Rev., beach . See on Mat 13:2. The preposition εἰς , to , makes the phrase equival...

On the shore ( εἰς τὸν αἰγιαλόν )

Rev., beach . See on Mat 13:2. The preposition εἰς , to , makes the phrase equivalent to " Jesus came to the beach and stood there."

Vincent: Joh 21:5 - Children Children ( παιδία ) Or, little children . Used also by John, in address, twice in the First Epistle (1Jo 2:13, 1Jo 2:18), where, howev...

Children ( παιδία )

Or, little children . Used also by John, in address, twice in the First Epistle (1Jo 2:13, 1Jo 2:18), where, however, the more common word is τεκνία , little children .

Vincent: Joh 21:5 - Have ye any meat ? Have ye any meat ( μή τι προσφάγιον ἔχετε )? The interrogative μή τι indicates that a negative answer is expect...

Have ye any meat ( μή τι προσφάγιον ἔχετε )?

The interrogative μή τι indicates that a negative answer is expected: you have not , I suppose , anything . Προσφάγιον is equivalent to ὀψάριον , what is added to bread at a meal , especially fish. See on Joh 6:9. Only here in the New Testament. Wyc, any supping-thing .

Vincent: Joh 21:6 - The net The net ( δίκτυον ) See on Mat 4:18; see on Mat 13:47.

The net ( δίκτυον )

See on Mat 4:18; see on Mat 13:47.

Vincent: Joh 21:6 - Were not able Were not able ( οὐκ ἴσχυσαν ) See on Luk 14:30; see on Luk 16:3; see on Jam 5:16.

Were not able ( οὐκ ἴσχυσαν )

See on Luk 14:30; see on Luk 16:3; see on Jam 5:16.

Vincent: Joh 21:6 - To draw To draw ( ἑλκῦσαι ) Into the boat. Compare σύροντες , Joh 21:8, dragging the net behind the boat.

To draw ( ἑλκῦσαι )

Into the boat. Compare σύροντες , Joh 21:8, dragging the net behind the boat.

Vincent: Joh 21:7 - Fisher's coat Fisher's coat ( ἐπενδύτην ) An upper garment or blouse. Only here in the New Testament. In the Septuagint, 1Sa 18:4, the robe wh...

Fisher's coat ( ἐπενδύτην )

An upper garment or blouse. Only here in the New Testament. In the Septuagint, 1Sa 18:4, the robe which Jonathan gave to David. 2Sa 13:18, the royal virgin garment of Tamar. The kindred verb, ἐπενδύομαι , occurs twice (2Co 5:2, 2Co 5:4), meaning " to be clothed upon ," with the house which is from heaven, i . e ., clothed as with an upper garment. See on that passage.

Vincent: Joh 21:7 - Naked Naked Not absolutely, but clothed merely in his undergarment or shirt.

Naked

Not absolutely, but clothed merely in his undergarment or shirt.

Vincent: Joh 21:8 - A little ship A little ship ( τῷ πλοιαρίῳ ) The noun is diminutive. Rev., the little boat . It is hardly probable that this refers to a ...

A little ship ( τῷ πλοιαρίῳ )

The noun is diminutive. Rev., the little boat . It is hardly probable that this refers to a smaller boat accompanying the vessel. Compare the alternation of πλοῖον and πλοιάριον in Joh 6:17, Joh 6:19, Joh 6:21, Joh 6:22, Joh 6:24.

Vincent: Joh 21:8 - Two hundred cubits Two hundred cubits A little over a hundred yards.

Two hundred cubits

A little over a hundred yards.

Vincent: Joh 21:8 - With fishes With fishes ( τῶν ἰχθύων ) Or, the net of the fishes . So Wyc, Rev., full of fishes .

With fishes ( τῶν ἰχθύων )

Or, the net of the fishes . So Wyc, Rev., full of fishes .

Vincent: Joh 21:9 - They were come to land They were come to land ( ἀπέβησαν εἰς τὴν γῆν ) Not of the arrival of the boat, but of the going ashore of the boatmen...

They were come to land ( ἀπέβησαν εἰς τὴν γῆν )

Not of the arrival of the boat, but of the going ashore of the boatmen. Rev., therefore, correctly, they got out upon the land .

Vincent: Joh 21:9 - A fire of coals A fire of coals Charcoal. See Joh 18:18.

A fire of coals

Charcoal. See Joh 18:18.

Vincent: Joh 21:9 - Fish Fish ( ὀψάριον ) See on Joh 6:9.

Fish ( ὀψάριον )

See on Joh 6:9.

Vincent: Joh 21:9 - Bread Bread ( ἄρτον ) Or, a loaf . See on Mat 4:1; see on Mat 7:9.

Bread ( ἄρτον )

Or, a loaf . See on Mat 4:1; see on Mat 7:9.

Vincent: Joh 21:10 - Of the fish Of the fish ( τῶν ὀψαρίων ) As in Joh 21:9. Emphasizing the fish as food .

Of the fish ( τῶν ὀψαρίων )

As in Joh 21:9. Emphasizing the fish as food .

Vincent: Joh 21:10 - Ye hate caught Ye hate caught ( ἐπιάσατε ) See on Joh 21:3. Bengel says: " By the Lord's gift they had caught them: and yet, He courteously says, th...

Ye hate caught ( ἐπιάσατε )

See on Joh 21:3. Bengel says: " By the Lord's gift they had caught them: and yet, He courteously says, that they have caught them."

Vincent: Joh 21:11 - Went up Went up Into the vessel.

Went up

Into the vessel.

Vincent: Joh 21:11 - To land To land ( ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς ) Strictly, upon the land.

To land ( ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς )

Strictly, upon the land.

Vincent: Joh 21:11 - Great fishes Great fishes All authorities agree as to the abundance of fish in the Lake of Galilee. M. Lortet, cited by Dr. Thomson, says that two castings of...

Great fishes

All authorities agree as to the abundance of fish in the Lake of Galilee. M. Lortet, cited by Dr. Thomson, says that two castings of the net usually filled his boat. Bethsaida (there were two places of that name on the lake) means House of the Fisheries . The fame of the lake in this particular reached back to very early times; so that, according to the Rabbinical legend, one of the ten fundamental laws laid down by Joshua on the division of the country was, that any one might fish with a hook in the Lake of Galilee, so that they did not interfere with the free passage of boats. The Talmud names certain kinds of fish which might be eaten without being cooked, and designates them as small fishes . So ὀψάρια is rendered in Joh 6:9. Possibly the expression great fishes may imply a contrast with the small fishes which swarmed in the lake, and the salting and pickling of which was a special industry among its fishermen.

Vincent: Joh 21:12 - Dine Dine ( ἀριστήσατε ) Rather, breakfast . In Attic Greek ἄριστον signified the mid-day meal; the evening meal be...

Dine ( ἀριστήσατε )

Rather, breakfast . In Attic Greek ἄριστον signified the mid-day meal; the evening meal being known as δεῖπνον . The regular hour for the ἄριστον cannot be fixed with precision. The drift of authority among Greek writers seems to be in favor of noon. The meal described here, however, evidently took place at an earlier hour, and would seem to have answered more nearly to the ἀκρατίσμα , or breakfast of the Greeks, which was taken directly upon rising. Plutarch, however, expressly states that both names were applied to the morning meal, and says of Alexander, " He was accustomed to breakfast (ἠρίστα ) at early dawn, sitting, and to sup (ἐδείπνει ) late in the evening." In Mat 22:4, it is an ἄριστον to which the king's wedding-guests are invited.

Vincent: Joh 21:12 - Ask Ask ( ἐξετα.σαι ) Rev., inquire . Implying careful and precise inquiry. It occurs only three times in the New Testament; of Herod's co...

Ask ( ἐξετα.σαι )

Rev., inquire . Implying careful and precise inquiry. It occurs only three times in the New Testament; of Herod's command to search diligently for the infant Christ (Mat 2:8), and of the apostles' inquiring out the worthy members of a household (Mat 10:11).

Vincent: Joh 21:13 - Bread - fish Bread - fish Both have the article - the loaf, the fish - apparently pointing to the provision which Jesus himself had made.

Bread - fish

Both have the article - the loaf, the fish - apparently pointing to the provision which Jesus himself had made.

Vincent: Joh 21:13 - Giveth them Giveth them Nothing is said of His partaking Himself. Compare Luk 24:42, Luk 24:43.

Giveth them

Nothing is said of His partaking Himself. Compare Luk 24:42, Luk 24:43.

Vincent: Joh 21:14 - The third time The third time The two former occasions being recorded in Joh 20:19, Joh 20:26. The appearance to Mary Magdalene is not counted, because the Evan...

The third time

The two former occasions being recorded in Joh 20:19, Joh 20:26. The appearance to Mary Magdalene is not counted, because the Evangelist expressly says to His disciples .

Vincent: Joh 21:15 - Simon, son of Jonas Simon, son of Jonas Compare Christ's first address to Peter, Joh 1:43. He never addresses him by the name of Peter , while that name is commonly...

Simon, son of Jonas

Compare Christ's first address to Peter, Joh 1:43. He never addresses him by the name of Peter , while that name is commonly used, either alone or with Simon, in the narrative of the Gospels, and in the Greek form Peter , not the Aramaic Cephas , which, on the other hand, is always employed by Paul. For Jonas read as Rev., John .

Vincent: Joh 21:15 - Lovest Lovest ( ἀγαπᾶς ) Jesus uses the more dignified, really the nobler, but, as it seems to Peter, in the ardor of his affection, the colde...

Lovest ( ἀγαπᾶς )

Jesus uses the more dignified, really the nobler, but, as it seems to Peter, in the ardor of his affection, the colder word for love . See on Joh 5:20.

Vincent: Joh 21:15 - More than these More than these More than these disciples love me. Compare Joh 13:37; Mat 26:33. The question conveys a gentle rebuke for his former extravagant ...

More than these

More than these disciples love me. Compare Joh 13:37; Mat 26:33. The question conveys a gentle rebuke for his former extravagant professions.

Vincent: Joh 21:15 - I love I love ( φιλῶ ) Peter substitutes the warmer, more affectionate word, and omits all comparison with his fellow-disciples.

I love ( φιλῶ )

Peter substitutes the warmer, more affectionate word, and omits all comparison with his fellow-disciples.

Vincent: Joh 21:15 - Feed Feed ( βόσκε ) See on 1Pe 5:2.

Feed ( βόσκε )

See on 1Pe 5:2.

Vincent: Joh 21:15 - Lambs Lambs ( ἀρνία ) Diminutive: little lambs . Godet remarks: " There is a remarkable resemblance between the present situation and that ...

Lambs ( ἀρνία )

Diminutive: little lambs . Godet remarks: " There is a remarkable resemblance between the present situation and that of the two scenes in the previous life of Peter with which it is related. He had been called to the ministry by Jesus after a miraculous draught of fishes; it is after a similar draught that the ministry is restored to him. He had lost his office by a denial beside a fire of coal; it is beside a fire of coal that he recovers it."

Vincent: Joh 21:16 - Lovest Lovest ( ἀγαπᾷς ) Again the colder word, but more than these is omitted.

Lovest ( ἀγαπᾷς )

Again the colder word, but more than these is omitted.

Vincent: Joh 21:16 - I love I love ( φιλῶ ) Peter reiterates his former word expressive of personal affection.

I love ( φιλῶ )

Peter reiterates his former word expressive of personal affection.

Vincent: Joh 21:16 - Feed Feed ( ποίμαινε ) A different word: tend , as Rev. See on 1Pe 5:2.

Feed ( ποίμαινε )

A different word: tend , as Rev. See on 1Pe 5:2.

Vincent: Joh 21:16 - Sheep Sheep ( πρόβατα ) Some of the best texts read προβάτια , diminutive, little sheep .

Sheep ( πρόβατα )

Some of the best texts read προβάτια , diminutive, little sheep .

Vincent: Joh 21:17 - Lovest Lovest ( φιλεῖς ) Here Jesus adopts Peter's word. Canon Westcott, however, ascribes Peter's use of φιλέω to his humility, and his...

Lovest ( φιλεῖς )

Here Jesus adopts Peter's word. Canon Westcott, however, ascribes Peter's use of φιλέω to his humility, and his hesitation in claiming that higher love which is implied in ἀγαπᾷς . This seems to me to be less natural, and to be refining too much.

Vincent: Joh 21:18 - Young Young ( νεώτερος ) Literally, younger . Peter was apparently of middle age. See Mat 8:14.

Young ( νεώτερος )

Literally, younger . Peter was apparently of middle age. See Mat 8:14.

Vincent: Joh 21:18 - Thou girdedst thyself Thou girdedst thyself ( ἐζώννυες σεαυτὸν ) The word may have been suggested by Peter's girding his fisher's coat round him...

Thou girdedst thyself ( ἐζώννυες σεαυτὸν )

The word may have been suggested by Peter's girding his fisher's coat round him. The imperfect tense signifies something habitual. Thou wast wont to clothe thyself and to come and go at will.

Vincent: Joh 21:18 - Walkedst Walkedst ( περιεπάτεις ) Literally, walkedst about . Peculiarly appropriate to describe the free activity of vigorous manhood.

Walkedst ( περιεπάτεις )

Literally, walkedst about . Peculiarly appropriate to describe the free activity of vigorous manhood.

Vincent: Joh 21:18 - Stretch forth thy hands Stretch forth thy hands The allusion to the extending of the hands on the cross, which some interpreters have found here, is fanciful. It is mere...

Stretch forth thy hands

The allusion to the extending of the hands on the cross, which some interpreters have found here, is fanciful. It is merely an expression for the helplessness of age.

Vincent: Joh 21:18 - Whither thou wouldest not Whither thou wouldest not According to tradition Peter suffered martyrdom at Rome, and was crucified with his head downward.

Whither thou wouldest not

According to tradition Peter suffered martyrdom at Rome, and was crucified with his head downward.

Vincent: Joh 21:19 - By what death By what death ( ποίῳ ) Properly, by what manner of death . So Rev.

By what death ( ποίῳ )

Properly, by what manner of death . So Rev.

Vincent: Joh 21:20 - Leaned Leaned ( ἀνέπεσεν ) Rev., leaned back . See on Joh 13:25. The reference is to the special act of John, leaning back to whisper to ...

Leaned ( ἀνέπεσεν )

Rev., leaned back . See on Joh 13:25. The reference is to the special act of John, leaning back to whisper to Jesus, and not to his position at table.

Vincent: Joh 21:21 - And what shall this man do ? And what shall this man do ( οὗτος δὲ τί ;)? Literally, and this one what?

And what shall this man do ( οὗτος δὲ τί ;)?

Literally, and this one what?

Vincent: Joh 21:22 - Till I come Till I come ( ἕως ἔρχομαι ) Rather, while I am coming . Compare Joh 9:4; Joh 12:35, Joh 12:36; 1Ti 4:13.

Till I come ( ἕως ἔρχομαι )

Rather, while I am coming . Compare Joh 9:4; Joh 12:35, Joh 12:36; 1Ti 4:13.

Vincent: Joh 21:22 - What is that to thee ? What is that to thee ( τί πρός σε ;)? Literally, what as concerns thee?

What is that to thee ( τί πρός σε ;)?

Literally, what as concerns thee?

Vincent: Joh 21:23 - Should not die Should not die ( οὐκ ἀποθνήσκει ) Literally, dieth not .

Should not die ( οὐκ ἀποθνήσκει )

Literally, dieth not .

Vincent: Joh 21:24-25 - -- Many interpreters think that these two verses were written by some other hand than John's. Some ascribe Joh 21:24 and Joh 21:25 to two different writ...

Many interpreters think that these two verses were written by some other hand than John's. Some ascribe Joh 21:24 and Joh 21:25 to two different writers. The entire chapter, though bearing unmistakable marks of John's authorship in its style and language, was probably composed subsequently to the completion of the Gospel.

Wesley: Joh 21:2 - There were together At home, in one house.

At home, in one house.

Wesley: Joh 21:4 - They knew not that it was Jesus Probably their eyes were holden.

Probably their eyes were holden.

Wesley: Joh 21:6 - They were not able to draw it for the multitude of fishes This was not only a demonstration of the power of our Lord, but a kind supply for them and their families, and such as might be of service to them, wh...

This was not only a demonstration of the power of our Lord, but a kind supply for them and their families, and such as might be of service to them, when they waited afterward in Jerusalem. It was likewise an emblem of the great success which should attend them as fishers of men.

Wesley: Joh 21:7 - Peter girt on his upper coat (for he was stript of it before) Reverencing the presence of his Lord: and threw himself into the sea - To swim to him immediately. The love of Christ draws men through fire and water...

Reverencing the presence of his Lord: and threw himself into the sea - To swim to him immediately. The love of Christ draws men through fire and water.

Wesley: Joh 21:12 - Come ye and dine Our Lord needed not food.

Our Lord needed not food.

Wesley: Joh 21:12 - And none presumed To ask a needless question.

To ask a needless question.

Wesley: Joh 21:14 - The third time That he appeared to so many of the apostles together.

That he appeared to so many of the apostles together.

Wesley: Joh 21:15 - Simon, son of Jonah The appellation Christ had given him, when be made that glorious confession, Mat 16:16, the remembrance of which might make him more deeply sensible o...

The appellation Christ had given him, when be made that glorious confession, Mat 16:16, the remembrance of which might make him more deeply sensible of his late denial of him whom he had so confessed.

Wesley: Joh 21:15 - Lovest thou me? Thrice our Lord asks him, who had denied him thrice: more than these - Thy fellow disciples do? - Peter thought so once, Mat 26:33, but he now answers...

Thrice our Lord asks him, who had denied him thrice: more than these - Thy fellow disciples do? - Peter thought so once, Mat 26:33, but he now answers only - I love thee, without adding more than these.

Wesley: Joh 21:15 - Thou knowest He had now learnt by sad experience that Jesus knew his heart.

He had now learnt by sad experience that Jesus knew his heart.

Wesley: Joh 21:15 - My lambs The weakest and tenderest of the flock.

The weakest and tenderest of the flock.

Wesley: Joh 21:17 - Because he said the third time As if he did not believe him.

As if he did not believe him.

Wesley: Joh 21:18 - When thou art old He lived about thirty - six years after this: another shall gird thee - They were tied to the cross till the nails were driven in; and shall carry the...

He lived about thirty - six years after this: another shall gird thee - They were tied to the cross till the nails were driven in; and shall carry thee - With the cross: whither thou wouldest not - According to nature; to the place where the cross was set up.

Wesley: Joh 21:19 - By what death he should glorify God It is not only by acting, but chiefly by suffering, that the saints glorify God.

It is not only by acting, but chiefly by suffering, that the saints glorify God.

Wesley: Joh 21:19 - Follow me Showing hereby likewise what death he should die.

Showing hereby likewise what death he should die.

Wesley: Joh 21:20 - Peter turning As he was walking after Christ.

As he was walking after Christ.

Wesley: Joh 21:20 - Seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following him There is a peculiar spirit and tenderness in this plain passage. Christ orders St. Peter to follow him in token of his readiness to be crucified in hi...

There is a peculiar spirit and tenderness in this plain passage. Christ orders St. Peter to follow him in token of his readiness to be crucified in his cause. St. John stays not for the call; he rises and follows him too; but says not one word of his own love or zeal. He chose that the action only should speak this; and even when he records the circumstance, he tells us not what that action meant, but with great simplicity relates the fact only. If here and there a generous heart sees and emulates it, be it so; but he is not solicitous that men should admire it. It was addressed to his beloved Master, and it was enough that he understood it.

Wesley: Joh 21:22 - If I will that he tarry Without dying, till I come - To judgment. Certainly he did tarry, till Christ came to destroy Jerusalem. And who can tell, when or how he died? What i...

Without dying, till I come - To judgment. Certainly he did tarry, till Christ came to destroy Jerusalem. And who can tell, when or how he died? What is that to thee? - Who art to follow me long before.

Wesley: Joh 21:23 - The brethren That is, the Christians. Our Lord himself taught them that appellation, Joh 20:17. Yet Jesus did not say to him, that he should not die - Not expressl...

That is, the Christians. Our Lord himself taught them that appellation, Joh 20:17. Yet Jesus did not say to him, that he should not die - Not expressly. And St. John himself, at the time of writing his Gospel, seems not to have known clearly, whether he should die or not.

Wesley: Joh 21:24 - This is the disciple who testifieth Being still alive after he had wrote.

Being still alive after he had wrote.

Wesley: Joh 21:24 - And we know that his testimony is true The Church added these words to St. John's, Gospel, as Tertius did those to St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans, Rom 16:22.

The Church added these words to St. John's, Gospel, as Tertius did those to St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans, Rom 16:22.

Wesley: Joh 21:25 - If they were to be written particularly Every fact, and all the circumstances of it.

Every fact, and all the circumstances of it.

Wesley: Joh 21:25 - I suppose This expression, which softens the hyperbole, shows that St. John wrote this verse.

This expression, which softens the hyperbole, shows that St. John wrote this verse.

JFB: Joh 21:1-2 - Jesus showed himself again Manifested himself again.

Manifested himself again.

JFB: Joh 21:1-2 - and on this wise he manifested himself This way of speaking shows that after His resurrection He appeared to them but occasionally, unexpectedly, and in a way quite unearthly, though yet re...

This way of speaking shows that after His resurrection He appeared to them but occasionally, unexpectedly, and in a way quite unearthly, though yet really and corporeally.

JFB: Joh 21:2 - Nathanael (See on Mat 10:3).

(See on Mat 10:3).

JFB: Joh 21:3-6 - Peter saith unto them, I go a fishing (See on Luk 5:11).

(See on Luk 5:11).

JFB: Joh 21:3-6 - that night . . . caught nothing As at the first miraculous draught (see on Luk 5:5); no doubt so ordered that the miracle might strike them the more by contrast. The same principle i...

As at the first miraculous draught (see on Luk 5:5); no doubt so ordered that the miracle might strike them the more by contrast. The same principle is seen in operation throughout much of Christ's ministry, and is indeed a great law of God's spiritual procedure with His people.

JFB: Joh 21:4 - Jesus stood (Compare Joh 20:19, Joh 20:26).

(Compare Joh 20:19, Joh 20:26).

JFB: Joh 21:4 - but the disciples knew not it was Jesus Perhaps there had been some considerable interval since the last manifestation, and having agreed to betake themselves to their secular employment, th...

Perhaps there had been some considerable interval since the last manifestation, and having agreed to betake themselves to their secular employment, they would be unprepared to expect Him.

JFB: Joh 21:5 - Children This term would not necessarily identify Him, being not unusual from any superior; but when they did recognize Him, they would feel it sweetly like Hi...

This term would not necessarily identify Him, being not unusual from any superior; but when they did recognize Him, they would feel it sweetly like Himself.

JFB: Joh 21:5 - have ye any meat? Provisions, supplies, meaning fish.

Provisions, supplies, meaning fish.

JFB: Joh 21:5 - They answered . . . No This was in His wonted style, making them tell their case, and so the better prepare them for what was coming.

