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Teks -- Ezekiel 3:1-27 (NET)

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Konteks
3:1 He said to me, “Son of man, eat what you see in front of you– eat this scroll– and then go and speak to the house of Israel.” 3:2 So I opened my mouth and he fed me the scroll. 3:3 He said to me, “Son of man, feed your stomach and fill your belly with this scroll I am giving to you.” So I ate it, and it was sweet like honey in my mouth. 3:4 He said to me, “Son of man, go to the house of Israel and speak my words to them. 3:5 For you are not being sent to a people of unintelligible speech and difficult language, but to the house of Israel3:6 not to many peoples of unintelligible speech and difficult language, whose words you cannot understand– surely if I had sent you to them, they would listen to you! 3:7 But the house of Israel is unwilling to listen to you, because they are not willing to listen to me, for the whole house of Israel is hard-headed and hard-hearted. 3:8 “I have made your face adamant to match their faces, and your forehead hard to match their foreheads. 3:9 I have made your forehead harder than flint– like diamond! Do not fear them or be terrified of the looks they give you, for they are a rebellious house.” 3:10 And he said to me, “Son of man, take all my words that I speak to you to heart and listen carefully. 3:11 Go to the exiles, to your fellow countrymen, and speak to them– say to them, ‘This is what the sovereign Lord says,’ whether they pay attention or not.”
Ezekiel Before the Exiles
3:12 Then a wind lifted me up and I heard a great rumbling sound behind me as the glory of the Lord rose from its place, 3:13 and the sound of the living beings’ wings brushing against each other, and the sound of the wheels alongside them, a great rumbling sound. 3:14 A wind lifted me up and carried me away. I went bitterly, my spirit full of fury, and the hand of the Lord rested powerfully on me. 3:15 I came to the exiles at Tel Abib, who lived by the Kebar River. I sat dumbfounded among them there, where they were living, for seven days. 3:16 At the end of seven days the word of the Lord came to me: 3:17 “Son of man, I have appointed you a watchman for the house of Israel. Whenever you hear a word from my mouth, you must give them a warning from me. 3:18 When I say to the wicked, “You will certainly die,” and you do not warn him– you do not speak out to warn the wicked to turn from his wicked deed and wicked lifestyle so that he may live– that wicked person will die for his iniquity, but I will hold you accountable for his death. 3:19 But as for you, if you warn the wicked and he does not turn from his wicked deed and from his wicked lifestyle, he will die for his iniquity but you will have saved your own life. 3:20 “When a righteous person turns from his righteousness and commits iniquity, and I set an obstacle before him, he will die. If you have not warned him, he will die for his sin. The righteous deeds he performed will not be considered, but I will hold you accountable for his death. 3:21 However, if you warn the righteous person not to sin, and he does not sin, he will certainly live because he was warned, and you will have saved your own life.”
Isolated and Silenced
3:22 The hand of the Lord rested on me there, and he said to me, “Get up, go out to the valley, and I will speak with you there.” 3:23 So I got up and went out to the valley, and the glory of the Lord was standing there, just like the glory I had seen by the Kebar River, and I threw myself face down. 3:24 Then a wind came into me and stood me on my feet. The Lord spoke to me and said, “Go shut yourself in your house. 3:25 As for you, son of man, they will put ropes on you and tie you up with them, so you cannot go out among them. 3:26 I will make your tongue stick to the roof of your mouth so that you will be silent and unable to reprove them, for they are a rebellious house. 3:27 But when I speak with you, I will loosen your tongue and you must say to them, ‘This is what the sovereign Lord says.’ Those who listen will listen, but the indifferent will refuse, for they are a rebellious house.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Chebar a waterway by the Euphrates River between Babylon and Warka (OS)
 · Israel a citizen of Israel.,a member of the nation of Israel
 · Tel-Abib a town in Babylonia
 · Tel-abib a town in Babylonia


Topik/Tema Kamus: Impenitence | Minister | Prophets | Chebar | Book | Adamant | Forehead | REVELATION, 3-4 | Wicked | Flint | PROPHECY; PROPHETS, 1 | Roll | HARD; HARDINESS; HARDDINESS; HARDLY | God | EZEKIEL, 1 | Ezekiel | Tel-abib | Word of God | Symbols and Similitudes | PLAINS | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Eze 3:1 - Eat This was done in a vision.

This was done in a vision.

Wesley: Eze 3:1 - Findeth In the hand which was sent to him.

In the hand which was sent to him.

Wesley: Eze 3:3 - Belly The mouth is the proper instrument of eating, but when meat is digested, the belly is said to eat.

The mouth is the proper instrument of eating, but when meat is digested, the belly is said to eat.

Wesley: Eze 3:3 - Fill thy bowels This denotes the fulness of the measure wherewith we should read, meditate, and digest the word of God.

This denotes the fulness of the measure wherewith we should read, meditate, and digest the word of God.

Wesley: Eze 3:3 - Honey It was sweet to receive things by revelation from God, and so to converse with God. And usually the first part of the ministerial work is pleasant.

It was sweet to receive things by revelation from God, and so to converse with God. And usually the first part of the ministerial work is pleasant.

Wesley: Eze 3:4 - Speak What things I shall shew thee, and in what words I shall declare them to thee.

What things I shall shew thee, and in what words I shall declare them to thee.

Wesley: Eze 3:6 - Many people Divers nations, that thou shouldest need divers tongues, to speak to them all in their own language.

Divers nations, that thou shouldest need divers tongues, to speak to them all in their own language.

Wesley: Eze 3:7 - All The far greater part, tho' not every particular person.

The far greater part, tho' not every particular person.

Wesley: Eze 3:8 - I have I have given thee, constancy, and manly carriage. The more impudent wicked people are in their opposition to religion, the more openly and resolutely ...

I have given thee, constancy, and manly carriage. The more impudent wicked people are in their opposition to religion, the more openly and resolutely should God's people appear in the practice and defence of it.

Wesley: Eze 3:11 - Captivity Of the first captivity under Jeconiah's reign, who succeeded his father Jehoiakim, slain for his conspiracy with Egypt against Nebuchadnezzar.

Of the first captivity under Jeconiah's reign, who succeeded his father Jehoiakim, slain for his conspiracy with Egypt against Nebuchadnezzar.

Wesley: Eze 3:12 - A voice An articulate sound, of many angels, attended with the rushing of the wheels, added to the noise of their wings.

An articulate sound, of many angels, attended with the rushing of the wheels, added to the noise of their wings.

Wesley: Eze 3:12 - Blessed Praised be the gloriously holy and just God.

Praised be the gloriously holy and just God.

Wesley: Eze 3:12 - His place Coming down from heaven.

Coming down from heaven.

Wesley: Eze 3:13 - Rushing The wheels of providence moved over against the angels, and in concert with them.

The wheels of providence moved over against the angels, and in concert with them.

Wesley: Eze 3:14 - Spirit Caught him up into the air.

Caught him up into the air.

Wesley: Eze 3:14 - Took Carried me to the place where the captive Jews were crowded together.

Carried me to the place where the captive Jews were crowded together.

Wesley: Eze 3:14 - Bitterness Not at all pleased with my work. He went in the heat of his spirit; because of the discouragements he foresaw he should meet with. But the hand of the...

Not at all pleased with my work. He went in the heat of his spirit; because of the discouragements he foresaw he should meet with. But the hand of the Lord was strong upon him, not only to compel him to the work, but to fit him for it.

Wesley: Eze 3:15 - Tel abib - A part of Mesopotamia, which was shut up within Chebar westward, and Saocora eastward.

abib - A part of Mesopotamia, which was shut up within Chebar westward, and Saocora eastward.

Wesley: Eze 3:15 - By On that part of the river Chebar, which runs west - ward of Tel - abib.

On that part of the river Chebar, which runs west - ward of Tel - abib.

Wesley: Eze 3:15 - Where Where I found them sitting astonished, at the sight of their change from freedom and honour to servitude and shame.

Where I found them sitting astonished, at the sight of their change from freedom and honour to servitude and shame.

Wesley: Eze 3:15 - Seven days Mourning no doubt all that while, and waiting 'till the spirit of prophecy should open his mouth.

Mourning no doubt all that while, and waiting 'till the spirit of prophecy should open his mouth.

Wesley: Eze 3:20 - I Lay Permit it to be laid before him.

Permit it to be laid before him.

Wesley: Eze 3:20 - He shall Perish in his sin.

Perish in his sin.

Wesley: Eze 3:20 - Remembered Shall not be profitable to him; "he that apostatizes is the worst of men, because he falls from known ways of goodness and holiness."

Shall not be profitable to him; "he that apostatizes is the worst of men, because he falls from known ways of goodness and holiness."

Wesley: Eze 3:22 - There At Tel - abib.

At Tel - abib.

Wesley: Eze 3:22 - Go forth Withdraw from the multitude.

Withdraw from the multitude.

Wesley: Eze 3:23 - As the glory We are not now to expect such visions. But we have a favour done us nothing inferior, if we by faith behold the glory of the Lord, so as to be changed...

We are not now to expect such visions. But we have a favour done us nothing inferior, if we by faith behold the glory of the Lord, so as to be changed into the same image. And this honour have all his saints.

Wesley: Eze 3:24 - Shut To foresignify the shutting up of the Jews in Jerusalem.

To foresignify the shutting up of the Jews in Jerusalem.

Wesley: Eze 3:25 - Not go Thou shalt be straitly confined.

Thou shalt be straitly confined.

Wesley: Eze 3:26 - I I will make thee as dumb as if thy tongue clave to the roof of thy mouth.

I will make thee as dumb as if thy tongue clave to the roof of thy mouth.

Wesley: Eze 3:27 - But When ever I shall reveal any thing to thee.

When ever I shall reveal any thing to thee.

Wesley: Eze 3:27 - Open I will give thee power to speak.

I will give thee power to speak.

Wesley: Eze 3:27 - Let 'Tis his duty and safety.

'Tis his duty and safety.

Wesley: Eze 3:27 - Forbear 'Tis at his own peril.

'Tis at his own peril.

JFB: Eze 3:1 - eat . . . and . . . speak God's messenger must first inwardly appropriate God's truth himself, before he "speaks" it to others (see on Eze 2:8). Symbolic actions were, when pos...

God's messenger must first inwardly appropriate God's truth himself, before he "speaks" it to others (see on Eze 2:8). Symbolic actions were, when possible and proper, performed outwardly; otherwise, internally and in spiritual vision, the action so narrated making the naked statement more intuitive and impressive by presenting the subject in a concentrated, embodied form.

JFB: Eze 3:3 - honey for sweetness Compare Psa 19:10; Psa 119:103; Rev 10:9, where, as here in Eze 3:14, the "sweetness" is followed by "bitterness." The former being due to the painful...

Compare Psa 19:10; Psa 119:103; Rev 10:9, where, as here in Eze 3:14, the "sweetness" is followed by "bitterness." The former being due to the painful nature of the message; the latter because it was the Lord's service which he was engaged in; and his eating the roll and finding it sweet, implied that, divesting himself of carnal feeling, he made God's will his will, however painful the message that God might require him to announce. The fact that God would be glorified was his greatest pleasure.

JFB: Eze 3:5 - -- See Margin, Hebrew, "deep of lip, and heavy of tongue," that is, men speaking an obscure and unintelligible tongue. Even they would have listened to t...

See Margin, Hebrew, "deep of lip, and heavy of tongue," that is, men speaking an obscure and unintelligible tongue. Even they would have listened to the prophet; but the Jews, though addressed in their own tongue, will not hear him.

JFB: Eze 3:6 - many people It would have increased the difficulty had he been sent, not merely to one, but to "many people" differing in tongues, so that the missionary would ha...

It would have increased the difficulty had he been sent, not merely to one, but to "many people" differing in tongues, so that the missionary would have needed to acquire a new tongue for addressing each. The after mission of the apostles to many peoples, and the gift of tongues for that end, are foreshadowed (compare 1Co 14:21 with Isa 28:11).

JFB: Eze 3:6 - had I sent thee to them, they would have hearkened (Mat 11:21, Mat 11:23).

JFB: Eze 3:7 - will not hearken unto thee: for . . . not . . . me (Joh 15:20). Take patiently their rejection of thee, for I thy Lord bear it along with thee.

(Joh 15:20). Take patiently their rejection of thee, for I thy Lord bear it along with thee.

JFB: Eze 3:8 - -- Ezekiel means one "strengthened by God." Such he was in godly firmness, in spite of his people's opposition, according to the divine command to the pr...

Ezekiel means one "strengthened by God." Such he was in godly firmness, in spite of his people's opposition, according to the divine command to the priest tribe to which he belonged (Deu 33:9).

JFB: Eze 3:9 - As . . . flint So Messiah the antitype (Isa 50:7; compare Jer 1:8, Jer 1:17).

So Messiah the antitype (Isa 50:7; compare Jer 1:8, Jer 1:17).

JFB: Eze 3:10 - receive in . . . heart . . . ears The transposition from the natural order, namely, first receiving with the ears, then in the heart, is designed. The preparation of the heart for God'...

The transposition from the natural order, namely, first receiving with the ears, then in the heart, is designed. The preparation of the heart for God's message should precede the reception of it with the ears (compare Pro 16:1; Psa 10:17).

JFB: Eze 3:11 - thy people Who ought to be better disposed to hearken to thee, their fellow countryman, than hadst thou been a foreigner (Eze 3:5-6).

Who ought to be better disposed to hearken to thee, their fellow countryman, than hadst thou been a foreigner (Eze 3:5-6).

JFB: Eze 3:12 - -- (Act 8:39). Ezekiel's abode heretofore had not been the most suitable for his work. He, therefore, is guided by the Spirit to Tel-Abib, the chief town...

(Act 8:39). Ezekiel's abode heretofore had not been the most suitable for his work. He, therefore, is guided by the Spirit to Tel-Abib, the chief town of the Jewish colony of captives: there he sat on the ground, "the throne of the miserable" (Ezr 9:3; Lam 1:1-3), seven days, the usual period for manifesting deep grief (Job 2:13; see Psa 137:1), thus winning their confidence by sympathy in their sorrow. He is accompanied by the cherubim which had been manifested at Chebar (Eze 1:3-4), after their departure from Jerusalem. They now are heard moving with the "voice of a great rushing (compare Act 2:2), saying, Blessed be the glory of the Lord from His place," that is, moving from the place in which it had been at Chebar, to accompany Ezekiel to his new destination (Eze 9:3); or, "from His place" may rather mean, in His place and manifested "from" it. Though God may seem to have forsaken His temple, He is still in it and will restore His people to it. His glory is "blessed," in opposition to those Jews who spoke evil of Him, as if He had been unjustly rigorous towards their nation [CALVIN].

JFB: Eze 3:13 - touched Literally, "kissed," that is, closely embraced.

Literally, "kissed," that is, closely embraced.

JFB: Eze 3:13 - noise of a great rushing Typical of great disasters impending over the Jews.

Typical of great disasters impending over the Jews.

JFB: Eze 3:14 - bitterness Sadness on account of the impending calamities of which I was required to be the unwelcome messenger. But the "hand," or powerful impulse of Jehovah, ...

Sadness on account of the impending calamities of which I was required to be the unwelcome messenger. But the "hand," or powerful impulse of Jehovah, urged me forward.

JFB: Eze 3:15 - Tel-Abib Tel means an "elevation." It is identified by MICHAELIS with Thallaba on the Chabor. Perhaps the name expressed the Jew's hopes of restoration, or els...

Tel means an "elevation." It is identified by MICHAELIS with Thallaba on the Chabor. Perhaps the name expressed the Jew's hopes of restoration, or else the fertility of the region. Abib means the green ears of corn which appeared in the month Nisan, the pledge of the harvest.

JFB: Eze 3:15 - I sat, &c. This is the Hebrew Margin reading. The text is rather, "I beheld them sitting there" [GESENIUS]; or, "And those that were settled there," namely, the ...

This is the Hebrew Margin reading. The text is rather, "I beheld them sitting there" [GESENIUS]; or, "And those that were settled there," namely, the older settlers, as distinguished from the more recent ones alluded to in the previous clause. The ten tribes had been long since settled on the Chabor or Habor (2Ki 17:6) [HAVERNICK].

JFB: Eze 3:17 - watchman Ezekiel alone, among the prophets, is called a "watchman," not merely to sympathize, but to give timely warning of danger to his people where none was...

Ezekiel alone, among the prophets, is called a "watchman," not merely to sympathize, but to give timely warning of danger to his people where none was suspected. Habakkuk (Hab 2:1) speaks of standing upon his "watch," but it was only in order to be on the lookout for the manifestation of God's power (so Isa 52:8; Isa 62:6); not as Ezekiel, to act as a watchman to others.

JFB: Eze 3:18 - warning . . . speakest to warn The repetition implies that it is not enough to warn once in passing, but that the warning is to be inculcated continually (2Ti 4:2, "in season, out o...

The repetition implies that it is not enough to warn once in passing, but that the warning is to be inculcated continually (2Ti 4:2, "in season, out of season"; Act 20:31, "night and day with tears").

JFB: Eze 3:18 - save Eze 2:5 had seemingly taken away all hope of salvation; but the reference there was to the mass of the people whose case was hopeless; a few individua...

Eze 2:5 had seemingly taken away all hope of salvation; but the reference there was to the mass of the people whose case was hopeless; a few individuals, however, were reclaimable.

JFB: Eze 3:18 - die in . . . iniquity (Joh 8:21, Joh 8:24). Men are not to flatter themselves that their ignorance, owing to the negligence of their teachers, will save them (Rom 2:12, "A...

(Joh 8:21, Joh 8:24). Men are not to flatter themselves that their ignorance, owing to the negligence of their teachers, will save them (Rom 2:12, "As many as have sinned without law, shall also perish without law").

JFB: Eze 3:19 - wickedness . . . wicked way Internal wickedness of heart, and external of the life, respectively.

Internal wickedness of heart, and external of the life, respectively.

JFB: Eze 3:19 - delivered thy soul (Isa 49:4-5; Act 20:26).

JFB: Eze 3:20 - righteous . . . turn from . . . righteousness Not one "righteous" as to the root and spirit of regeneration (Psa 89:33; Psa 138:8; Isa 26:12; Isa 27:3; Joh 10:28; Phi 1:6), but as to its outward a...

Not one "righteous" as to the root and spirit of regeneration (Psa 89:33; Psa 138:8; Isa 26:12; Isa 27:3; Joh 10:28; Phi 1:6), but as to its outward appearance and performances. So the "righteous" (Pro 18:17; Mat 9:13). As in Eze 3:19 the minister is required to lead the wicked to good, so in Eze 3:20 he is to confirm the well-disposed in their duty.

JFB: Eze 3:20 - commit iniquity That is, give himself up wholly to it (1Jo 3:8-9), for even the best often fall, but not wilfully and habitually.

That is, give himself up wholly to it (1Jo 3:8-9), for even the best often fall, but not wilfully and habitually.

JFB: Eze 3:20 - I lay a stumbling-block Not that God tempts to sin (Jam 1:13-14), but God gives men over to judicial blindness, and to their own corruptions (Psa 9:16-17; Psa 94:23) when the...

Not that God tempts to sin (Jam 1:13-14), but God gives men over to judicial blindness, and to their own corruptions (Psa 9:16-17; Psa 94:23) when they "like not to retain God in their knowledge" (Rom 1:24, Rom 1:26); just as, on the contrary, God makes "the way of the righteous plain" (Pro 4:11-12; Pro 15:19), so that they do "not stumble." CALVIN refers "stumbling-block" not to the guilt, but to its punishment; "I bring ruin on him." The former is best. Ahab, after a kind of righteousness (1Ki 21:27-29), relapsed and consulted lying spirits in false prophets; so God permitted one of these to be his "stumbling-block," both to sin and its corresponding punishment (1Ki 22:21-23).

JFB: Eze 3:20 - his blood will I require (Heb 13:17).

JFB: Eze 3:22 - hand of the Lord (Eze 1:3).

(Eze 1:3).

JFB: Eze 3:22 - go . . . into the plain In order that he might there, in a place secluded from unbelieving men, receive a fresh manifestation of the divine glory, to inspirit him for his try...

In order that he might there, in a place secluded from unbelieving men, receive a fresh manifestation of the divine glory, to inspirit him for his trying work.

JFB: Eze 3:23 - glory of the Lord (Eze 1:28).

JFB: Eze 3:24 - set me upon my feet Having been previously prostrate and unable to rise until raised by the divine power.

Having been previously prostrate and unable to rise until raised by the divine power.

JFB: Eze 3:24 - shut thyself within . . . house Implying that in the work he had to do, he must look for no sympathy from man but must be often alone with God and draw his strength from Him [FAIRBAI...

Implying that in the work he had to do, he must look for no sympathy from man but must be often alone with God and draw his strength from Him [FAIRBAIRN]. "Do not go out of thy house till I reveal the future to thee by signs and words," which God does in the following chapters, down to the eleventh. Thus a representation was given of the city shut up by siege [GROTIUS]. Thereby God proved the obedience of His servant, and Ezekiel showed the reality of His call by proceeding, not through rash impulse, but by the directions of God [CALVIN].

JFB: Eze 3:25 - put bands upon thee Not literally, but spiritually, the binding, depressing influence which their rebellious conduct would exert on his spirit. Their perversity, like ban...

Not literally, but spiritually, the binding, depressing influence which their rebellious conduct would exert on his spirit. Their perversity, like bands, would repress his freedom in preaching; as in 2Co 6:12, Paul calls himself "straitened" because his teaching did not find easy access to them. Or else, it is said to console the prophet for being shut up; if thou wert now at once to announce God's message, they would rush on thee and bind them with "bands" [CALVIN].

JFB: Eze 3:26 - I will make my tongue . . . dumb Israel had rejected the prophets; therefore God deprives Israel of the prophets and of His word--God's sorest judgment (1Sa 7:2; Amo 8:11-12).

Israel had rejected the prophets; therefore God deprives Israel of the prophets and of His word--God's sorest judgment (1Sa 7:2; Amo 8:11-12).

JFB: Eze 3:27 - when I speak . . . I will open thy mouth Opposed to the silence imposed on the prophet, to punish the people (Eze 3:26). After the interval of silence has awakened their attention to the caus...

Opposed to the silence imposed on the prophet, to punish the people (Eze 3:26). After the interval of silence has awakened their attention to the cause of it, namely, their sins, they may then hearken to the prophecies which they would not do before.

JFB: Eze 3:27 - He that heareth, let him hear . . . forbear That is, thou hast done thy part, whether they hear or forbear. He who shall forbear to hear, it shall be at his own peril; he who hears, it shall be ...

That is, thou hast done thy part, whether they hear or forbear. He who shall forbear to hear, it shall be at his own peril; he who hears, it shall be to his own eternal good (compare Rev 22:11).

Clarke: Eze 3:1 - Eat this roll, and go speak Eat this roll, and go speak - This must have passed in vision; but the meaning is plain. Receive my word - let it enter into thy Soul; digest it - l...

Eat this roll, and go speak - This must have passed in vision; but the meaning is plain. Receive my word - let it enter into thy Soul; digest it - let it be thy nourishment; and let it be thy meat and drink to do the will of thy Father who is in heaven.

Clarke: Eze 3:3 - It was in my mouth as honey It was in my mouth as honey - It was joyous to me to receive the Divine message, to be thus let into the secrets of the Divine counsel, and I promis...

It was in my mouth as honey - It was joyous to me to receive the Divine message, to be thus let into the secrets of the Divine counsel, and I promised myself much comfort in that intimate acquaintance with which I was favored by the Supreme Being. In Rev 10:10 we find St. John receiving a little book, which he ate, and found it sweet as honey in his mouth, but after he had eaten it, it made his belly bitter, signifying that a deep consideration of the awful matter contained in God’ s word against sinners, which multitudes of them will turn to their endless confusion, must deeply afflict those who know any thing of the worth of an immortal spirit.

Clarke: Eze 3:5 - Thou art not sent to a people of a strange speech Thou art not sent to a people of a strange speech - I neither send thee to thy adversaries, the Chaldeans, nor to the Medes and Persians, their enem...

Thou art not sent to a people of a strange speech - I neither send thee to thy adversaries, the Chaldeans, nor to the Medes and Persians, their enemies. Even these would more likely have hearkened unto thee than thy own countrymen.

Clarke: Eze 3:7 - Impudent and hard-hearted Impudent and hard-hearted - "Stiff of forehead, and hard of heart."- Margin. The marginal readings on several verses here are very nervous and very ...

Impudent and hard-hearted - "Stiff of forehead, and hard of heart."- Margin. The marginal readings on several verses here are very nervous and very correct.

Clarke: Eze 3:12 - Then the Spirit took me up Then the Spirit took me up - This, as Calmet remarks, has been variously understood 1.    An impetuous wind carried him to the place ...

Then the Spirit took me up - This, as Calmet remarks, has been variously understood

1.    An impetuous wind carried him to the place where his brethren sojourned

2.    The Holy Spirit, which filled his heart, transported him in a moment to the place where the captives were

3.    Or, he was so transported with heavenly ardour in his mind, that he ran immediately off, and seemed to fly to the place where God commanded him to go

The promptitude and impetuosity of his spirit seemed to furnish him with wings on the occasion. However this may be understood, the going to the captives was real

Clarke: Eze 3:12 - A voice of a great rushing A voice of a great rushing - This was the noise made by the wings of the living creatures that formed the chariot of Jehovah. See the notes on Ezeki...

A voice of a great rushing - This was the noise made by the wings of the living creatures that formed the chariot of Jehovah. See the notes on Ezekiel 1 (note) and Ezekiel 10 (note)

Clarke: Eze 3:12 - Blessed be the glory of the Lord Blessed be the glory of the Lord - Probably the acclamation of the living creatures: "Let God be blessed from the throne of his glory! He deserves t...

Blessed be the glory of the Lord - Probably the acclamation of the living creatures: "Let God be blessed from the throne of his glory! He deserves the praises of his creatures in all the dispensations of his mercy and justice, of his providence and grace."

Clarke: Eze 3:13 - A great rushing A great rushing - All the living creatures and the wheels being then in motion.

A great rushing - All the living creatures and the wheels being then in motion.

Clarke: Eze 3:14 - I went in bitterness I went in bitterness - Being filled with indignation at the wickedness and obstinacy of my people, I went, determining to speak the word of God with...

I went in bitterness - Being filled with indignation at the wickedness and obstinacy of my people, I went, determining to speak the word of God without disguise, and to reprove them sharply for their rebellion; and yet I was greatly distressed because of the heavy message which I was commanded to deliver.

Clarke: Eze 3:15 - I came to them of the captivity I came to them of the captivity - Because the hand of the Lord was strong upon him and supported him, he soon reached the place

I came to them of the captivity - Because the hand of the Lord was strong upon him and supported him, he soon reached the place

Clarke: Eze 3:15 - Tel-abib Tel-abib - תל אביב "a heap of corn."So the Vulgate: acervum novarum frugum , "a heap of new fruits."letola chib , "to the hill Chib,"or the ...

Tel-abib - תל אביב "a heap of corn."So the Vulgate: acervum novarum frugum , "a heap of new fruits."letola chib , "to the hill Chib,"or the hill of grief. - Syriac

Clarke: Eze 3:15 - Seven days Seven days - Perhaps God kept him all this time without an immediate revelation, that the bitterness and heat of spirit of which he speaks above mig...

Seven days - Perhaps God kept him all this time without an immediate revelation, that the bitterness and heat of spirit of which he speaks above might be subdued, and that he might speak God’ s words in God’ s own Spirit. Had he gone in a better spirit he had probably been employed in his work as soon as he had gained the place of labor.

Clarke: Eze 3:17 - I have made thee a watchman I have made thee a watchman - The care and welfare of all this people I have laid on thee. Thou must watch for their safety, preach for their edific...

I have made thee a watchman - The care and welfare of all this people I have laid on thee. Thou must watch for their safety, preach for their edification, and pray for their eternal welfare. And that thou mayest be successful, receive the word at my mouth, and warn them from me

God is particularly jealous lest any words but his own be taught for Divine doctrines. He will not have human creeds, no more than Traditions, taught instead of his own word. No word can be successful in the salvation of sinners but that which comes from God. Every minister of the Gospel should be familiar with his Maker by faith and prayer; God will then hold communion with his spirit; otherwise, what he preaches will be destitute of spirit and life, and his hackneyed texts and sermons, instead of being the bread from heaven, will be like the dry mouldy Gibeonitish crusts.

Clarke: Eze 3:18 - Thou shalt surely die Thou shalt surely die - That is, If he turn not from his wickedness, and thou givest him not warning, as above, he shalt die in his iniquity, which ...

Thou shalt surely die - That is, If he turn not from his wickedness, and thou givest him not warning, as above, he shalt die in his iniquity, which he should not have committed; but his blood will I require at thy hand - I will visit thy soul for the loss of his. O how awful is this! Hear it, ye priests, ye preachers, ye ministers of the Gospel; ye, especially, who have entered into the ministry for a living, ye who gather a congregation to yourselves that ye may feed upon their fat, and clothe yourselves with their wool; in whose parishes and in whose congregations souls are dying unconverted from day to day, who have never been solemnly warned by you, and to whom you have never shown the way of salvation, probably because ye know nothing of it yourselves! O what a perdition awaits you! To have the blood of every soul that has died in your parishes or in your congregations unconverted laid at your door! To suffer a common damnation for every soul that perishes through your neglect! How many loads of endless wo must such have to bear! Ye take your tithes, your stipends, or your rents, to the last grain, and the last penny; while the souls over whom you made yourselves watchmen have perished, and are perishing, through your neglect. O worthless and hapless men! better for you had ye never been born! Vain is your boast of apostolical authority, while ye do not the work of apostles! Vain your boast of orthodoxy, while ye neither show nor know the way of salvation! Vain your pretensions to a Divine call, when ye do not the work of evangelists! The state of the most wretched of the human race is enviable to that of such ministers, pastors, teachers, and preachers

But let not this discourage the faithful minister who teaches every man, and warns every man, in all wisdom, that he may present every man perfect to Christ Jesus. If after such teaching and warning they will sin on, and die in their sins, their blood will be upon themselves; but thou, O man of God, hast delivered thine own soul.

Clarke: Eze 3:20 - When a righteous man doth turn from his righteousness When a righteous man doth turn from his righteousness - Which these words plainly state he may do, and commit iniquity and die in his sin; and conse...

When a righteous man doth turn from his righteousness - Which these words plainly state he may do, and commit iniquity and die in his sin; and consequently die eternally, which is also here granted; if he have not been warned, though he die in his sin, the blood - the life and salvation, of this person also will God require at the watchman’ s hand. Pastor hunc occidit, quia eum tacendo morti tradidit . "This man the pastor kills; for in being silent, he delivers him over to death."- Gregory. From these passages we see that a righteous man may fall from grace, and perish everlastingly. Should it be said that it means the self-righteous, I reply, this is absurd; for self-righteousness is a fall itself, and the sooner a man falls from it the better for himself. Real, genuine righteousness of heart and life is that which is meant. Let him that standeth take heed lest he fall

Clarke: Eze 3:20 - And I lay a stumbling-block before him And I lay a stumbling-block before him - That is, I permit him to be tried, and he fall in the trial. God is repeatedly represented as doing things ...

And I lay a stumbling-block before him - That is, I permit him to be tried, and he fall in the trial. God is repeatedly represented as doing things which he only permits to be done. He lays a stumbling-block, i.e., he permits one to be laid.

Clarke: Eze 3:22 - Arise, go forth into the plain Arise, go forth into the plain - Into a place remote from observation and noise; a place where the glory of God might have sufficient room to manife...

Arise, go forth into the plain - Into a place remote from observation and noise; a place where the glory of God might have sufficient room to manifest itself, that the prophet might see all its movements distinctly.

Clarke: Eze 3:24 - The spirit - said unto me, Go, shut thyself within thine house The spirit - said unto me, Go, shut thyself within thine house - Hide thyself for the present. The reason is immediately subjoined.

The spirit - said unto me, Go, shut thyself within thine house - Hide thyself for the present. The reason is immediately subjoined.

Clarke: Eze 3:25 - They shall put bands upon thee They shall put bands upon thee - Thy countrymen will rise up against thee; and, to prevent thy prophesying, will confine thee.

They shall put bands upon thee - Thy countrymen will rise up against thee; and, to prevent thy prophesying, will confine thee.

Clarke: Eze 3:26 - I will make thy tongue cleave to the roof of thy mouth I will make thy tongue cleave to the roof of thy mouth - I will not give thee any message to deliver to them. They are so rebellious, it is useless ...

I will make thy tongue cleave to the roof of thy mouth - I will not give thee any message to deliver to them. They are so rebellious, it is useless to give them farther warning.

Clarke: Eze 3:27 - I will open thy mouth I will open thy mouth - When it is necessary to address them again, thou shalt sum up what thou hast said in this one speech: Thus saith the Lord, "...

I will open thy mouth - When it is necessary to address them again, thou shalt sum up what thou hast said in this one speech: Thus saith the Lord, "He that heareth, let him hear; and he that forbeareth, let him forbear."Let him who feels obedience to the voice of God his interest, be steadfast. Let him who disregards the Divine monition go in his own way, and abide the consequences.

Calvin: Eze 3:1 - NO PHRASE When the Prophet is ordered to eat whatever he receives, this ought not to be extended to everything which he meets with, but, whatever may be the ta...

When the Prophet is ordered to eat whatever he receives, this ought not to be extended to everything which he meets with, but, whatever may be the taste of the book, he is forbidden to refuse it: for its bitterness might possibly cause him to reject the threats of God. Lastly, the quality of the book is noted, because it contained nothing but the material for sorrow. He adds, that he opened his mouth, for the sake of obedience; by which he signifies that he was not curious or dainty in seeking to taste it, but that he took what was divinely offered him, without the slightest hesitation. Now he adds —

Calvin: Eze 3:3 - NO PHRASE Ezekiel, as we have just seen, proceeds to say, that a book was given him to eat, because God’s servants ought to speak from the inmost affection o...

Ezekiel, as we have just seen, proceeds to say, that a book was given him to eat, because God’s servants ought to speak from the inmost affection of their heart. We know that many have a tongue sufficiently fluent, but use it only for ostentation: meanwhile, God treats their vanity as a laughing stock, because their labor is fruitless. Hence we must observe the passage of Paul already quoted, “the kingdom of God is with power.” (1Co 4:20.) But the efficacy of the Holy Spirit is not exerted unless when he who is called to teach applies his serious endeavors to attain to the discharge of his duty. For this reason, then, Ezekiel is commanded to eat the roll Next he says, it was as sweet as honey; and, but a little before, he said it was filled with curses: therefore, either he had put off all humanity, or ought to be grieved, when he found himself appointed to be the herald of God’s vengeance. But, in other places, we saw that the servants of God were endued with feelings of an opposite kind; for, as they were often rough and stern like their work, so they condoled with the miserable people: but, their grief did not hinder them from proceeding in the discharge of their duty. For this reason Ezekiel now says, the book was sweet, because he acquiesced in God’s commands, and although he pitied his own people, yet he acknowledged that it could not happen otherwise, and subscribed to the just judgment of God. Therefore, by the word sweetness, he signifies his acquiescence in embracing the office enjoined upon him, and he so obeyed God that he forgot all the material for sorrow in the book, because the justice of God prevailed and thus extinguished the feeling of too great humanity which might otherwise have delayed him. Jeremiah uses the same expression. (Jer 15:16.) He says, that he found the words of God, and that they became to him gladness and joy of heart. For we saw, that he was only anxious but very sorrowful when he thought that utter destruction was impending over the people. But, as I have just said, these two things are not discordant: that Prophets should desire the safety of the people, and use their utmost endeavors to promote it, and yet manifest a firm constancy, and never hesitate, when necessity demands it, to condemn the people and to utter God’s threats which are enjoined ‘upon them. Thus shortly afterwards Jeremiah says, that he was filled with anger; thy words were found, says he, and I did eat them, and they afforded me joy and gladness of heart, because thy name has been called over me, O Jehovah God of hosts: that is, because I have been taught by the power of thy Spirit, and as I have been called to this office, so thou hast stretched forth thy hand unto me that I may fulfill thy commands with good faith and constancy: therefore thy words were my delight. Afterwards he adds, (Eze 3:17,) neither have I sat in the council of scorners, nor have I exalted myself for the sake of throwing off the yoke; for since I perceived that thou must be obeyed, I was, as it were, overpowered, yet I did not sit with the scorners, but I sat alone, says he, because thou hast filled me with indignation. Hence we see, that in one person were two feelings very different and contrary in appearance, because he was filled with indignation, and yet received joy through the words of God.

Calvin: Eze 3:4 - NO PHRASE Now at greater length God explains why he wished his servant to eat the volume which he held forth in his hand, namely, that when instructed by it he...

Now at greater length God explains why he wished his servant to eat the volume which he held forth in his hand, namely, that when instructed by it he might approach the children of Israel; for he ought not to come empty, and we know that man of himself can bring forward nothing solid: hence Ezekiel must receive from God’s hand what he delivers to the Israelites. Let us then preserve this order, as the volume is first given to the Prophet, and then transferred to the people. God orders him, to offer or speak his own words, which is worthy of remark, as having the same meaning. But if Ezekiel ought to bring forward nothing but what he had received from God, this rule ought to prevail among all God’s servants, that they should not heap up their own comments, but pronounce what God teaches them as if from his mouth: lastly, that passage of Peter (1Pe 4:11) ought to guide us, he who speaks in the Church ought to speak the words of God. Now he adds, I do not send thee to a people strange in speech and hard in language, but to the house of Israel Stone think that the prophet is here animated to his duty, because God demanded nothing from him which was too difficult. For if he had been sent to remote nations with whom there was no interchange of speech, he might object that a greater burden than he could bear was imposed upon him. The difficulty would then have been a complete obstacle. They think that remote and foreign nations are here compared with the people of Israel, that he may discharge his duty with alacrity, as if it had been said, “I do not send thee to strangers. For neither could they understand thee, and they also would be barbarians to thee, but because thou art familiarly acquainted with thine own people, thou canst not turn thy back when I send thee unto them.” But this opinion does not approve itself to me, because I read these three verses in the same context, as they are united. It is by no means doubtful, that, by this comparison, God aggravates the impiety of the people. For this sentence is first in order, that the Israelites would be deaf, although the Prophet should use among them the common and vernacular language: this is the first point: now he shows the reason, because they were a bitter people Here God signifies, that nothing prevented the Israelites from obeying the doctrine of the Prophet but their malice and impiety. For this reason he says, I do not send thee to a people profound in speech I know not how some have conjectured that this epithet means learned or clever; for it is the same thing for a people to be of a strange speech and of a hard language. For what is a “hard” but a barbarous language? Now we perceive the genuine sense, that the Prophet is not sent to men of an unknown language because he would have been a barbarian to them and they to him. I do not send thee to them, therefore, but to the house of Israel.

Calvin: Eze 3:6 - NO PHRASE Now he adds, not to many peoples Those who translate “many” by “great,” do not understand the Prophet’s meaning, for God had spoken i...

Now he adds, not to many peoples Those who translate “many” by “great,” do not understand the Prophet’s meaning, for God had spoken in the singular number concerning all people, but now he uses the plural, as if he had said, I send thee neither to Egyptians, nor to Chaldeans, nor to any other remote nation, since the world is on all sides of thee, inhabited by peoples whose language thou dost not understand: to those therefore I do not send thee. The particle, if not, follows, and Jerome translates, “If I had sent thee unto them,” although the negative particle is interposed, literally, if not, but because this phrase appears harsh, some have supposed אם-לא , am-la, to have the sense of swearing, and interpret it affirmatively for כאמת , cameth, “truly,” or “surely.” But if we receive it so, the passage will be defective; for they understand אם , am, “again,” “afterwards:” for these two words, אם-לא , am-la, have the force of an oath interposed. What sense then shall we extract from the words, “truly I will send thee unto them, and they shall hear thee?” We see then this sense to be too forced. Some explain the passage thus: “If I had not sent thee unto them, they would have heard thee,” as if God here blamed the disposition of the people, because they rather sought vain and foolish prophecies:, than submitted themselves to the truth; just as if he had said, if any impostor should pour darkness upon them, they would immediately embrace his fables and lies, as they are so prone to foolishness. Since, therefore, I send thee, therefore they do not hear. But this explanation does not suit, because a little afterwards we shall see it in its own place. To me therefore this context is most probable, if I had not sent thee to them, these also would have heard thee, as if it had been said, unless a difference of speech had interposed, I had rather have used thine assistance with reference to foreign nations. In this way God signifies his displeasure, when he says, that he would rather send his Prophet hither and thither than to the Israelites, except through the want of a common language; for this difference of language presented the only boundary to the Prophet, so that he was confined to his own people. In this sense there is nothing forced. I do not, therefore, send thee to many peoples, profound in speech and strange in tongue, because thou wouldst not understand their language But if this had not been an obstacle, I would have sent thee, and they would have heard thee. We see then what I have just touched upon, that the Israelites are compared to foreign or uncircumcised tribes, because they rejected the instruction offered them, not through ignorance of the language, but through the hardness of their heart. Isaiah also says, (Isa 28:11,) that the word of God would be deep and obscure to even the Jews themselves, but in another sense; he also compares his prophecies to a sealed book, since God had blinded them according to their deserts. Since therefore they were so given over to a reprobate mind, and were destitute of sound understanding, therefore he says, that his teaching would be like a closed and sealed book: then he says, that he would be a barbarian, as if he was using an unknown language. So God in this place clearly shows that the house of Israel were suffering no impediment in profiting by his word, except their own unwillingness to hear. (Isa 8:16; Isa 29:11.) For he says, that the heathen would be obedient, if they could be partakers of such a benefit. Unless therefore the language of the Prophet had been unknown to the profane and uncircumcised heathen, he had there found attentive and obedient disciples, as God testifies. How then comes it to pass that the house of Israel cannot hear! It now follows, But the house of Israel are unwilling to hear, that is, the house of Israel is unwilling to hear thee, because it will not hear me, says he.

Calvin: Eze 3:7 - NO PHRASE Now, therefore, we clearly see the sloth of the people assigned as a reason why they purposely rejected the Word of God, and hardened themselves in o...

Now, therefore, we clearly see the sloth of the people assigned as a reason why they purposely rejected the Word of God, and hardened themselves in obstinacy. He also ascends higher, and says, that the people were not only disobedient to the Prophet but to God himself, as Christ also when he exhorts his disciples to perseverance in teaching. Therefore, says he, they will not hear you, because they will not hear me, and why am I and my teaching hated by them, unless because they do not receive my Father? (Joh 15:18.) For this stumblingblock is likely to break the spirits of the pious, when they see their teaching so proudly rejected. This reproach alone, therefore, is often accustomed to recall the servants of God from their course: but this admonition is proposed to them in the midst, that God himself is despised. Why then should they take it ill, that they are held in the same estimation as God, who is himself rejected? They think themselves undeserving of such contempt and haughtiness being thrown upon their labor. But is not God worthy of being listened to before all angels? Since, then, they are proud and unbelieving towards God himself, it is not surprising that they do not reverently receive what is proposed to them by mortal man. Now, therefore, we see what the intention of God is when he says, the house of Israel will not hear thee, because they do not hear me: lest it should be vexatious to the Prophet to see his labor profitless, nay, even the children of Israel rising against him: because he ought to bear it patiently, if he should suffer the same obloquy which they did not hesitate to display against the Almighty himself. It follows, Because the whole house of Israel is of a bold or a daring aspect, and of a hard heart He repeats what we saw before, but in other words — namely, that the people’s hardness of heart was untameable, and that they were not only obstinate in heart but brazen in countenance, so that they cast aside all modesty; and lastly, he implies that their obstinacy was desperate, when he joins a brazen countenance with a hard heart.