This was in His wonted style, making them tell their case, and so the better prepare them for what was coming.

JFB: Joh 21:6 - he said unto them, Cast the net on the right side of the ship No doubt, by this very specific direction, intending to reveal to them His knowledge of the deep and power over it.

No doubt, by this very specific direction, intending to reveal to them His knowledge of the deep and power over it.

JFB: Joh 21:7-11 - that disciple whom Jesus loved, said, It is the Lord Again having the advantage of his brother in quickness of recognition (see on Joh 20:8), to be followed by an alacrity in Peter all his own.

Again having the advantage of his brother in quickness of recognition (see on Joh 20:8), to be followed by an alacrity in Peter all his own.

JFB: Joh 21:7-11 - he was naked His vest only on, worn next the body.

His vest only on, worn next the body.

JFB: Joh 21:7-11 - cast himself into the sea The shallow part, not more than a hundred yards from the water's edge (Joh 21:8), not meaning therefore to swim, but to get sooner to Jesus than in th...

The shallow part, not more than a hundred yards from the water's edge (Joh 21:8), not meaning therefore to swim, but to get sooner to Jesus than in the full boat which they could hardly draw to shore.

JFB: Joh 21:8 - the other disciples came in a little ship By ship.

By ship.

JFB: Joh 21:9 - they saw "see."

"see."

JFB: Joh 21:9 - a fire of coals, and fish laid thereon, and bread By comparing this with 1Ki 19:6, and similar passages, the unseen agency by which Jesus made this provision will appear evident.

By comparing this with 1Ki 19:6, and similar passages, the unseen agency by which Jesus made this provision will appear evident.

JFB: Joh 21:10 - Jesus saith unto them, Bring of the fish ye have now caught Observe the double supply thus provided--His and theirs. The meaning of this will perhaps appear presently.

Observe the double supply thus provided--His and theirs. The meaning of this will perhaps appear presently.

JFB: Joh 21:11 - Peter went up Into the boat; went aboard.

Into the boat; went aboard.

JFB: Joh 21:11 - and drew the net to land full of great fishes, an hundred and fifty and three; and for all there were so many, yet was not the net broken The manifest reference here to the former miraculous draught (Luk 5:1-11) furnishes the key to this scene. There the draught was symbolical of the suc...

The manifest reference here to the former miraculous draught (Luk 5:1-11) furnishes the key to this scene. There the draught was symbolical of the success of their future ministry: While "Peter and all that were with him were astonished at the draught of the fishes which they had taken, Jesus said unto him, Fear not, from henceforth thou shalt catch men." Nay, when first called, in the act of "casting their net into the sea, for they were fishers," the same symbolic reference was made to their secular occupation: "Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men" (Mat 4:18-19). Here, then, if but the same symbolic reference be kept in view, the design of the whole scene will, we think, be clear. The multitude and the size of the fishes they caught symbolically foreshadowed the vast success of their now fast approaching ministry, and this only as a beginning of successive draughts, through the agency of a Christian ministry, till, "as the waters cover the sea, the earth should be full of the knowledge of the Lord." And whereas, at the first miraculous draught, the net "was breaking" through the weight of what it contained--expressive of the difficulty with which, after they had 'caught men,' they would be able to retain, or keep them from escaping back into the world--while here, "for all they were so many, yet was not the net broken," are we not reminded of such sayings as these (Joh 10:28): "I give unto My sheep eternal life, and they shall never perish, neither shall any pluck them out of My hand" [LUTHARDT]? But it is not through the agency of a Christian ministry that all true disciples are gathered. Jesus Himself, by unseen methods, gathers some, who afterwards are recognized by the constituted fishers of men, and mingle with the fruit of their labors. And are not these symbolized by that portion of our Galilean repast which the fishers found, in some unseen way, made ready to their hand?

JFB: Joh 21:12-14 - none . . . durst ask him, Who art thou, knowing it was the Lord Implying that they would have liked Him just to say, "It is I"; but having such convincing evidence they were afraid of being "upbraided for their unb...

Implying that they would have liked Him just to say, "It is I"; but having such convincing evidence they were afraid of being "upbraided for their unbelief and hardness of heart" if they ventured to put the question.

JFB: Joh 21:13 - Jesus . . . taketh bread The bread.

The bread.

JFB: Joh 21:13 - and giveth them, and the fish likewise (See on Luk 24:30).

(See on Luk 24:30).

JFB: Joh 21:14 - This is the third time that Jesus showed himself Was manifested.

Was manifested.

JFB: Joh 21:14 - to his disciples His assembled disciples; for if we reckon His appearances to individual disciples, they were more.

His assembled disciples; for if we reckon His appearances to individual disciples, they were more.

JFB: Joh 21:15-17 - when they had dined, Jesus saith Silence appears to have reigned during the meal; unbroken on His part, that by their mute observation of Him they might have their assurance of His id...

Silence appears to have reigned during the meal; unbroken on His part, that by their mute observation of Him they might have their assurance of His identity the more confirmed; and on theirs, from reverential shrinking to speak till He did.

JFB: Joh 21:15-17 - Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? Referring lovingly to those sad words of Peter, shortly before denying his Lord, "Though all men shall be offended because of Thee, yet will I never b...

Referring lovingly to those sad words of Peter, shortly before denying his Lord, "Though all men shall be offended because of Thee, yet will I never be offended" (Mat 26:33), and intending by this allusion to bring the whole scene vividly before his mind and put him to shame.

JFB: Joh 21:15-17 - Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee He adds not, "more than these," but prefixes a touching appeal to the Saviour's own omniscience for the truth of his protestation, which makes it a to...

He adds not, "more than these," but prefixes a touching appeal to the Saviour's own omniscience for the truth of his protestation, which makes it a totally different kind of speech from his former.

JFB: Joh 21:15-17 - He saith unto him, Feed my lambs It is surely wrong to view this term as a mere diminutive of affection, and as meaning the same thing as "the sheep" [WEBSTER and WILKINSON]. It is mu...

It is surely wrong to view this term as a mere diminutive of affection, and as meaning the same thing as "the sheep" [WEBSTER and WILKINSON]. It is much more according to usage to understand by the "lambs," young and tender disciples, whether in age or Christian standing (Isa 40:11; 1Jo 2:12-13), and by the "sheep" the more mature. Shall we say (with many) that Peter was here reinstated in office? Not exactly, since he was not actually excluded from it. But after such conduct as his, the deep wound which the honor of Christ had received, the stain brought on his office, the damage done to his high standing among his brethren, and even his own comfort, in prospect of the great work before him, required some such renewal of his call and re-establishment of his position as this.

JFB: Joh 21:16 - He saith to him . . . the second time . . . lovest thou me, &c. In this repetition of the question, though the wound was meant to be reopened, the words "more than these" are not repeated; for Christ is a tender as...

In this repetition of the question, though the wound was meant to be reopened, the words "more than these" are not repeated; for Christ is a tender as well as skilful Physician, and Peter's silence on that point was confession enough of his sin and folly. On Peter's repeating his protestation in the same words, our Lord rises higher in the manifestation of His restoring grace.

JFB: Joh 21:16 - Feed Keep.

Keep.

JFB: Joh 21:16 - my sheep It has been observed that the word here is studiously changed, from one signifying simply to feed, to one signifying to tend as a shepherd, denoting t...

It has been observed that the word here is studiously changed, from one signifying simply to feed, to one signifying to tend as a shepherd, denoting the abiding exercise of that vocation, and in its highest functions.

JFB: Joh 21:17 - He saith unto him the third time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? Peter was grieved because he said the third time, &c. This was the Physician's deepest incision into the wound, while yet smarting under the two former probings. Not till now would Peter discern the objec...

This was the Physician's deepest incision into the wound, while yet smarting under the two former probings. Not till now would Peter discern the object of this succession of thrusts. The third time reveals it all, bringing up such a rush of dreadful recollections before his view, of his "thrice denying that he knew Him," that he feels it to the quick. It was fitting that he should; it was meant that he should. But this accomplished, the painful dialogue concludes with a delightful "Feed My sheep"; as if He should say, "Now, Simon, the last speck of the cloud which overhung thee since that night of nights is dispelled: Henceforth thou art to Me and to My work as if no such scene had ever happened."

JFB: Joh 21:18-19 - When thou wast young Embracing the whole period of life to the verge of old age.

Embracing the whole period of life to the verge of old age.

JFB: Joh 21:18-19 - thou girdedst thyself, and walkedst whither thou wouldest Wast thine own master.

Wast thine own master.

JFB: Joh 21:18-19 - when . . . old thou shalt stretch forth thine hands To be bound for execution, though not necessarily meaning on a cross. There is no reason, however, to doubt the very early tradition that Peter's deat...

To be bound for execution, though not necessarily meaning on a cross. There is no reason, however, to doubt the very early tradition that Peter's death was by crucifixion.

JFB: Joh 21:19 - This spake he, signifying by what death he should glorify God Not, therefore, a mere prediction of the manner of his death, but of the honor to be conferred upon him by dying for his Master. And, indeed, beyond d...

Not, therefore, a mere prediction of the manner of his death, but of the honor to be conferred upon him by dying for his Master. And, indeed, beyond doubt, this prediction was intended to follow up his triple restoration:--"Yes, Simon, thou shall not only feed My lambs, and feed My sheep, but after a long career of such service, shalt be counted worthy to die for the name of the Lord Jesus."

JFB: Joh 21:19 - And when he had spoken this, he saith unto him, Follow me By thus connecting the utterance of this prediction with the invitation to follow Him, the Evangelist would indicate the deeper sense in which the cal...

By thus connecting the utterance of this prediction with the invitation to follow Him, the Evangelist would indicate the deeper sense in which the call was understood, not merely to go along with Him at that moment, but to come after Him, "taking up his cross."

JFB: Joh 21:20-21 - Peter, turning about Showing that he followed immediately as directed.

Showing that he followed immediately as directed.

JFB: Joh 21:20-21 - seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following; which also leaned on Jesus' breast at supper, and said, Lord, which is he that betrayeth thee? The Evangelist makes these allusions to the peculiar familiarity to which he had been admitted on the most memorable of all occasions, perhaps lovingl...

The Evangelist makes these allusions to the peculiar familiarity to which he had been admitted on the most memorable of all occasions, perhaps lovingly to account for Peter's somewhat forward question about him to Jesus; which is the rather probable, as it was at Peter's suggestion that he put the question about the traitor which he here recalls (Joh 13:24-25).

JFB: Joh 21:21 - Peter . . . saith to Jesus, Lord, and what shall this man do? What of this man? or, How shall it fare with him?

What of this man? or, How shall it fare with him?

JFB: Joh 21:22-23 - Jesus saith to him, If I will that he tarry fill I come, what is that to thee? follow thou me From the fact that John alone of the Twelve survived the destruction of Jerusalem, and so witnessed the commencement of that series of events which be...

From the fact that John alone of the Twelve survived the destruction of Jerusalem, and so witnessed the commencement of that series of events which belongs to "the last days," many good interpreters think that this is a virtual prediction of fact, and not a mere supposition. But this is very doubtful, and it seems more natural to consider our Lord as intending to give no positive indication of John's fate at all, but to signify that this was a matter which belonged to the Master of both, who would disclose or conceal it as He thought proper, and that Peter's part was to mind his own affairs. Accordingly, in "follow thou Me," the word "thou" is emphatic. Observe the absolute disposal of human life which Christ claims: "If I will that he tarry till I come," &c.

JFB: Joh 21:23 - Then went this saying abroad among the brethren, that that disciple should not die Into which they the more easily fell from the prevalent expectation that Christ's second coming was then near at hand.

Into which they the more easily fell from the prevalent expectation that Christ's second coming was then near at hand.

JFB: Joh 21:23 - yet Jesus said not unto him, He shall not die The Evangelist is jealous for His Master's honor, which his death might be thought to compromise if such a misunderstanding should not be corrected.

The Evangelist is jealous for His Master's honor, which his death might be thought to compromise if such a misunderstanding should not be corrected.

JFB: Joh 21:24 - This is the disciple which testifieth of these things, and wrote these things Thus identifying the author of this book with all that it says of this disciple.

Thus identifying the author of this book with all that it says of this disciple.

JFB: Joh 21:24 - we know that his testimony is true (Compare Joh 19:35).

(Compare Joh 19:35).

JFB: Joh 21:25 - And there are many other things which Jesus did (Compare Joh 20:30-31).

(Compare Joh 20:30-31).

JFB: Joh 21:25 - if . . . written every one, I suppose An expression used to show that what follows is not to be pressed too far.

An expression used to show that what follows is not to be pressed too far.

JFB: Joh 21:25 - even the world itself would not hold the books, &c. Not a mere hyperbolical expression, unlike the sublime simplicity of this writer, but intended to let his reader know that, even now that he had done,...

Not a mere hyperbolical expression, unlike the sublime simplicity of this writer, but intended to let his reader know that, even now that he had done, he felt his materials so far from being exhausted, that he was still running over, and could multiply "Gospels" to almost any extent within the strict limits of what "Jesus did." But in the limitation of these matchless histories, in point of number, there is as much of that divine wisdom which has presided over and pervades the living oracles, as in their variety and fulness.

Clarke: Joh 21:1 - Jesus showed himself again Jesus showed himself again - After that our Lord had appeared several times to the women, and to the apostles at Jerusalem, and at the tomb, he bade...

Jesus showed himself again - After that our Lord had appeared several times to the women, and to the apostles at Jerusalem, and at the tomb, he bade them go into Galilee, giving them the promise of meeting them there: Mat 28:7; Mar 16:7. This promise we find he fulfilled in the way John relates here. This was the seventh appearance of our Lord after the resurrection. Matthew, Mat 28:16, has but just mentioned it: of it the rest of the evangelists say nothing, and this is the reason why John gives it so particularly.

Clarke: Joh 21:3 - Peter saith - I go a fishing Peter saith - I go a fishing - Previously to the crucifixion of our Lord, the temporal necessities of himself and his disciples appear to have been ...

Peter saith - I go a fishing - Previously to the crucifixion of our Lord, the temporal necessities of himself and his disciples appear to have been supplied by the charity of individuals: Luk 8:3. As it is probable that the scandal of the cross had now shut up this source of support, the disciples, not fully knowing how they were to be employed, purposed to return to their former occupation of fishing, in order to gain a livelihood; and therefore the seven, mentioned Joh 21:2, embarked on the sea of Tiberias, otherwise called the sea of Galilee

Clarke: Joh 21:3 - That night they caught nothing That night they caught nothing - God had so ordered it, that they might be the more struck with the miracle which he afterwards wrought.

That night they caught nothing - God had so ordered it, that they might be the more struck with the miracle which he afterwards wrought.

Clarke: Joh 21:4 - Knew not that it was Jesus Knew not that it was Jesus - Probably because it was either not light enough, or he was at too great a distance, or he had assumed another form, as ...

Knew not that it was Jesus - Probably because it was either not light enough, or he was at too great a distance, or he had assumed another form, as in Mar 16:12; otherwise his person was so remarkable that all his disciples readily knew him when he was at hand: see Joh 21:12.

Clarke: Joh 21:5 - Children Children - Παιδια, a term of familiarity and affectionate kindness: it is the vocative case plural of παιδιον, which is the diminutiv...

Children - Παιδια, a term of familiarity and affectionate kindness: it is the vocative case plural of παιδιον, which is the diminutive of παις, and literally signifies little children, or beloved children. How the margin has made sirs out of it I cannot conceive

Clarke: Joh 21:5 - Any meat Any meat - Προσφαγιον from προς, besides, and φαγω, I eat; any thing that is eaten with bread, or such like solid substances, ...

Any meat - Προσφαγιον from προς, besides, and φαγω, I eat; any thing that is eaten with bread, or such like solid substances, to make the deglutition the more easy: here it evidently means any kind of fish; and our Lord seems to have appeared at first in the character of a person who wished to purchase a part of what they had caught: see the note on Joh 6:9.

Clarke: Joh 21:6 - And ye shall find And ye shall find - The Ethiopic, three copies of the Itala, and St. Cyril, add, They said therefore unto him, we have labored all the night and cau...

And ye shall find - The Ethiopic, three copies of the Itala, and St. Cyril, add, They said therefore unto him, we have labored all the night and caught nothing, nevertheless at thy command we will let down the net. This is borrowed from Luk 5:5

Clarke: Joh 21:6 - For the multitude of fishes For the multitude of fishes - This was intended as an emblem of the immense number of souls which should be converted to God by their ministry; acco...

For the multitude of fishes - This was intended as an emblem of the immense number of souls which should be converted to God by their ministry; according to the promise of Christ, Mat 4:19.

Clarke: Joh 21:7 - His fisher’ s coat His fisher’ s coat - Or, his upper coat. Επενδυτην, from επι, upon, and ενδυω, I clothe; something analagous to what we ter...

His fisher’ s coat - Or, his upper coat. Επενδυτην, from επι, upon, and ενδυω, I clothe; something analagous to what we term a great coat or surtout

Clarke: Joh 21:7 - He was naked He was naked - He was only in his vest. Γυμνος, naked, is often used to signify the absence of this upper garment only. In 1Sa 19:24, when Sa...

He was naked - He was only in his vest. Γυμνος, naked, is often used to signify the absence of this upper garment only. In 1Sa 19:24, when Saul had put off his ἱματια, upper garments, he is said to have been γυμνος, naked; and David, when girded only with a linen ephod, is said to have been uncovered, in 2Sa 6:14, 2Sa 6:20. To which may be added what we read in the Sept. Job 22:6, Thou hast taken away the covering of the naked; αμφιασιν γυμνων, the plaid or blanket in which they wrapped themselves, and besides which they had none other. In this sense it is that Virgil says, Geor. i. 299: Nudus ara, sere nudus , i.e. strip off your upper garments, and work till you sweat. See more examples in Bp. Pearce

Clarke: Joh 21:7 - Cast himself into the sea Cast himself into the sea - It is likely that they were in very shallow water; and, as they were only two hundred cubits from the land, (about one h...

Cast himself into the sea - It is likely that they were in very shallow water; and, as they were only two hundred cubits from the land, (about one hundred and thirty-two English yards), it is possible that Peter only stepped into the water that he might assist them to draw the boat to land, which was now heavily laden. It is not likely that he went into the water in order to swim ashore; had he intended this, it is not to be supposed that he would have put his great coat on, which must have been an essential hinderance to him in getting to shore.

Clarke: Joh 21:8 - Dragging the net Dragging the net - It is probable that this was that species of fishing in which the net was stretched from the shore out into the sea; the persons ...

Dragging the net - It is probable that this was that species of fishing in which the net was stretched from the shore out into the sea; the persons who were in the boat, and who shot the net, fetched a compass, and bringing in a hawser, which was attached to the other end of the net, those who were on shore helped them to drag it in. As the net was sunk with weights to the bottom, and the top floated on the water by corks, or pieces of light wood, all the fish that happened to come within the compass of the net were of course dragged to shore. The sovereign power of Christ had in this case miraculously collected the fish to that part where he ordered the disciples to cast the net.

Clarke: Joh 21:9 - They saw a fire, etc. They saw a fire, etc. - This appears to have been a new miracle. It could not have been a fire which the disciples had there, for it is remarked as ...

They saw a fire, etc. - This appears to have been a new miracle. It could not have been a fire which the disciples had there, for it is remarked as something new; besides, they had caught no fish, Joh 21:5, and here was a small fish upon the coals, and a loaf of bread provided to eat with it. The whole appears to have been miraculously prepared by Christ.

Clarke: Joh 21:12 - Come and dine Come and dine - Δευτε αριϚησατε . Though this is the literal translation of the word, yet it must be observed that it was not dinner ...

Come and dine - Δευτε αριϚησατε . Though this is the literal translation of the word, yet it must be observed that it was not dinner time, being as yet early in the morning, Joh 21:4; but Kypke has largely shown that the original word is used by Homer, Xenophon, and Plutarch, to signify breakfast, or any early meal, as well as what we term dinner. It might perhaps appear singular, otherwise it would be as agreeable to the use of the Greek word, to have translated it, come and breakfast

Clarke: Joh 21:12 - Durst ask him Durst ask him - Ever since the confession of Thomas, a proper awe of the Deity of Christ had possessed their minds.

Durst ask him - Ever since the confession of Thomas, a proper awe of the Deity of Christ had possessed their minds.

Clarke: Joh 21:13 - And giveth them And giveth them - Eating likewise with them, as Luke expressly says: Luk 24:43.

And giveth them - Eating likewise with them, as Luke expressly says: Luk 24:43.

Clarke: Joh 21:14 - This is now the third time This is now the third time - That is, this was the third time he appeared unto the apostles, when all or most of them were together. He appeared to ...

This is now the third time - That is, this was the third time he appeared unto the apostles, when all or most of them were together. He appeared to ten of them, Joh 20:19; again to eleven of them, Joh 20:26; and at this time to seven of them, Joh 21:2. But, when the other evangelists are collated, we shall find that this was the seventh time in which he had manifested himself after he arose from the dead

1st. He appeared to Mary of Magdala, Mar 16:9; Joh 20:15, Joh 20:16

2ndly, To the holy women who came from the tomb. Mat 28:9

3dly, To the two disciples who went to Emmaus, Luk 24:13, etc

4thly, To St. Peter alone, Luk 24:34

5thly, To the ten, in the absence of Thomas, Joh 20:19

6thly, Eight days after to the eleven, Thomas being present; Joh 20:26

7thly, To the seven, mentioned in Joh 21:2; which was between the eighth and fortieth day after his resurrection. Besides these seven appearances, he showed himself

8thly, To the disciples on a certain mountain in Galilee, Mat 28:16

If the appearance mentioned by St. Paul, 1Co 15:6, to upwards of 500 brethren at once - if this be not the same with his appearance on a mountain in Galilee, it must be considered the ninth. According to the same apostle, he was seen of James, 1Co 15:7, which may have been the tenth appearance. And, after this, to all the apostles, when, at Bethany, he ascended to heaven in their presence. See Mar 16:19, Mar 16:20; Luk 24:50-53; Act 1:3-12; 1Co 15:7. This appears to have been the eleventh time in which he distinctly manifested himself after his resurrection. But there might have been many other manifestations, which the evangelists have not thought proper to enumerate, as not being connected with any thing of singular weight or importance.

Clarke: Joh 21:15 - Simon lovest thou me Simon lovest thou me - Peter had thrice denied his Lord, and now Christ gives him an opportunity in some measure to repair his fault by a triple con...

Simon lovest thou me - Peter had thrice denied his Lord, and now Christ gives him an opportunity in some measure to repair his fault by a triple confession

Clarke: Joh 21:15 - More than these? More than these? - This was a kind of reproach to Peter: he had professed a more affectionate attachment to Christ than the rest; he had been more f...