Calvin: Eze 3:8 - NO PHRASE Ezekiel was forewarned of the obstinacy of the people, yea, even of their desperate wickedness. Now God strengthens him lest he should despair when...

Ezekiel was forewarned of the obstinacy of the people, yea, even of their desperate wickedness. Now God strengthens him lest he should despair when he saw that he must contend with such abandoned and reckless men; for what else was it than contending with stones? If Ezekiel had been commanded to strike a mountain, it would have been just the same as contending with such a people. He had need then of this strengthening, viz., his forehead should be adamant against the hardness of the people If he had hoped for more fruit from his labor, perhaps that facility had been the cause of negligence: for confidence makes us more remiss when the work in hand is neither laborious nor difficult. The Prophet, therefore, would have been colder, if, certainly persuaded that the people would be docile, he had approached them more carelessly. God, therefore, excites him when he speaks of their obstinacy. As then it was useful that the Prophet should comprehend how arduous was the duty to the discharge of which he was called, so also he ought to be armed with the strength of God, for otherwise he would have been easily overcome by its difficulty. This is the reason why God adds, that he had given him a stout front and a brazen aspect against the face and front of the people Besides, in this way he was admonished that fortitude was to be hoped for from some other quarter, that he might not spend his strength in vain, but allow himself to be governed by the Spirit of God. For when we think only on the quality and quantity of our own powers, they may easily flow away, and disperse, and even become vapid, unless we discharge our duty with manliness. God, therefore, recalls his Prophet when he says, that he had given him a face, as if he would say, that the Prophet did not make war in his own strength, but was armed with celestial virtue. Although, therefore, this seems to have been spoken once for Ezekiel’s private use, yet it belongs to us all. Let us learn, then, when God calls us to the office of teaching, never to measure the effect of our work by the standard of our own capacity, nor yet to consider our own powers, but to repose on some communicated strength which God here extols in no empty praises. Whoever, therefore, shall acknowledge that God is sufficient for overcoming all obstacles, will gird himself bravely for his work; but he who delays for calculating his own strength is not only weakened but is almost overcome. Besides, we see that we are here instructed in humility and modesty, lest we should claim anything as due to our own strength. Hence it happens, that many are so full, yea so puffed out with confidence, that they bring forth nothing but wind. Hence, let us learn to seek from God alone that fortitude which we need: for we are not stronger than Ezekiel, and if he needed to be strengthened by the Spirit of God, much more do we at this time need it.

Calvin: Eze 3:9 - NO PHRASE Lastly, we gather from this passage that although the whole world should rise up against the servants of God, yet his strength would be superior, as ...

Lastly, we gather from this passage that although the whole world should rise up against the servants of God, yet his strength would be superior, as we saw it was with Jeremiah: They shall fight against thee, but they shall not prevail. (Jer 1:19; Jer 15:20.) Hence there is no reason why we should be afraid of the violent attack of any enemy, and although the whole world should be in a tumult, yet we need not tremble, because God’s strength in us will always be more powerful. Therefore it is added, as an adamant, harder than flint, have I placed thee; therefore do not fear them. God says I have placed the forehead of the Prophet like adamant; not that he strove with the people by either injustice or audacity, but because God opposed the confidence with which Ezekiel was endowed to the furious impudence of the people. In this sense then the forehead of the Prophet is said to be adamant Now he adds — do not fear, then, and do not be broken by their face or presence These phrases, that the Prophet be not broken, and yet fear not, seem to be opposed to each other, since he excels in unconquered fortitude. But God so tempers his favor, that the faithful always have need of excitements, even when he animates them, and supplies them with strength. God, therefore, so works within his servants, that they do nothing except as they are ruled by his Spirit; and yet they have need of his teaching, since his exhortations to them are never superfluous. Profane men think that there is no use in teaching, and that all exhortations are frivolous, if God, when he acts upon us by his Spirit, not only begins, but continues and perfects his own work. But the Scripture shows that these two things mutually agree; for while God strengthens us and renders us unconquerable by his Spirit, at the same time he breathes virtue into his exhortations, and causes them to flourish within us, and to bring forth fruit In this way God on his part confirms his Prophet, by giving him an adamantine forehead and more than stony, and by giving him an unconquered spirit, and yet he exhorts him to fear not. We see, then, how God governs his own people within them, and yet adds teaching as an instrument of his Spirit. Then he adds, because they are a rebellious house, or although they are; for the particle כי , ki, is often put adversatively, as we have said elsewhere. If we take it in its proper sense, it will suit very well, because they are a rebellious house; as if it had been said, the Prophet has no cause for fear, because he was carefully admonished beforehand, and nothing new could happen; for we are accustomed to be very much frightened by novelty; but when we have meditated on what happens, we are not disturbed, neither do we stand still nor hesitate; for although the Prophet had already learnt that the house of Israel was rebellious, yet he perseveres, because he experiences nothing new or unusual. It follows —

Calvin: Eze 3:10 - NO PHRASE This is a repetition of the same doctrine; for we said that our Prophet is more verbose than Isaiah, and even than Jeremiah, because he had accustome...

This is a repetition of the same doctrine; for we said that our Prophet is more verbose than Isaiah, and even than Jeremiah, because he had accustomed himself to the form of speech which was then customary among the exiles, he is not, therefore, either so restricted or so polished; but we must understand that he accommodated his language to learners, because he had to do with a people not only rude and dull, but also obstinate. And then they had degenerated as much from the purity of their language as from that of their faith; hence the Prophet purposely bends aside from elegance of language. Whatever repetition he might use with men so dull and slothful, it was not superfluous. He says, therefore, what we have formerly seen, that he was commanded to speak all the words, but he previously says, that he was commanded to receive them in his heart, and to perceive them with his ears The order is inverted, because we must perceive with the ear before we receive in the heart. And they philosophize with more subtlety than truth who say, that the interior hearing precedes, inasmuch as the ears are struck by the sound in vain, unless the heart was already docile. For although God prepares his elect for hearing, and gives them ears for that purpose, yet his teaching does not penetrate to their minds before it has been received by the car. There is no doubt, then, that here one thing is put before the other, by what we call a ὕστερον πρότερον The result is, that; the Prophet, as he is sure of his calling, hears God speaking to him. But this was not said for his sake, but that he might securely boast himself to be a servant of God, and bring forward nothing but what he had heard from the mouth of God himself. As, therefore, in this confidence, he was to contend against the people’s impiety, so he was commanded to hear the words of God We hear, then, a repetition of what we formerly saw, namely, that the Prophet freely boasts that he did not bring forward merely windy eloquence, as profane men do, who have no other object than to obtain the applause of men.

The Prophet, therefore, here says, that he was commanded to receive the words of God in his heart.

Calvin: Eze 3:11 - NO PHRASE Now it is added, that he may go and proceed to the captivity, to the children of his own people We see, then, that God does not regard the Prophet ...

Now it is added, that he may go and proceed to the captivity, to the children of his own people We see, then, that God does not regard the Prophet so much as the Israelites, because they had never willingly yielded to the Prophet when he brought a message by no means pleasing. For nothing could be more sad and hateful to them than to hear threats and curses. Because, then, they had never willingly bent to obedience, he is sent with a testimony that he had learnt what he uttered in God’s school; then that he had so learnt from God, that he adds nothing of his own; lastly, that he so speaks, that; the obstinacy of the people is not overcome: Whether they will hear, or whether they will forbear, do thou nevertheless go forward Wherefore? Thou shalt say, thus saith the Lord. We have already explained the meaning of this phrase, namely, where we are persuaded that our labor is pleasing to God, although it be useless to men, yet this ought to suffice us, that God has sent us. Then he wishes to try our constancy, lest when we see ourselves laboring in vain, we should cease on that account, instead of being prepared to obey, whatever may happen.

Calvin: Eze 3:12 - NO PHRASE The Prophet again affirms what we have formerly seen, that God had worked upon his mind by the secret instinct of his own Spirit. Although, therefore...

The Prophet again affirms what we have formerly seen, that God had worked upon his mind by the secret instinct of his own Spirit. Although, therefore, God had exhorted him to fortitude, yet the Prophet shows what he demanded of himself. In short, the Prophet was strong in God, because God implanted his virtue within him. He says, therefore, that he was raised up by the Spirit, which only means that the agitation within him was of no avail, unless through heavenly inspiration; so also he ought to be carried beyond himself for the time, that nothing human should appear within him. But more will be said about this hereafter.

He adds, that he heard a voice of a great rushing, that is, a sonorous voice, and one different from the usual voice of men: for the, Prophet, by the noise or tumult of the voice, could distinguish it from the usual voice of men. Blessed, said it, be the glory of Jehovah from his own place We cannot doubt that this benediction was suitable to the occasion of its utterance: when, therefore, this voice was heard, God wished to refute the clamorous voices of the people who thought themselves injured. For we know that the people were querulous, and murmured because they thought themselves treated with greater harshness than they deserved. Hence the glory of God is opposed to all impious and sacrilegious blasphemies, which the Israelites were in the habit of vomiting forth against God, as if he treated them cruelly. In short, this voice restrained all calumnies, by which the impious then endeavored to overwhelm the glory of God. He says that glory is blessed, because although men dare not utter gross and open reproaches against God, nevertheless they curse his glory as often as they detract from his justice, and accuse him of too much rigor. Hence, in opposition to this, a voice is heard, saying, the glory of God is blessed

By God’s place, I understand the Temple. I confess that in many passages of Scripture heaven is so called; not that God’s essence, which is immense, can be included within any place; for as heaven is called his throne or seat, so also the earth is his footstool, because he fills all things with his immensity. So here, as often in other places, the Temple is called God’s place, because he dwelt there with respect to men. Besides, this is said as well with reference to the exiles as to the rest of the people yet remaining at Jerusalem. For the exiles did not sufficiently consider that they were banished from their country, and dragged into a distant region, through the just vengeance of God. Since, therefore, this captivity did not sufficiently subdue them, the name of God ought to be set before them, that they might know that they were not banished from their country by the cruelty of their enemies, but by the judgment of God. The Prophet, doubtless, regards also those Jews who as yet remained at home: for they boasted that God was seated in the Temple, and so fancied that they should be always safe under his protection. But the Prophet, as we shall afterwards see, denounces on those who remained a punishment similar to that of those who were in captivity. It is then just as if he had said that God remained in his Temple, that he might shine there with conspicuous glory. Now as he wished to humble the ten tribes as well as the other two, so he wished to alleviate the grief of them all, that they should not cease to hope for the promised return. For calamity itself might lead them to despair, and to suppose their salvation impossible: nay, to think that God was as it were dead, and his virtue extinct. To what purpose, then, was the worship of God? to what purpose the splendor and dignity of the Temple, unless that God should protect his own? But they had been deserted by him; here then was matter for despair, unless it had been met: the Prophet now treats this, since on one side he reminds them that God was the just avenger of wickedness, when he suffered the ten tribes to be dragged into exile, yet that he would be their deliverer, because he does not cease to reign in his Temple, although profane men think him conquered, and treat with wanton insolence their own triumphs over him. Now therefore we perceive the sense of the Prophet: for this sentence would be cold if it were merely general; but when it is accommodated to the state of things at the time, we see that the glory of God is not extolled by any vain eulogium, and that the Temple is not mentioned in vain. (Psa 11:4; Psa 103:19; Isa 66:1.)

Calvin: Eze 3:13 - NO PHRASE The Prophet now seems to express from whence the voice which he heard proceeded: for I do not think that the voice proceeded from any other quarter, ...

The Prophet now seems to express from whence the voice which he heard proceeded: for I do not think that the voice proceeded from any other quarter, and that afterwards the living creatures moved in unison with the wheels, but it seems to me to explain what would otherwise have been doubtful, namely, that God’s glory was celebrated by the living creatures and the wheels. It is not wonderful then that a voice should be attributed to the living creatures, because we saw them to be cherubim or angels, as by the wheels God wishes to mark all actions and motions; motions, I say, which seem fortuitous, but yet are governed by the living creatures, whom God inspires with his own virtue, while he wishes to execute his designs, and so exercises his dominion over all creatures; for nothing happens which is not governed by his will. Hence a voice proceeds as well from the living creatures as from the wheels, which extolled the glory of God, and proclaimed him, in the midst of that sad and wretched slaughter of the people, still reigning in his own Temple; then, indeed, especially exercising his power, because he was a judge, in punishing their wickedness; then because he was about to become the deliverer of his own people, as he had promised them restoration after seventy years. He says also, I heard the voice of wings when they mutually embraced each other; for נקש , nekesh, signifies to embrace: others translate, when they struck or engaged in conflict with each other: but by the word osculating, conjunction is metaphorically signified. When, therefore, each wing embraced its fellow, then the voice emerged: he adds also the same thing concerning the wheels, and at length he repeats what he had said, that there was a sound of a great rushing It follows —

Calvin: Eze 3:14 - NO PHRASE He confirms what we have formerly seen, namely, that he was acted upon by the Spirit of God, so that it was in some way without himself, and not as p...

He confirms what we have formerly seen, namely, that he was acted upon by the Spirit of God, so that it was in some way without himself, and not as profane men have invented, enthusiastically: for their Prophets were deprived of self-control, and the devil so dealt with them, that they were not of sound mind. Hence the Prophet does not understand that he was deprived of self-control, because God’s Prophets were of a sedate and composed mind; but he understands that he was so governed by the Spirit of God, that he was unlike himself, and did not breathe a terrestrial air; lastly, he understands that visible marks were graven upon him, which obtained for his doctrine authority with all the people. And it was the more necessary that the Prophet should be adorned with his own proofs, on account of the dullness of the people, and also because his message was distasteful to them, and he had not previously discharged the duty of a teacher. It was needful, therefore, that he should be so renewed that the people should acknowledge him as inspired. He had lived familiarly among his friends, and was sufficiently known both by appearance and character. Meanwhile God, as I have said, separated him from common life, that he should represent something celestial; and the object of this was, as we have shown, to conciliate confidence and reverence towards his teaching. He felt indeed the agitation of the Spirit, and it is scarcely to be doubted that the people also knew it, otherwise they would scarcely have had confidence in him when speaking of himself.

The object of this remarkable government of the Spirit was, that the Israelites, if only awake and attentive to the miracle, might know the Prophet to be in some manner renovated. But what follows seems opposed to the former sentence; for he says (Eze 3:3) the volume was sweet as honey, but now that he departed in the bitterness of his spirit;. but as I briefly explained yesterday, this is easily reconciled; for the Prophet was not deprived of all sensation. Although he was entirely consecrated to God, and in no degree remitted his diligence and alacrity, yet he retained some human feelings: hence the spirit of bitterness of which he speaks, which he calls his own spirit Whence we perceive an implied contrast between that motion by which he was caught up and that feeling, which, although not sinful, was in some way different from the grace of the Spirit, because the Prophet so burnt with zeal that he performed the commands of God almost in forgetfulness of self: yet, at the same time, he felt within him something human, since the power of the Spirit had not extinguished all sorrow. We hold, therefore, that the Prophet was in some degree inspired by the Spirit, and yet that his own spirit was bitter He adds, and the hand of Jehovah was strong upon me By “hand,” some understand prophecy, but in my opinion ignorantly: I do not doubt that its meaning is power or authority. He says, the hand of God was strong, because he ought to obey God, although the bitterness of which he spoke should draw him in a contrary direction. As Paul says, (2Co 5:14, and Phi 1:23,) that he was constrained by a zeal of God, so also the Prophet signifies that he was constrained by the secret instinct of the Spirit, so that he did not act from human motives, nor yet obey the wishes of his own mind, nor follow his own individual will, but was only intent on rendering obedience to God. In this sense, then, he says, that the hand of God was strong upon him Otherwise it might be objected — why did he not fall away when he was so oppressed with grief, and anxiety so overwhelmed his spirit? he replies, the hand of God was strong and prevailed, since otherwise he would have failed a hundred times, had he not been supported by the power of God. And thus we see that there was some repugnance in the Prophet, since as man he was affected with sorrow, but the power of the Holy Spirit ruled over him, so that he denied himself and all his human affections.

Calvin: Eze 3:15 - NO PHRASE Now he says, that he had returned to his own people, not that he had ever removed from them, but had been drawn by the vision from the intercourse wi...

Now he says, that he had returned to his own people, not that he had ever removed from them, but had been drawn by the vision from the intercourse with men. For God revealed himself to him on the bank of the river Chebar, but he was solitary: and that this was done by vision, is by no means doubtful, since he was always among his own people. How then does he say, that he is now returned? Why, because the vision had vanished, and so he was entirely occupied with the other captives. What some affirm with subtlety, that he was like a monk, is frivolous: for they say, that he abhorred the wickedness of the people, and, that he might not contract any stain of impurity, had sought solitude: but this is not probable. Without doubt., the Prophet means that he returned to his former mode of life from the time when he heard God speaking and saw the vision. He then says — I sat seven days in some way absorbed in either admiration or sorrow, for שמם , shemew, signifies “to be desolate,” “to be astonished,” “to wonder.” But as to the Prophet sitting quiet and silent for seven days, there is little doubt but that in this way God prepared him for beginning to speak afterwards to the greater surprise of the whole people. Nor ought it to seem absurd that he was dumb although sent by God:: for this did not occur through any negligence or delay which can be accounted a fault, but the office of teaching had been so imposed that he was not yet instructed by any fixed commands; as if any one were chosen ambassador either by a king or a senate, and were afterwards furnished with his instructions, so the Prophet was called to the prophetic office., but knew not yet what he was to say. He had indeed eaten the roll, but God had not yet suggested whence he ought to begin, nor how he ought to temper his doctrine. Hence Ezekiel had not yet been drawn forth: therefore he says, that he sat with either great stupor or great desolation, as they say. For his very appearance would rouse the attention of men, that they should enquire the meaning of this unusual sorrow. Whatever it was, we see that this silence was a preparation for the discharge of his duty with greater fruit and efficacy, since his speech ought afterwards to be received with greater reverence when he had been silent for seven days

Then he says, I came to the exiles who sat in Thelabib I willingly accord with the opinion of those who take this for the name of a place, and ancient interpreters even have left these two words. Their Septuagint version has μετέωρον , as if it meant “lofty.” תלל , thelel, signifies to elevate, but it ought to be תלול , thelol, if the Prophet meant that he was exalted, but this is not suitable, since he rather asserts that he was like the rest of mankind after the vision was withdrawn. Some render it “skillful,” but I am not aware of their reason: but as I have already said, their opinion is probable, who suppose it the proper name of a place. Jerome translates, “a heap of fruit,” and not badly; for this was probably the origin of the place’s name, as cities and villages and mountains often receive their name from their situation and other circumstances; so also this place was called Thelabib. For תל , thel, signifies “a heap,” and אביב , abib, means a “stalk,” or “straw of corn,” and it may, therefore, be that the place was called Thelabib on account of its fertility, since the harvest there is very plentiful. But this is of no great moment. What we have mentioned must be especially remembered, that the Prophet was beheld in that sad and sorrowful countenance, and was silent for seven days

Calvin: Eze 3:16 - NO PHRASE Now the Prophet shows more clearly why he continued in silence for seven days, because, indeed, he had been appointed a teacher, but the time had not...

Now the Prophet shows more clearly why he continued in silence for seven days, because, indeed, he had been appointed a teacher, but the time had not fully arrived in which he was to utter the commands of God. He waited, therefore until he should receive a distinct message. Hence he says, at the end of seven days I received a word from the Lord Whence we gather, that he had been chosen before, and that the burden of an embassy was imposed upon him: meanwhile he stood, as it were, in suspense, because he did not distinctly understand what he was to say, and where he ought to begin. Hence it appears, that God acts by degrees towards his servants, so that he claims them for his own, then he shows them generally what duties and labors they have to discharge, and at length he sends them forth to the performance of their work, and the execution of their office. This we see was done in the case of our Prophet. For first he learned that he was chosen by God, afterwards he was admonished generally to behave himself courageously, and not to yield to any threats or terrors: at length God explained to him what commands he wished him to bear to the people. As yet God seems to speak but generally, but it is as if he announced that the time had come when the Prophet must gird himself to his work: hence he says, Son of man I have appointed thee a watchman of the house of Israel

Calvin: Eze 3:17 - NO PHRASE What Ezekiel heard belongs to all teachers of the Church, namely, that they are Divinely appointed and placed as on watch-towers, that they may keep ...

What Ezekiel heard belongs to all teachers of the Church, namely, that they are Divinely appointed and placed as on watch-towers, that they may keep watch for the common safety of all. It was the duty of those who have been appointed from the beginning ministers of the heavenly doctrine to be watchmen. And would that in the Papacy, as this name has been imposed on idols, dumb and blind and deaf, those who with swelling cheeks call themselves Bishops, had been admonished of their vocation. For we know that the word Bishop means the same as watchman. But when they were boasting themselves to be bishops, they were drowned in the darkness of gross ignorance: then also they were buried in their pleasure, as well as in sloth, for there is no more intelligence in these animals than in oxen or asses. Asses and oxen do spend their labor for the advantage of man, but these are not only destitute of all judgment and reason, but are altogether useless. But what I have said is to be remembered, when God chooses Prophets, that they are placed, as it were, on watch-towers, that they may keep watch for the safety of the whole Church. This ought now to have its force, that pastors may acknowledge themselves placed in stations whence they may be watchful: and this, indeed, is one point. Now this cannot be done unless they are endued with superior gifts and prevail in the grace of the Spirit above the commonalty. Nor is it sufficient that pastors should live as private men, but they ought to wait longer, as if they were placed on a lofty watchtower, which demands both diligence and a power of observation: this is a second point.

It is now added, thou shalt hear words from my mouth, and shalt announce them to the people from me. Here a general rule is prescribed to all Prophets and pastors of the Church, namely, that they should hear the word from the mouth of God: by which particle God wishes to exclude whatever men fabricate or invent for themselves. For it is evident, when God claimed to himself the right of speaking that he orders all men to be silent and not to offer anything of their own, and then, when he orders them to hear the word from his mouth, that he puts a bridle upon them that they should neither invent anything, nor hanker after their own devices, nor dare to conceive either more or less than the word: and, lastly, we see that whatever men offer of their ownselves, is here abolished, when God alone wishes to be heard, for he does not mingle himself here with others as in a crowd, as if he wished to be heard only in part. He assumes to himself, therefore, what we ought to attribute to his supreme command over all things, namely, that we should hang upon his lips. But if this was said to Ezekiel, how is it that men of no authority now dare to spread abroad their own fictions, as we see done in the Papacy? for what. is such a religion but a confused jumble of the numberless fictions of men? dray have heaped together, from many brains, an immense chaos of errors; ‘for they wish us to adore as the oracles of God whatever foolish men have imagined. But who among them will boast himself superior to Ezekiel? nay, if they were all put together will they dare to assert that they can be compared with him alone? And if they dare, who will admit their arrogance? We see then, that Ezekiel with the other Prophets is reined in, that he should not say anything but what he has heard from God’s mouth.

Now it follows, thou shalt admonish them from me The word which the Prophet uses, signifies as well to admonish as to caution. There is no doubt that he means those admonitions by which men are roused to caution, lest they should perish through any error or thoughtlessness. Hence after God had subjected the Prophet to himself, and commanded him to be a disciple, he appointed him a teacher, because hearing was not sufficient, unless he who had been called to rule the Church should deliver out of his hand what he had received from God. God therefore commands his Prophet to speak, after he had ordered him to hear. But he adds, from me, that the people may understand that God alone is the author of instruction. False teachers, indeed, proudly assume the name of God, as we see in the Papacy that this axiom sounds through it, that the Church is ruled by the Holy Spirit immediately, and therefore that it cannot err: but these two things are to be read conjointly, namely, that he who is appointed a teacher should hear God speaking, and afterwards should admonish in the name of God himself, that is, should profess that he is the minister and witness of God, so that his teaching should not be thought his own. For those who affect the praise of ability, or learning, or eloquence, often obscure the name of God, and therefore although they professed that they had their teaching from God, yet afterwards they speak from themselves: that is, they puff themselves up with vain ostentation, so that the majesty of God does not appear, nor the efficacy of the Spirit in that profane method of teaching. Hence God afterwards imposed a law upon his Prophet, that he should utter nothing but what he had heard: now he adds another clause: that he should admonish the people; but he must admonish them not from himself, but must always have in his mouth that sacred name of God, and show that he is in reality sent from him. For after this manner spake Moses, What am I and my brother Aaron? (Num 16:11.) Here we see that Moses spake from God; that is, professed himself to be God’s minister, when he bore witness that he was nothing, that he assumed nothing to himself, and acted in nothing by his own peculiar counsel or motion.

Calvin: Eze 3:18 - NO PHRASE The Prophet is now taught how difficult and dangerous an office he has now to undertake. God had previously laid it down as a law that he should utte...

The Prophet is now taught how difficult and dangerous an office he has now to undertake. God had previously laid it down as a law that he should utter nothing of himself: now he adds, that, the watchman is so set over the people that he must render an account of the diligence with which he goes through his watches. It is just as if it had been said that souls were committed to his care and fidelity, so that if they should perish he must undergo punishment before God. But it is better to explain the words — if when I say to the impious, “Thou shalt surely die,” and thou dost not admonish him, and he perish, then from thee will I require his blood In the first place, God confirms what we saw yesterday, that it is not. permitted to any mortal to condemn or absolve at his own discretion. When, therefore, God sends forth his servants, he does not resign that power, for still the supreme authority remains with himself: because there is one lawgiver, as James says, who can save and destroy. (Jas 4:12; Eze 13:19.) And elsewhere Ezekiel reproves the false prophets, because they keep alive the souls which were dying, and slay the souls not devoted to death. For we know that proud men always tyrannize over the conscience when they take upon themselves the prophetic name, and substitute themselves in the place of God, as their practice is in the Papacy. For the Pope indeed pretends that he does nothing in his own proper name, but meanwhile he claims the prerogative of God, and sits in the temple as an idol, because nothing is more peculiar to God than ruling our minds with celestial doctrine; but the Papists themselves heap on their own comments, and so it comes to pass that they miserably distort and drown their own consciences even to utter destruction. They enact laws according to their pleasure, then they always add the condition, that they must be kept under pain of eternal damnation, or of mortal sin, as they say. This place, then, must be diligently marked, where God claims to himself alone the power and right of condemning: if, says he, when I say to the impious. From this we infer, that all those are sacrilegious who bind consciences with their own laws, decrees, and enactments, enforcing one thing and forbidding another, because they take away from God what here he wishes to be assigned to him, for it is his office alone to pronounce sentence, for Prophets are only his heralds.

Meanwhile those fanatics are to be rejected, who, under pretext of this place, wish to give license to sin, and assert there is no difference between good and evil, because it is not our duty to condemn. For, properly speaking, we do not assume anything to ourselves when we recite what has proceeded from the mouth of God. God condemns adulterers, thieves, drunkards, murderers, enviers, slanderers, oppressors: if one inveigh against an adulterer, another a thief, a third a drunkard, shall we say that they take upon themselves more than they ought? By no means, because they do not pronounce of themselves as we have said, but God has said it, and they are but witnesses and messengers of his sentence. Yet this moderation must be maintained, not to condemn any one through moroseness, since many immediately abominate whatever displeases them, and cannot be induced to use diligent inquiry. Inquiry, therefore, should precede our sentences; but when God has spoken, then we must follow the rule which was given to the Prophet, if thou hast not admonished him, and spoken for his admonition Here the character which was imposed upon Ezekiel is referred to: for the same duty does not devolve upon private individuals who do not bear the prophetic name. For we must remark that this is not a general declaration which concerns all men at large, but it concerns a Prophet who had already been called to be a watchman: for unless those who sustain such a burden admonish mankind, no excuse remains for them but the necessity of sending an account to God for those who are lost. And the repetition shows that this ought not to be done as a matter of course, but that Prophets ought to be anxious and even zealous in recalling sinners. This clause was clear enough: if thou dost not admonish the wicked after I have spoken: but it is added, and hast not spoken for his admonition This sentence seems to be repeated in vain, but God signifies that. unless the Prophet admonishes sinners, he is not absolved, because he spoke once in passing and uttered but a single word. We should remember that sinners ought to be continually reproved that they may return to the right way. And this is the tendency of Paul’s doctrine to Timothy:

“be instant in season and out of season.” (2Ti 4:2.)

For if it had been sufficient to reprove sinners mildly, and afterwards to spare them, Paul would have been content with that courtesy, but he says, we must be urgent on every occasion. The minister of the Church then must not cease to repeat these admonitions, as Paul says elsewhere to the Philippians —

“I am not weary of repeating the same things to you.”
(Phi 3:18.)

And we know what he professes in the Acts. (Act 20:31.) I have not ceased day and night, publicly and privately, to admonish each of you. That perseverance then which Paul shows that he used is here enjoined on all the Prophets and servants of God.

He says, to urge him to turn from his evil way, that is, to be cautious; as it was said yesterday, זהר , zeher, means to be cautious; here it is taken actively unless thou hast spoken, that thou mayest teach him to be cautious, or to return from his evil way Here it may be asked, why does God touch only on one side of the teaching, and omit the chief point? For why was the law given? and why were Prophets called forth, unless to collect the people for God? Here we must exercise the obedience of faith, since we know that God regards nothing as more important than uniting miserable men in the hope of eternal life. This is the chief end of the law and the gospel, that men being reconciled to God, may worship him as a Father. Chastisements, threats, and terrors follow afterwards, of which now there is only the mention; but we must consider the condition of the people, as we have already seen it; for at that time the prevalence of impiety, and contempt of God, and of all kinds of wickedness, was so great, that the Prophet could not address the people mildly and softly. Since, indeed, that passage of Paul must be remembered, (1Co 4:21,) what will ye? how shall I come to you? with a rod, or in the spirit of mildness? When he gives the Corinthians the choice, whether they wish him to come in a spirit of tenderness, or armed with a rod for their chastisement — and why? For when they were self-satisfied with their sins, Paul could not, according to his custom, treat them as sons, nor deal freely with them, but he was compelled to assume, as it were, another character, and to use pure austerity and rigor. Such, then, were the Israelites, and hence we cannot feel surprise that God should lay aside his pity, his promises of favor, and whatever is sweet and pleasant to men; for they were not in a fit state to hear the paternal voice of God, unless previously subdued; and this could not be done without violence, because of their exceeding perverseness.

Hence we must remark, that the more displeasing the Prophets’ embassy, the greater need they had of excitements; because, if the grace of God only is to be set before a people, and the hope of eternal life to be held out to them, since there is nothing in such teaching which greatly offends them, or embitters their feelings, hence it is easy to offer freely messages of this kind. But when men are to be summoned, or rather dragged, to the tribunal of God, when they are to be frightened by the fear of eternal death, when the minister, in the armory of God, as Paul says, (2Co 10:5,) brings his vengeance before mankind, because offense is thus stirred up, and this sometimes instigates men to fury, because, they cannot bear thus to be pressed home with the word of God; hence it is necessary that Prophets themselves should be animated, lest they fail, or even hesitate in their duty. Now, therefore, we understand why God speaks only of his own threats and terrors, for he mingles no taste of pity, because, in truth, the Israelites were not capable of profiting by any mildness, so that the Prophet would never have dared to discharge his duty so courageously unless this threat had been added. In other places we shall see the Prophet as God’s ambassador, for reconciling the miserable exiles to God; for he will bring forward many testimonies concerning the reign of Christ, and the restoration of the Church, and will herald the mercy and pardon of God; but before he can utter any message of grace, he must himself contend with the extreme obstinacy of the people. Hence it is, therefore, that God only can say, that the impious must be admonished, that they may return from their impiety

It is added, to give them life; and this may seem absurd, because all hope of repentance was taken away beforehand; they are a rebellious house and a bitter one, thou wilt not profit them. (Eze 2:5.) But it now seems that the fruit of his labor is promised, when mention is made of the life of those who, when admonished, shall repent. But in the first place we must remember, that some individuals always are curable, even if the whole body of the people appears desperate. For God, when he previously said that all the Israelites were rebellious and intractable, referred to the body at large, but as he is accustomed to preserve some small seed, there were a few remaining in that people who might be converted by the Prophet’s labor. This is one point. Besides, we must remember, even if no success from labor appears, yet it ought to satisfy us, just as if we had succeeded better and according to our wishes. For example, suppose our duty to be with the impious multitude, where-ever we turn our eyes contempt of God meets us, and even such wickedness, that we seem to lose all our pains. But yet, whilst the sin of the people affords us only materials for despair, we ought, nevertheless, to pursue our course, just as if the seed sown were producing fruit. Although, therefore, Ezekiel had heard from God’s mouth that the people would be rebellious, yet he ought to spend his labors for God quite as much as if he either perceived or hoped for some good result. In the meantime, what I have touched upon must be borne in mind, namely, that God always has some seed as a remnant, although the people as a whole may be lapsed into impiety.

It is now added, the impious man shall die in his impiety, but I will require his blood at thy hand. God here says, that he had called his servant under this condition, that he must render an account if any one perished through his fault. This place, although I have lately touched upon the subject, shows how dangerous an office those sustain who are called to the duty of teaching. Nothing is more precious to God than souls which he has created after his own image, and of which he is both the Redeemer and Father. Since, therefore, our souls and their salvation are so dear to God, hence we infer, how anxiously Prophets and all pastors ought to discharge their duties; for it is just as if God were to commit souls to their care, under this condition of rendering an account of each. Nor is it sufficient to admonish one and another, for unless they had endeavored to recall all from destruction to life and salvation, we hear what God here pronounces. Hence, also, Paul uses this expression, woe is me if I preach not the gospel, for a necessity is laid upon me. (1Co 9:16.) In fine, that the Prophet may be roused to undertake his office, God here announces that certain penalties hang over him, unless he diligently endeavor to recall all wanderers into the way of salvation. But, because men think that their ignorance will prove a sufficient defense, this cavil is removed, because God says they shall perish, although they were not admonished. This exception is added advisedly, that men may not flatter themselves, and throw the blame upon their pastors, if they perish in error. Although, therefore, any one has not been admonished, yet he shall die, and although the pastor shall render an account of his negligence, and shall spare himself while doing so, yet he shall have no excuse before God. Now we perceive that negligence in Prophets and pastors is allied to perfidy, when they knowingly and willingly permit souls to perish through their own silence: meanwhile, it is not surprising if God adjudges to death those who are not admonished: for their conscience is a sufficient accuser, and however they may now defend their error and ignorance, it is certain that they perish of their own accord. Afterwards it follows —

Calvin: Eze 3:19 - NO PHRASE The Prophet is here taught how usefully he will lay out his labor, although he should appear to fail, for he ought to be satisfied with this alone, t...

The Prophet is here taught how usefully he will lay out his labor, although he should appear to fail, for he ought to be satisfied with this alone, that God approves his efforts. Although, therefore, those who were to be brought back by holy exhortations remain obstinate, yet God’s servants ought not, through fastidiousness, to throw up their commission as if it were useless, for they free their own souls. It has been formerly said, that a necessity was imposed upon them, but if they are dumb dogs the destruction of souls will be imputed to them, but when they have executed their duty and satisfied the Almighty, ought not it to suffice them to be absolved in his opinion? We see then, that the Prophet was animated by this consolation, lest he should be weary of admonishing abandoned and obstinate men, because, if they were not profited by his teaching, yet its fruit should return to himself. That expression of Christ’s is well known, “Into whatsoever house ye enter, salute it: if the house be unworthy, your blessing shall return to yourselves.” (Mat 10:12; Luk 10:5.) So also when the Prophets anxiously desired to reclaim the wandering sheep and to collect them within the fold, if they experienced such petulance that their labor did not profit them, yet their usefulness shall return to themselves. Now we understand the counsel of God in these words, Thou, therefore, hast freed thy soul. Here he does not put impiety only, but impious way, for the sake of explanation: unless any one had rather distinguish that impiety is the interior wickedness of the heart, but an impious way is the outward life and comprehends all actions, which is perhaps more probable, although there is no reason to object to add impious way as an explanation after the mention of impiety. Now it follows —

Calvin: Eze 3:20 - NO PHRASE Here God adds another part of duty which is incumbent on all Prophets. For they are first sent to bring back into the way those who had been alienate...

Here God adds another part of duty which is incumbent on all Prophets. For they are first sent to bring back into the way those who had been alienated from God, then to retain those who are already within the flock, and to lead those onward to the goal who have already entered upon the course. We see, therefore, that Prophets ought to be occupied with both duties, so that they may not only recall to their obedience to God those who wander after their own lusts, but also confirm those who are, of their own accord, teachable already, and encourage them to persevere, and prevent them from failing away. Hence, after God has spoken concerning the correction of sinners who had strayed, he now adds another member. If, says he, the righteous man be turned aside from his righteousness, and thou hast not admonished him, he shall ate, and I will require his blood at thy hand Where in effect God signifies, that Prophets are guilty, not only if they do not exhort those who have withdrawn from the right way to retrace their steps, but also if they do not retain within their duty those who have already entered upon the right course. We must then have two objects in view, to recall those who have fallen into various errors, and to take care that those within the fold should not fall away, but be strengthened in perseverance. Hence it is now added, If the righteous shall turn aside, he indeed shall die, but his blood will I require

Here it may be asked, how can the just turn aside, since there is no righteousness without the spirit of regeneration But the seed of the Spirit is incorruptible, (1Pe 1:23,) nor can it ever happen that his grace is utterly extinguished; for the Spirit, is the earnest and seal of our adoption, for God’s adoption is without repentance, as Paul says. (Rom 11:29.) Hence it may seem absurd to say, that the just recedes and turns aside from the right way. That passage of John is well known — if they had been of us, they had remained with us, (1Jo 2:19,) but because they have departed, that falling away proves sufficiently that they were never ours. But we must here mark, that righteousness is here called so:, which has only the outward appearance and not the root: for when once the spirit of regeneration begins to flourish, as I have said, it remains perpetually. And we shall sometimes see men borne along with a wonderful ardor of zeal for the worship of God, and to be urged to promote his glory beyond even the very best men; indeed we shall see this, but, says Paul, God knows those who are his own. (2Ti 2:19.) Hence it is not wonderful that God under the name of righteousness here commends virtues which deserve praise before men, even if they do not spring from a pure fountain. Thus we see it. often happens that the righteous are alienated, and turn aside from the right way. This passage, then, ought to stir us up to seek from God continually a spirit of perseverance, because such is our propensity to sin, that we immediately flow in different directions like water, unless God strengthen us. When therefore we see the righteous themselves depart from the way, let us lea4 and become sure of the constancy of our own faith, only let our confidence be founded on the help of the Holy Spirit and not. in ourselves. In the meantime, we see that Christ did not pronounce this passage in vain: Happy are those who persevere unto the end, (Mat 24:13,) because many fall away in the midst of their course, or reversing their steps, turn their backs upon God.

Now we must carefully remark what follows, his righteousness shall not be remembered, because some desire to bargain with God, so that if for a time they enter upon the pursuit of piety, that may be taken into account and avail in their favor. But we hear what God pronounces, all their righteousness shall not be remembered in the case of backsliders There is no encouragement to flatter ourselves into sloth and security, when God shows that unless we continue to the end, even the goal of our career, whatever else we attain unto, it is useless. He says, as clearly as words will express it, if he shall fall away, or recede, or turn aside from his righteousness and shall commit iniquity We must mark this diligently, because we know that the very best men often fall away; but here a falling away is intended, where any one casts himself headlong on impiety: hence to commit iniquity is to give oneself up entirely to impiety; as when John says, that those who are born again of the Spirit of God do not commit sin, (1Jo 3:9,) he means, are not addicted to sin, even if as yet they dwell among many infirmities and failings: as also Paul says, that sin dwells in us, but does not reign. (Rom 6:12.) Hence to commit sin is to give oneself up to sin. But God says, I will place, or for placing, or if I shall have placed, a stumblingblock before his face Punishment is here called a stumblingblock, when God demonstrates his vengeance against apostates. Although a stumblingblock may also be called actual admonition, as the phrase is; but because that is too far-fetched, I receive it simply, if the righteous shall have turned aside: but I shall have rendered the reward which he deserved, he shall die, because thou hast not admonished him: in his unrighteousness shall he die: thus I point it off, for interpreters seem to me improperly to have mingled together — he shall die, and — he shall die in his iniquity. Now that threat which we have seen is repeated, namely, that all prophets who have deserted their office are guilty before God, because their sloth differs little from perfidy: for God considered them worthy of the greatest honor, since he committed souls to them, which, as we have said, he esteems so dear and precious. But if they reject this trust committed to them, we see that they not only act injuriously to man, but are also ungrateful to God; and their sluggishness is not only united with perfidy, but also with sacrilege, because they permit Satan to snatch from God what was his own. Just as if any watchman should desert his post and betray it to the enemy; because when they see some wander and others desert, it is clear that this does not arise from ignorance, as we have said, but to the snares of Satan and lust are those exposed whom Christ has redeemed with his blood: hence as we have said, this their treachery is without excuse.

Calvin: Eze 3:21 - NO PHRASE We saw in our last lecture that the office of pastors is twofold, that they collect the dispersed sheep, and retain within the fold those whom they h...

We saw in our last lecture that the office of pastors is twofold, that they collect the dispersed sheep, and retain within the fold those whom they had gathered together. For as man’s nature is inclined to many failures, it often happens that those who have been gathered into God’s sheepfold are dispersed hither and thither, through their own infirmity, unless they are strengthened. For this reason constant admonitions are necessary; and hence God asserts that those pastors will be guilty, if though their negligence the righteous fall away. He now pursues the same sentiment, but adds another clause — but if the righteous is admonished the shepherd is guiltless The whole meaning is this, because Ezekiel had been called to the office of teaching, he ought to be intent in recalling into the way those who have erred, and also in retaining others. In the meanwhile we must observe, that those who seem to have entered on the right way are daily subject to error, unless God retains them by his servants, and urges them to go forward. Now it follows —

Calvin: Eze 3:22 - NO PHRASE God seems in some way to play with his Prophet, when he sends him about, and apparently changes his plan. For the duty of teaching was previously imp...

God seems in some way to play with his Prophet, when he sends him about, and apparently changes his plan. For the duty of teaching was previously imposed upon the holy man, but now he is commanded to go abroad, and afterwards God orders him to shut himself up at home. Hence this variety seems like a change of plan, when God first commands his servant to speak, and afterwards to be silent. But it is by no means doubtful that, by this method, the authority of the Prophet was confirmed, when God evidently governed his tongue, whether for speech or silence. For although he was created a teacher, yet he restrained himself till God should suggest what he was to say. Afterwards he was ordered to be silent, and obeyed God; then when God dictated words, and commanded him to go forth in public, he began to discharge his office. Now, if he had begun to speak directly upon his appointment, too great levity might be objected against him; but when he showed his alacrity, and yet remained silent during God’s pleasure, greater weight was added to his teaching.