More than these? - This was a kind of reproach to Peter: he had professed a more affectionate attachment to Christ than the rest; he had been more forward in making professions of friendship and love than any of the others; and no one (Judas excepted) had treated his Lord so basely. As he had before intimated that his attachment to his Master was more than that of the rest, our Lord now puts the question to him, Dost thou love me more than these? To which Peter made the most modest reply - Thou knowest I love thee, but no longer dwells on the strength of his love, nor compares himself with even the meanest of his brethren. He had before cast the very unkind reflection on his brethren, Though all be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended, Mat 26:33. But he had now learned, by dreadful experience, that he who trusteth his own heart is a fool; and that a man’ s sufficiency for good is of the Lord alone

The words, more than these, Bishop Pearce thinks refer to the provisions they were eating, or to their secular employments; for says he, "It does not seem probable that Jesus should put a question to Peter which he could not possibly answer; because he could only know his own degree of love for Jesus, not that of the other disciples."But it appears to me that our Lord refers to the profession made by Peter, which I have quoted above

It is remarkable that in these three questions our Lord uses the verb αγαπαω, which signifies to love affectionately, ardently, supremely, perfectly - see the note on Mat 21:37; and that Peter always replies, using the verb φιλεω, which signifies to love, to like, to regard, to feel friendship for another. As if our Lord had said, "Peter, dost thou love me ardently and supremely?"To which he answers, "Lord, I feel an affection for thee - I do esteem thee - but dare, at present, say no more.

There is another remarkable change of terms in this place. In Joh 21:15, Joh 21:17, our Lord uses the verb βοσκδω, to feed, and in Joh 21:16 he uses the word ποιμαινω, which signifies to tend a flock, not only to feed, but to take care of, guide, govern, defend, etc., by which he seems to intimate that it is not sufficient merely to offer the bread of life to the congregation of the Lord, but he must take care that the sheep be properly collected, attended to, regulated, guided, etc.; and it appears that Peter perfectly comprehended our Lord’ s meaning, and saw that it was a direction given not only to him, and to the rest of the disciples, but to all their successors in the Christian ministry; for himself says, 1Jo 5:2 : Feed the flock of God ( ποιμανατε το ποιμνιον του Θεου ) which is among you, taking the oversight ( επισκοπουντες, acting as superintendents and guardians), not by constraint, but willingly; not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mind. Every spiritual shepherd of Christ has a flock, composed of Lambs - young converts, and Sheep - experienced Christians, to feed, guide, regulate, and govern. To be properly qualified for this, his wisdom and holiness should always exceed those of his flock. Who is sufficient for these things? The man who lives in God, and God in him

To the answer of Christ, in Joh 21:16, the later Syriac adds, If thou lovest me and esteemest me, feed my sheep.

Clarke: Joh 21:17 - Peter was grieved Peter was grieved - Fearing, says St. Chrysostom, lest Christ saw something in his heart which he saw not himself, and which might lead to another f...

Peter was grieved - Fearing, says St. Chrysostom, lest Christ saw something in his heart which he saw not himself, and which might lead to another fall; and that Christ was about to tell him of it, as he had before predicted his denial.

Clarke: Joh 21:18 - Thou shalt stretch forth thy hands Thou shalt stretch forth thy hands - Wetstein observes that it was a custom at Rome to put the necks of those who were to be crucified into a yoke, ...

Thou shalt stretch forth thy hands - Wetstein observes that it was a custom at Rome to put the necks of those who were to be crucified into a yoke, and to stretch out their hands and fasten them to the end of it; and having thus led them through the city they were carried out to be crucified. See his note on this place. Thus then Peter was girded, chained, and carried whither he would not - not that he was unwilling to die for Christ; but he was a man - he did not love death; but he loved his life less than he loved his God.

Clarke: Joh 21:19 - Should glorify God Should glorify God - Ancient writers state that, about thirty-four years after this, Peter was crucified; and that he deemed it so glorious a thing ...

Should glorify God - Ancient writers state that, about thirty-four years after this, Peter was crucified; and that he deemed it so glorious a thing to die for Christ that he begged to be crucified with his head downwards, not considering himself worthy to die in the same posture in which his Lord did. So Eusebius, Prudentius, Chrysostom, and Augustin. See Calmet

Clarke: Joh 21:19 - Follow me Follow me - Whether our Lord meant by these words that Peter was to walk with him a little way for a private interview, or whether he meant that he ...

Follow me - Whether our Lord meant by these words that Peter was to walk with him a little way for a private interview, or whether he meant that he was to imitate his example, or be conformed to him in the manner of his death, is very uncertain.

Clarke: Joh 21:22 - If I will that he tarry till I come If I will that he tarry till I come - There are several opinions concerning this: the following are the principal 1.    Some have con...

If I will that he tarry till I come - There are several opinions concerning this: the following are the principal

1.    Some have concluded from these words that John should never die. Many eminent men, ancients and moderns, have been and are of this opinion

2.    Others thought that our Lord intimated that John should live till Christ came to judge and destroy Jerusalem. On this opinion it is observed that Peter, who was the oldest of the apostles, died in the year 67, which, says Calmet, was six years before the destruction of Jerusalem; and that John survived the ruin of that city about thirty years, he being the only one of the twelve who was alive when the above desolation took place

3.    St. Augustin, Bede, and others, understood the passage thus: If I will that he remain till I come and take him away by a natural death, what is that to thee? follow thou me to thy crucifixion. On this it may be observed, that all antiquity agrees that John, if he did die, was the only disciple who was taken away by a natural death

4.    Others imagine that our Lord was only now taking Peter aside to speak something to him in private, and that Peter, seeing John following, wished to know whether he should come along with them; and that our Lord’ s answer stated that John should remain in that place till Christ and Peter returned to him; and to this meaning of the passage many eminent critics incline. For neatly eighteen hundred years, the greatest men in the world have been puzzled with this passage. It mould appear intolerable in me to attempt to decide, where so many eminent doctors have disagreed, and do still disagree. I rather lean to the fourth opinion. See the conclusion of the Preface to this Gospel.

Clarke: Joh 21:24 - This is the disciple This is the disciple - It is, I think, very likely that these two verses were added by some of the believers at that time, as a testimony to the tru...

This is the disciple - It is, I think, very likely that these two verses were added by some of the believers at that time, as a testimony to the truth of the preceding narration; and I allow, with Bishop Pearce and others, that it is possible that John may mean himself when he says We know, etc., yet, I think that it is very unlikely. It is certain that this Gospel loses no part of its authority in admitting the suffrage of the Church of God: it rather strengthens the important truths which are delivered in it; and in the mouths of so many witnesses the sacred matters which concern the peace and salvation of the world, are still more abundantly established. See the last note on the preceding chapter

Clarke: Joh 21:24 - We know We know - Instead of οιδαμεν, we know, some have written οιδα μεν, I know indeed; but this is mere conjecture, and is worthy of no r...

We know - Instead of οιδαμεν, we know, some have written οιδα μεν, I know indeed; but this is mere conjecture, and is worthy of no regard. It is likely that these verses were added by those to whom John gave his work in charge.

Clarke: Joh 21:25 - Many other things Many other things - Before his disciples, is added by two MSS. The Scholia in several MSS. intimate that this verse is an addition; but it is found ...

Many other things - Before his disciples, is added by two MSS. The Scholia in several MSS. intimate that this verse is an addition; but it is found in every ancient version, and in Origen, Cyril, and Chrysostom

Clarke: Joh 21:25 - Could not contain, etc. Could not contain, etc. - Origen’ s signification of the word χωρειν is to admit of, or receive favourably. As if he had said, the mira...

Could not contain, etc. - Origen’ s signification of the word χωρειν is to admit of, or receive favourably. As if he had said, the miracles of Christ are so many, and so astonishing, that if the whole were to be detailed, the world would not receive the account with proper faith; but enough is recorded that men may believe that Jesus is the Son of God, and that in believing they may have life through his name: Joh 20:31

We have already seen that this apostle often uses the term world to designate the Jewish people only; and if it have this sense here, which is possible, it will at once vindicate the above exposition of the word χωρειν . As if he had said, Were I to detail all the signs and miracles which Jesus did among his disciples, and in the private families where he sojourned, the Jewish people themselves would not receive nor credit these accounts; but enough is written to prove that this Christ was the promised Messiah

Bishop Pearce has a very judicious note here, of which what follows is an abstract, with a few additions

Even the world itself, etc. This is a very strong eastern expression, to represent the number of miracles which Jesus wrought. But, however strong and strange this expression may seem to us of the western world, we find sacred and other authors using hyperboles of the like kind and signification. In Num 13:33, the spies who returned from the search of the land of Canaan say that they saw giants there of such a prodigious size that they were in their own sight as grasshoppers. In Dan 4:11, mention is made of a tree, whereof the height reached unto the heaven; and the sight thereof unto the end of all the earth. And the author of Ecclesiasticus, in 47:15, speaking of Solomon’ s wisdom, says, Thy soul covered the whole earth, and thou filledst it with parables: so here, by one degree more of hyperbole, it is said that the world would not contain all the books which should be written concerning Jesus’ s miracles, if the particular account of every one of them were given. In Josephus, Antiq. lib. xix. c. 20, God is mentioned as promising to Jacob that he would give the land of Canaan to him and his seed; and then it is added, οἱ πληρουσι πασαν, ὁσην ἡλιος ὁρᾳ, και γην και θαλασσαν . They shall fill all, whatsoever the sun illuminates, whether earth or sea. Philo in his tract De Ebriet, T. i. p. 362, 10, is observed to speak after the same manner, ουδε γαρ των δωρεων ἱκανος ουδεις χωρησαι το αφθονον πληθος, ισως δ ουδ ὁ κοσμος . Neither is any one able to contain the vast abundance of gifts; nor is the world capable of it. And in his tract De Posterit. Caini, T. i. p. 253, l. 38, he says, speaking of the fullness of God, Ουδε γαρ εις ( ει ) πλουτον επιδεικνυσθαι βουληθειη τον ἑαυτου, χωρησαι αν, ηπειρωθεισης και θαλαττης, ἡ συμπασα γη . And should he will to draw out his fullness, the whole compass of sea and land could not contain it.

Homer, who, if not born in Asia Minor, had undoubtedly lived there, has sometimes followed the hyperbolic manner of speaking which prevailed so much in the east, as in Iliad, b. xx. he makes Aeneas say to Achilles: -

Αλλ αγε μηκετι ταυτα λεγωμεθα, νηπυτιοι ὡς

ἙϚαοτ εν μεσσῃ ὑσμινῃ δηΐοτητος.

ΕϚι γαρ αμφοτεροισιν ονειδεα μυθησασθα

Πολλα μαλ · ουδ αν νηυς ἑκατονζυγος αχθος αροιτο.

Στρεπτη δε γλωσς εϚι βροτων, πολεες δ ενι μυθοι

Παντοιοι· επεων δε πολυς νομος ενθα και ενθα.

Ὁπποιον κ ειπῃσθα επος, τοιον κ επακουσαις.

Iliad, xx. v. 244-250

But wherefore should we longer waste the tim

In idle prate, while battle roars around

Reproach is cheap. With ease we might discharg

Gibes at each other, till a ship that ask

A hundred oars should sink beneath the load

The tongue of man is voluble, hath word

For every theme, nor wants wide field and long

And, as he speaks, so shall he hear again

Cowper

Few instances of any thing like these have been found in the western world; and yet it has been observed that Cicero, in Philip ii. 44, uses a similar form: Praesertim cum illi eam gloriam consecuti sunt, quae vix coelo capi posse videatur - "especially when they pursued that glory which heaven itself seems scarcely sufficient to contain."And Livy also, in vii. 25, Hae vires populi Romani, quas vix terrarum capit orbis - "these energies of the Roman people, which the terraqueous globe can scarcely contain.

We may define hyperbole thus: it is a figure of speech where more seems to be said than is intended; and it is well known that the Asiatic nations abound in these. In Deu 1:28, cities with high walls round about them are said to be walled up to heaven. Now, what is the meaning of this hyperbole? Why, that the cities had very high walls: then, is the hyperbole a truth? Yes, for we should attach no other idea to these expressions than the authors intended to convey by them. Now, the author of this expression never designed to intimate that the cities had walls which reached to heaven; nor did one of his countrymen understand it in this sense - they affixed no other idea to it, (for the words, in common use, conveyed no other), than that these cities had very high walls. When John, therefore, wrote, the world itself could not contain the books, etc., what would every Jew understand by it! Why, that if every thing which Christ had done and said were to be written, the books would be more in number than had ever been written concerning any one person or subject: i.e. there would be an immense number of books. And so there would be; for it is not possible that the ten thousandth part of the words and actions of such a life as our Lord’ s was could be contained in the compass of one or all of these Gospels

There is a hyperbole very like this, taken from the Jewish writers, and inserted by Basnage, Hist. des Juifs, liv. iii. c. 1, s. 9. "Jochanan succeeded Simeon - he attained the age of Moses - he employed forty years in commerce, and in pleading before the Sanhedrin. He composed such a great number of precepts and lessons, that if the heavens were paper, and all the trees of the forest so many pens, and all the children of men so many scribes, they would not suffice to write all his lessons!"Now, what meaning did the author of this hyperbole intend to convey? Why, that Jochanan had given more lessons than all his contemporaries or predecessors. Nor does any Jew in the universe understand the words in any other sense. It is worthy of remark that this Jochanan lived in the time of St. John; for he was in Jerusalem when it was besieged by Vespasian. See Basnage, as above

There is another quoted by the same author, ibid. c. v. s. 7, where, speaking of Eliezar, one of the presidents of the Sanhedrin, it is said: "Although the firmament were vellum, and the waters of the ocean were chanced into ink, it would not be sufficient to describe all the knowledge of Eliezar; for he made not less than three hundred constitutions concerning the manner of cultivating cucumbers."Now, what did the rabbin mean by this hyperbole? Why, no more than that Eliezar was the greatest naturalist in his time; and had written and spoken more on that subject and others than any of his contemporaries. This Eliezar flourished about seventy-three years after Christ. It is farther worthy of remark that this man also is stated to have lived in the time of St. John. John is supposed to have died a.d. 99

Hyperboles of this kind, common to the east and to the west, to the north and to the south, may be found every where; and no soul is puzzled with them but the critics. The above examples, I trust, are sufficient to vindicate and explain the words in the text. It is scarcely necessary to add that the common French expression, tout le monde , which literally means the whole world, is used in a million of instances to signify the people present at one meeting, or the majority of them, and often the members of one particular family. And yet no man who understands the language ever imagines that any besides the congregation in the one case, or the family in the other, is intended

Clarke: Joh 21:25 - Amen Amen - This word is omitted by ABCD, several others; Syriac, all the Arabic, and both the Persic; the Coptic, Sahidic, Ethiopic, Armenian, Syriac Hi...

Amen - This word is omitted by ABCD, several others; Syriac, all the Arabic, and both the Persic; the Coptic, Sahidic, Ethiopic, Armenian, Syriac Hieros., Vulgate, and all the Itala but three

The word אמן amen , which has passed unaltered into almost all the languages of the world in which the sacred writings are extant, is pure Hebrew; and signifies to be steady, constant, firm, established, or confirmed. It is used as a particle of affirmation and adjuration. When a person was sworn to the truth of any fact, the oath was recited to him, and he bound himself by simply saying, אמן אמן amen , amen . See an instance of this, Num 5:22. In Deu 27:15-26, it is to be understood in the same sense; the persons who use it binding themselves, under the curse there pronounced, should they do any of the things there prohibited. It is often used as a particle of affirmation, approbation, and consent, examples of which frequently occur in the Old Testament. When any person commenced a discourse or testimony with this word, it was considered in the light of an oath; as if he had said, I pledge my truth, my honor, and my life to the certainty of what I now state

Our Lord begins many of his discourses with this word, either singly, Amen, I say unto you; or doubled, Amen, amen, I say unto you; which we translate verily: as Christ uses it, we may ever understand it as expressing an absolute and incontrovertible truth. Instances of the use of the single term frequently occur: see Mat 5:18, Mat 5:26; Mat 6:2, Mat 6:5, Mat 6:16; Mat 8:10; Mat 10:15, Mat 10:23, Mat 10:42, etc., etc.; but it is remarkable that it is doubled by St. John, see Joh 1:51; Joh 3:3, Joh 3:5, Joh 3:11; Joh 5:19, Joh 5:24, Joh 5:25; Joh 6:26, Joh 6:32, Joh 6:47, Joh 6:53; Joh 8:34, Joh 8:51, Joh 8:58; Joh 10:1, Joh 10:7; Joh 12:24; Joh 13:16, Joh 13:20, Joh 13:21, Joh 13:38; Joh 14:12; Joh 16:20, Joh 16:23; Joh 21:18; and is never found iterated by any of the other evangelists. Some have supposed that the word אמן is contracted, and contains the initials of אדני מלך נעמן Adonai Malec Neeman , my Lord the faithful King; to whom the person who uses it is always understood to make his appeal. Christ is himself called the Amen, ὁ Αμην, Rev 1:18; Rev 3:14; because of the eternity of his nature and the unchangeableness of his truth. In later ages, it was placed at the end of all the books in the New Testament, except the Acts, the Epistle of James, and the third Epistle of John, merely as the transcriber’ s attestation to their truth; and, perhaps, it is sometimes to be understood as vouching to the fidelity of his own transcript

The subscriptions to this Gospel, as well as to the preceding Gospels, are various in the different versions and manuscripts. The following are those which appear most worthy of being noticed

"The most holy Gospel of the preaching of John the evangelist, which he spake and proclaimed in the Greek language at Ephesus, is finished."- Syriac in Bib. Polyglott

"With the assistance of the supreme God, the Gospel of St. John the son of Zebedee, the beloved of the Lord, and the preacher of eternal life, is completed. And it is the conclusion of the four most holy and vivifying Gospels, by the blessing of God. Amen."- Arabic in Bib. Polyglott

"The four glorious Gospels, of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, are completed."- Persic in Bib. Polyglott

Other subscriptions are as follow: -

"The end of the holy Gospel of John - delivered thirty years - thirty - two years after the ascension of Christ - in the Isle of Patmos - in the Greek tongue at Ephesus - under the reign of Domitian - written by John when he was an exile in Patmos - under the Emperor Trajan - and delivered in Ephesus by Gaius the host of the apostles. John, having returned from his exile in Patmos, composed his Gospel, being 100 years of age and lived to the age of 120."- Suidas

In an Ethiopic MS. in the royal library in Paris, at the conclusion of this evangelist are these words: - "Now the sum of all the clauses of the four Gospels is 9700. - By the grace of the Lord, here are ended the four Gospels. The sections of the four Gospels are 217. The clauses of the holy Gospel, even from its beginning to its end, namely, the writing of St. John, are completed.

It may be just necessary to inform the reader that the most ancient MSS. have scarcely any subscription at all, and that there is no dependence to be placed on any thing of this kind found in the others; most of the transcribers making conclusions according to their different fancies. See the concluding note of the preceding chapter; and see the preface to this Gospel, where other subjects relative to it are discussed

Calvin: Joh 21:1 - After these things Jesus manifested himself again 1.After these things Jesus manifested himself again The Evangelist still labors to prove the resurrection of Christ, and relates, that he appeared to...

1.After these things Jesus manifested himself again The Evangelist still labors to prove the resurrection of Christ, and relates, that he appeared to seven disciples, among whom he mentions Thomas, not out of respect to him, so much as because his testimony ought to be the more readily believed in proportion to the obstinacy of his unbelief. The Evangelist enters sufficiently into detail; for he carefully collects all the circumstances which contribute to prove the truth of the history. We have formerly mentioned that the Lake of Tiberias, according to the Hebrew custom, is called the Sea of Tiberias.

Calvin: Joh 21:3 - I am going to fish // And that night they caught nothing 3.I am going to fish That Peter gave his attention to fishing, ought not to be regarded as inconsistent with his office. By breathing on him, Jes...

3.I am going to fish That Peter gave his attention to fishing, ought not to be regarded as inconsistent with his office. By breathing on him, Jesus had ordained him to be an Apostle, as we saw a little before; but he abstained from the exercise of the apostleship for a short time, till he should be clothed with new power. For he had not yet been enjoined to appear in public for the discharge of his office of teaching, but had only been reminded of his future calling, that he and the others might understand that they had not in vain been chosen from the beginning. Meanwhile, they do what they were accustomed to do, and what belonged to men in private life. It is true that Paul, in the midst of his employment as a preacher, gained the support of his life by his own hands, but it was for a different reason; for his time was so arranged, that the labors of his hands did not withdraw him from teaching. Peter and his companions, on the other hand, give themselves up entirely to fishing, because they are not hindered from doing so by any public employment.

And that night they caught nothing God permitted them to toil to no purpose during the whole night, in order to prove the truth of the miracle; for if they had caught any thing 227 what followed immediately afterwards would not have so clearly manifested the power of Christ, but when, after having toiled ineffectually during the whole night, they are suddenly favored with a large take of fishes, they have good reason for acknowledging the goodness of the Lord. In the same manner, also, God often tries believers, that he may lead them the more highly to value his blessing. If we were always prosperous, whenever we put our hand to labor, scarcely any man would attribute to the blessing of God the success of his exertions, all would boast of their industry, and would kiss their hands. But when they sometimes labor and torment themselves without any advantage, if they happen afterwards to succeed better, they are constrained to acknowledge something out of the ordinary course; and the consequence is, that they begin to ascribe to the goodness of God the praise of their prosperity and success.

Calvin: Joh 21:6 - Cast the net on the right side of the ship // And now they were not able to draw it 6.Cast the net on the right side of the ship Christ does not command with authority and power as Master and Lord, but gives advice like one of th...

6.Cast the net on the right side of the ship Christ does not command with authority and power as Master and Lord, but gives advice like one of the people; and the disciples, being at a loss what to do, readily obey him, though they did not know who he was. If, before the first casting of the net, any thing of this sort had been said to them, they would not have so quickly obeyed. I mention this, that no one may wonder that they were so submissive, for they had already been worn out by long and useless toil. Yet it was no small proof of patience and perseverance, that, though they had labored unsuccessfully during the whole night, they continue their toil after the return of daylight. And, indeed, if we wish to allow an opportunity for the blessing of God to descend on us, we ought constantly to expect it; for nothing can be more unreasonable than to withdraw the hand immediately from labor, if it do not give promise of success.

That Simon Peter Was Naked, is a proof that the disciples had labored in earnest; and yet they do not hesitate to cast the net again to make another trial, that they may not neglect any opportunity. Their obedience to the command of Christ cannot be ascribed to faith; for they hear him speak as a person who was unknown to them. Now, if we dislike our calling, because the labor which we undertake appears to be unproductive, yet, when the Lord exhorts us to steadiness and perseverance, we ought to take courage; in the end we shall obtain a happy result, but it will be at the proper time.

And now they were not able to draw it 228 Christ here exhibited two proofs of his Divine power. The first consisted in their taking so large a draught of fishes; and the second was, when, by his concealed power, he preserved the net whole, which otherwise must unavoidably have been broken in pieces. Other circumstances are mentioned, namely, that the disciples find burning coals on the shore, that fishes are laid on them, and that bread is also prepared. As to the number of the fishes, we ought not to look for any deep mystery in it. Augustine enters into ingenious reasonings about the statement of the number, and says that it denotes the Law and the Gospel; but if we examine the matter carefully, we shall find that this is childish trifling.

Calvin: Joh 21:7 - Therefore the disciple whom Jesus loved saith to Peter 7.Therefore the disciple whom Jesus loved saith to Peter The Evangelist shows, by his example, that it is our duty to raise our hearts to God, whenev...

7.Therefore the disciple whom Jesus loved saith to Peter The Evangelist shows, by his example, that it is our duty to raise our hearts to God, whenever we succeed in any thing beyond our expectation; because we ought instantly to remember that this act of kindness has flowed from the favor of Him who is the Author of every blessing. That holy recognition of the grace of God, which dwelt in the heart of John, led him also to the knowledge of Christ; for he does not perceive Christ with his eyes, but, being convinced that the great multitude of fishes has been brought to him by the hand of God, he concludes that it was Christ who had guided his hands. But, as John goes before Peter in faith, so Peter afterwards excels him in zeal, when, disregarding personal danger, he throws himself into the lake. The rest follow in the ship. True, all come to Christ at length, but Peter is actuated by a peculiar zeal in comparison of the others. Whether he crossed over to the shore by walking or by swimming, is uncertain; but let us rest satisfied with knowing that the act of leaving the ship and going on shore was not the result of folly and rashness, but that he advanced beyond the others in proportion to his zeal.

Calvin: Joh 21:10 - Bring some of the fishes which you have now caught 10.Bring some of the fishes which you have now caught Though the net was filled in a moment, without any great labor on their part yet the taking of ...

10.Bring some of the fishes which you have now caught Though the net was filled in a moment, without any great labor on their part yet the taking of them is not ascribed by Christ to the disciples, thus, we call the bread which we daily eat, OUR bread, and yet, by asking that it may be given to us, we acknowledge that it proceeds from the blessing of God, (Mat 6:11.)

Calvin: Joh 21:12 - And not one of his disciples dared to ask him 12.And not one of his disciples dared to ask him It may be inquired, What hindered them? Was it shame arising from reverence, or was it any thing els...

12.And not one of his disciples dared to ask him It may be inquired, What hindered them? Was it shame arising from reverence, or was it any thing else? But if Christ saw that they were in a state of uncertainty, he ought to remove their doubt, as he had done on many other occasions. I reply, there was no other reason for shame, but because they were not sufficiently certain that he was the Christ; for it is not usual with us to inquire about matters that are doubtful and obscure. The Evangelist, therefore, means that the disciples did not ask Christ, because they were afraid of doing him wrong; so plain and manifest were the signs by which he had made himself known to them.

Calvin: Joh 21:14 - The third time 14.The third time The number three refers to the distance of time. Christ had already appeared to his disciples more than seven times, but all th...

14.The third time The number three refers to the distance of time. Christ had already appeared to his disciples more than seven times, but all that had been transacted in one day is included in one manifestation. The Evangelist, therefore, means that Christ had been seen by the disciples at intervals, in order to confirm their belief of his resurrection.

Calvin: Joh 21:15 - When, therefore, they had dined // Simon // Feed my lambs 15.When, therefore, they had dined The Evangelist now relates in what manner Peter was restored to that rank of honor from which he had fallen. That ...

15.When, therefore, they had dined The Evangelist now relates in what manner Peter was restored to that rank of honor from which he had fallen. That treacherous denial, which has been formerly described, had, undoubtedly, rendered him unworthy of the apostleship; for how could he be capable of instructing others in the faith, who had basely revolted from it? He had been made an Apostle, but it was along with Judas, and from the time when he had abandoned his post, 230 he had likewise been deprived of the honor of apostle-ship. Now, therefore, the liberty, as well as the authority, of teaching is restored to him, both of which he had lost through his own fault. And that the disgrace of his apostacy might not stand in his way, Christ blots out and destroys the remembrance of it. Such a restoration was necessary, both for Peter and for his hearers; for Peter, that he might the more boldly execute his office, being assured of the calling with which Christ had again invested him; for his hearers, that the stain which attached to his person might not be the occasion of despising the Gospel. To us also, in the present day, it is of very great importance, that Peter comes forth to us as a new man, from whom the disgrace that might have lessened his authority has been removed.

Simon ( son) of John 231 lovest thou me? By these words Christ means that no man can faithfully serve the Church, and employ himself in feeding the flock, if he do not look higher than to men. First, the office of feeding 232 is in itself laborious and troublesome; since nothing is more difficult than to keep men under the yoke of God, among whom there are many who are weak, others who are wanton and unsteady, others who are dull and sluggish, and others who are slow and unteachable. Satan now brings forward as many causes of offense as he can, that he may destroy or weaken the courage of a good pastor. 233 In addition to this, we must take into account the ingratitude of many and other causes of disgust. No man, therefore, will steadily persevere in the discharge of this office, unless the love of Christ shall reign in his heart, in such a manner that, forgetful of himself and devoting himself entirely to Christ, he overcomes every obstacle. Thus Paul declares this to have been the state of his own feelings, when he says,

The love of Christ constraineth us, judging thus, that if one died for all,
then all must have been dead,
(2Co 5:14.)

For, though he means that love with which Christ hath loved us, and of which he hath given us a proof by his death, yet he connects with us that mutual love which springs from the conviction of having received so great a blessing. Ungodly and false teachers, on the other hand, are pointed out by him in another passage by this mark, that they do not love the Lord Jesus, (1Co 16:22.)

Those who are called to govern the Church ought, therefore, to remember that, if they are desirous to discharge their office properly and faithfully, they must begin with the love of Christ. Meanwhile, Christ openly testifies how highly he values our salvation, when he employs such earnest and striking language in recommending it to Pastors, and when he declares that, if the salvation of their flock be the object of their earnest solicitude, he will reckon it a proof of the ardor of their love to himself. And, indeed, nothing could have been spoken that was better fitted for encouraging the ministers of the Gospel, than to inform them that no service can be more agreeable to Christ than that which is bestowed on feeding his flock. All believers ought to draw from it no ordinary consolation, when they are taught that they are so dear and so precious in the sight of the Son of God, that he substitutes them, as it were, in his own room. But the same doctrine ought greatly to alarm false teachers, who corrupt and overturn the government of the Church; for Christ, who declares that he is insulted by them, will inflict on them dreadful punishment.

Feed my lambs The word feed is metaphorically applied by Scripture to any kind of government; but as the present subject is the spiritual government of the Church, it is of importance to observe what are the parts of which the office of pastor or shepherd consists. No idle rank is here described to us, nor does Christ bestow on a mortal man any government to be exercised by him in a confused manner according to his own pleasure. In expounding the Tenth Chapter, we have seen that Christ is the only Pastor or Shepherd of the Church. 234 We have seen also why he takes this name to himself. If, is, because he feeds, that is, he governs his sheep, because he is the only true food of the soul. But because he employs the agency of men in preaching doctrine, he conveys to them also his own name, or, at least, shares it with them. Those men, therefore, are reckoned to be Pastors in the sight of God, who govern the Church by the ministry of the word under Christ, who is their Head. Hence we may easily infer what is the burden which Christ lays on Peter, and on what condition he appoints him to govern his flock.

This enables us plainly to refute the wicked adherents of the Church of Rome, who torture this passage to support the tyranny of their Popery. “To Peter” they tell us, “in preference to others, it is said, Feed my sheep ” We have already explained the reason why it was said to him rather than to the others; namely, that being free from every disgraceful stain, he might boldly preach the Gospel; and the reason why Christ thrice appoints him to be a pastor is, that the three denials, by which Peter had brought on himself everlasting shame, may be set aside, and thus may form no barrier to his apostleship, as has been judiciously observed by Chrysostom, Augustine, and Cyril, and most of the other Commentators. Besides, nothing was given to Peter by these words, that is not also given to all the ministers of the Gospel.

In vain, therefore, do the Papists maintain that he holds the highest rank, because he alone is specially addressed; and, granting that some special honor was conferred on him, how, I ask, will they prove from this that he has been elevated to the primacy? Though he were the chief among the apostles, does it thence follow that he was the universal bishop of the whole world? To this it must be added, that all that Peter received does not belong to the Pope any more than to Mahomet; for on what ground does he claim to be Peter’s heir, and what man of sound understanding will admit that Christ here bestows on him any hereditary right? Yet he wishes to be reckoned Peter’s successor: I wish he were so. None of us hinders him from loving Christ, and from taking care to feed his flock; but to take no concern about loving Christ, and to throw aside the office of feeding, and then to boast of being Peter’s successor, is excessively foolish and absurd. Now, as Christ, in assigning to Peter the duty of teaching, did not intend to erect a throne for an idol or for a murderer of souls, that by means of it he might miserably oppress the Church, so he stated in a few words, what kind of government of the Church he approves. This removes the mask from all the mitred bishops, who, satisfied with a mere theatrical display and an empty title, claim for themselves the authority of bishops.

Calvin: Joh 21:16 - Feed my sheep 16.Feed my sheep Christ does not give to Peter and others the office of feeding all sorts of persons, but only his sheep or his lambs. He elsew...

16.Feed my sheep Christ does not give to Peter and others the office of feeding all sorts of persons, but only his sheep or his lambs. He elsewhere describes who they are whom he reckons to belong to his flock.

My sheep, says he, hear my voice, and follow me; they hear not the voice of a stranger,
(Joh 10:5.)

True, faithful teachers ought to endeavor to gather all to Christ; and as they cannot distinguish between sheep and wild beasts, they ought to try by all methods if they can tame those who resemble wolves rather than sheep. But after having put forth their utmost efforts, their labor will be of no avail to any but the elect sheep; for docility and faith arise from this, that the heavenly Father delivers to his Son, that they may obey him, those whom he elected before the creation of the world. Again, we are taught by this passage, that none can be fed to salvation by the doctrine of the Gospel but those who are mild and teachable; for it is not without reason that Christ compares his disciples to lambs and sheep; but it must also be observed, that the Spirit of God tames those who by nature were bears or lions.

Calvin: Joh 21:17 - Peter was grieved 17.Peter was grieved Peter undoubtedly did not perceive the object which Christ had in view, in putting the same question so frequently; and therefor...

17.Peter was grieved Peter undoubtedly did not perceive the object which Christ had in view, in putting the same question so frequently; and therefore he thinks that he is-in-directly accused, as if he had not answered with sincerity. But we have already showed that the repetition was not superfluous. Besides, Peter was not yet sufficiently aware how deeply the love of Christ must be engraven on the hearts of those who have to struggle against innumerable difficulties. He afterwards learned by long experience, that such a trial had not been made in vain. Those who are to undertake the charge of governing the Church are also taught, in his person, not to examine themselves slightly, but to make a thorough scrutiny what zeal they possess, that they may not shrink or faint in the middle of their course. We are likewise taught, that we ought patiently and mildly to submit, if at any time the Lord subject us to a severe trial; because he has good reasons for doing so, though they are generally unknown to us.

Calvin: Joh 21:18 - Verily, verily, I tell thee // When thou wast younger // Another will gird thee // And will lead thee whither thou wouldst not 18.Verily, verily, I tell thee After having exhorted Peter to feed his sheep, Christ likewise arms him to maintain the warfare which was approachin...

18.Verily, verily, I tell thee After having exhorted Peter to feed his sheep, Christ likewise arms him to maintain the warfare which was approaching. Thus he demands from him not only faithfulness and diligence, but invincible courage in the midst of dangers, and firmness in bearing the cross. In short, he bids him be prepared for enduring death whenever it shall be necessary. Now, though the condition of all pastors is not alike, still this admonition applies to all in some degree. The Lord spares many, and abstains from shedding their blood, satisfied with this alone, that they devote themselves to him sincerely and unreservedly as long as they live. But as Satan continually makes new and various attacks, all who undertake the office of feeding must be prepared for death; as they certainly have to do not only with sheep, but also with wolves. So far as relates to Peter, Christ intended to forewarn him of his death, that he might at all times ponder the thought, that the doctrine of which he was a minister must be at length ratified by his own blood. Yet it appears that in these words Christ did not speak with a view to Peter alone, but that he adorned him with the honourable title of Martyr in presence of the others; as if he had said, that Peter would be a very different kind of champion from what he had formerly shown himself to be.

When thou wast younger Old age appears to be set apart for tranquillity and repose; and, accordingly, old men are usually discharged from public employments, and soldiers are discharged from service. Peter might, therefore, have promised to himself at that age a peaceful life. Christ declares, on the other hand, that the order of nature will be inverted, so that he who had lived at his ease when he was young will be governed by the will of another when he is old, and will even endure violent subjection.

In Peter we have a striking mirror of our ordinary condition. Many have an easy and agreeable life before Christ calls them; but as soon as they have made profession of his name, and have been received as his disciples, or, at least, some time afterwards, they are led to distressing struggles, to a troublesome life, to great dangers, and sometimes to death itself. This condition, though hard, must be patiently endured. Yet the Lord moderates the cross by which he is pleased to try his servants, so that he spares them a little while, until their strength has come to maturity; for he knows well their weakness, and beyond the measure of it he does not press them. Thus he forbore with Peter, so long as he saw him to be as yet tender and weak. Let us therefore learn to devote ourselves to him to the latest breath, provided that he supply us with strength.

In this respect, we behold in many persons base ingratitude; for the more gently the Lord deals with us, the more thoroughly do we habituate ourselves to softness and effeminacy. Thus we scarcely find one person in a hundred who does not murmur if, after having experienced long forbearance, he be treated with some measure of severity. But we ought rather to consider the goodness of God in sparing us for a time. Thus Christ says that, so long as he dwelt on earth, he conversed cheerfully with his disciples, as if he had been present at a marriage, but that fasting and tears afterwards awaited them, 235 (Mat 9:15.)

Another will gird thee Many think that this denotes the manner of death which Peter was to die, 236 meaning that he was hanged, with his arms stretched out; but I consider the word gird as simply denoting all the outward actions by which a man regulates himself and his whole life. Thou girdedst thyself; that is, “thou wast accustomed to wear such raiment as thou chosest, but this liberty of choosing thy dress will be taken from thee.” As to the manner in which Peter was put to death, it is better to remain ignorant of it than to place confidence in doubtful fables.

And will lead thee whither thou wouldst not The meaning is, that Peter did not die a natural death, but by violence and by the sword. It may be thought strange that Christ should say that Peter’s death will not be voluntary; for, when one is hurried unwillingly to death, there is no firmness and none of the praise of martyrdom. But this must be understood as referring to the contest between the flesh and the Spirit, which believers feel within themselves; for we never obey God in a manner so free and unrestrained as not to be drawn, as it were, by ropes, in an opposite direction, by the world and the flesh. Hence that complaint of Paul,

“The good that I would I do not, but the evil that I would not, that I do,”
(Rom 7:19.)

Besides, it ought to be observed, that the dread of death is naturally implanted in us, for to wish to be separated from the body is revolting to nature. Accordingly, Christ, though he was prepared to obey God with his whole heart, prays that he may be delivered from death. Moreover, Peter dreaded the cross on account of the cruelty of men; and, therefore, we need not wonder if, in some measure, he recoiled from death. But this showed the more clearly the obedience which he rendered to God, that he would willingly have avoided death on its own account, and yet he endured it voluntarily, because he knew that such was the will of God; for if there had not been a struggle of the mind, there would have been no need of patience.

This doctrine is highly useful to be known; for it urges us to prayer, because we would never be able, without extraordinary assistance from God, to conquer the fear of death; and, therefore, nothing remains for us but to present ourselves humbly to God, and to submit to his government. It serves also to sustain our minds, that they may not altogether faint, if it happen at any time that persecutions make us tremble. They who imagine that the martyrs were not moved by any fear make their own fear to yield them a ground of despair. But there is no reason why our weakness should deter us from following their example, since they experienced a fear similar to ours, so that they could not gain a triumph over the enemies of truth but by contending with themselves.

Calvin: Joh 21:19 - Signifying by what death he should glorify God // And when he had said this 19.Signifying by what death he should glorify God This circumlocution is highly emphatic; for though the end held out to all believers ought to be, t...

19.Signifying by what death he should glorify God This circumlocution is highly emphatic; for though the end held out to all believers ought to be, to glorify God both by their life and by their death, yet John intended to employ a remarkable commendation for adorning the death of those who, by their blood, seal the Gospel of Christ and glorify his name, as Paul teaches us, (Phi 1:20.) It is now our duty to reap the fruit which the death of Peter has yielded; for it ought to be imputed to our indolence, if our faith be not confirmed by it, and if we do not keep the same object in view, that the glory of God may be displayed by us. If the Papists had considered this end in the death of the martyrs, that sacrilegious and detestable invention would never have entered into their minds, that their death contributes to appease the wrath of God, and to pay the ransom for our sins.

And when he had said this Christ here explains what was the design of that prediction of a violent death. It was, that Peter might be prepared to endure it; as if he had said, “Since you must endure death by my example, follow your leader.” Again, that Peter may the more willingly obey God who calls him to the cross, Christ offers himself as a leader; for this is not a general exhortation by which he invites him to imitate himself, but he speaks only of the kind of death. Now, this single consideration greatly soothes all the bitterness that is in death, when the Son of God presents himself before our eyes with his blessed resurrection, which is our triumph over death.

Calvin: Joh 21:20 - And Peter, turning about // Whom Jesus loved 20.And Peter, turning about We have in Peter an instance of our curiosity, which is not only superfluous, but even hurtful, when we are drawn aside f...

20.And Peter, turning about We have in Peter an instance of our curiosity, which is not only superfluous, but even hurtful, when we are drawn aside from our duty by looking at others; for it is almost natural to us to examine the way in which other people live, instead of examining our own, and to attempt to find in them idle excuses. We willingly deceive ourselves by this semblance of apology, that other people are no better than we are, as if their indolence freed us from blame. Scarce one person in a hundred considers the import of those words of Paul,

Every man shall bear his own burden, (Gal 6:5.)

In the person of one man, therefore, there is a general reproof of all who look around them in every direction, to see how other men act, and pay no attention to the duties which God has enjoined on themselves. Above all, they are grievously mistaken in this respect, that they neglect and overlook what is demanded by every man’s special calling.

Out of ten persons it may happen that God shall choose one, that he may try him by heavy calamities or by vast labors, and that he shall permit the other nine to remain at ease, or, at least, shall try them lightly. Besides, God does not treat all in the same manner, but makes trial of every one as he thinks fit. As there are various kinds of Christian warfare, let every man learn to keep his own station, and let us not make inquiries like busybodies about this or that person, when the heavenly Captain addresses each of us, to whose authority we ought to be so submissive as to forget every thing else.

Whom Jesus loved This circumlocution was inserted, in order to inform us what was the reason why Peter was induced to put the question which is here related; for he thought it strange that he alone should be called, and that John should be overlooked, whom Christ had always loved so warmly. Peter had, therefore, some apparently good reason for asking why no mention was made of John, as if Christ’s disposition towards him had undergone a change. Yet Christ cuts short his curiosity, by telling him that he ought to obey the calling of God, and that he has no right to inquire what other people do.

Calvin: Joh 21:22 - If I will that he remain 22.If I will that he remain It has been customary to take this sentence as detached, and to read the former clause affirmatively, I will that he tar...

22.If I will that he remain It has been customary to take this sentence as detached, and to read the former clause affirmatively, I will that he tarry till I come; but this has been done through the ignorance of transcribers, not through the mistake of the translator; for he could not have been mistaken about the Greek word, but a single letter might easily creep into the Latin version, so as to alter the whole meaning. 237 The whole sentence, therefore, is a question, and ought to be read in immediate connection; for Christ intended to put his hand on his disciple, in order to keep him within the limits of his calling. “It is no concern of yours,” says he, “and you have no right to inquire what becomes of your companion; leave that to my disposal; think only about yourself, and prepare to follow where you are called.” Not that all anxiety about brethren is uncalled for but it ought to have some limit, so that it may be anxiety, and not curiosity, that occupies our attention. Let every man, therefore, look to his neighbours, if by any means he may succeed in drawing them along with him to Christ, and let not the offenses of others retard his own progress.

Calvin: Joh 21:23 - Then this saying went forth 23.Then this saying went forth The Evangelist relates that, from misunderstanding Christ’s words, an error arose among the disciples, that John wo...

23.Then this saying went forth The Evangelist relates that, from misunderstanding Christ’s words, an error arose among the disciples, that John would never die. He means those who were present at that conversation, that is, the Apostles; not that the name brethren belongs to them alone, but that they were the first-fruits, as it were, of that holy union. It is also possible, that, besides the eleven, he refers to others who were at that time in company with them; and by the expression, went forth, he means that this error was spread in all directions; yet probably it was not of long duration, but subsisted among them, until, being enlightened by the Holy Spirit, they formed purer and more correct views of the kingdom of Christ, having laid aside carnal and foolish imaginations. 238

What John relates about the Apostles happens every day, and we ought not to wonder at it; for if Christ’s disciples, who belonged to his family and were intimately acquainted with him, were so egregiously mistaken, how much more are they liable to fall into mistakes, who have not been so familiarly instructed in the school of Christ? But let us also observe whence this fault arises. The teaching of Christ is useful, and for edification; that is, it is plain; but we obscure the light by our wicked inventions, which we bring to it from our own views. Christ had not intended to pronounce any thing certain or definite about John, but only to affirm that he had full power to decide about his life and death; so that the doctrine is simple and useful in itself, but the disciples imagine and contrive more than had been told them. Accordingly, in order that we may be safe from this danger, let us learn to be wise and to think soberly. But such is the wantonness of the human understanding, that it rushes with all its force into foolishness. The consequence was, that this very error, against which the Evangelist had expressly warned them to be on their guard, continued notwithstanding to gain currency in the world; for a fable has been contrived, that he ordered a ditch to be digged for him, and went down into it, and that next day it was found empty. We see, therefore, that we shall never cease to err, unless we unreservedly receive what the Lord hath taught us, and reject all inventions of men.

Calvin: Joh 21:24 - This is that disciple 24.This is that disciple Having hitherto mentioned himself in the third person, John now declares that it is himself; that greater weight may be atta...

24.This is that disciple Having hitherto mentioned himself in the third person, John now declares that it is himself; that greater weight may be attached to the statements of one who was an eye-witness, and who had fully known all that he relates.

Calvin: Joh 21:25 - There are also many other things that Jesus did 25.There are also many other things that Jesus did Lest any one should view his narrative with suspicion, as if it had been written through partialit...

25.There are also many other things that Jesus did Lest any one should view his narrative with suspicion, as if it had been written through partiality, because Jesus loved him, he anticipates this objection, by saying, that he has passed over more than he has written. He does not speak of Christ’s actions of every kind, but of those which relate to his public office; nor ought we to think that the hyperbole is absurd, when we bear with many figures of speech of the same kind in heathen authors. Not only ought we to take into account the number of Christ’s works, but we ought also to consider their importance and magnitude. The majesty of Christ, which by its infinity swallowed up, if I may so speak, not only the senses of men, but heaven and earth, gave a miraculous display of its own splendor in those works. If the Evangelist, casting his eyes on that brightness, exclaims in astonishment, that even the whole world could not contain a full narrative, ought we to wonder at it? Nor is he at all to be blamed, if he employ a frequent and ordinary figure of speech for commending the excellence of the works of Christ. For we know how God accommodates himself to the ordinary’ way of speaking, on account of our ignorance, and sometimes even, if I may be allowed the expression, stammers.