Now we understand to what purpose the hand of God was upon him By the hand of God his power is understood; for that exposition is cold, as I have before observed, which interprets the hand of God as the prophetic office. He perceives, then, that he was impelled by the secret virtue of God. Lastly, the hand of God is nothing else but the agitation of the Spirit, since the Prophet felt that he was not carried forward by human power, or by any arbitrary impulse, tie says, therefore, the hand of Jehovah was upon me, and he said to me arise, and go forth to the plain, that I may speak there with thee. Ezekiel could not but suppose that he was led forth to proclaim immediately God’s commands to the people. But in this opinion he was mistaken, because, as we shall see, he was brought forth into the midst that he should immediately shut himself up at home. But before he says this, he says that he went forth We see hove submissive he was whenever God sent him. And this is worthy of notice, because unless God’s calling please us, and our sense approve 80 it, we fly back, or at least put it off. But the Prophet had a just excuse, according to human judgment, for turning his back with some color of reason; for God had often addressed him already, and as yet without fruit. But now, although he is hitherto held in suspense, yet God does not pronounce what he wishes him to do; yet he goes out into the plain, because God commanded him. We are taught by this example, even if the result of things is hidden from us, that as soon as God issues any command, we must obey, even if our senses refuse, yet we ought so to obey him as to follow whenever he calls, even if our doing it seems not only in vain, but ridiculous. But God did not address him in vain when he appeared in his glory, for the appearance of the glory of God ought to satisfy a holy man, although all other things should fail. He saw the glory of God, as it were, near the river Chebar; whence we gather, that. the vision was not fixed to any definite place. God, therefore, appeared once above the bank of the river to his servant, and then in the plain. As to his saying he fell on his face, I have previously explained what he means. It must necessarily happen that the faithful, who are impressed with a serious fear of God, should dread his appearance. The impious, also, are compelled to fear God, but afterwards they grow hardened, and although they are rendered almost lifeless, the stupor which follows extinguishes all sensation. But the fear which the faithful feel from the appearance of God is joined with reverence. Thus also Ezekiel fell on his face, so as not to rise again until the Spirit raised him up, as it follows afterwards.

Calvin: Eze 3:24 - NO PHRASE Here Ezekiel confirms what I have said: whenever the faithful are frightened at the sight of God’s glory, they cannot collect their mind unless the...

Here Ezekiel confirms what I have said: whenever the faithful are frightened at the sight of God’s glory, they cannot collect their mind unless the Lord prop them up by his strength. But this state was peculiar to the Prophet, because he ought to acknowledge himself, as it were, dead when he felt the Spirit of God living and flourishing in his mind. Therefore this tends to confirm him, because the Spirit restored him from a state of death to life: therefore he says, the Spirit came In fine, as the soul gives life to the man, so the Spirit of God is a supernatural life in man. We live after the manner of men, because a virtue is implanted in our soul which has faculties of its own. For in the soul is the seat of intelligence, and the will, and the sensations, and it diffuses its vigor through all the members. But the life which souls breathe into bodies is only earthly, but the Spirit of God gives life supernaturally. And this distinction must be held, because profane men boast only in outward appearances, as they call it — that is, in outward splendor, which is nothing else but a mask: and so with all their might they celebrate free-will and our natural faculties, because they have never tasted what that supernatural life is which is here mentioned. Ezekiel indeed was filled with the Spirit of God after a peculiar manner, that he might be fit to undertake the prophetic office, but this is common to the faithful for their spiritual life.

He says next, that he was placed upon his feet, because he was lying prostrate, nor could he, as I have said, raise a finger, unless he had been raised by divine power. Afterwards he relates the command of God, which appears to be absurd. For why did God appoint Ezekiel a Prophet unless that he should apply himself to the office of teaching? But now he orders him not only to rest, but even to he concealed at home. He uses the word “concealed” as if he had said, remain at home as a captive. If he had been a private man, he had enjoyed a free passage out, but now since God enjoins upon him the prophetic office, he is held captive. But all this is opposed to his mission. But first, God wished to prove the obedience of his servant; then he wished specially to confirm his calling more and more, for this was no common confirmation, because although the Prophet excelled in singular virtue, yet he did not leap into the midst, but rested at home, and became a voluntary captive, because it so pleased God. Hence the whole people might know that the Prophet did not proceed rashly, or by any sudden impulse, because he was often mute by the command of God. Afterwards it follows —

Calvin: Eze 3:25 - NO PHRASE Now God explains the reason why he wishes the Prophet to cease for a time, and to remain at home as if dumb. They have placed, said he, ropes upon...

Now God explains the reason why he wishes the Prophet to cease for a time, and to remain at home as if dumb. They have placed, said he, ropes upon thee with which they may bind thee. The opinion of those who take the passage metaphorically is not unsuitable, as if it had been said, the perverseness of the people hinders Ezekiel in the discharge of his duty, just as if he had been bound with ropes.

To make this clearer, we may call to mind what Paul says to the Corinthians, (2Co 6:11,) namely, that he was held in bondage, because his teaching could not find access to them, nor penetrate to their souls. “Our mouth,” says he, “is open towards you, O Corinthians! Our heart is enlarged towards you:” that is, as far as lieth in me, I am prepared faithfully to spend my labors upon you: but your bowels are straitened. Since therefore men, by their own depravity, hinder the course of doctrine, by reducing the servants of God to straits, it is quite consistent to represent the malice of those who are not teachable to be like ropes by which faithful teachers are bound, so that they cannot proceed freely in the course of their duty. If any one, however, prefers taking what is here said strictly and literally, the sentence must thus be understood, that the Israelites were not as yet prepared for instruction, because if the Prophet shall utter God’s commands immediately, they would be like the furious who would lay hands upon him and bind him with ropes. This sense also is very appropriate, and hence we may choose freely between them. But as to the general purport, God’s intention is by no means obscure, namely, that the Prophet ought not to take it ill, if he be for a time apparently useless without obtaining either hearers or fit disciples. We see then that this is said for the Prophet’s comfort, that he should not murmur or take it ill that God wishes him ‘to remain shut up at home; because the fit time had not yet come, as if it had been said — “If you hasten now, you will approach furious men who will by and bye rush against you and bind you with ropes. Because, therefore, you see them not yet prepared for learning, wait a while until I prepare their ears for you, that they may attend to you; or at least, that they may be rendered the more excuseless, I will send thee; and meanwhile, although they are as yet perverse, yet they cannot rise violently against thee, but whether they will or not, they shall be compelled to hear the commands which proceed from my mouth.” And he afterwards confirms this at length, as we shall see.

Calvin: Eze 3:26 - NO PHRASE But he now adds, I will fix thy tongue to thy palate — or I will make thy tongue adhere to thy palate — so that thou shalt not be to them a re...

But he now adds, I will fix thy tongue to thy palate — or I will make thy tongue adhere to thy palate — so that thou shalt not be to them a reprover, because they are a rebellious house What God ascribed to the Israelites he now transfers to himself. He had said, They will bind thee with ropes: he now says, I will make thy tongue cleave to thy palate But these two things are easily reconciled, because in truth the Israelites rejected prophecies through their intemperance, and God thus deprived them of this benefit, because he saw they were unworthy of it. But this place shows that it is a sign of God’s vengeance, when all prophecies cease, and opportunity for hearing is taken away. For as God shines upon us by his instruction, and we have thereby a certain pledge of his fatherly grace and favor, so also when instruction is removed, it is just as if God hid his face, nay, even turned his back upon us. We must consider, therefore, what is here said — because the house of Israel was rebellious: hence the Prophet was dumb, and refrained from teaching those impious ones. God therefore desists, when he sees that he is dealing with the stupid and deaf; but. not on the first occasion of their wearying him, because he rather contends with man’s ingratitude, and never ceases, as we see in Jeremiah, to rise in the morning, and to keep watch even while it is yet night; (Jer 7:2; Jer 11:7; Jer 35:14; Psa 74:9;) he never ceases to call to himself even those who are slow and sluggish, nay, even the utterly rebellious: but at length, when he sees that he does not succeed by long-suffering, he takes away his instruction, as we have said. And therefore the Church complains that it is destitute of Prophets, and places that slaughter among the extreme signs of God’s anger: “We do not see our signs, and Prophets do not appear among us. ” In this way they understand that they are alienated from God, and that no consolation remains to them, when God does not give them any taste of his goodness by Prophets. The ungodly indeed wish this, because nothing is more troublesome to them than to hear God continually exclaiming. Hence, as far as they can, they seek hiding-places, and think nothing better for themselves than to be torpid amidst their vices, and to be deaf to every voice of reproach; but yet nothing is more destructive to them, because God offers himself as a physician who cures our diseases, while he exhorts us to wisdom. But when he is silent, he deserts us as if abandoned to de-st, ruction, and hence I said that nothing is more destructive than when no reproach sounds in our ears, but we are sweetly flattered, because in this way Satan deprives us of our senses, and this is his final poisoning, when he so soothes us with his blandishments, that all reproach which may alarm our security altogether ceases. Now it follows: —

Calvin: Eze 3:27 - NO PHRASE After a silence, God shows by what commands he wishes to instruct his servant, namely, by such as would exasperate the people, as we have formerly se...

After a silence, God shows by what commands he wishes to instruct his servant, namely, by such as would exasperate the people, as we have formerly seen. His embassy therefore was hateful, since the Prophet begins with this insult — “If ye wish to hear, hear; but if not, I am not concerned.” Those who are sent as ambassadors are usually ordered to try whether they can conciliate, by courteous and friendly discourse, those with whom they have to deal. But God here follows a method completely the contrary. For what is the meaning of these words, He who hears, let him hear: he who desists, let him, desist? namely, that the Israelites may understand that the Prophet was sent to them, not because there was any hope of their becoming wise again, since they had borne witness by experiments sufficiently numerous that they were altogether desperate: but the Lord sends the Prophet, that he may strike and wound them further, and at length inflict a deadly blow. Now, therefore, we see that confirmed which the Prophet previously brought forward, that the office of teaching was enjoined upon him, not because his labor would be useful and fruitful with reference to the common people, but that he might inflame the Israelites to madness, if they were unwilling to grow wise again, that he might break them if they would not bend, and if they rejected him, that he should accuse them before God, who would be their judge, and in the meanwhile the course of Prophetic teaching would be free, however pertinaciously they might resist it. Now we understand the intention of the Prophet. Hence also we collect what I have lately touched upon: that God deals with the reprobate in various ways. Sometimes he makes it doubtful whether they be curable, and destines Prophets for them, who should exhort them to repentance. But when he sees them in their ingratitude burying all the light, then he deprives them of all doctrine; afterwards it shines forth again: at length other and denser darkness succeeds: therefore let us hasten, as long as the doctrine of salvation shines upon us, lest God darken all our minds and senses, and deprive us of that singular benefit, when the image of his paternal favor is engraven on us, as we have said. Let us go on —

Defender: Eze 3:2 - eat that roll This action of eating the scroll, like the similar command directed to the Apostle John (Rev 10:8-11) was, of course, symbolic of becoming so filled w...

This action of eating the scroll, like the similar command directed to the Apostle John (Rev 10:8-11) was, of course, symbolic of becoming so filled with the Word of God that the prophet was both enabled and constrained to proclaim it."

Defender: Eze 3:9 - adamant This word (Hebrew, shamir) may also mean "diamond" or "briar," in the sense of being used in cutting (compare Zec 7:12). The Word of God, properly und...

This word (Hebrew, shamir) may also mean "diamond" or "briar," in the sense of being used in cutting (compare Zec 7:12). The Word of God, properly understood and proclaimed, is "sharper than any two-edged sword" (Heb 4:12)."

Defender: Eze 3:18 - require at thine hand God repeatedly warns the ungodly of judgment to come, through His prophets in ancient times, and through His Word (and those who are His witnesses) to...

God repeatedly warns the ungodly of judgment to come, through His prophets in ancient times, and through His Word (and those who are His witnesses) today. The responsibility of the prophet - or the modern Christian witness - to get this critical message to the lost is thus inestimably great. In effect, for a believer to fail to witness to those he is able to reach would make him, in effect, their executioner. More important by far, however, is the certainty that, whether they hear a warning or not, the ungodly will die in their sins, for they are already "without excuse" (Rom 1:20), having rejected the witness in the creation itself (Eze 33:14-19)."

Defender: Eze 3:23 - glory of the Lord This overpowering "glory of the Lord" (no doubt the same shekinah glory that filled the tabernacle in the wilderness: Exo 40:34) is very prominent in ...

This overpowering "glory of the Lord" (no doubt the same shekinah glory that filled the tabernacle in the wilderness: Exo 40:34) is very prominent in Ezekiel, the phrase occurring no less than sixteen times."

TSK: Eze 3:1 - eat // go eat : This must have passed in a vision; but the meaning is plain: Receive ny word into thy mind, let it enter into they soul; digest it, let it be th...

eat : This must have passed in a vision; but the meaning is plain: Receive ny word into thy mind, let it enter into they soul; digest it, let it be they nourishment, they meat and thy drink, to do the will of thy Father who is in heaven. Eze 3:10, Eze 2:8, Eze 2:9; 1Ti 4:15; Rev 10:9, Rev 10:10

go : Eze 3:11, Eze 3:15, Eze 3:17-21, Eze 2:3; Jer 24:1-7

TSK: Eze 3:2 - -- Jer 25:17; Act 26:19

TSK: Eze 3:3 - and fill // Then // it was and fill : Eze 2:10; Job 32:18, Job 32:19; Jer 6:11, Jer 20:9; Joh 7:38; Col 3:16 Then : Psa 119:11; Jer 15:16; Joh 6:53-63 it was : Job 23:12; Psa 19...

TSK: Eze 3:4 - -- Eze 3:11, Eze 2:3, Eze 2:7; Mat 10:5, Mat 10:6, Mat 15:24; Act 1:8

TSK: Eze 3:5 - thou // of a strange speech and of an hard language thou : Jon 1:2, Jon 3:2-4; Act 26:17, Act 26:18 of a strange speech and of an hard language : Heb. deep of lip and heavy of tongue, and so, Eze 3:6; P...

thou : Jon 1:2, Jon 3:2-4; Act 26:17, Act 26:18

of a strange speech and of an hard language : Heb. deep of lip and heavy of tongue, and so, Eze 3:6; Psa 81:5; Isa 33:19

TSK: Eze 3:6 - of a strange speech and of an hard language of a strange speech and of an hard language : Heb. deep of lip and heavy of language. Surely, etc. or, If I had sent thee to them, would they not ha...

of a strange speech and of an hard language : Heb. deep of lip and heavy of language. Surely, etc. or, If I had sent thee to them, would they not have hearkened? etc. Jon 3:5-10; Mat 11:20-24, Mat 12:41, Mat 12:42; Luk 11:30-32; Act 27:28; Rom 9:30-33

TSK: Eze 3:7 - Israel will // all the // impudent and hardhearted Israel will : 1Sa 8:7; Jer 25:3, Jer 25:4, Jer 44:4, Jer 44:5, Jer 44:16; Luk 10:16, Luk 13:34, Luk 19:14; Joh 5:40-47; Joh 15:20-24 all the : Eze 2:4...

Israel will : 1Sa 8:7; Jer 25:3, Jer 25:4, Jer 44:4, Jer 44:5, Jer 44:16; Luk 10:16, Luk 13:34, Luk 19:14; Joh 5:40-47; Joh 15:20-24

all the : Eze 2:4, Eze 24:7; Isa 3:9; Jer 3:3, Jer 5:3

impudent and hardhearted : Heb. stiff of forehead and hard of heart

TSK: Eze 3:8 - -- Exo 4:15, Exo 4:16, Exo 11:4-8; 1Ki 21:20; Isa 50:7; Jer 1:18, Jer 15:20; Mic 3:8; Act 7:51-56; Heb 11:27, Heb 11:32-37

TSK: Eze 3:9 - adamant // fear adamant : Zec 7:12 fear : Eze 2:6; Isa 41:10,Isa 41:14, Isa 50:7; Jer 1:8, Jer 1:17, Jer 17:18; Mic 3:8; 1Ti 2:3; 2Ti 2:6

TSK: Eze 3:10 - receive receive : Eze 3:1-3, Eze 2:8; Job 22:22; Psa 119:11; Pro 8:10, Pro 19:20; Luk 8:15; 1Th 2:13; 1Th 4:1

TSK: Eze 3:11 - get // the children // speak get : Eze 3:15, Eze 11:24, Eze 11:25; Dan 6:13 the children : Eze 33:2, Eze 33:12, Eze 33:17, Eze 33:30, Eze 37:18; Exo 32:7; Deu 9:12; Dan 12:1 speak...

TSK: Eze 3:12 - spirit // a voice // Blessed // glory spirit : Eze 3:14, Eze 2:2, Eze 8:3, Eze 11:1, Eze 11:24, Eze 40:1, Eze 40:2; 1Ki 18:12; 2Ki 2:16; Act 8:39 a voice : Act 2:2; Rev 1:10,Rev 1:15 Bless...

TSK: Eze 3:13 - the noise // touched // and the noise the noise : Eze 1:24, Eze 10:5; 2Sa 5:24 touched : Heb. kissed and the noise : Eze 10:16, Eze 10:17

the noise : Eze 1:24, Eze 10:5; 2Sa 5:24

touched : Heb. kissed

and the noise : Eze 10:16, Eze 10:17

TSK: Eze 3:14 - the spirit // in bitterness, in the heat of my spirit // but the spirit : Eze 3:12, Eze 8:3, Eze 37:1 in bitterness, in the heat of my spirit : Heb. bitter in hot anger, Num 11:11-19; Jer 6:11, Jer 20:14-18; Joh...

the spirit : Eze 3:12, Eze 8:3, Eze 37:1

in bitterness, in the heat of my spirit : Heb. bitter in hot anger, Num 11:11-19; Jer 6:11, Jer 20:14-18; Joh 4:1, Joh 4:3, Joh 4:9

but : Eze 1:3, Eze 8:1, Eze 37:1; 1Ki 18:46; 2Ki 2:16, 2Ki 3:15; Jer 20:7-9

TSK: Eze 3:15 - that dwelt // sat that dwelt : Eze 3:23, Eze 1:1, Eze 10:15, Eze 43:3 sat : Gen 50:10; Job 2:13; Psa 137:1; Jer 23:9; Hab 3:16

TSK: Eze 3:17 - I have // a watchman // hear I have : Eze 33:2-9; 1Co 12:28 a watchman : Son 3:3, Son 5:7; Isa 21:6, Isa 21:8, Isa 21:11, Isa 21:12, Isa 52:8, Isa 56:10, Isa 62:6; Jer 6:17, Jer 3...

TSK: Eze 3:18 - I say // to save // the same // but I say : Eze 18:4, Eze 18:13, Eze 18:20, Eze 33:6, Eze 33:8; Gen 2:17, Gen 3:3, Gen 3:4; Num 26:65; 2Ki 1:4; Isa 3:11; Luk 13:3, Luk 13:5; Eph 5:5, Eph...

TSK: Eze 3:19 - if thou // he shall // but thou if thou : 2Ki 17:13-23; 2Ch 36:15, 2Ch 36:16; Pro 29:1; Jer 42:19-22, Jer 44:4, Jer 44:5; Luk 10:10,Luk 10:11; Act 18:5, Act 18:6; 1Th 4:6; Heb 2:1-3,...

TSK: Eze 3:20 - When // righteousness // and I lay // because // and his // but his When : Eze 18:24, Eze 18:26, Eze 33:12, Eze 33:13; 2Ch 24:2, 2Ch 24:17-22; Psa 36:3, Psa 125:5; Zep 1:6; Mat 13:20,Mat 13:21; Heb 10:38; 2Pe 2:18-22; ...

TSK: Eze 3:21 - if thou // he shall // also if thou : Mat 24:24, Mat 24:25; Act 20:31; 1Co 4:14, 1Co 10:12; Gal 1:6-10, Gal 5:2-7; Eph 4:17-21, Eph 5:5, Eph 5:6; Col 1:28, Col 3:5-8; 1Th 4:6-8, ...

TSK: Eze 3:22 - the hand // Arise the hand : Eze 3:14, Eze 1:3, Eze 37:1 Arise : Eze 8:4; Act 9:6

the hand : Eze 3:14, Eze 1:3, Eze 37:1

Arise : Eze 8:4; Act 9:6

TSK: Eze 3:23 - the glory // river // and I fell the glory : Eze 1:4, Eze 1:28, Eze 9:3, Eze 10:18; Num 16:19, Num 16:42; Act 7:55 river : Eze 1:1-3 and I fell : Eze 1:28; Dan 8:17, Dan 10:8, Dan 10:...

TSK: Eze 3:24 - the spirit // Go the spirit : Eze 2:2, Eze 37:10; Dan 10:8-10,Dan 10:19 Go : Eze 4:1-4

TSK: Eze 3:25 - -- Eze 4:8; Mar 3:21; Joh 21:18; Act 9:16, Act 20:23, Act 21:11-13

TSK: Eze 3:26 - I will // and shalt // a reprover // for I will : Eze 24:27; Psa 51:15, Psa 137:6; Jer 1:17; Luk 1:20-22 and shalt : Psa 36:11, Psa 36:12; Lam 2:9; Hos 4:17; Amo 5:10, Amo 8:11, Amo 8:12; Mic...

I will : Eze 24:27; Psa 51:15, Psa 137:6; Jer 1:17; Luk 1:20-22

and shalt : Psa 36:11, Psa 36:12; Lam 2:9; Hos 4:17; Amo 5:10, Amo 8:11, Amo 8:12; Mic 3:6, Mic 3:7

a reprover : Heb. a man reproving

for : Eze 2:3-8; Isa 1:2

TSK: Eze 3:27 - I will // Thus // for they I will : Eze 11:25, Eze 24:27, Eze 29:21, Eze 33:32; Exo 4:11, Exo 4:12; Luk 21:15; Eph 6:19 Thus : Eze 3:11, Eze 2:5; Mat 11:15, Mat 13:9; Rev 22:10,...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Eze 3:1 - He // That thou findest // Eat this roll // And go He who sat on the throne and directed the chariot or cherubims, the Lord Jesus Christ, who also spake to him in the chapter before. Eat : this was ...

He who sat on the throne and directed the chariot or cherubims, the Lord Jesus Christ, who also spake to him in the chapter before. Eat : this was done in a vision.

That thou findest in the hand which was sent to him, Eze 2:9 : this explains the former, and being ingeminated, doth require the prophet’ s greatest resolution and diligence.

Eat this roll read attentively, meditate thoroughly, impress the things upon thy soul deeply, for thou must declare them with very great affection and tenderness, with exact faithfulness and fearless courage.

And go for then art thou fitted for and commissioned to undertake the prophetic function, speak unto the house of Israel; publish to them of the captivity in Babylon what I have declared to them, tell them what they should do, and what I will do.

Poole: Eze 3:2 - So // He caused me to eat that roll So Heb. And ; so soon as he had heard he must eat it. I opened my mouth ; not to discuss points, but to obey, to show my readiness indeed, and to d...