Yet we ought to remember what we formerly stated, that the summary which the Evangelists have committed to writing, is sufficient both for regulating faith and for obtaining salvation. That man who has duly profited under such teachers will be truly wise. And, indeed, since they were appointed by God to be witnesses to us, as they have faithfully discharged their duty; so it is our duty, on the other hand, to depend wholly on their testimony, and to desire nothing more than what they have handed down to us; and especially, because their pens were guided by the sure providence of God, that they might not oppress us by an unlimited mass of narratives, and yet, in making a selection, might make known to us all that God knew to be necessary for us, who alone is wise, and the only fountain of wisdom; to whom be praise and glory for ever. Amen.

Defender: Joh 21:2 - together This epilogue chapter, added after John had apparently ended his narrative, may well have been intended partly for symbolic reasons. This may be sugge...

This epilogue chapter, added after John had apparently ended his narrative, may well have been intended partly for symbolic reasons. This may be suggested by the fact that just seven of the disciples were involved, the number possibly representing all disciples of the Lord as "fishers of men" (Mat 4:19). The number seven has, of course, symbolized completeness ever since God established the seven-day week in commemoration of the completion of His week of creation. The Great Commission had now been given and it would soon be time for the disciples, and all those who would follow them, to go into all the world to "fish for men" (Mat 4:19). By this additional miraculous sign, Jesus would encourage His people that their fishing would ultimately be successful in bringing many to the Savior."

Defender: Joh 21:4 - morning was now come Continuing with the symbolic theme, the disciples can fish all night long in the sea (which represents the world at large) without success, because Je...

Continuing with the symbolic theme, the disciples can fish all night long in the sea (which represents the world at large) without success, because Jesus, the light of the world, is not with them during the world's dark night. "Without me, ye can do nothing," He had said (Joh 15:5)."

Defender: Joh 21:6 - multitude of fishes This remarkable change of fortune would remind them immediately of their experience three years earlier when Jesus had similarly given them a miraculo...

This remarkable change of fortune would remind them immediately of their experience three years earlier when Jesus had similarly given them a miraculous catch of fishes and told them they would "catch men" (Luk 5:10) in the future (Luk 5:1-10). They recognized that it was Jesus and, most likely, would have understood His presence and the miracle as a rebuke and a reminder that they must soon be fishing for men instead of fish."

Defender: Joh 21:8 - two hundred cubits Possibly, John was led to note the distance of two hundred cubits in recollection of the "two hundred" penny's worth of bread which the disciples had ...

Possibly, John was led to note the distance of two hundred cubits in recollection of the "two hundred" penny's worth of bread which the disciples had once thought was needed to feed a multitude (Joh 6:7 - the only other reference to "two hundred" in the Gospels). Just as Christ provided more than the needed two hundred penny's worth of bread to feed a multitude, so here He provided a multitude of fish (representing a multitude of people) when they ventured two hundred cubits from the shore. Jesus had once said that "the kingdom of heaven is like a net, that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind" (Mat 13:47). The disciples may also have remembered that parable, concluding that the Lord would have them make disciples of all nations (Mat 28:19) just as the net in the parable had gathered every kind of fish."

Defender: Joh 21:9 - fish laid thereon The disciples had not caught the fish which Jesus had cooked for them; evidently He, as Creator, had created these fishes. The disciples would realize...

The disciples had not caught the fish which Jesus had cooked for them; evidently He, as Creator, had created these fishes. The disciples would realize that Jesus did not have to depend on them to fish for men; it was a privilege He was giving them - that of sharing in His mission to seek and save the lost (Luk 19:10)."

Defender: Joh 21:11 - an hundred and fifty and three The reason why the disciples were careful to count, and John to record, the number of fishes brought to shore must again involve symbolism as there se...

The reason why the disciples were careful to count, and John to record, the number of fishes brought to shore must again involve symbolism as there seems no other reason for it. It has been calculated that there were 153 distinct nations in the world at the time of Christ (the number is not much different at present); these were represented at Pentecost by seventeen ethnic groups (Act 2:8-11), when the disciples first began to carry out the Commission, preaching to the world in microcosm. The number 17 is also symbolic: when all the numbers are added up through 17 (that is, 1+2+3+...+16+17), they add up to 153. Furthermore, the digits in 153 (1+5+3) add up to 9, which, when multiplied by 17, again makes 153. It is also interesting that there are three digits in the number, and if each is multiplied by itself three times, then the total once again adds up to 153, (that is: (1 x 1 x 1) + (5 x 5 x 5) + (3 x 3 x 3) = 153). There seems no other number that could possibly be more appropriate to represent all the peoples of the world than this number, and it is surely more than coincidence (in fact, providential) that the Creator saw to it that exactly 153 great fishes entered the gospel net.

Defender: Joh 21:11 - was not the net broken On that occasion three years previously, the net had broken (Luk 5:6). This time, however, it did not break, indicating that if the human "fish" were ...

On that occasion three years previously, the net had broken (Luk 5:6). This time, however, it did not break, indicating that if the human "fish" were securely caught in the gospel net, they would surely be drawn to shore. It is probably noteworthy in this connection that the greatest passage on security in the Bible (Rom 8:35-39) lists exactly seventeen things that can never separate us from God's love in Christ, the last consisting of "every other creation." No one is ever more secure than the loved ones of the Savior. One might even multiply this seventeen-fold security by the nine-fold fruit of the Spirit (Gal 5:22, Gal 5:23) and again there results 153-fold effectiveness in true evangelism. Then also, one could note that the word "sign" or "miracle" occurs seventeen times in John, and there are nine "signs" described in John's Gospel (the seven performed by Christ before His resurrection plus His own resurrection plus this symbolic post-resurrection miracle). Again we have 17 x 9 suggested. That is not all, but it should be obvious that all of this simply could not be mere coincidence. Its symbolic, or parabolic, or typological significance is real and powerful."

Defender: Joh 21:17 - lovest thou me Jesus had twice asked Peter if he loved Him with agape love (true self-less devotion to the one loved). Peter had answered that he did love Him, but w...

Jesus had twice asked Peter if he loved Him with agape love (true self-less devotion to the one loved). Peter had answered that he did love Him, but with phileo love (brotherly kindness). This third time, Jesus also used phileo, and Peter was grieved. He finally recognized that the thrice-repeated question was intended to remind him of His thrice-repeated denial of the Lord (Joh 18:17, Joh 18:25, Joh 18:27). Further, the Lord had not addressed him as Peter ("the rock") but by his old name Simon. Jesus wanted to bring him back to the point where he henceforth would not just "go (a) fishing" (Joh 21:3) but would "Feed my lambs," "Feed my sheep" and "Feed my sheep" (Joh 21:15, Joh 21:17, Joh 21:16). The converts must be fed and tended with God's Word (1Pe 5:2, 1Pe 5:3), and this must be done through love for Christ."

Defender: Joh 21:22 - tarry till I come Tradition has it that all twelve disciples, except John, died as martyrs for their testimony. Peter is said to have been crucified (Joh 21:18), possib...

Tradition has it that all twelve disciples, except John, died as martyrs for their testimony. Peter is said to have been crucified (Joh 21:18), possibly upside down, although none of this is confirmed in the Bible itself, except for James, the brother of John (Act 12:1, Act 12:2). Except for John, all were probably dead by the time he wrote his Gospel, somewhere around a.d. 85. In one sense, he did tarry until the Lord's coming, for as a prisoner on the isle of Patmos he was translated into the future to see and record all the main events associated with Christ's return in the book of Revelation (Rev 1:1, Rev 1:2, Rev 1:10, Rev 1:11)."

Defender: Joh 21:25 - the books This apparently hyperbolic statement is actually quite realistic. The four Gospels only record what Jesus began both to do and teach (Act 1:1). These ...

This apparently hyperbolic statement is actually quite realistic. The four Gospels only record what Jesus began both to do and teach (Act 1:1). These works and words have been continued throughout the world for 2000 years by all those in whom Christ dwells by the Holy Spirit. If every such person could write a complete autobiography about all that the indwelling Spirit of Christ has done in and through him, the number of books would indeed be astronomical. And this will continue throughout eternity."

TSK: Joh 21:1 - these // Jesus // the sea these : Joh 20:19-29 Jesus : Mat 26:32, Mat 28:7, Mat 28:16; Mar 16:7 the sea : Joh 6:1, Joh 6:23

TSK: Joh 21:2 - Thomas // Nathanael // Cana // the sons Thomas : Joh 20:28 Nathanael : Joh 1:45-51 Cana : Joh 2:1, Joh 2:11, Joh 4:46; Jos 19:28, Kanah the sons : Mat 4:21, Mat 4:22

Thomas : Joh 20:28

Nathanael : Joh 1:45-51

Cana : Joh 2:1, Joh 2:11, Joh 4:46; Jos 19:28, Kanah

the sons : Mat 4:21, Mat 4:22

TSK: Joh 21:3 - I go // and that I go : 2Ki 6:1-7; Mat 4:18-20; Luk 5:10,Luk 5:11; Act 18:3, Act 20:34; 1Co 9:6; 1Th 2:9; 2Th 3:7-9 and that : Luk 5:5; 1Co 3:7

TSK: Joh 21:4 - but but : Joh 20:14; Mar 16:12; Luk 24:15, Luk 24:16, Luk 24:31

TSK: Joh 21:5 - Children // have Children : or, Sirs, 1Jo 2:13, 1Jo 2:18 *Gr. have : Psa 37:3; Luk 24:41-43; Phi 4:11-13, Phi 4:19; Heb 13:5

Children : or, Sirs, 1Jo 2:13, 1Jo 2:18 *Gr.

have : Psa 37:3; Luk 24:41-43; Phi 4:11-13, Phi 4:19; Heb 13:5

TSK: Joh 21:6 - Cast // They cast // the multitude Cast : Mat 7:27; Luk 5:4-7 They cast : Joh 2:5; Psa 8:8; Heb 2:6-9 the multitude : Act 2:41, Act 4:4

Cast : Mat 7:27; Luk 5:4-7

They cast : Joh 2:5; Psa 8:8; Heb 2:6-9

the multitude : Act 2:41, Act 4:4

TSK: Joh 21:7 - that disciple // It is // when // fisher’ s coat // naked that disciple : Joh 21:20,Joh 21:24, Joh 13:23, Joh 19:26, Joh 20:2 It is : Joh 20:20,Joh 20:28; Psa 118:23; Mar 11:3; Luk 2:11; Act 2:36, Act 10:36; ...

that disciple : Joh 21:20,Joh 21:24, Joh 13:23, Joh 19:26, Joh 20:2

It is : Joh 20:20,Joh 20:28; Psa 118:23; Mar 11:3; Luk 2:11; Act 2:36, Act 10:36; 1Co 15:47; Jam 2:1

when : Son 8:7; Mat 14:28, Mat 14:29; Luk 7:47; 2Co 5:14

fisher’ s coat : Or, upper coat, great coat, or, surtout, επενδυτην [Strong’ s G1903], from επι [Strong’ s G1909], upon, and ενδυω [Strong’ s G1746], I clothe.

naked : That is, he was only in his vest, or under garment; for γυμνος [Strong’ s G1131], naked, like the Hebrew arom is frequently applied to one who has merely laid aside his outer garment. See note on 1Sa 19:24, and see note on 2Sa 6:20. To which may be added what we read in the LXX, Job 22:6, ""Thou has taken away the covering of the naked,"" αμφιαιν γυμνων , the plaid, or blanket, in which they wrapped themselves, and besides they had no other. In this sense Virgil says, Nudus ara, sere nudus ""plough naked, and sow naked,""i.e., strip off your upper garments.

TSK: Joh 21:8 - cubits cubits : Deu 3:11

cubits : Deu 3:11

TSK: Joh 21:9 - they saw they saw : 1Ki 19:5, 1Ki 19:6; Mat 4:11; Mar 8:3; Luk 12:29-31

TSK: Joh 21:11 - and for and for : Luk 5:6-8; Act 2:41

and for : Luk 5:6-8; Act 2:41

TSK: Joh 21:12 - Come // dine // durst Come : Act 10:41 dine : The word αρισταν [Strong’ s G712], like prandere was used for any meat taken before the coena or supper. ...

Come : Act 10:41

dine : The word αρισταν [Strong’ s G712], like prandere was used for any meat taken before the coena or supper.

durst : Joh 4:27, Joh 16:19; Gen 32:29, Gen 32:30; Mar 9:32; Luk 9:45

TSK: Joh 21:13 - -- Luk 24:42, Luk 24:43; Act 10:41

TSK: Joh 21:14 - the third time the third time : Or, as some read, the third day. On the day the Saviour rose he appeared five times; the second day was that day se’ nnight; an...

the third time : Or, as some read, the third day. On the day the Saviour rose he appeared five times; the second day was that day se’ nnight; and this was the third day - or this was his third appearance to any considerable number of his disciples together. Though he had appeared to Mary, to the women, to the two disciples, to Cephas - yet he had but twice appeared to a company of them together. Joh 20:19, Joh 20:26

TSK: Joh 21:15 - son // lovest // more // thou knowest // Feed // lambs son : Joh 21:16, Joh 21:17, Joh 1:42, Jona, Mat 16:17, Bar-jona lovest : Joh 8:42, Joh 14:15-24, Joh 16:27; Mat 10:37, Mat 25:34-45; 1Co 16:21, 1Co 16...

TSK: Joh 21:16 - the second // my sheep the second : Joh 18:17, Joh 18:25; Mat 26:72 my sheep : Joh 10:11-16, Joh 10:26, Joh 10:27; Psa 95:7, Psa 100:3; Zec 13:7; Mat 25:32; Luk 15:3-7, Luk ...

TSK: Joh 21:17 - the third // grieved // Lord // thou knowest that // Feed the third : Joh 13:38, Joh 18:27; Mat 26:73, Mat 26:74; Rev 3:19 grieved : 1Ki 17:18; Lam 3:33; Mat 26:75; Mar 14:72; Luk 22:61, Luk 22:62; 2Co 2:4-7;...

TSK: Joh 21:18 - but // another // thou wouldest not but : Joh 13:36; Act 12:3, Act 12:4 another : Act 21:11 thou wouldest not : Joh 12:27, Joh 12:28; 2Co 5:4

but : Joh 13:36; Act 12:3, Act 12:4

another : Act 21:11

thou wouldest not : Joh 12:27, Joh 12:28; 2Co 5:4

TSK: Joh 21:19 - by // Follow by : Phi 1:20; 1Pe 4:11-14; 2Pe 1:14 Follow : Joh 21:22, Joh 12:26, Joh 13:36, Joh 13:37; Num 14:24; 1Sa 12:20; Mat 10:38, Mat 16:21-25, Mat 19:28; Ma...

TSK: Joh 21:20 - seeth // which seeth : Joh 21:7, Joh 21:24, Joh 20:2 which : Joh 13:23-26, Joh 20:2

TSK: Joh 21:21 - Lord Lord : Mat 24:3, Mat 24:4; Luk 13:23, Luk 13:24; Act 1:6, Act 1:7

TSK: Joh 21:22 - If // follow If : Mat 16:27, Mat 16:28, Mat 24:3, Mat 24:27, Mat 24:44, Mat 25:31; Mar 9:1; 1Co 4:5, 1Co 11:26; Rev 1:7, Rev 2:25; Rev 3:11, Rev 22:7, Rev 22:20 fo...

TSK: Joh 21:23 - what what : Deu 29:29; Job 28:28, Job 33:13; Dan 4:35

TSK: Joh 21:24 - we know we know : Joh 19:35; 1Jo 1:1, 1Jo 1:2, 1Jo 5:6; 3Jo 1:12

TSK: Joh 21:25 - there // that even there : Joh 20:30,Joh 20:31; Job 26:14; Psa 40:5, Psa 71:15; Ecc 12:12; Mat 11:5; Act 10:38; Act 20:35; Heb 11:32 that even : This is a very strong ea...

there : Joh 20:30,Joh 20:31; Job 26:14; Psa 40:5, Psa 71:15; Ecc 12:12; Mat 11:5; Act 10:38; Act 20:35; Heb 11:32

that even : This is a very strong eastern expression to represent the number of miracles which Jesus wrought. But however strong and strange it may appear to us of the western world, we find sacred and other authors using hyperboles of the like kind and signification. See Num 13:33; Deu 1:28; Dan 4:11; Ecc 1:15. Basnage gives a very similar hyperbole taken from the Jewish writers, in which Jochanan is said to have ""composed such a great number of precepts and lessons, that if the heavens were paper, and all the trees of the forest so many pens, and all the children of men so many scribes, they would not suffice to write all his lessons.""Amo 7:10; Mat 19:24

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Joh 21:1 - -- Joh 21:1-11 Christ appeareth to his disciples at the sea of Tiberias, and maketh himself known by a great draught of fishes. Joh 21:12-14 He eat...

Joh 21:1-11 Christ appeareth to his disciples at the sea of Tiberias, and maketh himself known by a great draught of fishes.

Joh 21:12-14 He eateth before them. Joh 21:15-23 He thrice repeateth his charge to Peter to feed his

flock; foretells the manner of his death; and rebuketh his curiosity concerning John.

Joh 21:24,25 John asserts the truth of his testimony, and that Jesus did many acts besides, too numerous to be recorded.

After three several appearances of Christ to his disciples, which hitherto were all of them in Jerusalem, Christ showed himself again to them in Galilee, whither he had ordered his disciples to go, promising there to meet them, Mat 26:32 Mar 16:7 . Here the occasion and circumstances of this his third appearance are related by St. John.

Poole: Joh 21:2 - -- All the disciples were either there in several places, or going thither, according to Christ’ s direction before mentioned: but either these se...

All the disciples were either there in several places, or going thither, according to Christ’ s direction before mentioned: but either these seven were there before the rest; or else they lodged together, or near one another; so as these only are here mentioned as being together at this time, and so witnesses of this miracle which followeth.

Poole: Joh 21:3 - that night caught nothing Peter and divers others were fishermen, as we have formerly heard, and had boats which they so employed. Though they were called to the work of the ...

Peter and divers others were fishermen, as we have formerly heard, and had boats which they so employed. Though they were called to the work of the ministry, yet, churches not yet being gathered and constituted able to maintain them, they did not judge it unlawful to employ themselves in honest vocations, which might bring in something of a livelihood; no more did Paul afterward. The others resolve to go with Peter. They went, but

that night caught nothing the providence of God so ordering it, that Christ’ s Divine power might be seen in commanding fish into their nets.

Poole: Joh 21:4 - -- Probably their distance from him was the cause that they did not know him, though they had seen him once and again since his resurrection from the d...

Probably their distance from him was the cause that they did not know him, though they had seen him once and again since his resurrection from the dead: others think, that by the providence of God their eyes were holden that they should not know him, as Luk 24:16 .

Poole: Joh 21:5 - -- He asketh them if they had any thing to eat, not because he knew not, but in order to what he intended to do to make them more attentive to the mira...

He asketh them if they had any thing to eat, not because he knew not, but in order to what he intended to do to make them more attentive to the miracle which he by and by intended to work.

Poole: Joh 21:6 - -- Though they had before laboured in vain, yet their Master’ s command encourages them to go to work again; then they take a multitude of fishes;...

Though they had before laboured in vain, yet their Master’ s command encourages them to go to work again; then they take a multitude of fishes; a presage, say some, of that great success which the apostles should have in their fishing for men.

Poole: Joh 21:7 - -- There is a great dispute amongst critical writers what this fisher’ s coat was; whether a loose coat, or the garment next his skin, or a fish...

There is a great dispute amongst critical writers what this

fisher’ s coat was; whether a loose coat, or the garment next his skin, or a fisherman’ s slop. It is a point not worth the disputing: it was some garment that might modestly cover him when he came to Jesus, and yet not hinder him in his swimming.

Poole: Joh 21:8 - -- The other disciples came in a little fishing boat, dragging the net with fishes; probably, because it was too heavy to be lifted up into the boat.

The other disciples came in a little fishing boat, dragging the net with fishes; probably, because it was too heavy to be lifted up into the boat.

Poole: Joh 21:9 - -- As to the question whence this fish came, there are three opinions: some think that our Saviour caught it out of the sea without a net, or by his po...

As to the question whence this fish came, there are three opinions: some think that our Saviour caught it out of the sea without a net, or by his power commanded it to come to his service; others think that the history is transposed, and this verse should in its true order come after the eleventh; but it is most probable that Christ by his Divine power created the fish, as well as the coals and the bread.

Poole: Joh 21:10-11 - -- Ver. 10,11. In this one miracle there is a complication of miracles. 1. That having fished all night and caught nothing, they should at Christ’...

Ver. 10,11. In this one miracle there is a complication of miracles.

1. That having fished all night and caught nothing, they should at Christ’ s command throw out the net on the side of the ship next the shore, and so most unlikely to have plenty of fish, and catch so many.

2. That before their fish could be brought on shore, they should see a fish broiling on coals, and bread lying by.

3. That notwithstanding the multitude of fish, the net should not be broken.

Poole: Joh 21:12 - Come and dine It was in the morning, and may as well be translated, Come and break your fasts, as Come and dine They now knew it was the Lord, if not by his fac...

It was in the morning, and may as well be translated, Come and break your fasts, as

Come and dine They now knew it was the Lord, if not by his face and voice, yet by this miracle; therefore they durst not ask him, for fear of a sharp reproof, after he had by such a miraculous operation made himself known to them.

Poole: Joh 21:13 - -- Those who question whether our Saviour himself did eat, seem not to consider what is written Act 10:41 , where it is expressly said, he did eat and...

Those who question whether our Saviour himself did eat, seem not to consider what is written Act 10:41 , where it is expressly said, he did eat and drink with them after he rose from the dead; which he doubtless did, to show that he was truly risen from the dead, and his seeming body was not a phantasm, and mere apparition of a body, but the same true body which was crucified, though now more glorious, and not clothed with those infirmities which it had before his death; from whence it only followeth, that he did not eat to satisfy his hunger, but only to confirm the truth of his resurrection. He did before this eat with some of them, Luk 24:30 .

Poole: Joh 21:14 - The third time The third time that is, the third day, for upon his resurrection day he showed himself, 1. To Mary Magdalene, Joh 20:14 . 2...

The third time that is, the third day, for upon his resurrection day he showed himself,

1. To Mary Magdalene, Joh 20:14 .

2. To the two disciples going to Emmaus, Luk 24:15,31 .

3. To the women going to tell his disciples, Mat 28:9 .

4. In the evening to his disciples, met, Joh 20:19 .

All these are by John counted for one time, because they were upon one and the same day. That day seven night he appeared to them again, Joh 20:26 . After this at the sea of Tiberias, mentioned in this chapter.

Poole: Joh 21:15 - Lovest thou me more than these? // Feed my lambs Lovest thou me more than these? More than the rest of my disciples love me? For so Peter had professed, when he told our Saviour, Mat 26:33 , Though...

Lovest thou me more than these? More than the rest of my disciples love me? For so Peter had professed, when he told our Saviour, Mat 26:33 , Though all men should be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended. Peter now having by his temptation learned more humility and modesty, doth not reply, Lord, thou knowest that I love thee more than these; he only avers the truth and sincerity, not the degree of his love. Christ replies,

Feed my lambs: by which he understands his people, his church; not the pastors of it, (as if Christ by this had made Peter the chief pastor over the rest of the apostles), but the community. The papists from this text argue for Peter’ s primacy and authority over his fellow apostles, as well as over the members of the church. But Christ said not to Peter only, but to all the rest of the eleven, Mat 28:19 Mar 16:15 , Go ye, preach the gospel to all nations; and it was to the rest as well as to Peter that he said, Joh 20:23 , Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted. So as it is apparent, whether feeding only signifies instructing, or feeding by doctrine, or (as most judge) comprehends government, and signifies that universal charge which ministers have over the church, the same power which Peter had was also committed to the other disciples.

Poole: Joh 21:16-17 - -- Ver. 16,17. Divines here raise a question, why our Saviour propounds this question thrice to Peter. The most of the ancients agree, that it was becau...

Ver. 16,17. Divines here raise a question, why our Saviour propounds this question thrice to Peter. The most of the ancients agree, that it was because Peter had thrice denied him. Some say, it was to show his great love to his church, which he could not commit to Peter but after three inquiries if he truly loved him, who was the Lord of it. Others refer it to the three ways by which good pastors ought to feed the church; prayer, preaching, and a holy life. Others think, that it hath reference to the three flocks that Peter was to feed; the Jews in Judea, the Gentiles, the dispersed amongst the Gentiles.

Poole: Joh 21:18-19 - -- Ver. 18,19. Joh 21:19 gives us the general scope of Joh 21:15 , viz. that it was a prediction of that particular death by which Peter should die, wh...

Ver. 18,19. Joh 21:19 gives us the general scope of Joh 21:15 , viz. that it was a prediction of that particular death by which Peter should die, which was (if we may believe what the ancients have generally reported, and we can have no other proof) by crucifying; in which kind of death the hands of the person crucified are stretched out and nailed to the cross. But which way he died we cannot certainly affirm. The evangelist assures us, that our Saviour spake these words with reference to that kind of death by which Peter as a martyr was to glorify God; nor is it any objection against his martyrdom, that our Saviour here saith, that he should be carried whither he would not; for he was not better than his Lord, whose spirit was willing, and flesh weak. Whether our Saviour by his command, Follow me, intended the imitation of him, his death, or the particular kind of his death, is uncertain; unless we will allow this text to be interpreted by Joh 13:36 2Pe 1:14 .

Poole: Joh 21:19 - See Poole on "Joh 21:18 " See Poole on "Joh 21:18 "

See Poole on "Joh 21:18 "

Poole: Joh 21:20 - -- That is, he saw John, whom we have often before heard so described.

That is, he saw John, whom we have often before heard so described.

Poole: Joh 21:21 - -- Do is not in the Greek, nor possibly is so properly added: the sense is, What shall become of this man? What shall be his fate? What shall he suff...

Do is not in the Greek, nor possibly is so properly added: the sense is, What shall become of this man? What shall be his fate? What shall he suffer?

Poole: Joh 21:22 - -- Our Lord only checks the curiosity of Peter, and minds him to attend things which himself was concerned in; telling him, he was not concerned what b...

Our Lord only checks the curiosity of Peter, and minds him to attend things which himself was concerned in; telling him, he was not concerned what became of John, whether he should die, or abide upon the earth until Christ’ s second coming: it was Peter’ s concern, without regarding what others did, or what became of them, himself to execute his Master’ s command, and follow his example.

Poole: Joh 21:23 - -- But the disciples, knowing the particular kindness our Saviour had for John, upon these words, not duly attended to, concluded John should abide upo...

But the disciples, knowing the particular kindness our Saviour had for John, upon these words, not duly attended to, concluded John should abide upon the earth to the second coming of Christ.

Poole: Joh 21:24 - -- John, who wrote this Gospel, was that disciple whom Jesus loved, who leaned on our Saviour’ s breast at supper, and inquired who should betray ...

John, who wrote this Gospel, was that disciple whom Jesus loved, who leaned on our Saviour’ s breast at supper, and inquired who should betray Christ; of whom Peter spake, Joh 21:21 , and who testifieth these things, both concerning Peter, and concerning himself, and the church: the ancient church knew his testimony was true.

Poole: Joh 21:25 - -- But none must imagine that all Christ’ s sermons, or miracles, are recorded in this book, or in any of the other Gospels; the world would have ...

But none must imagine that all Christ’ s sermons, or miracles, are recorded in this book, or in any of the other Gospels; the world would have been too much filled with books, if all spoke or done by our Saviour had been written. There is so much written as it pleased God we should know, or was necessary for us to know for the true ends of such revelation; to beget and increase faith in us, and to promote and direct holiness.

Lightfoot: Joh 21:2 - Simon Peter, and Thomas, etc. There were together Simon Peter, and Thomas called Didymus, and Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, and the sons of Zebedee, and two other of his disc...

There were together Simon Peter, and Thomas called Didymus, and Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, and the sons of Zebedee, and two other of his disciples.   

[Simon Peter, and Thomas, etc.] here are seven of the disciples mentioned, and but five of them named. Those two whose names are not recited probably were Philip and Andrew; as the four that were absent at the time were the sons of Alpheus, Matthew, Judas, Simeon, and James. Compare those that are mentioned, John_1; and you may reasonably suppose the person not named there, Joh 1:37; Joh 1:40; might be Thomas.

Lightfoot: Joh 21:3 - I go a fishing Simon Peter saith unto them, I go a fishing. They say unto him, We also go with thee. They went forth, and entered into a ship immediately; and...

Simon Peter saith unto them, I go a fishing. They say unto him, We also go with thee. They went forth, and entered into a ship immediately; and that night they caught nothing.   

[I go a fishing.] Christ had ordered his apostles to meet him at a mountain in Galilee, Mat 28:16. It is plain, Joh 21:14, that he had not yet appeared to them there: so that it is something strange how they durst keep away from that mountain, and how the four newly mentioned durst be absent from the rest of their number. They knew the mountain without doubt; and if they knew not the time wherein Christ would make his appearance amongst them, why should they not abide continually there in attendance for him?   

It should seem, that they did not look for him till the Lord's day, which had not yet been since they were come into Galilee. And perhaps the sons of Alpheus had, in their return from Jerusalem, betaken themselves amongst their relations, determining to be at that mountain on the Lord's day. These seven dwelt not far off the mountain, which was near Capernaum, and hard by the sea of Galilee: only Nathanael, who dwelt more remote in Cana, towards the extreme north parts of that sea. He was not yet gone home, but, waiting the appointed time, stayed here. Peter and Andrew dwelt in Capernaum, and so, probably, did James and John: Philip in Bethsaida, and Thomas (as we may conjecture from his Greek name Didymus) probably lived amongst the Syro-Grecians in Gadara, or Hippo, or some place in that country of Decapolis, not very far from Gennesaret.

Lightfoot: Joh 21:5 - Children. // Any meat Then Jesus saith unto them, Children, have ye any meat? They answered him, No.   [Children.] By what word soever Christ expressed this ...

Then Jesus saith unto them, Children, have ye any meat? They answered him, No.   

[Children.] By what word soever Christ expressed this children to them, it seems to be a very familiar and gentle compellation, that his disciples, from that very salutation of his, might discern him. They did not know him by sight, as appears, Joh 21:4; he would have them know him, therefore, by the title he gave them.   

[Any meat.] Very usual amongst the Rabbins may not unfitly be rendered meat for one single repast; as if Christ should have said, "Children, have ye any meat with you sufficient for a breakfast or a dinner?" But if any meat should signify any sort of meat that must be eaten with bread; as Camerarius thinks, then Christ's words seem to have this meaning: "Here, I have bread with me: have you taken any thing, that we may eat this bread?" and so meat may be distinguished from bread.

Lightfoot: Joh 21:15 - Lovest thou me more than these? // Feed my lambs So when they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou ...

So when they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my lambs.   

[Lovest thou me more than these?] why more than these? Might it not have been enough to have said, " as well as these?" For what reason had he to expect that Peter should love him more than the rest did? Especially more than St. John, whom Christ himself had so loved, and who had stuck so close to him?   

Christ seems, therefore, to reflect upon Peter's late confidence, not without some kind of severity and reproof: q.d. "Thou saidst, O Simon, a little while ago, that thou wouldst never forsake me, no, not though all the other disciples should. Thou didst profess beyond all the rest that thou wouldst rather die than deny me; thou wouldst follow me to prison, to death; nay, lay down thy own life for me. What sayest thou now, Simon? Dost thou yet love me more than these? If thou thinkest thou art provided, and canst hazard thy life for me, feed my sheep; and for my sake do thou expose thy life, yea, and lay it down for them."   

[Feed my lambs.] If there be any thing in that threefold repetition, Feed, Feed, Feed; we may most fitly apply it to the threefold object of St. Peter's ministry, viz. The Gentiles, the Jew, and the Israelites of the ten tribes.   

I. To him were committed, by his Lord, the keys of the kingdom of heaven, Matthew_16; that he might open the door of faith and the gospel to the Gentiles, which he did in his preaching it to Cornelius.   

II. In sharing out the work of preaching the gospel amongst the three ministers of the circumcision, his lot fell amongst the Jews in Babylon. James's lot was amongst the Jews in Palestine and Syria: and John's amongst the Hellenists in Asia.   

III. Now amongst the Jews in Babylon were mixed the Israelites of the ten tribes; and to them did the gospel come by the ministry of St. Peter, as I have shewn more at large in another treatise.   

To this, therefore, have the words of our Saviour a plain reference; namely, putting Peter in mind, that whereas he had, with so much confidence and assurance of himself, made such professions of love and constancy beyond the other disciples, pretending to a wonderful resolution of laying down his very life in that behalf, that he would now shew his zeal and courage in 'feeding the sheep' of Christ: -- "Thou canst not, Simon, lay down thy life for me, as thou didst once promise; for I have myself laid down my own life, and taken it up again. 'Feed thou my sheep,' therefore; and be ready to lay down thy life for them, when it shall come to be required of thee."   

So that what is here said does not so much point out Peter's primacy, as his danger; nor so much the privilege as the bond of his office, and at last his martyrdom: for that our Saviour had this meaning with him, is plain, because, immediately after this, he tells him by what death he should glorify God, Joh 21:18.

Lightfoot: Joh 21:24 - And we know that his testimony is true This is the disciple which testifieth of these things, and wrote these things: and we know that his testimony is true.   [And we know that...

This is the disciple which testifieth of these things, and wrote these things: and we know that his testimony is true.   

[And we know that his testimony is true.] The evangelist had said before, Joh 19:35; "He knoweth that he saith true"; and here in this place he changeth the person, saying, " We know that his testimony is true."   

I. One would believe that this was an idiotism in the Chaldee and Syriac tongue, to make ' We' know; and ' I' know; the same thing: which is not unusual in other languages also; Jos 2:9; I know. The Targumist hath which you would believe to be We know. 1Sa 17:28; I know. Targumist, We know.   

II. We suppose the evangelist, both here and Joh 19:35, referreth to an eyewitness. For in all judicial causes the ocular testimony prevailed. If any person should testify that he himself saw the thing done, his witness must be received; for true when it is said of any testimony, does not signify barely that which is true; but that which was to be believed and entertained for a sure and irrefragable evidence. So that the meaning of these words is this: "This is the disciple who testifies of these things and wrote them: and we all know that such a testimony obtains in all judgments whatever; for he was an eyewitness, and saw that which he testifies."

Haydock: Joh 21:3 - -- How comes it that Peter, after his conversion, should return to his fishing, when Jesus Christ had said, that he that sets his hand to the plough, and...

How comes it that Peter, after his conversion, should return to his fishing, when Jesus Christ had said, that he that sets his hand to the plough, and looks back, is not worthy of the kingdom of heaven? The employments they applied to before their conversion, without being guilty of sin, these they might, without fault, exercise, after their conversion: therefore Peter returned to his fishing; but St. Matthew never returned to his custom-house, because when once converted, we never can be allowed to give ourselves to these employments, which of themselves lead to sin. And there are many pursuits which can scarcely, or not at all, be followed without sin. (St. Gregory, hom. xxiv. in Evan.)

Haydock: Joh 21:5 - Have you any meat? Have you any meat? [1] Have you any thing to eat? This is what is literally signified, both in the Latin and in the Greek text. (Witham) ========...

Have you any meat? [1] Have you any thing to eat? This is what is literally signified, both in the Latin and in the Greek text. (Witham)

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Numquid pulmentarium habetis? Greek: me ti prosphagion.

Haydock: Joh 21:7 - It is the Lord It is the Lord. St. John Chrysostom says, we may here see the different characters of the two apostles, Peter and John; the former is more ardent, t...

It is the Lord. St. John Chrysostom says, we may here see the different characters of the two apostles, Peter and John; the former is more ardent, the latter more sublime; the first more vehement, the last more penetrating; for these reasons, John was the first to know Christ, Peter the first to hasten to him. (Hom. lxxxvi.)

Haydock: Joh 21:8 - -- The evangelist praises Peter, and excuses the other apostles: all come to Christ; the former leaving his boat, his companions, his nets and prey, arri...

The evangelist praises Peter, and excuses the other apostles: all come to Christ; the former leaving his boat, his companions, his nets and prey, arrives more expeditiously; the latter with the impediments of the boat and nets, &c. &c. arrive also, but not so readily; a just figure this of religious, who leave all to go directly to God, and of those who remain in the world, and have to navigate a treacherous element with imminent danger of shipwreck. (Maldonatus) ---

The poet Sedulius writes thus on the nets: Pendula fluctivagam traxerunt retia prædam,

Per typicam noscenda viam; nam retia dignis

Lucida sunt præcepta Dei, quibus omnis in illa

Dextra parte manens concluditur, ac simul ulnis

Fertur apostolicis Domini ad vestigia Christi.

Haydock: Joh 21:9 - Hot coals lying, and a fish laid thereon, and bread Hot coals lying, and a fish laid thereon, and bread. The fish caught in the net were not yet drawn to land. These things, then, were created out of...

Hot coals lying, and a fish laid thereon, and bread. The fish caught in the net were not yet drawn to land. These things, then, were created out of nothing, or miraculously transported thither, by the divine power. (Witham)

Haydock: Joh 21:11 - Simon Peter went up, and drew the net to land, full of great fishes, one hundred and fifty-three Simon Peter went up, and drew the net to land, full of great fishes, one hundred and fifty-three; a figure of the great number to be converted by the...

Simon Peter went up, and drew the net to land, full of great fishes, one hundred and fifty-three; a figure of the great number to be converted by the labours of the apostles. (Witham)

Haydock: Joh 21:12 - And none of them who were at meat, durst ask him, who art thou? knowing that it was the Lord And none of them who were at meat, durst ask him, who art thou? knowing that it was the Lord. It is likely he appeared to them with a countenance di...

And none of them who were at meat, durst ask him, who art thou? knowing that it was the Lord. It is likely he appeared to them with a countenance different, and brighter than before his death; yet they were presently so convinced it was Jesus, that they were ashamed to ask or doubt of it. (Witham)

Haydock: Joh 21:14 - This is now the third time that Jesus was manifested to his disciples This is now the third time that Jesus was manifested to his disciples. He had appeared to them more than thrice, even the very day of his resurrecti...

This is now the third time that Jesus was manifested to his disciples. He had appeared to them more than thrice, even the very day of his resurrection. (Matthew xxviii. 16.) Here it is called the third time either because it was the third different day; or because it was the third time that he had them appeared to a considerable number together. After this, he appeared to them frequently, and conversed with them for forty days, till his ascension. See Acts i. 3. and 1 Corinthians xv. 5. (Witham) ---

This must be understood of the third day, or of the third time, that our Saviour appeared to his apostles assembled: the first day, being the day of his resurrection; the second, eight days after, when St. Thomas saw, and believed; and on this day of their fishing. (St. Augustine, tract. 122. in Joan.) ---

The evangelists relates ten different manifestations of our Saviour, after his resurrection. First, he was seen by the women at the sepulchre; 2ndly, he was again seen by the same holy women, returning from the sepulchre; 3rdly, by St. Peter; 4thly, by the two going to Emmaus; 5thly, by many at Jerusalem, when Thomas was not with them; 6thly, at the time when St. Thomas saw him; 7thly, at the sea of Tiberias; 8thly, by the eleven, on a mountain of Galilee, according to St. Matthew; 9thly, according to St. Mark, by the disciples, at their refreshment, because he was going to sup with them no more; and 10thly, on the day of his ascension, raised from the earth into heaven. (St. Augustine, de Concord. Ev. lib. iii. chap. 25.)

Haydock: Joh 21:15 - Simon, son of John, lovest thou me more than these? // Simon Simon, son of John, lovest thou me more than these? That is, more than any one of these love me. Christ puts this question thrice to St. Peter, tha...

Simon, son of John, lovest thou me more than these? That is, more than any one of these love me. Christ puts this question thrice to St. Peter, that this triple protestation of love, says St. Augustine, might correspond to his triple denial. St. Peter did not answer that he loved him more than the rest did, which he could not know, but modestly said: yea, Lord, thou knowest I love thee: and the third time, thou knowest all things, and the hearts of all men, thou knowest how much I love thee. At each protestation, Jesus answered, feed my lambs; and the third time, feed my sheep. To feed, in the style of the Scriptures, is to guide, rule, and govern. St. Ambrose and some others take notice, as if by the lambs, might be understood the people, and by the sheep, those placed over them, as bishops, priests, &c. but others make no such difference in this place, betwixt lambs and sheep, only as comprehending all the members of Christ's Church, of what condition soever, even the rest of the apostles. For here it was that Christ gave to St. Peter that power which he had promised him, (Matthew xvi. 18.) that is, He now made St. Peter head[1] of his whole Church, as he had insinuated at the first meeting, when St. Andrew brought him to our Saviour, when he changed his name from Simon to Peter: again, when he chose him, and made him the first of his twelve apostles; but particularly, when he said, thou art Peter, (a rock) and upon this rock will I build my Church, &c. Upon this account the Catholic Church, from the very first ages, hath always reverenced, and acknowledged the supreme power of the successors of St. Peter, in spirituals, over all Christian Churches. This appears also by the writings of Tertullian, of St. Irenæus, of St. Cyprian, of the greatest doctors and bishops, both of the west and east, of St. Jerome, St. Augustine, of St. John Chrysostom, in several places, of the first general Councils, particularly of the great Council of Chalcedon, &c. (Witham) ---

Simon (son) of John. The father's name is here added, to discriminate him from Simon Thaddeus, that every one might know that the chief care of the universal Church was not given to any other apostle but Peter. This Simon of John is the same as Simon Bar-jona. See Matthew xvi. 17. (Menochius) ---

St. Peter had three times renounced his master; and Jesus, to give him an opportunity of repairing his fault by a triple confession, three several times demanded of him, if he loved him more than these? That, as St. Augustine remarks, he who had thrice denied through fear might thrice confess through love. (Calmet)

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He made St. Peter head of his whole Church. See Tertullian, lib. de pudicitia, p. 556. Ed. Rig. where he calls the successor of St. Peter, Pontificem maximum, & Episcopum Episcoporum; St. Irenæus, lib. iii. chap. 3; St. Cyprian, ep. 55. p. 84, Ed. Rig. Navigare audent & ad Petri Cathedram, atque ad Ecclesiam principalem. See St. Jerome, epist. lvii. and lviii. p. 175. nov. Ed. St. Augustine. ---

St. John Chrysostom on this place, hom. lxxxviii. p. 525. nov. Ed. Cur. aliis prætermissis (Petrum) alloquitur? he answers, Greek: ekkritos en ton Apostolon, kai stoma ton matheton, kai koruphe tou chorou, cœtus illius caput. ... fratrum præfecturam suscipe; Greek: egcheirizetai ten prostasian ton adelphon. And a little after, p. 527. putting the objection, why St. James, and not St. Peter, was made bishop of Jerusalem, he answers; because St. Peter was to be over the whole universe; Greek: tes oikoumenes echeirotonese, &c. The same St. John Chrysostom, lib. ii. de Sacerd. chap. 1. tom. 1. p. 372. nov. Ed. Ben. qua de causa ille sanguinem effudit suum? certe ut oves eas acquireret, quarum curam tum Petro, tum Petri Successoribus committebat. ---

Conc. Chalced. Lab. tom. 4. p. 565. The Council thus writes to St. Leo; omnibus constitutus interpres, quibus tu quidem tanquam caput membris præeras, &c. Greek: pasin ermeneus kathestamenos, &c. And p. 368. Petrus per Leonem ita locutus est; Greek: Petros dia Leontos tauta exephonesen. See Annotation for Matthew xvi. ver. 18.

Haydock: Joh 21:16-17 - Feed my sheep The lambs and the sheep of our Saviour here mean the faithful, who compose his Church, without any distinction of Jew or Gentile. St. Peter, by these...

The lambs and the sheep of our Saviour here mean the faithful, who compose his Church, without any distinction of Jew or Gentile. St. Peter, by these words, is appointed to take charge of the whole flock, as being the chief and prince of the apostles. He is, in some manner, the pastor, not of the sheep only, but of the pastors themselves. They have each their own flock to look after; but to him is committed the care of all; he alone is the pastor of all. (Calmet) ---

Feed my sheep. Our Lord had promised the spiritual supremacy to St. Peter; (St. Matthew xvi. 19.) and here he fulfils that promise, by charging him with the superintendency of all his sheep, without exception; and consequently of his whole flock, that is, of his whole Church. (Challoner)

Haydock: Joh 21:18 - Thou shalt stretch forth thy hands ... signifying by what death he should glorify God // Whither thou wouldst not Thou shalt stretch forth thy hands ... signifying by what death he should glorify God; that is, that a cross should be the instrument of his death an...

Thou shalt stretch forth thy hands ... signifying by what death he should glorify God; that is, that a cross should be the instrument of his death and martyrdom. ---

Whither thou wouldst not: which is no more than to say, that a violent death is against the natural inclination of any man, even though he be ever so willing, and disposed to undergo it. (Witham) ---

By this is meant the martyrdom of St. Peter, which took place thirty-four years after this. He was first cast into prison, and then led out to punishment as Christ had foretold him. He stretched out his arms to be chained, and again he stretched them out, when he was crucified; for he died on the cross, as the ancients assure us. (Calmet)

Haydock: Joh 21:21 - Lord, what shall this man do? Lord, what shall this man do? St. John Chrysostom thinks, it was the love and friendship, that St. Peter had for St. John, that moved him to ask thi...