So Heb. And ; so soon as he had heard he must eat it. I opened my mouth ; not to discuss points, but to obey, to show my readiness indeed, and to do what lay on me to do.

He caused me to eat that roll not by a force compelling me, but by a concurrent help in what the prophet was ready to do.

Poole: Eze 3:3 - Cause thy belly to eat // And fill thy bowels // This roll that I give thee // Then did I eat it // It was in my mouth as honey for sweetness // Answ In this verse is confirmed and explained what was spoken Eze 3:1 , which see. Cause thy belly to eat the mouth is the proper instrument of eating,...

In this verse is confirmed and explained what was spoken Eze 3:1 , which see.

Cause thy belly to eat the mouth is the proper instrument of eating, but when meat is eaten and digested, the belly is said to eat; the prophet must not just taste, but he must chew, swallow down, retain, and fill his belly with God’ s word.

And fill thy bowels: this is the same repeated, unless it add to the other the measure, the fulness of the measure wherewith we should read, meditate, and digest the word of God and his works. And since bowels are the seat of compassion, it is likely the Lord would have his prophet be affected with pity toward that captive people, whose miseries he must foretell, and he foresees they must suffer.

This roll that I give thee: the roll and all that was in it came from God, and Ezekiel must remember this.

Then did I eat it Heb. And I did eat it.

It was in my mouth as honey for sweetness ; upon the palate it was sweet (this done in vision still) as honey. If you wonder that such bitter tidings could be sweet to the prophet, if it be doubted how this could be, since, Eze 2:10 , it was full of lamentation, &c..

Answ It was sweet to receive such things by revelation from God, and so to converse with God; it is sweet to foresee future events, and to foretell God’ s just judgments against sinners, and to have prospect of a vindication of the honour of God and credit of the prophet, who seeing all, these things with a well-composed mind, and just zeal for God, could not but approve and be pleased therewith. Or, it was sweet, as usually the first part of the ministerial work is pleasant, but at last wicked men’ s opposition and persecution make it bitter, as Eze 3:14 Jer 15:16-18 Rev 10:10 .

Poole: Eze 3:4 - Son of man // get thee // The house of Israel // Speak with my words Son of man: see Eze 3:1 , and Eze 2:1 . Go ; either the first word, go, intimates the awakening and rousing him, and the latter, get thee directs ...

Son of man: see Eze 3:1 , and Eze 2:1 . Go ; either the first word, go, intimates the awakening and rousing him, and the latter,

get thee directs him whither to go when on his legs, or else it is an idiom of the Hebrew language, or a hendyadis, an ingemination of the same command.

The house of Israel: see Eze 2:3 .

Speak with my words see Eze 3:1 ; in my name and authority, so some, but then it would have been in the singular number, not plural. Better and fuller it is by others thus, What things I shall show thee, and in what words I shall declare them to thee, these declare to the captives in Babylon. They perhaps do expect to hear somewhat else, and their flattering false prophets suggest other matters; but look to it, thou goest on my errand, speak therefore in my words, as the Hebrew.

Poole: Eze 3:5 - A people of a strange speech // Of an hard language // To the house of Israel Though the Divine command is reason enough why we should obey readily, yet God is pleased to give the prophet arguments to persuade, and ushers them...

Though the Divine command is reason enough why we should obey readily, yet God is pleased to give the prophet arguments to persuade, and ushers them in here.

A people of a strange speech who cannot skill of thy speech, nor thou speak (without gift of tongues) to them. Shift not off thy work as if, with Jonah, sent to a people of barbarous tongue, in which are dark and profound idioms, but as horrid to thy ear as deep and dark precipices and gulfs to the eye, as the Hebrew, deep of lip , intimates.

Of an hard language the same repeated in other words; they will need no interpreter to tell them what thou sayest to them, nor wilt thou need an interpreter to tell thee what answer they give. Thy work will be the easier, neither difficult, as things that lie deep to be digged out, nor as things of great weight and heaviness to be lifted, as both metaphors imply: this is his first argument. Next, implied in it, I send thee to thine own countrymen, whose welfare thou shouldst readily seek, and in their own tongue thou mayst express thy care for them.

To the house of Israel they still are a family that God owneth he hath not broke up housekeeping, there is further encouragement; and they are Israel’ s seed, the posterity of Jacob, and under covenant mercy; go therefore readily, for Israel shall be gathered.

Poole: Eze 3:6 - Many people // Strange speech // Whose words thou canst not understand // Surely This verse is much what the former, yet strengthens and illustrates what is laid down there. Many people here may be, according to the comprehensi...

This verse is much what the former, yet strengthens and illustrates what is laid down there.

Many people here may be, according to the comprehensiveness of the Hebrew word, either numerous, whose multitudes would be their pride, and tempt them to deride thee; or, mighty in valour and feats of war and policy, whose might would harden them; or, far off, who would wonder a stranger should come to tell them their destiny; or, divers nations, that thou shouldst need divers tongues, to speak to them all in their own language. This difficult work is reserved to those whom Shiloh will send, it is kept to the times when the Spirit poured forth shall enrich with the gift of tongues in gospel days.

Strange speech deep lip, &c.: see Eze 3:5 .

Whose words thou canst not understand: words are articulate and significant, and when understood they are words to the hearer, but whilst not understood they are but empty and barbarous sounds, as the apostle observes in 1Co 14 .

Surely: in the Hebrew the words occasion difficulty and variety of translations, but all of no great moment. Some would refer it to the Jews, and make this sense, Hadst thou gone in any name but mine they would have heard; so parallel it with Joh 5:43 ; but it is better, and more agreeable with the text, to refer it to many nations mentioned, who would have heard what the house of Israel refused to hear, (of which Jonah’ s Ninevites are pregnant proofs,) and to them I would have sent thee, (say some,) but that they did not understand thee: this is but a very slender guess, and ill consists with the power of God, which can give the tongue, if he would have sent the message, as he intimated to Moses, unwilling to go. Our version hath well read and referred the words; with that asseveration,

surely they have expressed what some will have the Hebrew al Ma to be, a form of an oath. God assures the prophet the message is such that any men in their wits would hear; go therefore to thy people, try whether they will act like men and hear, especially when their condition is quite otherwise than that I now suggest of the nations, for the Jews are few, weak, reduced to this by neglecting to hear; in reason, they should now hear, repent, seek me, do my word, and live.

Poole: Eze 3:7 - But // Will not hearken unto thee // For they will not hearken unto me // All the house of Israel // Are impudent // Hard-hearted But Heb. And , put adversatively, is rightly rendered but . Will not hearken unto thee have no mind or will. The original is not here, as mostly ...

But Heb. And , put adversatively, is rightly rendered but .

Will not hearken unto thee have no mind or will. The original is not here, as mostly it is elsewhere, content to express it by the word in the tense which connoteth the event. But the original first points out their want of a will and inclination, they have no propensity to hear, they are obstinate in their refusal; next adds what it was their wills were obstinately averse to, i.e. hearing and obeying.

For they will not hearken unto me: this passage confirms the prediction, and withal forearms the prophet that he stumble not at their scandalous refusal and abusing of him; so they have used their God and his, and no wonder if they consent as little to him as they have to God.

All the house of Israel i.e. the far greater part, not every particular person; there were of the captives some few like good figs, &c.

Are impudent have hardened their faces, they are not ashamed, nor can they blush now, as Jer 3:3 . Brazenfaced is no new phrase or Anglicism, but as old as Isa 48:4 , nay, as old as habitual sin.

Hard-hearted: this the root whence the other springs; and what hope from such whose hearts are as far from relenting as their faces from blushing? How can it be expected they will hear, whose hearts are deafer than their ear?

Poole: Eze 3:8 - I have made // Thy forehead strong This may be to remove the objection of the prophet, who might plead the softness of his own metal, and pretend shameless sinners will scoff a young ...

This may be to remove the objection of the prophet, who might plead the softness of his own metal, and pretend shameless sinners will scoff a young prophet out of countenance. Behold, says God, consider.

I have made given. They have given themselves this impudent countenance; I have given thee true courage, constancy, and manly carriage.

Thy forehead strong the same answer in words very little varying. God will qualify and gift him for this work among this people, and edge his own tools to cut into the hardest metal. So Isa 1:7 Jer 1:18 Mic 3:8 .

Poole: Eze 3:9 - Fear them not // A rebellious house If their foreheads be hard and cutting as the flint, if they wound the soft and tender, if they sparkle with fire against those of harder metal; yet...

If their foreheads be hard and cutting as the flint, if they wound the soft and tender, if they sparkle with fire against those of harder metal; yet be not afraid, I have made thee as the adamant, harder than flint, able to cut and to break it. But what if there should be allusion to the Talmudic rabbinical tradition about their supposed worm

shamir the word here used; if the tradition be as old as Ezekiel’ s time, it will carry some probability with it. This

schamir they say was a worm, which by secret virtue would, when applied, cut or form hard stones, and divide the greatest; that Moses used it to prepare the precious stones for the breastplate, and Solomon, they say, used it to fit the stones without hammer for the temple. Well then, Ezekiel, fear not, thou shalt be a

schamir to the Jews in captivity, and fit some of them to be either rich ornaments in the breastplate, or beautiful stones in the temple; go about thy work, it shall not be, though it seem, successless.

Fear them not let no prevailing fear take thee quite off from thy work; let not any lesser surprises and sudden discomposures of mind, when thou appearest before them, unfit thee for this work I set thee about.

A rebellious house as a house that is rebellion itself.

Poole: Eze 3:10 - Receive in thine heart This verse is a repetition of the charge given to the prophet, to deal faithfully and undauntedly in the delivering his message, to deliver always w...

This verse is a repetition of the charge given to the prophet, to deal faithfully and undauntedly in the delivering his message, to deliver always what God should speak, to speak nothing else, and to speak all that. These repetitions in the abundance of the same words, are from the usage and custom of the people of those countries in which the Jews were now captive.

Receive in thine heart: this explains the visionary eating, of which Eze 3:3 . Hearing is first, and receiving into the heart follows; but with the Jews such transpositions are very usual.

Poole: Eze 3:11 - To them of the captivity // Thy people // Speak unto them // Thus saith the Lord See Eze 3:4 . To them of the captivity of the first captivity under Jeconiah’ s reign, who succeeded his father Jehoiakim, slain for his cons...

See Eze 3:4 .

To them of the captivity of the first captivity under Jeconiah’ s reign, who succeeded his father Jehoiakim, slain for his conspiracy with Egypt against Nebuchadnezzar, as 2Ki 24:1,6,7 . These are those good figs, Jer 24:5-7 , of whom such good is spoken, and to whom those promises are made.

Thy people Heb. the sons of thy people . Some will have God speaking here of this people as no more his, but I think it rather is to be interpreted of some that were amidst them who were disowned of God, and were now but children or sons of the people, the apostate idolaters and debauched sinners, which might possibly have embraced the conqueror’ s religion and manners.

Speak unto them: here again the command is repeated and doubled.

Thus saith the Lord: see Eze 2:4,5 .

Poole: Eze 3:12 - The spirit // Took me up // Behind me // Blessed be the glory of the Lord // From his place The spirit the Spirit of God, which governed the wheels and the living creatures, Eze 8:3 . Took me up either raised him up to nearer approaches, t...

The spirit the Spirit of God, which governed the wheels and the living creatures, Eze 8:3 .

Took me up either raised him up to nearer approaches, to see and discern, to hear and learn; or carried him to his countrymen, to whom he was to speak.

Behind me his face toward the north while he saw the vision, now that he is carried south to his people the voice is behind him. A voice of a great rushing ; an articulate sound, and intelligible, but with great commotion, for it was the voice of angels, attended with the rushing noise of the wheels added to the noise of their wings, and a mighty wind which might likely accompany all this.

Blessed be the glory of the Lord praised and magnified be the gloriously holy and just God, riding on the glorious chariot of his sovereignty in prescribing laws, appointing ordinances, threatening sin, and punishing sinners.

From his place either coming down from heaven, or departing from his temple. In brief, the glorious angels, and all the saints of God, bless, i.e. praise, admire, and justify God in all the ways of his judgments among the sons of men.

Poole: Eze 3:13 - I heard // And the noise was of the wings // Touched one another I heard added to connect the verses and to make the reading full, hath I think somewhat perplexed the words, and occasioned inquiry after two differe...

I heard added to connect the verses and to make the reading full, hath I think somewhat perplexed the words, and occasioned inquiry after two different sounds or voices; whereas if we read them as in the Hebrew and as the Latin,

And the noise was of the wings & c., so the 13th verse will explain the 12th, and tell you what was that great rushing which Ezekiel heard behind him.

Touched one another: see Eze 1:9 . Over against them : see Eze 1:19,20 .

Poole: Eze 3:14 - So // The spirit // Lifted me up // Took me away // I went // In bitterness, in the heat of my spirit So Heb. And , or then, at that very time. The spirit the Spirit of God, as Eze 3:12 , which see. Lifted me up either from that prostration which...

So Heb. And , or then, at that very time.

The spirit the Spirit of God, as Eze 3:12 , which see.

Lifted me up either from that prostration which the terrible vision had caused when he fell to the ground; or rather, caught him, who before was on his legs and well come to himself, up into the air.

Took me away carried me, (as was Philip when carried away from the eunuch,) and brought me to the place where I was to deliver my message, the place where the captive Jews were crowded together.

I went: hitherto nothing appears of the prophet’ s concurrence, but the verse seems to speak constraint and force, but now you have his voluntary concurrence with the motion of the Spirit. He went when so moved and assisted.

In bitterness, in the heat of my spirit Heb. bitter in the heat of my spirit ; grieved, sad, and my spirit within me was as all in a heat of anger: either,

1. Enkindled within by the sympathy he had with his countrymen in their sufferings and calamities; or,

2. Because of those wickednesses he saw and reproved in them; or,

3. Because he must be the unwelcome messenger of such unwelcome news; or,

4. Because of the danger he was exposed to among enraged desperadoes: which way soever you explain it, Ezekiel’ s weakness and distempered humour will appear in it; Jonas-like, he will be angry. But; for , as some others; and, as the Hebrew. The hand of the Lord was strong upon me ; either in general the power of God, which cannot be resisted; or the Spirit of prophecy, which, as a fire shut up, will break forth, as in Jer 20:7-9 ; indeed both concur.

Poole: Eze 3:15 - Tel-abib // By the river // I sat where they sat // Remained there astonished // Seven days See Eze 3:11 . Tel-abib the name of a place in that part of Mesopotamia, which was shut up within Chebar westward, and Saocora eastward. This was ...

See Eze 3:11 .

Tel-abib the name of a place in that part of Mesopotamia, which was shut up within Chebar westward, and Saocora eastward. This was divided into superior, called Gozan, and inferior, called here Tel-abib, a low country, and unprofitable, because spoiled by waters, and secure to keep captives in, and so it afforded matter of labour and toil to the captive Jews, and was as a prison to them lest they should escape, and in both pleased the Babylonians.

By the river on or near to that part of the river Chebar which runs westward of this Tel-abib. Here then is no more contradiction than is in this, if I should name a place between two rivers, and say the place is near one of those rivers.

I sat where they sat sat sad and astonished, where I found and saw them sitting astonished; for sitting sometimes is a posture of mourning and sadness, as in Lam 1:1 , and Job’ s friends, and Psa 137:1 .

Remained there astonished either at the sight of that woeful change of the Jews from freedom and honour to servitude and shame; or astonished at foresight of that which the roll contained, or at the Jews’ impenitence and unreformed manner of living under all these afflictions.

Seven days mourning no doubt all that while, and waiting till the Spirit of prophecy should open his mouth, and till he might know persons, their inclinations, vices, and temper in them, and till he might speak somewhat of personal knowledge against their wickednesses.

Poole: Eze 3:16 - -- This verse gives us sufficient account why the prophet staid these seven days; it was because the particular word he was to speak to them was not ye...

This verse gives us sufficient account why the prophet staid these seven days; it was because the particular word he was to speak to them was not yet declared to him. He had a call and commission to be a prophet, and comes in this character to these Jews, but till seven days are ended he receives no particular word, when by his carriage among the Jews it appeared he was more than a common man, that he was full of matter more than ordinary; then came the word of the Lord, saying,

Poole: Eze 3:17 - I the person that appeared to him, Eze 1:26 // Made thee // Watchman // Hear the word at my mouth // Give them warning See Eze 2:1 . I the person that appeared to him, Eze 1:26 . It is the great and glorious One. Made thee appointed by commission; I have qualifie...

See Eze 2:1 .

I the person that appeared to him, Eze 1:26 . It is the great and glorious One.

Made thee appointed by commission; I have qualified by gifts, I have actually sent thee forth, &c.

Watchman night and day to observe whether the enemy approach, and to give notice on pain of death.

Hear the word at my mouth: see Eze 2:8 .

Give them warning I will give thee notice, thou art then to give warning unto them, and let them know it comes from me, and in mercy, to prevent their final ruin. Be not as a prognosticator, as one that consults the stars, and foretells from the conjunction of them, but own the things thou art to warn them of as from my mouth.

Poole: Eze 3:18 - When I say // The wicked // Thou shalt surely die // Givest him not warning // Nor speakest // From his way // Shall die in his iniquity When I say either by the, menaces of my law, or by motion of my Spirit stirring thee up to reprove and warn. The wicked any wicked one whatever, ri...

When I say either by the, menaces of my law, or by motion of my Spirit stirring thee up to reprove and warn.

The wicked any wicked one whatever, rich or poor, mean or mighty.

Thou shalt surely die such courses will certainly end in death, and in damnation if not left.

Givest him not warning frequently, and with repeated monitions, as the word signifies, and as the apostle, Act 20:31 . This to those that will hearken.

Nor speakest some will profanely scoff and deride, yet speak to warn them, till it do appear they are such as will turn again and rent you. Or else it is the same thing repeated.

From his way men must be told of their own sins; these are their dangers. To save his life; that thou mayst preserve his life, his soul, and recall him at once from sin and death.

Shall die in his iniquity the man who is not warned by thee will certainly die in his sin, the sinner’ s ignorance will not be sufficient to prevent his death, but thy not admonishing him will involve thee also in guilt and death. I will punish thee, who possibly mightest have saved by warning, however oughtest to have warned.

Poole: Eze 3:19 - His wickedness // His wicked way // He shall die in his iniquity His wickedness: this may denote the sinfulness of his mind and heart, which is the spring of all. His wicked way his actual sinful courses; the pra...

His wickedness: this may denote the sinfulness of his mind and heart, which is the spring of all.

His wicked way his actual sinful courses; the practices of sin and the habits of sin must be left.

He shall die in his iniquity the punishment of his unrepented sins shall be death, but there is no danger unto the watchman, the prophet and minister, who did his duty, and warned the sinner.

Poole: Eze 3:20 - A righteous man // Doth turn from his righteousness // Commit iniquity // I lay a stumbling-block // He shall die // His righteousness What must be done to sinners is said, now for those that have been righteous take thy directions. A righteous man either one that hath for some co...

What must be done to sinners is said, now for those that have been righteous take thy directions.

A righteous man either one that hath for some continuance of time professed the way of righteousness, but is now overcome of vices; or who is righteous only in appearance, as Pro 18:17 Eze 18:24,26 33:13 Mat 9:13 .

Doth turn from his righteousness gives just cause to fear he not only hath committed some particular sin, but that he hath changed the course of life, the thoughts and purposes from good to evil, hath forsaken the way of righteousness.

Commit iniquity gives himself up to a sinful life, wallows in sin.

I lay a stumbling-block dispose affairs so by a just and punishing providence that what did restrain is taken away, or what will be occasion of greater sinning is not removed, or any other way I give such a one up to his own heart’ s lust, so that he continue in sin.

He shall die shall perish in his sin.

His righteousness either external, and seeming; or his partial and temporary righteousness, which he himself or others ascribed to him, and thought to be in him; shall not be profitable to him: he that apostatizeth is the worst of men, because he falls from known ways of goodness and holiness. Yet such must be warned, else their blood will be required at the hand of those who were to warn them.

Poole: Eze 3:21 - If thou warn // Sin not // And he doth not sin // Live If thou warn as often as need. The righteous man; the truly and really pious, the regenerate man. Sin not deliberately, customarily, habitually. A...

If thou warn as often as need. The righteous man; the truly and really pious, the regenerate man.

Sin not deliberately, customarily, habitually.

And he doth not sin takes warning, and departs further from sin, and keeps better to the ways of God.

Live be accepted with God and happy; and both warner and warned have delivered their souls.

Poole: Eze 3:22 - There // Go forth into the plain // Talk with thee See Eze 3:14 Eze 1:3 . There at Tel-abib. Go forth into the plain withdraw from the multitude, and retire into the opener place. Likely it was s...

See Eze 3:14 Eze 1:3 .

There at Tel-abib.

Go forth into the plain withdraw from the multitude, and retire into the opener place. Likely it was some spacious level in that low country which lay between the rivers.

Talk with thee to comfort, encourage, direct, and communicate further of the Divine will and counsels to the prophet.

Poole: Eze 3:23 - Then // The glory of the Lord // Stood there // As the glory which I saw by the river Then so soon as commanded. The glory of the Lord: see Eze 1:28 , with foregoing verses. Stood there in the plain whither he is now come. As the ...

Then so soon as commanded.

The glory of the Lord: see Eze 1:28 , with foregoing verses.

Stood there in the plain whither he is now come.

As the glory which I saw by the river it overpowered him now as then, and he could bear it no more now than before he could.

Poole: Eze 3:24 - The spirit // Shut thyself within thy house The spirit: see Eze 2:2 . Shut thyself within thy house: some say this is to be an interrogation, wilt thou, &c.? others add it is an irony, upbrai...

The spirit: see Eze 2:2 .

Shut thyself within thy house: some say this is to be an interrogation, wilt thou, &c.? others add it is an irony, upbraiding him; but I see no ground for either. It is, as we read it, a plain command, which appears, in that with the command God giveth strength to do what is commanded; and he is to shut up himself, to learn of God what he must foretell, to foresignify the shutting up of Jews in Jerusalem.