Lord, what shall this man do? St. John Chrysostom thinks, it was the love and friendship, that St. Peter had for St. John, that moved him to ask this question. (Witham)

Haydock: Joh 21:22 - Jesus saith: so I will have him remain Jesus saith: so I will have him remain, [3] &c. That is, in case I will have him remain; or, as it is in the Greek, if I will have him remain, what ...

Jesus saith: so I will have him remain, [3] &c. That is, in case I will have him remain; or, as it is in the Greek, if I will have him remain, what is that to thee? It is thy duty, and thy concern, to follow me. (Witham) ---

When Christ told St. Peter to follow him, he meant, that he should go like himself to the death of the cross; but when he says of St. John, So I will have him to remain till I come, he insinuates that his beloved disciple should not undergo a violent death; but remain in the world, till he should visit him by death, and conduct him to glory. It may likewise be understood of the Revelation, in which our Saviour manifested himself in his glory to this his beloved disciple. In the Greek, it is, if I will have him to remain; and this is the true reading, according to Estius, and Jansenius, bishop of Ghent, authorized by many Latin copies. Others refer these words of Christ to his coming to destroy Jerusalem: an epoch which St. John survived.

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Sic eum volo manere, Greek: ean auton thelo menein.

Haydock: Joh 21:23 - This saying, therefore This saying, therefore: [4] that is, a report went about among the disciples, the John was not to die. But St. John himself, as St. Augustine and S...

This saying, therefore: [4] that is, a report went about among the disciples, the John was not to die. But St. John himself, as St. Augustine and St. John Chrysostom observe, took care to tell us, that Christ said not so. Nor do we find any sufficient grounds to think that St. John is not dead. (Witham)

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

St. Augustine, tract. 124. p. 819. D. Hanc opinionem Joannes ipse abstulit, non hoc dixisse Dominum, aperta contradictione declarans: cur emin subjungeret, non dixit Jesus, non moritur, nisi ne hominum cordibus quod falsum fuerat inhæreret? &c. So St. John Chrysostom says, he spoke this to prevent or correct this mistake. p. 528. Greek: diorthoutai.

Haydock: Joh 21:24 - This is that disciple This is that disciple, &c. Some conjecture, that these words wer added by the Church of Ephesus. But the ancient Fathers, St. John Chrysostom, St. ...

This is that disciple, &c. Some conjecture, that these words wer added by the Church of Ephesus. But the ancient Fathers, St. John Chrysostom, St. Cyril, St. Augustine, expound them as they do the rest, without any such remark. Nor is it unusual for a person to write in this manner of himself, as of a third person. It is what St. John hath done of himself, chap. xix. ver. 35. (Witham) ---

Some conjecture, that these words were added by the Church of Ephesus, to point out St. John to be the real author of this history, and to record their own assent to this his testimony. But the ancient Fathers give no such comment. Nor is it unusual for a person to write of himself, as of a third person. It is what St. John hath done before.

Haydock: Joh 21:25 - The world The world [5] itself, I think, &c. It is an hyperbolical way of speaking, says St. Cyril, common enough, even in the holy Scriptures; and only sign...

The world [5] itself, I think, &c. It is an hyperbolical way of speaking, says St. Cyril, common enough, even in the holy Scriptures; and only signifies, that a very great number of things, which Christ did and said, have not been recorded. (Witham) ---

This is a figure of speech, called hyperbole, and only means that it would require many, many books, to contain all the various actions and sayings of our divine Lord.

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Nec ipsum arbitror mundum, &c. St. Cyril on this expression, p. 1123, Greek: uperbolikos. See St. Augustine at the end of his 124. tract. where he says, such hyperboles are found elsewhere in the holy Scripture.

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Gill: Joh 21:1 - After these things // Jesus showed himself again to the disciples // at the sea of Tiberias // and on this way showed he himself After these things,.... The resurrection of Christ from the dead, his appearance to Mary Magdalene, and twice to his disciples; once when Thomas was a...

After these things,.... The resurrection of Christ from the dead, his appearance to Mary Magdalene, and twice to his disciples; once when Thomas was absent, and at another time when he was present:

Jesus showed himself again to the disciples, a third time, as in Joh 21:14 though not to them all; seven are only mentioned, as together, when he appeared to them:

at the sea of Tiberias; the same with the sea of Galilee; see Joh 6:1 for after the second appearance of Christ to his disciples, they went from Jerusalem to Galilee, by the order of Christ, who appointed to meet them there, Mat 28:10

and on this way showed he himself; the manner in which he made his appearance, and the persons to whom, are as follow.

Gill: Joh 21:2 - There were together // and Thomas, called Didymus // And Nathanael of Cana in Galilee // and the sons of Zebedee // and two other of his disciples There were together,.... In one place, in one house, in some town, or city of Galilee, not far from the sea of Tiberias; nor, as very likely, far from...

There were together,.... In one place, in one house, in some town, or city of Galilee, not far from the sea of Tiberias; nor, as very likely, far from the mountain where Christ had promised to meet them. Simon Peter, who though he had denied his Lord, dearly loved him, and truly believed in him, kept with the rest of his disciples, and was waiting for another interview with him:

and Thomas, called Didymus; who, though for a while an unbeliever with respect to the resurrection of Christ, was now fully assured of it, and, for the future, was unwilling to lose any opportunity of meeting with his risen Lord.

And Nathanael of Cana in Galilee; an Israelite indeed, in whom there was no guile. Dr. Lightfoot thinks he is the same with Bartholomew, and so one of the eleven. The Syriac version reads it, "Cotne", and the Persic, Catneh of Galilee; no doubt the same place is meant, where Jesus turned water into wine, of which Nathanael was an inhabitant:

and the sons of Zebedee; who were James, whom Herod killed with the sword, and John, the writer of this Gospel:

and two other of his disciples; who are thought to be Andrew and Philip; which is very likely, since they were both of Bethsaida, Joh 1:44 a city in Galilee, and not far from the sea of Tiberias. Andrew is particularly mentioned by Nonnus: so that here were seven of them in all; four of them, according to this account, being wanting; who must be James the less, the brother of our Lord, Judas called Lebbaeus, and surnamed Thaddaeus, Simon the Canaanite, or Zealot, and Matthew the publican.

Gill: Joh 21:3 - Simon Peter saith unto them, I go a fishing // they say unto him, we also go with thee // They went forth // and entered into a ship immediately // and that night they caught nothing Simon Peter saith unto them, I go a fishing,.... Which was his business before his conversion; and now having nothing to do, and his Lord and master h...

Simon Peter saith unto them, I go a fishing,.... Which was his business before his conversion; and now having nothing to do, and his Lord and master having, as yet, no service for him in the ministry of the word, until the Spirit was poured down in an extraordinary manner, which was given to be expected, in the mean while he was inclined to, and resolved upon taking up his former employment; partly that he might not live an idle life, and partly to obtain a livelihood, which was now to be sought after in another manner, since the death of Christ; and these inclinations and resolutions of his he signifies to the rest of the disciples, who agreed with him:

they say unto him, we also go with thee; that is, a fishing; for it seems to have been the business and employment of them all formerly: the place they went to was the sea of Tiberias, as appears from Joh 21:1 a place free for any to fish at. This is said to be one of the ten traditions which Joshua delivered to the children of Israel, when he divided the land among them z:

"that any man should be free to catch fish in the waters (or sea) of Tiberias; and he might fish with an hook only; but he might not spread a net, or place a ship there, except the children of the tribe to whom that sea belonged in their division.''

But now these disciples, or the greater part of them at least, belonging to the tribe and division in which the sea was, had a right to carry a ship or boat thither, and make use of a net, as they did. Besides, there was another reason for fishing here, because there were no unclean fish; for the Jews say a, that

"in a place of running water no clean fish goes along with unclean fish, and lo, the sea of Tiberias is מהלכין הן כגון המים, "as running waters".''

They went forth: from the house, town, or city where they were, whether Capernaum, or Bethsaida, or Tiberias itself:

and entered into a ship immediately; which was either one of their own, that belonged to some one of them before their call; which though they had left, had reserved their right and claim unto; see Luk 5:3 or which they hired for their present purpose: the word immediately is not in the Vulgate Latin, nor in the Syriac, Arabic, Persic, and Ethiopic versions, nor in Beza's ancient copy:

and that night they caught nothing. They went out in the evening of the day, and fished all night, that being a proper time for such business, and the most likely to succeed in, but caught no fish, or very little: and so it is sometimes with Gospel ministers, who are fishers of men, though they take every opportunity, and the most proper methods to gain souls to Christ, yet sometimes do not succeed; which makes things look dark and gloomy in their apprehensions.

Gill: Joh 21:4 - But when the morning was now come // Jesus stood on the shore // but the disciples knew not that it was Jesus But when the morning was now come,.... The day began to dawn, and light to appear, very early in the morning; for Christ visits his right early, and i...

But when the morning was now come,.... The day began to dawn, and light to appear, very early in the morning; for Christ visits his right early, and is a present help to them in their time of trouble.

Jesus stood on the shore: on firm ground, whilst his disciples were beating about in the waves, and toiling to no purpose. So Christ, risen from the dead, is glorified, is in heaven; but not unmindful of his people amidst all their afflictions in this world:

but the disciples knew not that it was Jesus; though he was so near them that they could hear what he said; but it not being broad daylight they could not distinctly discern him, or their eyes might be held that they could not know him. So Christ is sometimes near his people, and they know it not.

Gill: Joh 21:5 - Then Jesus saith unto them, children // have ye any meat? // They answered him no Then Jesus saith unto them, children,.... And still they knew him not, though he used this endearing and familiar appellation, and which they had been...

Then Jesus saith unto them, children,.... And still they knew him not, though he used this endearing and familiar appellation, and which they had been wont to hear from him; and he had called them by a little before his departure from them, Joh 13:33 and which he uses here as expressive of his tender affection for them, their relation to him, and that he might be known by them:

have ye any meat? that is, as the Syriac renders it, מדם למלעס, "anything to eat"; meaning fish that they had caught; and whether they had got a sufficient quantity to make a meal of for him and them.

They answered him no; they had got nothing at all; or at least what they had was far from being enough to make a breakfast of; for so a meal early in a morning may be most properly called, though it is afterwards called dining. Christ's children, true believers, are sometimes without spiritual food; there is always indeed enough in Christ, and he has an heart to give it; but either through prevailing iniquity they feed on something else, or do not go to him for food, or go elsewhere; but he will not suffer them to starve; for as he has made provisions for them in the ministry of the word and ordinances; and he himself is the bread of life; if they do not ask him for food, he will ask them whether they have any; will kindly invite them to the provisions he himself makes; will bid them welcome, and bless them to them.

Gill: Joh 21:6 - And he said unto them // cast the net on the right side of the ship, and ye shall find // they cast therefore // And now they were not able to draw it for the multitude of fishes And he said unto them,.... Willing to make himself known by a miracle, since they knew him not by his person, nor voice: cast the net on the right ...

And he said unto them,.... Willing to make himself known by a miracle, since they knew him not by his person, nor voice:

cast the net on the right side of the ship, and ye shall find; that is, a large multitude of fish, as they did. The ship was an emblem of the church in its present afflicted state; the right side of it points to the elect, and where they are to be found in this world; the casting of the net signifies the preaching of the Gospel; the promise of finding fish, the assurance Christ gives of the success of his word, which he owns and blesses for the conversion of elect sinners:

they cast therefore; the net, willing to try what success they might have at the instance of this person, whom they knew not. The Ethiopic version reads the passage thus, "and they said unto him, we have laboured all night, and have found nothing, but at thy word we will let down"; which seems to be taken out of Luk 5:5. However, they obeyed his orders and directions, as the faithful ministers of the Gospel do, and should, and, succeeded.

And now they were not able to draw it for the multitude of fishes. The Syriac adds, "which it held"; being in number, as in Joh 21:11 an hundred and fifty, and three great fishes; which was an emblem and presage of that large number of souls both among the Jews and Gentiles, which they should be instrumental in bringing to Christ, through the preaching of the Gospel.

Gill: Joh 21:7 - Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved // saith unto Peter, it is the Lord // Now when Simon heard that it was the Lord // he girt his fisher's coat unto him // and did cast himself into the sea Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved,.... Which was John the Evangelist and Apostle, the writer of this Gospel: saith unto Peter, it is the Lor...

Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved,.... Which was John the Evangelist and Apostle, the writer of this Gospel:

saith unto Peter, it is the Lord; which two disciples were very intimate with each other, and communicated their thoughts freely to one another. John knew that it was the Lord, either by some special revelation, or from the multitude of fishes which were taken, and which showed a divine hand and power to be concerned. So faithful ministers of the Gospel know when Christ is with them, by his power attending their ministrations to the conversion of souls. The Cambridge copy of Beza's reads, "our Lord"; as do the Syriac, Persic, and Ethiopic versions; and it is reasonable to think, John speaking to a fellow disciple, who had equal interest in him with himself, might so say.

Now when Simon heard that it was the Lord; faith came by hearing, he was immediately convinced, and thoroughly satisfied, having received the hint upon a reflection on the surprising capture of the fishes, that it must be the Lord:

he girt his fisher's coat unto him. The Greek word επενδυτης, here used, is manifestly the אפונדת of the Hebrews; and which, the Jewish writers say b, was a strait garment, which a man put on next his flesh to dry up the sweat; and a very proper one for Peter, who had been toiling all night, and very fit for him to swim in; and, by what follows, appears to be put on him next his flesh: for he was naked; for to suppose him entirely naked, whilst fishing, being only in company with men, and those parts of nature having a covering, which always require one, was not at all indecent and unbecoming:

and did cast himself into the sea; the Syriac adds, "that he might come to Christ"; and the Persic, "and he came to Christ"; showing his great love and eagerness to be with him; and, as fearless of danger, risks all to be with Christ; his love being such, that many waters could not quench, nor floods drown.

Gill: Joh 21:8 - And the other disciples came in a little ship // for they were not far from land, but, as it were, two hundred cubits // dragging the net with fishes And the other disciples came in a little ship,.... The same that they were fishing in, in which they came to Christ as soon as they could, not choosin...

And the other disciples came in a little ship,.... The same that they were fishing in, in which they came to Christ as soon as they could, not choosing to expose themselves, as Peter did; nor was it proper that they should leave the ship, and, as it was, might have hands few enough to bring ship and net, so full of fish, safe to shore; and the rather, they did not think fit to do as he did,

for they were not far from land, but, as it were, two hundred cubits; which was about an hundred yards:

dragging the net with fishes: towing the net full of fishes all along in the water, till they came to land; an emblem of laborious Gospel ministers, who being once embarked in the work of the ministry, continue in it to the end, notwithstanding all toil, labour, and difficulties that attend them; and will at last bring the souls with them they have been made useful to, with great satisfaction and joy, to their dear Lord and master.

Gill: Joh 21:9 - As soon then as they were come to land // they saw a fire of coals there // and fish laid there // and bread As soon then as they were come to land,.... As soon as they were come out of the ship, and safe on shore, not only Peter, but all the rest of the disc...

As soon then as they were come to land,.... As soon as they were come out of the ship, and safe on shore, not only Peter, but all the rest of the disciples:

they saw a fire of coals there: on the shore, to their great surprise:

and fish laid there; which could not be any that they had taken, for, as yet, the net was not drawn up, and the fish took out:

and bread; not upon the coals baking, but hard by, being ready prepared to eat with the fish, when sufficiently broiled. This was all of Christ's preparing, and a considerable proof of his deity; and a confirmation of that provision he will make for his ministering servants, whilst they are about his work, and in this world; and a representation of that spiritual and eternal refreshment they shall have with him in heaven to all eternity, when they have done their work.

Gill: Joh 21:10 - Jesus saith unto them // bring of the fish which ye have now caught Jesus saith unto them,.... The disciples: bring of the fish which ye have now caught: for they might have caught some before, though so few and sma...

Jesus saith unto them,.... The disciples:

bring of the fish which ye have now caught: for they might have caught some before, though so few and small, as scarcely to be reckoned any; nor were they bid to bring all they had taken, only some of them, to add to these Christ had prepared for them on land; they being both indeed of a miraculous production, and the effects of his divine power. Christ's view in ordering to bring some of them, and put to those that lay upon the coals, was partly that they might have enough to make a meal of for them all; and also, that they might have a more perfect knowledge of the miracle wrought, by seeing the number and largeness of the fishes, and by bringing the net full of them to shore unbroken; and may be an emblem of the bringing of souls to Christ by the ministry of the word, thereby adding to those that are already gathered.

Gill: Joh 21:11 - Simon Peter went up // drew the net to land full of great fishes // And for all there were so many // yet was not the net broken Simon Peter went up,.... Either to the sea, that being higher than the land, or to the ship which lay by the shore: he went aboard it, and drew the...

Simon Peter went up,.... Either to the sea, that being higher than the land, or to the ship which lay by the shore: he went aboard it, and

drew the net to land full of great fishes; not alone, but others of the disciples with him; though he only is mentioned, being the leading person in this affair; an emblem of the whole number of God's elect being brought safe to shore, to Christ, and to heaven, through various tribulations and afflictions in the world, fitly signified by the waves of the sea. What mystery there may be in the number, I know not. The conjecture of Grotius, that it is a figure of the proselytes in the days of David and Solomon, seems to be without foundation; since they were not only so many thousands, but six hundred over. And as little to be regarded is the thought of others, that the larger number, one hundred, regards the converted among the Gentiles, and the lesser those among the Jews; much better is the observation of others, that it may design a collection, out of all sorts of people, to Christ, and his church.

And for all there were so many; in number, and these so large and big, and the weight of them so great. The Syriac reads כלה יוקרא בהנא, "with all this weight", or "burden", and so the Persic; but the Arabic, "with such a number"; both ideas of number and weight are to be preserved, to make what follows the more observable:

yet was not the net broken; which must be ascribed to the divine power of Christ; and is an emblem of the power of God attending the Gospel to the regeneration, conversion, and salvation of his people, and of the great usefulness of it, however mean and despicable it may be in the eyes of men, and of its permanence and duration, until all the elect of God are gathered in by it.

Gill: Joh 21:12 - Jesus saith unto them, come and dine // And none of the disciples durst ask him, who art thou Jesus saith unto them, come and dine,.... One would think it should rather have been said, come and take a breakfast than a dinner, since it was so ea...

Jesus saith unto them, come and dine,.... One would think it should rather have been said, come and take a breakfast than a dinner, since it was so early in the morning: but Grotius has observed, out of Homer, that αριστον, is used for food taken in a morning; so that it may signify here, not what we properly call dining, but eating a morning's meal; and may be an emblem of that spiritual refreshment believers enjoy with Christ in his house and ordinances now, and of those everlasting pleasures they will partake with him in the resurrection morn: and it is to be observed, that he does not say go and dine, but come and dine; that is, along with himself: he does not send his disciples elsewhere for food, but invites them to come to him, to hear his word, which is food for faith, to wait in his house, where plenty of provision is made, and to attend on his ordinances, and in all to feed upon himself, and to feed with him; to all which they are heartily welcome.

And none of the disciples durst ask him, who art thou? knowing that it was the Lord: to ask such a question was altogether unnecessary, and would have been impertinent, and they might justly have been upbraided and rebuked for it: it would have looked like insolence, or unbelief, or both, and that greatly aggravated, when it was so clear a case that it was the Lord; who might be known by his voice and person, especially when they came near to him, and also by the miracles which he wrought: so at the last day, when every eye shall see him coming in the clouds of heaven, none will ask who he is; all will know him.

Gill: Joh 21:13 - Jesus then cometh and taketh bread // And giveth them, and fish likewise Jesus then cometh and taketh bread,.... After they had taken the fish out of the net, and all was prepared for the meal, and the disciples were set do...

Jesus then cometh and taketh bread,.... After they had taken the fish out of the net, and all was prepared for the meal, and the disciples were set down to eat, Christ came and took his place as the master of the feast, and head of the family; and taking up the bread, as was his usual method, he asked a blessing over it, and gave thanks for it. Beza's ancient copy, and one of Stephens's read, "and having given thanks he gave", &c. which is agreeably to his usual practice at meals.

And giveth them, and fish likewise; he distributed both bread and fish to his disciples. So, in a spiritual sense, he provides plentifully for his people; gives them to eat of the hidden manna, and tree of life, and leads to fountains of living waters; encourages them to eat and drink freely, what is of his own preparing, and at his own expense provided for them.

Gill: Joh 21:14 - This is now the third time // that Jesus showed himself to his disciples after that he was risen from the dead This is now the third time,.... Or day of Christ's appearance to his disciples: he appeared to them first on the same day he rose, and then a second t...

This is now the third time,.... Or day of Christ's appearance to his disciples: he appeared to them first on the same day he rose, and then a second time eight days after, or that day a week later, and now at the sea of Tiberias; for within this compass of time he had made more appearances than three, though to particular persons, and not to such a number of the disciples as at these three times:

that Jesus showed himself to his disciples after that he was risen from the dead: and thus, as by the mouth of two or three witnesses, everything is established; so by these three principal appearances of Christ to his disciples, his resurrection from the dead was confirmed.

Gill: Joh 21:15 - So when they had dined // Jesus turned his face to Simon Peter // Simon, son of Jonas // lovest thou me more than these // he saith unto him, yea, Lord, thou knowest that I love thee // he saith unto him, feed my lambs So when they had dined,.... The Persic version adds, Jesus turned his face to Simon Peter; he did not interrupt them whilst they were eating; but w...

So when they had dined,.... The Persic version adds,

Jesus turned his face to Simon Peter; he did not interrupt them whilst they were eating; but when they had comfortably refreshed themselves, he looked at Peter, and singled him out from the rest, and directed his discourse to him; and saith unto Simon Peter,

Simon, son of Jonas; not John, as the Vulgate Latin, and Nonnus, and some copies read; for this answers not to the Hebrew word Jochanan, but Jonah, the same name with the prophet. Some have observed, that Christ spoke to him particularly by his original name, and not by that which he himself had given him, with a view to his strong faith, as Cephas, or Peter; but it should be known that Christ calls him by this name of Simon bar Jonah, when he made the most ample profession of his faith in him, and was pronounced blessed by him, Mat 16:16

lovest thou me more than these? meaning, not than the fishes he had caught, nor the net and boat, or any worldly enjoyment, nor than he loved the disciples; but the question is, whether he loved Christ more than the rest of the disciples loved him: the reason of which was, because he had some time ago declared, though all the disciples were offended at Christ, and should deny him, he would not; and had just now thrown himself into the sea to come to him first, as if he loved him more than they did: which question is put, not out of ignorance, or as if Christ knew not whether he loved him or not, and what was the degree of his affection to him; but because the exercise of this grace, and the expressions of it, are very grateful to him; and that Peter also might have an opportunity of expressing it before others, who had so publicly denied him:

he saith unto him, yea, Lord, thou knowest that I love thee: not in word and tongue, but in deed and in truth; in sincerity, and without dissimulation, fervently and superlatively; for the truth of which he appeals to Christ himself; for he was so conscious to himself of the reality of his love, and the sincerity of his affection, that he chooses to make Christ himself judge of it, rather than say any more of it himself; though he modestly declines saying that he loved him more than the rest of the disciples did, having had an experience of his vanity and self-confidence. He was sure he loved Christ heartily; but whether he loved him more than the rest did, he chose not to say:

he saith unto him, feed my lambs; the younger and more tender part of the flock, weak believers, Christ's little children, newborn babes, the day of small things, which are not to be despised, the bruised reed that is not to be broken, and the smoking flax that is not to be quenched; but who are to be nourished, comforted, and strengthened, by feeding them with the milk of the Gospel, and by administering to them the ordinances and breasts of consolation. These Christ has an interest in, and therefore calls them "my lambs", being given him by the Father, and purchased by his blood, and for whom he has a tender concern and affection; and nothing he looks upon as a firmer and clearer proof and evidence of love to him, than to feed these lambs of his, and take care of them.

Gill: Joh 21:16 - He saith unto him again the second time // Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me // he saith unto him, yea, Lord, thou knowest that I love thee // he saith unto him, feed my sheep He saith unto him again the second time,.... Willing to have the expressions of his love repeated and confirmed; Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou m...

He saith unto him again the second time,.... Willing to have the expressions of his love repeated and confirmed;

Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? he leaves out the words, "more than these", though Nonnus expresses them; he saw Peter's heart, and observed the modesty of his answer, and would not urge him any more in that comparative way, only required a repetition of his sincere and hearty love to him:

he saith unto him, yea, Lord, thou knowest that I love thee; expressing himself in the same language as before; and it is, as if he should say, Lord, what can I say more? I can say no more than I have done, and by that I abide:

he saith unto him, feed my sheep; both the lost sheep of the house of Israel, and his other sheep among the Gentiles, whom the Father had given him, and he had paid a price for, and must be brought in; these being called, he would have fed with the word and ordinances, with the bread of life, and water of life, not lorded over, and fleeced, and much less worried and destroyed; every instance of care and love shown to these, he takes as a mark of affection and respect to himself.

Gill: Joh 21:17 - He saith unto him the third time // Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me // Peter was grieved, because he said unto him the third time, lovest thou me // and he said unto him, Lord, thou knowest all things, thou knowest that I love thee // Jesus saith unto him, feed my sheep He saith unto him the third time,.... That by these three testimonies, out of his mouth, the thing might be established, and be out of all doubt: S...

He saith unto him the third time,.... That by these three testimonies, out of his mouth, the thing might be established, and be out of all doubt:

Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? is it so indeed that thou lovest me? is thy love really so hearty and sincere as thou savest? may it be depended upon?

Peter was grieved, because he said unto him the third time, lovest thou me? because it put him in mind of his having denied his Lord three times; the remembrance of which cut him to the heart and it added to his grief, that his love, which he knew was unfeigned, notwithstanding his conduct, should seem to be suspected:

and he said unto him, Lord, thou knowest all things, thou knowest that I love thee; he appeals with great warmth and earnestness to him, as the omniscient God, and the searcher of all hearts, who knows all persons and things, and the secret thoughts, dispositions, and affections of men's minds, for the truth of his love to him; for though he knew the treachery of his own heart, and durst not trust to it; and therefore chose not to be determined by his own assertions, and was well aware that the sincerity of his love might be called in question by fellow Christians, because of his late conduct; but as everything was naked and open to his Lord, with whom he had to do, he lodges and leaves the appeal with him: so every soul that truly loves Christ, whatever Satan, the world, professors, or their own hearts under unbelieving frames, may suggest to the contrary, can appeal to Christ, as the trier of the reins of the children of men, that he it is whom their souls love; and though their love may be greatly tried, and they themselves be sorely tempted by Satan, and suffered to fall greatly; yet their love to Christ can never be lost; the fervency of it may be abated, the exercise of it may be very languid, but the principle itself always remains, as it did in Peter:

Jesus saith unto him, feed my sheep. It may be observed from the repetition of this phrase following upon Peter's declaration of his love to Christ, that such only are proper persons to feed the lambs and sheep of Christ, who truly and sincerely love him: and in doing which they show their love to him: and who indeed would be concerned in this service, but such? since the work is so laborious, the conduct of those to whom they minister oftentimes is so disagreeable, the reproach they meet with from the world, and the opposition made unto them by Satan, and all the powers of darkness: it is true indeed, there are some that take upon them this work, and pretend to do it, who do not love Christ; but then they are such who feed themselves, and not the flock; and who feed the world's goats, and not Christ's lambs and sheep, and in time of danger leave the flock; only the true lovers of Christ faithfully perform this service, and abide in it by preaching the pure Gospel of Christ, by administering his ordinances, in their right manner, and by directing souls in all to Christ, the heavenly manna, and bread of life. Dr. Lightfoot thinks that by the threefold repetition of the order to feed Christ's lambs and sheep, is meant the threefold object of Peter's ministry; the Jews in their own land, the Gentiles, and the Israelites of the ten tribes, that were in Babylon.

Gill: Joh 21:18 - Verily, verily, I say unto thee // when thou wast young // thou girdest thyself, and walkest whither thou wouldst // but when thou shalt be old // thou shalt stretch forth thy hands, and another shall gird thee // and carry thee whither thou wouldst not Verily, verily, I say unto thee,.... A way of speaking often used by Christ, when about to deliver anything of considerable moment, partly to raise th...

Verily, verily, I say unto thee,.... A way of speaking often used by Christ, when about to deliver anything of considerable moment, partly to raise the attention, and partly for the more strong asseveration of what is spoken; and may have reference both to what went before, confirming Peter's declaration of his love, which would be demonstrated by dying for him, and the testimony of his omniscience, by foretelling his death, and the kind of it; and to what follows after, which contains an account of Peter in his younger years, and a prophecy of what should befall him in old age:

when thou wast young; not that he was old now, and capable he was of doing, and he did do but just now, what our Lord ascribes to his younger years:

thou girdest thyself, and walkest whither thou wouldst; that is, he could put on his clothes himself, and gird them about him with a girdle, as was the custom of the eastern nations, who usually wore long garments; and as he, a little before, had girt his fisher's coat about him, and walked where he pleased; denoting the liberty of his will in things natural and civil, which every man is possessed of, though not in things spiritual, without the grace of God; and also his power of doing what was most grateful to him, without being hindered by, or obliged to ask the leave of others:

but when thou shalt be old; implying, that he should live to a good old age, and be continued to be useful and serviceable in the cause of Christ, in preaching his Gospel, and feeding his lambs and sheep, as he did; for he lived to the times of Nero c, under whom he suffered, about forty years after this:

thou shalt stretch forth thy hands, and another shall gird thee. This refers not so much to an inability through old age to gird himself, and therefore should stretch forth his hands, that another might with more ease do it for him, and which would be the reverse of his former and present case; for the word gird is used in another sense than before, and signifies the binding of him as, a prisoner with cords, or chains; so "girding", with the Jews, is the same as הקשירה והאסירה, "tying and binding" d: but either to the stretching out of his hands upon the cross, when he should be girt and bound to that; for persons were sometimes fastened to the cross with cords, and not always with nails e: or, as others think, to his carrying of his cross on his shoulders, with his hands stretched out and bound to the piece of wood which went across; though his being girded or bound may as well be thought to follow the former, as this: indeed, what is added best suits with the latter,

and carry thee whither thou wouldst not; to a painful, cruel, shameful, and accursed death, the death of the cross; not that Peter in spirit would be unwilling to die for Christ, nor was he; but it signifies, that he should die a death disagreeable to the flesh.

Gill: Joh 21:19 - This spake he // signifying by what death he should glorify God // and when he had spoken this // he saith unto him, follow me This spake he,.... These are the words of the evangelist, explaining the meaning of Christ in like manner, as in Joh 12:33 signifying by what death...

This spake he,.... These are the words of the evangelist, explaining the meaning of Christ in like manner, as in Joh 12:33

signifying by what death he should glorify God; for by the above words Christ not only intimated that Peter should die, not a natural, but a violent death, or that he should die a martyr in his cause, but the very kind of death he should die, namely, by crucifixion; and that Peter was crucified at Rome, ecclesiastical history confirms f, when Christ was magnified, and God was glorified by his zeal and courage, faith and patience, constancy and perseverance to the end:

and when he had spoken this: concerning the usage and treatment he should meet with, the sufferings he should undergo, and death he should die for his sake, for the present trial of him:

he saith unto him, follow me: which may be understood literally, Jesus now rising up, and ordering him to come after him; and yet as a sign of his following him, in a spiritual sense, exercising every grace upon him, discharging every duty towards him, faithfully and constantly performing his work and office, as an apostle and preacher of the Gospel, in which he had now reinstated and confirmed him, and patiently bearing and suffering all kind of reproach, persecution, and death, for his name's sake.

Gill: Joh 21:20 - Then Peter turning about // seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following // which also leaned on his breast at supper Then Peter turning about,.... After he was risen, and was following Christ: seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following also; by whom is designed...

Then Peter turning about,.... After he was risen, and was following Christ:

seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following also; by whom is designed John the Evangelist, and writer of this Gospel; who hearing Christ bid Peter follow him, rose up likewise, and went after him, in token of his willingness to serve him, and suffer for him too:

which also leaned on his breast at supper; at the "paschal supper", as the Persic version here reads it: "and said, Lord, which is he that betrayeth thee?" This disciple had a peculiar share in the love of Christ, as man, and was admitted to great nearness and freedom with him, signified by his leaning on his breast; and who being so near his person, and allowed to use a liberty with him, everyone did not take, at the motion of Peter, asked our Lord at supper, who the person was he meant that should betray him; all this is said as descriptive of the disciple here spoken of, which leaves it without any doubt, that it was the Apostle John; and who, from Joh 21:2 appears to be one of this company, and is further confirmed at Joh 21:24.

Gill: Joh 21:21 - Peter seeing him, saith to Jesus // Lord, and what shall this man do Peter seeing him, saith to Jesus,.... Peter took a great deal of notice of John, and very likely understood, that he meant by his rising up and follow...

Peter seeing him, saith to Jesus,.... Peter took a great deal of notice of John, and very likely understood, that he meant by his rising up and following Christ, to signify his readiness for service and suffering in the cause of Christ: and therefore says,

Lord, and what shall this man do? The phrase in the original is very short and concise, "Lord, and this what?" The Arabic version renders it, "and this, of what mind is he?" it looks as if he was of the same mind with me to follow thee; but it is better rendered by us, "what shall this man do?" in what work and service shall he be employed, who seems as willing as I am to serve thee? or it may be rendered thus, "and what shall this man suffer?" shall he suffer at all? and if he shall, what kind of death shall he undergo? what will become of him? what will be his end? how will it fare with him? this he said, partly out of curiosity, and partly out of concern for him, they two being associates and intimates, who had a strong affection for each other.

Gill: Joh 21:22 - Jesus saith unto him // if I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee // follow thou me Jesus saith unto him,.... Christ vouchsafes an answer to Peter, but not a very clear one, nor such an one as he wished for, and not without a rebuke t...

Jesus saith unto him,.... Christ vouchsafes an answer to Peter, but not a very clear one, nor such an one as he wished for, and not without a rebuke to him:

if I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee? meaning, that if it was his pleasure that he should live, not till his second coming to judge the quick and dead at the last day, but till he should come in his power and take vengeance on the Jewish nation, in the destruction of their city and temple by the Romans, and in dispersing them through the nations of the world; till which time John did live, and many years after; and was the only one of the disciples that lived till that time, and who did not die a violent death; what was that to Peter? it was no concern of his. The question was too curious, improper, and impertinent; it became him to attend only to what concerned himself, and he was bid to do:

follow thou me; whence it may be observed, that it becomes the saints to mind their duty in following Christ, and not concern themselves in things that do not belong to them. Christ is to be followed by his people as their leader and commander; as the shepherd of the flock; as a guide in the way, and the forerunner that is gone before; as the light of the world; as the pattern and example of the saints, and as their Lord and master; and that in the exercise of every grace, as humility and meekness, love, zeal, patience, and resignation to the will of God; and also in the discharge of duty, both with respect to moral life and conversation, and instituted worship, as attendance on public service, and submission to ordinances; and likewise in enduring sufferings patiently and cheerfully for his sake. Saints are under obligation to follow Christ; it is their interest so to do; it is honourable, safe, comfortable, and pleasant, and ends in happiness here and hereafter.

Gill: Joh 21:23 - Then went this saying abroad among the brethren // that that disciple should not die // Yet Jesus said not unto him he shall not die, but if I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee Then went this saying abroad among the brethren,.... It not being rightly understood by some one or more of the disciples present: it was divulged wit...

Then went this saying abroad among the brethren,.... It not being rightly understood by some one or more of the disciples present: it was divulged with a wrong sense annexed to it among other persons; who, though not of the eleven, yet were followers of Christ, children of God, that belonged to the same family, and were, in a spiritual relation, brethren to each other, and to the apostles:

that that disciple should not die; but should remain till the second coming of Christ, and be found among them that shall be then alive, and be changed. And such a notion not only was among the ancients; but Beza, in his notes on this text, tells us of a strolling wicked fellow, that gave out that he was the Apostle John; and was encouraged by some, particularly Postellus, a Sorbonic doctor, but was afterwards burnt at Tholouse.

Yet Jesus said not unto him he shall not die, but if I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee? These are the words of John himself, the disciple spoken of, who gives a true and just account of Christ's words, freeing them from the false sense that was put upon them; which shows his ingenuous disposition, his integrity and love of truth; being unwilling that such an error should obtain among the disciples, and pass in the world for truth.

Gill: Joh 21:24 - This is the disciple which testifieth of these things // wrote these things // and we know that his testimony is true This is the disciple which testifieth of these things,.... Recorded in this chapter concerning the appearance of Christ to his disciples at the sea of...

This is the disciple which testifieth of these things,.... Recorded in this chapter concerning the appearance of Christ to his disciples at the sea of Tiberias, and what were done by him in their presence, what passed between them; particularly the conversation he had with Peter, both concerning himself, and the disciple John: and also, of all things that are written in this whole Gospel. These are testified to be true by this very disciple John, concerning whom the above report went upon a mistaken sense of Christ's words, and who himself

wrote these things; all that is contained in this book, as well as the particulars relating to this conversation of Christ with Peter:

and we know that his testimony is true. The testimony of one that was an eye and ear-witness, as John was, of all that he testified and wrote, must be known, owned, and allowed by all to be true, firm, and unquestionable; and therefore the apostle speaks in the plural number, as being not only his own sense, but the sense of all men. Though some take this to be the attestation of the Ephesian church, or of the bishops of the Asiatic churches, who put John upon writing this Gospel; of which they give their judgment and testimony, as believing it to be a true and faithful narrative.

Gill: Joh 21:25 - And there are also many other things which Jesus did // the which, if they should be written everyone // I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that should be written And there are also many other things which Jesus did,.... Which refer not to his doctrines and discourses, his sermons and prayers, and the conversati...

And there are also many other things which Jesus did,.... Which refer not to his doctrines and discourses, his sermons and prayers, and the conversation he had with his disciples, and others, on different accounts; but to the signs, and wonders, and miraculous operations, which were done by him, that are neither recorded in this, nor in any of the evangelists:

the which, if they should be written everyone; with all the particular circumstances relating to them:

I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that should be written. The Arabic version renders it, "the things written in the books"; and the Syriac, "that the world would not be sufficient for the books that should be written"; and so the Persic, which adds, "and the Scribes of the world would fail, or be deficient"; there would not be Scribes enough in the world to write them; nor could they be read by men, if they were written; the world would be overloaded with them; and therefore the Holy Ghost has not thought fit to lay such a burden on men they could not bear, as to read such numbers of volumes; but has reduced them into a brief compendium, which may be read with ease, delight, and pleasure; and which is abundantly sufficient to attest the truth of Christ's incarnation, miracles, doctrines, obedience, sufferings, death, resurrection, ascension, session at God's right hand, &c. and of the whole of Christianity, and all that appertains to it, or whatever is necessary to be known, for the salvation of men: for this cannot be understood of the carnal and unbelieving part of the world, not receiving and bearing what would be contained in such volumes, were they written; for they are not able to receive and bear what is now written, but reject and despise it as foolishness. Some understand this as an hyperbolical expression; but the sense above given, may be admitted without an hyperbole; though an hyperbole may very well be allowed of; nor, taken literally, will it appear greater than some others used in Scripture; as when the posterity of Abraham are said to be as numerous as the stars of the sky; and especially when said to be as the sand by the sea shore, innumerable, Heb 11:12 and when Capernaum is said to be exalted unto heaven, or to reach unto it, Mat 11:23 and particularly the Jews have no reason to object, as one of them does g, to such a way of speaking, whose writings abound in hyperbolical expressions, and in some like to this; as when one of their Rabbins says h,

"if all the seas were ink, and the bulrushes pens, and the heavens and the earth volumes, and all the children of men Scribes, אין מספיקין לכתוב תורה, "they would not be sufficient to write the law", which have learned, &c.''

and it is commonly said i by them, if this, or that, or the other thing was done, לא יכיל עלמא למסבל, "the world would not be able to bear them". And a later writer k of theirs, speaking of the different interpretations given by some of their Rabbins of a certain passage, says, they are so many, that an ass is not able to carry their books. And the intention of this expression, supposing it hyperbolical, is to show, that but a few of the wonderful things done by Christ were recorded by the evangelist, in comparison of the many which he every day did, in all places where he came; for he was continually going about doing good, and healing all manner of diseases; but these that were written are sufficient to prove him to be the true Messiah, and to require faith in him as such. To all which the evangelist sets his "Amen", as attesting and confirming the truth of all he had written; and which may be depended upon, and assented to, as truth, by all that read this Gospel. The Alexandrian copy, and Beza's Cambridge copy, have not the word "Amen"; nor have the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Arabic, and Persic versions. In some copies the following words are added,

"the Gospel according to John was given out thirty two years after the ascension of Christ;''

which would fall on the year of Christ 66, and so before the destruction of Jerusalem; which is contrary to the common opinion of learned men, some placing it in the year 97, others in the year 99.

(John starts his Gospel by stating: "All things were made by him". If one were to attempt to even summarise the works of creation, there is no way the world could contain the resulting volumes! Editor.)

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Joh 21:1 Grk “how he revealed himself.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:2 The two other disciples who are not named may have been Andrew and Philip, who are mentioned together in John 6:7-8 and 12:22.

NET Notes: Joh 21:3 Grk “they said to him.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:5 Grk “They answered him.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:6 The words “the net” are not in the Greek text but are implied. Direct objects were often omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

NET Notes: Joh 21:7 Grk “threw himself.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:8 Or “about a hundred meters”; Grk “about two hundred cubits.” According to BDAG 812 s.v., a πῆχυς (ph...

NET Notes: Joh 21:9 Grk “placed,” “laid.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:10 Grk “said to them.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:11 Here the author makes two further points about the catch of fish: (1) there were one hundred fifty-three large fish in the net, and (2) even with so m...

NET Notes: Joh 21:12 Grk “said to them.” The words “to them” are omitted because it is clear in context to whom Jesus was speaking, and the words a...

NET Notes: Joh 21:15 Grk “He”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Joh 21:16 Grk “He”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Joh 21:17 Grk “Jesus said to him.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:18 Grk “others will gird you.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:19 Grk “After he said this, he said to him”; the referents (first Jesus, second Peter) have been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Joh 21:20 This is a parenthetical note by the author.

NET Notes: Joh 21:21 Grk “saw this one.”

NET Notes: Joh 21:22 The word “back” is supplied to clarify the meaning.

NET Notes: Joh 21:23 The word “back” is supplied to clarify the meaning.

NET Notes: Joh 21:25 The author concludes the Gospel with a note concerning his selectivity of material. He makes it plain that he has not attempted to write an exhaustive...

Geneva Bible: Joh 21:1 After these things ( 1 ) Jesus shewed himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias; and on this wise shewed he [himself]. ( 1 ) In that Chri...

Geneva Bible: Joh 21:7 Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved saith unto Peter, It is the Lord. Now when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he girt [his] fisher's ( a...

Geneva Bible: Joh 21:15 ( 2 ) So when they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, [son] of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou kn...

Geneva Bible: Joh 21:17 He saith unto him the ( b ) third time, Simon, [son] of Jonas, lovest thou me? Peter was grieved because he said unto him the third time, Lovest thou ...

Geneva Bible: Joh 21:18 ( 3 ) Verily, verily, I say unto thee, When thou wast young, thou ( c ) girdedst thyself, and walkedst whither thou wouldest: but when thou shalt be o...

Geneva Bible: Joh 21:19 This spake he, signifying by ( f ) what death he should glorify God. And when he had spoken this, he saith unto him, Follow me. ( f ) That is, that P...

Geneva Bible: Joh 21:20 ( 4 ) Then Peter, turning about, seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following; which also leaned on his breast at supper, and said, Lord, which is he...

Geneva Bible: Joh 21:24 ( 5 ) This is the disciple which testifieth of these things, and wrote these things: and we know that his testimony is true. ( 5 ) The history of Chr...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Joh 21:2 - A Libation To Jehovah An Eloquent Catalogue There were together Simon Peter, and Thomas called Didymus, and Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, and the sons of Zebedee, and two ...

Maclaren: Joh 21:4 - A Libation To Jehovah The Beach And The Sea When the morning was now come. Jesus stood on the shore; but the disciples knew not that it was Jesus.'--John 21:4. THE incide...

Maclaren: Joh 21:7 - A Libation To Jehovah It Is The Lord!' Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved saith unto Peter, It is the Lord.'--John 21:7. IT seems a very strange thing that these dis...

Maclaren: Joh 21:15 - A Libation To Jehovah Lovest Thou Me?' Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou Me more than these? He saith unto Him, Yea, Lord; Thou knowest that I ...

Maclaren: Joh 21:18-19 - A Libation To Jehovah Youth And Age, And The Command For Both When thou wast young, thou girdedst thyself, and walkedst whither thou wouldest: but when thou shelf be old,...

Maclaren: Joh 21:21-22 - A Libation To Jehovah They Also Serve Who Only Stand And Wait' Peter, seeing him, saith to Jesus, Lord, and what shall this man do! Jesus saith unto him, If I will that he...

MHCC: Joh 21:1-14 - --Christ makes himself known to his people, usually in his ordinances; but sometimes by his Spirit he visits them when employed in their business. It is...

MHCC: Joh 21:15-19 - --Our Lord addressed Peter by his original name, as if he had forfeited that of Peter through his denying him. He now answered, Thou knowest that I love...

MHCC: Joh 21:20-24 - --Sufferings, pains, and death, will appear formidable even to the experienced Christian; but in the hope to glorify God, to leave a sinful world, and t...

MHCC: Joh 21:25 - --Only a small part of the actions of Jesus had been written. But let us bless God for all that is in the Scriptures, and be thankful that there is so m...

Matthew Henry: Joh 21:1-14 - -- We have here an account of Christ's appearance to his disciples at the sea of Tiberias. Now, 1. Let us compare this appearance with those that went...