Poole: Eze 3:25 - Son of man // Put bands upon thee // Shall bind thee with them // Thou shalt not go out among them Son of man: see Eze 2:1 . It is not said who shall do this, therefore interpreters guess variously at it. Some say it is figurative, noting the malic...

Son of man: see Eze 2:1 . It is not said who shall do this, therefore interpreters guess variously at it. Some say it is figurative, noting the malice of the Jews, who would not suffer him quietly to converse with them, their malice was like bonds. Others understand the words as they sound, and refer,

1. To angels, as if they bound him.

2. To his friends and domestics, who would take his intenseness and earnestness in continued, retired thoughtfulness to be madness; so prophets were mistaken and misreported, 2Ki 9 Mr 3:21 . To the ruder and more violent of the Jews, who on all occasions were ready thus to confine their prophets, when they foretold unwelcome tidings, and to stir up their governors hereto, as 1Ki 22:27 Jer 32:2 37:15 38:6,7 . It is not improbable that the rabble should incense the aicuagotarcai , presidents of the captivity, to do this.

Put bands upon thee signifying the bonds and chains of their future captivity who were yet at Jerusalem.

Shall bind thee with them: this I suppose denotes the severity with which the conqueror would treat them, he would bind their bonds fast, close, and this will be pain and grief to the bounden.

Thou shalt not go out among them a Hebraism, thou shalt be denied a free converse.

Poole: Eze 3:26 - A reprover // A rebellious house Either by forbidding thee to speak, I will make thee as dumb as if thy tongue did cleave to the roof of thy mouth; or possibly God did suspend his i...

Either by forbidding thee to speak, I will make thee as dumb as if thy tongue did cleave to the roof of thy mouth; or possibly God did suspend his influence, and leave the prophet dumb, as one who could not move his tongue, the use whereof is taken away.

A reprover a man to reprove (as Heb.); shalt tell them as little of their faults and danger as a dumb man can do. God hereby giving the prophet some respite, signifying the future state of the Jews would be such they should no more dare to mutter or whisper; and punishing the refractory deafness of the Jews with taking away their reprover, &c.

A rebellious house: see Eze 2:5,7 .

Poole: Eze 3:27 - When I speak with thee // Thou shalt say unto them // Let him hear // Let him forbear When I speak with thee whenever I shall reveal any thing to thee; or, when I shall have discovered all to thee which thy people should be informed in...

When I speak with thee whenever I shall reveal any thing to thee; or, when I shall have discovered all to thee which thy people should be informed in; then I will open thy lips, and loose they tongue, and give thee power to speak.

Thou shalt say unto them in point of duty thou must tell them what I speak, and tell them as from me, who am eternal and sovereign Lord of heaven and earth: and in this style the Lord speaks above eighty times in this prophecy.

Let him hear it is his duty and safety, and I propose it to his consideration, let him think what he hath to do herein.

Let him forbear it is at his own peril, thou hast warned him, and now trouble not thyself, neither be grieved much at it. They, a rebellious house, act like themselves in sinning, and thou hast acted like thyself, a faithful admonisher; I will act like myself in punishing and giving them up into the hands of cruel, ravenous, and devouring enemies, who shall destroy them.

Haydock: Eze 3:1 - Eat this book, and go speak to the children of Israel Eat this book, and go speak to the children of Israel. By this eating of the book, was signified the diligent attention and affection with which we ...

Eat this book, and go speak to the children of Israel. By this eating of the book, was signified the diligent attention and affection with which we are to receive and embrace the word of God; and to let it as it were, sink into our interior by devout meditation. (Challoner) ---

The revelation came from God, ver. 10. (Worthington)

Haydock: Eze 3:2 - Book Book, in spirit; (Calmet) or in reality, he chewed the volume. (Haydock)

Book, in spirit; (Calmet) or in reality, he chewed the volume. (Haydock)

Haydock: Eze 3:3 - Mouth Mouth. I readily accepted the commission, but soon found the difficulties to which it would expose me, ver. 12., Jeremias xv. 16., and Apocalypse x....

Mouth. I readily accepted the commission, but soon found the difficulties to which it would expose me, ver. 12., Jeremias xv. 16., and Apocalypse x. 10.

Haydock: Eze 3:6 - Unknown // To thee Unknown. Hebrew, "heavy." (Calmet) --- Protestants, "hard." (Haydock) --- It is not above thy strength, Deuteronomy xxx. 12. --- To thee. He ...

Unknown. Hebrew, "heavy." (Calmet) ---

Protestants, "hard." (Haydock) ---

It is not above thy strength, Deuteronomy xxx. 12. ---

To thee. He insinuates that the Gentiles would obey the apostles. (St. Jerome) ---

But the time was not yet come. (Calmet) ---

From this text and Matthew xi. 21., it appears that "the same grace" is accepted by some and rejected by others, as "more grace is added to the former, which was sufficient before, and by this....is made effectual" through God's mercy, Romans ix. (Worthington) ---

Those who reject the first grace, can blame only themselves, if they receive no more. The same grace falling on a heat better prepared by God, like seed on good soil, is more fruitful.

Haydock: Eze 3:7 - Hard Hard. Literally, "rubbed" like a stone, or brass; attrita. (Haydock) --- God's ambassadors (Ephesians vi. 20.; Calmet) must do their utmost. (H...

Hard. Literally, "rubbed" like a stone, or brass; attrita. (Haydock) ---

God's ambassadors (Ephesians vi. 20.; Calmet) must do their utmost. (Haydock) ---

The success must not puff them up, nor the failure too much depressed them, as all regards God, (Matthew x. 40.) who will know how to make things conduce to his own glory. They must only bewail the blindness of sinners. (Calmet) ---

The care of them, and not the cure, will be required at their hands, ver. 19. (Haydock)

Haydock: Eze 3:8 - Harder Harder. If they will not blush, thou shalt not be ashamed to lay their disorders before their eyes, though they be such as ought not to be mentioned...

Harder. If they will not blush, thou shalt not be ashamed to lay their disorders before their eyes, though they be such as ought not to be mentioned, as becomes saints. (Haydock) See chap. xvi., and xxii. (Calmet)

Haydock: Eze 3:12 - Spirit // Commotion Spirit; wind (Hugo) or angel, took me through the air; (Prado.) or, I went willingly. (St. Jerome) --- Commotion, like an earthquake, (Hebrew; S...

Spirit; wind (Hugo) or angel, took me through the air; (Prado.) or, I went willingly. (St. Jerome) ---

Commotion, like an earthquake, (Hebrew; Septuagint) occasioned by the motion of the chariot, or the voice of the cherubim, ver. 13.

Haydock: Eze 3:14 - Spirit Spirit, resolved to rebuke (Calmet) sinners. Septuagint, "the spirit of the Lord also lifted me....and I went aloft ( like a meteor; Greek: meteoros...

Spirit, resolved to rebuke (Calmet) sinners. Septuagint, "the spirit of the Lord also lifted me....and I went aloft ( like a meteor; Greek: meteoros ) by the impulse of my spirit; for the hand of the Lord upon me was strong; and I went loft, to the captivity, and passed through them....conversing in the midst of them." (Haydock)

Haydock: Eze 3:15 - The heap of new corn // Tel // Mourning The heap of new corn. It was the name of a place; in Hebrew, Telabib, (Challoner) as the Chaldean leaves it (Menochius) with the three Greek inte...

The heap of new corn. It was the name of a place; in Hebrew, Telabib, (Challoner) as the Chaldean leaves it (Menochius) with the three Greek interpreters. (Calmet) ---

Tel means "a heap," and abib "new corn." (Haydock) ---

There was no new wheat in the fourth month, but rather in May or June, chap. i. 1. Ptolemy places Thelda near the Chaboras. ---

Mourning; or Protestants, "astonished," like Job's friends, for people dead in sin. (Haydock) ---

Many suppose that he never spoke. Yet this is not certain, (ver. 11.; Calmet) though probable from ver. 16. (Haydock)

Haydock: Eze 3:17 - Watchman Watchman: the usual title of those placed over others, chap. xxxiii. 2., and Isaias xxi. 6. Let none perish through thy neglect. (Calmet) --- "He...

Watchman: the usual title of those placed over others, chap. xxxiii. 2., and Isaias xxi. 6. Let none perish through thy neglect. (Calmet) ---

"He (the pastor) kills the man whom he delivers up to death by silence." (St. Gregory, hom. xi. 9.)

Haydock: Eze 3:20 - Iniquity // Before him // Remembered Iniquity, for want of thy instruction; (Haydock) or, if thou neglect to reclaim him, (Calmet) and he perish, or owe his conversion to another, when d...

Iniquity, for want of thy instruction; (Haydock) or, if thou neglect to reclaim him, (Calmet) and he perish, or owe his conversion to another, when duty requires thee to take care of him, thou shalt answer for the possible bad consequences. Thy sin is great, whatever become of him. But if he be damned, though he must blame himself chiefly, yet the blood of his soul shall cry for vengeance more than Abel's. (Haydock) ---

Before him, taking away my grace in punishment of his revolt. (Worthington) ---

If thou neglect to attempt reclaiming him, thou shalt perish with him; (St. Gregory) or if he be exposed to trial, and thou abandon him, (Vatable) of if thou neglect to husband well the precious moments, when I open his eyes, and fill him with apprehensions of his dangerous state, I will require, &c. (Origin; St. Jerome) ---

Remembered. Ingratitude caused the fruits of virtue to decay, and former crimes to revive, in some sense. (St. Thomas, [Summa Theologiae ] iii. p. q. 88. a. 1.) (Matthew v. 26.) (Calmet)

Haydock: Eze 3:21 - Warn Warn. It is the duty of a pastor to warn the just as well as sinners. (Worthington) --- It will not suffice to do this publicly: sometimes we mu...

Warn. It is the duty of a pastor to warn the just as well as sinners. (Worthington) ---

It will not suffice to do this publicly: sometimes we must go from house to house, like St. Paul, and compel those who are in the hedges to enter the marriage feast, by the most persuasive arguments. (Haydock)

Haydock: Eze 3:25 - Bands Bands. It is uncertain whether by his order, or they supposed he was deranged, as our Saviour's brethren meant to treat him, Mark iii. 21. The Chal...

Bands. It is uncertain whether by his order, or they supposed he was deranged, as our Saviour's brethren meant to treat him, Mark iii. 21. The Chaldean explains it figuratively of God's order, attaching the prophet to his service. (Calmet) ---

But real chains would more forcibly shew the future captivity of Juda (Haydock) which the prophet declared both by words and actions. (Calmet)

Haydock: Eze 3:26 - House House. "When there is a multitude of sins, (or sinners; peccatorum ) the offenders are unworthy of being corrected by the Lord." (St. Jerome) --- ...

House. "When there is a multitude of sins, (or sinners; peccatorum ) the offenders are unworthy of being corrected by the Lord." (St. Jerome) ---

The prophet's silence might suffice to admonish them. (Calmet) ---

He heard the Lord's commands to chap. xi. 24., before he spoke to the people. (Menochius)

Haydock: Eze 3:27 - Forbeareth Forbeareth. Septuagint, "disbelieveth, let him disbelieve." So we read, He that is unjust, let him be unjust still; (Apocalypse xxii. 11.) which ...

Forbeareth. Septuagint, "disbelieveth, let him disbelieve." So we read, He that is unjust, let him be unjust still; (Apocalypse xxii. 11.) which denotes the most desperate condition. (Haydock) ---

Aquila (2 edition) has, "he who abandons, shall be abandoned." (St. Jerome) ---

The man who makes good use of grace shall receive more; but he who despises the offers of God, shall be justly deprived of them in his greatest need. (Calmet)

Gill: Eze 3:1 - Moreover he said unto me // son of man, eat that thou findest // eat this roll // and go, speak unto the house of Israel Moreover he said unto me,.... The same glorious Person who had been speaking all along in the preceding chapter; and who was seen by the prophet on a ...

Moreover he said unto me,.... The same glorious Person who had been speaking all along in the preceding chapter; and who was seen by the prophet on a sapphire throne, and described in Eze 1:26; the first fifteen verses of this chapter are by Junius and Tremellius made a part of the second:

son of man, eat that thou findest; not anything, but what he found in the hand sent unto him; wherefore the Targum is,

"son of man, receive what is given thee;''

which was the roll, as follows:

eat this roll; not literally, but figuratively, as John is bid to eat the little book, Rev 10:9; that is, read it, meditate upon the things contained therein; and digest them, that he might be able to impart them, and make them known to others: it is explained in Eze 3:10; by hearing and receiving the words of the prophecy; and so the Targum,

"receive what is written in this roll;''

this is to eat it; as great readers of books are called "helluones librorum", eaters of books, gluttons at them; read them greedily, deeply meditate upon what is in them, and thoroughly digest them; so it becomes all good men to eat the word, to mix it with faith, to receive it in the love of it, and constantly meditate on it, Psa 1:1; and especially ministers of the Gospel, 1Th 4:15;

and go, speak unto the house of Israel; or, as the Targum,

"go, and prophesy to the house of Israel;''

for by eating the roll, in the sense given, he was fit for it; and when ministers of the word have read, and thought of, and digested the truths of the Gospel themselves, then they are prepared to go and enter upon their work, and feed others with knowledge and understanding.

Gill: Eze 3:2 - So I opened my mouth // and he caused me to eat that roll So I opened my mouth,.... To take in the roll, and eat it; he was not disobedient to the heavenly vision; he did all that he could towards eating it, ...

So I opened my mouth,.... To take in the roll, and eat it; he was not disobedient to the heavenly vision; he did all that he could towards eating it, but was not sufficient of himself; and therefore it follows:

and he caused me to eat that roll; he, the Lord, put it into his mouth, caused him to eat it, and tilled him with it, according to his promise, Psa 81:10. The efficacy and sufficiency to think of good things, to meditate upon them, receive and digest them, are of God; it is he that makes men prophets, and able ministers. The Targum is,

"and I inclined my soul, and he taught me (or made me wise "with") what was written in this roll.''

Gill: Eze 3:3 - And he said unto me, son of man, cause thy belly to eat // and fill thy bowels with this roll that I give thee // then did I eat it, and it was in my mouth, as honey for sweetness And he said unto me, son of man, cause thy belly to eat,.... Or "devour" f, and consume; that is, concoct and digest; do not cast it out of thy mouth,...

And he said unto me, son of man, cause thy belly to eat,.... Or "devour" f, and consume; that is, concoct and digest; do not cast it out of thy mouth, as soon as thou hast tasted of it; but let it go down into the stomach, and there digest it; and from thence into the belly, that so, upon the whole, virtue may be received, and nourishment come by it:

and fill thy bowels with this roll that I give thee; eat to satiety; so the Targum,

"son of man, thou shalt satiate thy soul, and fill thy belly, if thou receivest what is written in this roll, which I give thee:''

this was sufficient to qualify the prophet for prophesying, and furnish him with materials enough; and these fit and proper for the discharge of his office; and so such who study the word of God with application become scribes well instructed in the kingdom of heaven; and being filled themselves, are able to bring forth things to the comfort and satisfaction of others:

then did I eat it, and it was in my mouth, as honey for sweetness; that is, as the roll was spread before him, he looked into it, and read it, and meditated upon it, and laid it up in his memory, in order to deliver it out when commanded; and though it contained things very distressing, and which would occasion lamentation, and mourning, and woe; yet, considering that these were the will of God, and in righteous judgment to men, he could not but acquiesce in and approve of them. All the words that come out of the mouth of God are as sweet as, honey, yea, sweeter than that, Psa 19:10; and so the Targum interprets it of the words of the Lord,

"and I took it, and his words were in my mouth as sweet honey;''

and especially the Gospel, and the truths of it, are like honey; they are gathered by laborious ministers, as honey by the industrious bee, out of the various flowers of the Scriptures, with which being laden, they bring into the hive of the church, and dispose of for general usefulness; these are like honey for healthfulness, for nourishment, and for sweetness to the taste; that which makes the Gospel so are the exceeding great and precious promises in it: its doctrines of grace, and those of peace and reconciliation, of pardon, righteousness, eternal life and salvation, by Jesus Christ; and, above all, Christ himself, who is the sum and substance of it; and all its truths being quickening; comforting, and refreshing: but thou the Gospel is, only sweet when it is eaten; not merely heard, assented to, and superficially tasted of, but eaten and fed upon by faith; and so, it is sweet, not to unregenerate persons, whose taste is not changed; nor to nominal and notional professors, who have only a superficial taste of it; but to true believers in Christ, spiritual men, who judge and discern all things; see Rev 10:9.

Gill: Eze 3:4 - And he said unto me, son of man, go // get thee unto the house of Israel // and speak with my words unto them And he said unto me, son of man, go,.... After he had eaten the roll; for then was he qualified to prophesy: get thee unto the house of Israel; to ...

And he said unto me, son of man, go,.... After he had eaten the roll; for then was he qualified to prophesy:

get thee unto the house of Israel; to whom he was to prophesy:

and speak with my words unto them: not with his own words; nor with the words of men, the enticing words of man's wisdom; but with the words of Christ; with the taught words of the Holy Ghost; with what is written in the roll; the words of this prophecy are meant. So the Targum,

"and thou shalt prophesy the words of my prophecy unto them;''

in like manner John after he had eaten the little book, is told that he must prophesy before many people, nations, tongues, and kings, Rev 10:9; though Ezekiel was only sent to one nation, as follows:

Gill: Eze 3:5 - For thou art not sent to a people of a strange speech // and of a hard language // but to the house of Israel For thou art not sent to a people of a strange speech,.... "Deep of lip" g, or "speech"; difficult to be got at and understood: and of a hard lang...

For thou art not sent to a people of a strange speech,.... "Deep of lip" g, or "speech"; difficult to be got at and understood:

and of a hard language: or "heavy of tongue" h of a barbarous and unknown language, whom he could not understand, nor they him; and so would have been barbarians to one another; and consequently it could not be thought his prophesying among them, could have been of any use. This may be considered, either by way of encouragement to the prophet to go on his errand to such a people; since as he could understand them, and they him he might hope to meet with success; or, however he could deliver his message so as to be understood: or as an aggravation of the impiety perverseness and stupidity of the Israelites; that though the prophet spoke to them in their own language, yet they would not hear nor receive his words:

but to the house of Israel; who were a people of the same speech and language with the prophet; all spoke and understood the language of Canaan; nor were the things he delivered such as they were altogether strangers to being the same, for substance, which Moses, and the other prophets, had ever taught.

Gill: Eze 3:6 - Not to many people of a strange speech and of an hard language // whose words, thou canst not understand // surely, had I sent thee to them, they would have hearkened unto thee Not to many people of a strange speech and of an hard language,.... The prophet was sent, not to different nations, of different languages; but to one...

Not to many people of a strange speech and of an hard language,.... The prophet was sent, not to different nations, of different languages; but to one nation of the same language; indeed several of his prophecies concern other nations, as the Ammonites, Moabites, Edomites, Tyrians, Philistines, Egyptians, and Assyrians; but then these had a relation to the, people of Israel, and were chiefly on their account; and therefore he was not sent to those nations to deliver his prophecies unto them, but to the people of Israel only; and so had no difficulty on his part concerning their language, which he would have had, had he been sent to the barbarous nations;

whose words, thou canst not understand: the prophet being, only used to the language of the Jews and not having the gift of speaking with and understanding divers tongues; as the apostles of Christ had, when they were sent to many people of different languages, and which is here tacitly intimates:

surely, had I sent thee to them, they would have hearkened unto thee; which is an aggravation of the obstinacy and disobedience of the people of Israel; that had the barbarous nations been favoured with the same means of instruction they were they would have been obedient; see Mat 11:21; for though they could not understand the prophet's language, nor he theirs; yet, as Kimchi observes, they would have sought for an interpreter to have explained the prophecy to them. The thing is very strongly affirmed, "surely", verily, באמת, "of a truth"; as the same Jewish writer interprets אם לא; and both he and Jarchi take it to be the form of an oath. Some render the words, "if I had not sent thee to them, they would have hearkened unto thee" i; and the sense is, either that if the Lord had not sent him to the Israelites, but to the peopled a strange speech, they, the people, would have hearkened to him: or, if the Lord had not sent the prophet, but he had gone of himself, as the false prophets in their own name, the Israelites would have hearkened to him; such was their perverseness and rebellion: others render the words, "if not", or had it not been for their strange speech and hard language, "I would have sent thee to them" k, the barbarous nation, and "they would have hearkened unto thee"; but the first sense seems best; which is confirmed by the Targum, Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and the Oriental versions.

Gill: Eze 3:7 - But the house of Israel would not hearken unto thee // for they will not hearken unto me // for all the house of Israel are impudent and hardhearted But the house of Israel would not hearken unto thee,.... "They are not willing" l; they have no desire, no inclination, to hear and hearken; but the r...

But the house of Israel would not hearken unto thee,.... "They are not willing" l; they have no desire, no inclination, to hear and hearken; but the reverse; they were capable of hearing and understanding his speech and language, and though he was sent unto them by the Lord: and indeed the reason why they did not hearken to him was not because they rejected him and his words, but because they rejected the Lord and his words; they were the words of the Lord, and his reproofs; and therefore they would not hearken to them as follows:

for they will not hearken unto me; and which is an argument why the prophet should bear with patience their disregard to him and his words, and their neglect and contempt of them; for, seeing they would not hear the Lord, how could he exact they should hear him? and therefore he should not be uneasy at it; see Joh 15:20;

for all the house of Israel are impudent and hardhearted; or, "strong of front, and hard of heart" m; they had a whore's forehead, an impudent face, that could not blush and be ashamed; and hearts of stone, like a rock, and harder than the nether millstone, on which no impressions, could be made by all the admonitions and reproofs given them; see Eze 2:4; and this was the case of all of them in general, excepting some very few; which shows the sad degeneracy of this people.

Gill: Eze 3:8 - Behold, I have made the, face strong against their faces // and thy forehead strong against their foreheads Behold, I have made the, face strong against their faces,.... Not that the prophet should have the same sort of impudence and confidence they had; but...

Behold, I have made the, face strong against their faces,.... Not that the prophet should have the same sort of impudence and confidence they had; but that God would "give" n him such a face, as it is in the Hebrew text, such spirit and courage, that he should neither be ashamed of the words of the Lord, nor afraid to speak them to this people; so that he should be a match for them; they should not be able to outface him, or look him out of countenance; he should behave with an undaunted spirit, and with great intrepidity, amidst all opposition made to him: the Lord fits his ministers for the people he sends them to, and gives them courage and strength proportionate to the opposition they meet with; as their day is, their strength is; and all that invincible courage, boldness, and strength, with which they are endowed, it is all from the Lord, and a gift of his:

and thy forehead strong against their foreheads; which is the same thing in different words.

Gill: Eze 3:9 - As an adamant harder than flint have I made thy forehead // fear them not, neither be dismayed at their looks, though they be a rebellious house As an adamant harder than flint have I made thy forehead,.... Or, "than a rock" o; the "adamant" has its name in Greek, because it cannot be conquered...

As an adamant harder than flint have I made thy forehead,.... Or, "than a rock" o; the "adamant" has its name in Greek, because it cannot be conquered or subdued, neither by the hammer, nor by fire; the one cannot break, nor this other consume it; land it is called "shamir" in Hebrew, from its preserving itself from both; it will cut iron in pieces, which is harder than stone, and therefore must be harder than that. Bochart takes it to be the same with "smiris", a hard stone, which jewellers use to polish their gems with; see Jer 17:1. The design of the simile is to set forth the courage and fortitude of mind the prophet was endowed with, in order to face an impudent and hardhearted people;

fear them not, neither be dismayed at their looks, though they be a rebellious house; See Gill on Eze 2:6.

Gill: Eze 3:10 - Moreover he said unto me, son of man // all my words that I shall speak unto thee // receive in thine heart, and hear with thine ears Moreover he said unto me, son of man,.... The same glorious Person as before continued speaking to him, and added, as follows: all my words that I ...

Moreover he said unto me, son of man,.... The same glorious Person as before continued speaking to him, and added, as follows:

all my words that I shall speak unto thee; not only what he had spoken to him, but what he should hereafter; for he did not tell all at once what he should say, but gradually, revealing his mind to him by little and little; but then he was to receive all that he should say, and reject nothing, nor shun to declare the whole counsel of God:

receive in thine heart, and hear with thine ears; what the Lord says should not only be diligently attended to, and heard with eagerness, but should be received, in the love of it, into the heart, and laid, up in the mind and memory, in order to be delivered out to others at a proper time.

Gill: Eze 3:11 - And go, get thee to them of the captivity // unto the children of thy people // and speak unto them, and tell them // thus saith the Lord God; whether they will hear, or whether they will forbear And go, get thee to them of the captivity,.... Not in the times of Hoshea king of Israel, by Shalmaneser king of Assyria, for these were placed in the...

And go, get thee to them of the captivity,.... Not in the times of Hoshea king of Israel, by Shalmaneser king of Assyria, for these were placed in the cities of the Medes, 2Ki 17:6; but in the times of Jeconiah king of Judah, Eze 1:2;

unto the children of thy people; the Jews, which were in the land of Chaldea:

and speak unto them, and tell them: the words the Lord spoke to him:

thus saith the Lord God; whether they will hear, or whether they will forbear: See Gill on Eze 2:5.

Gill: Eze 3:12 - Then the spirit took me up // and I heard behind me a voice of a great rushing // saying, blessed be the glory of the Lord out of his place Then the spirit took me up,.... Not the wind, nor an angel, but the Spirit of God; who took up the prophet from the ground, from the place where he wa...

Then the spirit took me up,.... Not the wind, nor an angel, but the Spirit of God; who took up the prophet from the ground, from the place where he was, among the captives by the river Chebar, and had seen the glorious vision described in the first chapter; and had had his call and mission, as expressed in the second chapter, and hitherto in this; and was carried by him to another company of captives, who were at another place by the same river, as appears by comparing Eze 1:1, with Eze 3:15; for this was not done in a visionary way, as Kimchi thinks, but in reality; not in spirit, but in body; just as the Spirit caught away Philip from the eunuch, Act 8:39;

and I heard behind me a voice of a great rushing; of the living creatures and wheels, as is afterwards explained:

saying, blessed be the glory of the Lord out of his place; either out of heaven, the place where his glory is manifested; so the Targum, out of the place of his Shechinah or majesty; or out of the temple, from between the cherubim over the mercy seat, from whence he was about to remove, Eze 10:4. These words may be considered either as a doxology of the church, and people of God, ascribing glory, blessing, and praise unto him; not only on account of the perfections of his nature, but because of his works of nature, providence, and grace, and even for his righteous judgments on men. Maimonides p, by his place, understands the essence of God. Or as a lamentation for the departure of the blessed and glorious majesty of God from the temple, which seemed to be threatened; for the words may be rendered, "the blessed glory of the Lord out of his place" q; that is, it is just ready to go out of his place.

Gill: Eze 3:13 - I heard also the noise of the wings of the living creatures // that touched one another // and the noise of the wheels over against them // and a noise of a great rushing I heard also the noise of the wings of the living creatures,.... Which they clapped, when they uttered the preceding words; See Gill on Eze 1:24; ...

I heard also the noise of the wings of the living creatures,.... Which they clapped, when they uttered the preceding words; See Gill on Eze 1:24;

that touched one another; or "kissed, a woman her sister" r; denoting their affection and agreement in the doxology or ascription of glory to God; see Eze 1:9;

and the noise of the wheels over against them: the living creatures; for the wheels were by the living creatures, and went over against them, as they went, Eze 1:15; ministers and churches join together in this doxology:

and a noise of a great rushing; which is repeated for the confirmation of the thing, and to express the greatness of the noise made by the living creatures and wheels, like that of thunder or an earthquake; it is said to be like the noise of great waters, Eze 1:24.

Gill: Eze 3:14 - So the spirit lifted me up, and took me away // and I went in bitterness // in the heat of my spirit // but the hand of the Lord was strong upon me So the spirit lifted me up, and took me away,.... Lifted him up from the earth, and carried him through the air: and I went in bitterness; full of ...

So the spirit lifted me up, and took me away,.... Lifted him up from the earth, and carried him through the air:

and I went in bitterness; full of trouble and sorrow, that the Lord was departing from the temple; that his people had been guilty, of such crimes they had, and were such an impudent, and hardhearted people they were; and that such judgments were coming upon them he had seers written in the roll, full of lamentations, mourning, and woe:

in the heat of my spirit; the Targum and Vulgate Latin render it, "in the indignation of my spirit"; his spirit was hot and angry, he was froward and unwilling to go on the errand, to prophesy sad and dismal things to his people:

but the hand of the Lord was strong upon me; the Spirit of the Lord powerfully wrought upon him, and obliged him to go; and the hand of the Lord strengthened him, and removed his frowardness and perverseness of spirit. The Targum is,

"and prophecy from before the Lord was strong upon me;''

so Kimchi interprets it of the hand of prophecy; the Spirit of the Lord, as a spirit of prophecy, came upon him, with great impulse upon his spirit, and he could not refuse going to his people, to declare it to them.

Gill: Eze 3:15 - Then I came to them of the captivity at Telabib // that dwelt by the river of Chebar // and I sat where they sat // and remained there astonished among them seven days Then I came to them of the captivity at Telabib,.... For it seems the captive Jews were disposed of at different places, and there were some at this p...

Then I came to them of the captivity at Telabib,.... For it seems the captive Jews were disposed of at different places, and there were some at this place; for this was the name of a place, as Jarchi and Kimchi observe; as were Telmelah, and Telharsa, Ezr 2:59; it signifies "a heap of new fruit", and so the Vulgate Latin version renders it: not that there were such at this time here; and the captives were beating out the ripe ears of corn, as "abib" signifies; whence the month Abib has its name, and which was the first month with the Jews; whereas it was in the fourth month when Ezekiel was here, and there could no ears of new corn, Eze 1:1; according to Junius, this Telabib was a tract in Mesopotamia, reaching from Mount Masius to the river Euphrates, and lay between two rivers, Chebar and Saocoras; and he thinks the captive Jews were placed here, partly that they might be secured safe from getting away, or returning from their captivity; and partly that they might secure and defend the place from enemies, it being through inundations uninhabited, and so exposed unto them:

that dwelt by the river of Chebar; See Gill on Eze 1:1;

and I sat where they sat; there is a double reading here; the "Cetib" or writing is ואשר, which Junius takes to be the name of a river the prophet calls Haesher, the same with Saocoras, connecting it with the preceding clause, "that dwelt by the river of Chebar and Haesher"; the "Keri" or marginal reading is ואשב, "and I sat" or "dwelt"; but both signify the same thing, Since אשר is from שרה, which in Chaldee signifies to dwell s; and the "Keri" is confirmed by the Targum, which we follow. The sense is, that he placed himself among the captives,

and remained there astonished among them seven days: at the change of place and company; at the sad condition his people were in; and, above all, at the dreadful things he had to deliver to them. The Targum renders it, "silent"; through grief and trouble. So many days Job's friends kept silence, when they came to visit him, and saw his distress, Job 2:13. Or he might be waiting all this time for orders and instructions to prophesy; or to prepare the people to attend with more reverence and earnestness, to hear what he had to say when he should break silence. The Septuagint render it the reverse, "conversing in the midst of them".

Gill: Eze 3:16 - And it came to pass at the end of seven days // that the word of the Lord came unto me, saying And it came to pass at the end of seven days,.... Some think it was on the sabbath day he had the following declaration made to him, and instructions ...

And it came to pass at the end of seven days,.... Some think it was on the sabbath day he had the following declaration made to him, and instructions given him; but this is not certain; nor does it follow, or to be concluded, from such a way of speaking:

that the word of the Lord came unto me, saying; the Targum is,

"the word of prophecy from before the Lord.''

Gill: Eze 3:17 - Son of man, I have made thee a watchman unto the house of Israel // therefore hear the word at my mouth // and give them warning from me Son of man, I have made thee a watchman unto the house of Israel,.... Not in a civil sense, a watchman of a town or city, or of the whole country, but...

Son of man, I have made thee a watchman unto the house of Israel,.... Not in a civil sense, a watchman of a town or city, or of the whole country, but in an ecclesiastical sense. So the Targum renders it by מליף, "a teacher"; whose business it was to instruct the people in divine things, to warn them of their evil ways, and of the danger they exposed them to; such were the prophets of old, and such are the ministers of the New Testament: the office is the same with that of bishops or overseers; and lies in watching over the souls of men, as shepherds over their flocks, that they go into right pastures, and not astray, and so preserves them from beasts of prey; and as watchmen of cities, to give the time of night, and, notice of approaching danger; to the discharge of which office are necessary quick sight, diligence in looking out, sobriety and vigilance, courage, constancy, and faithfulness: and they are "sons of men" that are put into this office, and not angels; sons of fallen Adam, sinful men; men subject to infirmity, weak, frail, mortal men, and oftentimes of a mean and low extraction, and greatly unworthy of so high an honour; but Christ counts them faithful, and puts them into this office; they are not made and constituted watchmen or ministers by themselves or by others, but by him; and they are given by him as such to the church of God: "son of man, I have given thee a watchman" t, &c. they become watchmen through gifts bestowed upon them, qualifying them for this office; and they themselves are gifts to the churches over whom they are placed, signified by "the house of Israel"; for a church is a house of Christ's building, and where he dwells, and a family named of him, which he takes care of, and consists of Israelites indeed;

therefore hear the word at my mouth; for, as the prophets of old, so the ministers of the Gospel are first to hear what Christ says; and then deliver out his doctrine, called the doctrine of Christ, and the wholesome words of our Lord Jesus. So the Targum,

"and thou shalt receive the word from my Word;''

the word of prophecy, or the word of the Gospel, from Christ the essential Word;

and give them warning from me; in his name and stead, and as from his mouth, to take care of sinning against him, dishonouring his name, and wounding their own souls; that they live soberly, righteously, and godly, and adorn the doctrine of God their Saviour; that they avoid all appearances of evil, and shun the company of wicked men; the house of Israel, or church of God, are to be warned to be careful who they take into their communion, and to exclude such that are bad in principle and practice; to beware of innovations in worship, and of false teachers and false doctrines; and that they do not forsake the word, worship, and ordinances of God's house, but fill up their places, and perform all duties incumbent on them. The Targum is,

"and thou shalt warn them from sinning before me.''

Gill: Eze 3:18 - When I say unto the wicked, thou shalt surely die // and thou givest him not warning // nor speakest to warn the wicked from his wicked way // to save his life // the same wicked man shall die in his iniquity // but his blood will I require at thine hands When I say unto the wicked, thou shalt surely die,.... Not only a corporeal but an eternal death for this is what the law threatens with, and there th...

When I say unto the wicked, thou shalt surely die,.... Not only a corporeal but an eternal death for this is what the law threatens with, and there the Lord says this; and this is the wages, end, and issue of sin, if grace prevent not:

and thou givest him not warning; of the evil nature of sin, and of the danger it exposes to:

nor speakest to warn the wicked from his wicked way; to abstain from it, and live another course of life:

to save his life; for such warning, caution, exhortation, and doctrine, may be a means of converting a sinner from the evil of his way, and of saving a soul from death, 1Ti 4:16;

the same wicked man shall die in his iniquity; with the pollution and guilt of sin upon him, and so be punished for it; see Joh 8:24;

but his blood will I require at thine hands; thou shalt be answerable for him; his death shall be laid to thy charge, and thou shalt be chastised for thy negligence; see Act 20:26.

Gill: Eze 3:19 - Yet if thou warn the wicked // and he turn not from his wickedness, and from his wicked way // he shall die in his iniquity // but thou hast delivered thy soul Yet if thou warn the wicked,.... Of his sin and danger; lay before him his evil, and show him the sad consequences of going on in a course of sin, and...

Yet if thou warn the wicked,.... Of his sin and danger; lay before him his evil, and show him the sad consequences of going on in a course of sin, and warn him to flee from wrath to come:

and he turn not from his wickedness, and from his wicked way; does not repent of it, nor abstain from it:

he shall die in his iniquity; and for it, and that very righteously:

but thou hast delivered thy soul; thou hast done the duty of thine office; thou art clear from the charge of negligence and sloth, and from being answerable for the death of the sinner; and shalt save thyself, though not the wicked man; see 1Ti 4:16.

Gill: Eze 3:20 - Again, when a righteous man doth turn from his righteousness // and commit iniquity // and I lay a stumbling block before him // he shall die // because thou hast not given him warning // he shall die in his sin // and his righteousness which he hath done shall not be remembered // but his blood will I require at thine hand Again, when a righteous man doth turn from his righteousness,.... This is to be understood not of one that is truly righteous, or is justified by the...

Again, when a righteous man doth turn from his righteousness,.... This is to be understood not of one that is truly righteous, or is justified by the righteousness of Christ; for such can never turn from that righteousness, or be in an unjustified state; seeing that is the righteousness of God, and an everlasting one; but of one that is denominated righteous, from "his" own righteousness, from a righteousness "which he hath done", as is afterwards expressed; one that is outwardly righteous before men, that is outwardly reformed, that has a righteousness of his own, consisting of a little negative holiness, and a few moral performances; from such righteousness a man may apostatize, and go into a vicious course of life:

and commit iniquity; live in sin, make a trade of it; lead a life, the whole series and course of which is nothing else but sin; in this sense, one that is born of God, and has the righteousness of Christ revealed from faith to faith unto him, and lives by faith upon it, cannot commit sin, 1Jo 3:9;

and I lay a stumbling block before him; the Targum renders it, "the stumbling block of sins"; which designs either an occasion of sinning, which God permits, leaving him to his own lusts, and suffering him to fall thereby; and by this means he is discovered to be what he is, not a truly righteous man, but only one in appearance; that looked like a righteous person, but secretly a sinner, and now the Lord by such means exposes him openly; so Jarchi and other Jewish Rabbins; but Kimchi's father interprets the stumbling block of prosperity in this world u: or rather the punishment of sin is meant, as Kimchi himself observes; and the Septuagint renders it "torment"; since this follows up on his turning from righteousness, and committing sin; and seems to be explained by the next clause:

he shall die; the second death:

because thou hast not given him warning: of the dreadful evil of apostasy, and the sad estate of apostates, and the danger they are in, their last estate being worse than the first:

he shall die in his sin; of apostasy, and for it, being never to be recovered and brought to repentance:

and his righteousness which he hath done shall not be remembered; according to the "Keri" or marginal reading it is, "his righteousnesses"; all his works of righteousness which he hath done; and which reading is followed by the Targum, Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and the eastern versions; these shall not be remembered, neither in this world nor in that to come; no account shall be taken of them, nor shall they be reckoned as a righteousness unto him:

but his blood will I require at thine hand; See Gill on Eze 3:18.

Gill: Eze 3:21 - Nevertheless, if thou warn the righteous man // that the righteous sin not // and he doth not sin // he shall surely live // because he is warned // also thou hast delivered thy soul Nevertheless, if thou warn the righteous man,.... Every righteous man, that is so in a judgment of charity, whether truly righteous or not, which the...

Nevertheless, if thou warn the righteous man,.... Every righteous man, that is so in a judgment of charity, whether truly righteous or not, which the event shows; who should be warned not to trust in their own righteousness, but to depend on the righteousness of Christ; that they be careful to maintain good works, to avoid sin, and live holy lives and conversations, as follows:

that the righteous sin not; not that there is any just man that does good, and sins not; the best of men are often sinning in thought, word, or deed; but he is to be warned that he does not continue in sin, and lead a sinful coups of life; which is contrary to his character, and to his faith in Christ for righteousness, which is attended with good works:

and he doth not sin; the warning and exhortation given him having so good an effect, through the power of divine grace, as to be a means of preserving him from a vain conversation:

he shall surely live; spiritually and comfortably now, and eternally hereafter:

because he is warned; that being a means, and with the divine blessing taking effect:

also thou hast delivered thy soul; See Gill on Eze 3:19.

Gill: Eze 3:22 - And the hand of the Lord was there upon me // and he said unto me // arise, go forth into the plain // and I will there talk with thee And the hand of the Lord was there upon me,.... At Telabib, Eze 3:15. The Targum interprets "the hand of the Lord" of the spirit of prophecy, which re...

And the hand of the Lord was there upon me,.... At Telabib, Eze 3:15. The Targum interprets "the hand of the Lord" of the spirit of prophecy, which remained upon him there; but it seems to design a fresh impulse of the Spirit, a powerful emotion of the split upon his spirit, stirring up to attention to what might be said unto him:

and he said unto me; the same glorious Person, the Lord Christ, described in Eze 1:26;

arise, go forth into the plain; or "the valley" w; the Arabic version renders it, "the desert"; a solitary place, free from noise and hurry, and from the company and conversation of men; and so more fit for retirement and contemplation, and for attention to divine orders. What plain this was is not certain; Kimchi thinks it was the plain in which Babel was built, and where the Lord showed the prophet what he had in his providence done in this place formerly, in confounding the languages of men, and causing their devices to cease;

and I will there talk with thee; when alone, sedate, and composed; so God sometimes brings his people into a low and humble state and condition, into the valley of humility, and there grants them communion with himself; see Hos 2:14; perhaps the allusion to a custom among the Jews of revealing secrets to others in fields and deserts, and such like solitary places; see Gen 31:4 x.

Gill: Eze 3:23 - Then I arose and went forth into the plain // and, behold, the glory of the Lord stood there // as the glory which I saw by the river of Chebar // and I fell on my face Then I arose and went forth into the plain,.... He was obedient to the heavenly vision, which was owing to the hand of the Lord being upon him; the po...

Then I arose and went forth into the plain,.... He was obedient to the heavenly vision, which was owing to the hand of the Lord being upon him; the power of the Spirit and grace of God influences and engages to obedience; he went forth where he was ordered, though he knew not what would be said to him, or what he should see there:

and, behold, the glory of the Lord stood there; the glorious Person described in Eze 1:26;

as the glory which I saw by the river of Chebar; Eze 1:1; which vision was repeated for greater certainty, and to confirm the prophecies delivered to him, and to encourage him in the performance of his office:

and I fell on my face; as he did before, when he first saw this glorious object, Eze 1:28.

Gill: Eze 3:24 - Then the spirit entered into me // and set me upon my feet // and spake with me // and said unto me, go, shut thyself within thine house Then the spirit entered into me,.... Again; the Spirit of God, that was in the wheels and living creatures: see Eze 2:2; and set me upon my feet; a...

Then the spirit entered into me,.... Again; the Spirit of God, that was in the wheels and living creatures: see Eze 2:2;

and set me upon my feet; as he had done before, when in the same prostrate condition, Eze 2:2;

and spake with me; either the Spirit that entered into him, and set him upright; or rather the Lord Christ, the glory of the Lord that stood where he was, and appeared to him:

and said unto me, go, shut thyself within thine house: this was not said ironically, but in earnest; and the reason either was, because the people were not fit for reproof and correction, as Jarchi thinks, being a rebellious people; or that the prophet might receive further instructions, and have all the words of his prophecy delivered to him, before he began to prophesy. Some think this shutting up was an emblem of the siege of Jerusalem. It may seem strange that the prophet should be bid to go into the plain, where the Lord promised to talk with him; and this is all that is said to him, to go home, and shut himself up in his house: but it should be observed, that this was not the only thing for which he went into the plain: he was to have, and had, a fresh view of the glory of the Lord, and of the vision he had before, for the further confirmation of him; besides, this moving him from place to place, before he prophesied, might be partly to try his faith, and partly to preserve him from the violence of the people; who, had he delivered his message at once, might have been so provoked, as to have fallen upon him, and destroyed him; as well as to prepare them to receive his prophecies with more respect and reverence, when they saw he did not rashly, and at once, deliver them out to them.

Gill: Eze 3:25 - But thou, O son of man, behold, they shall put bands upon thee // and shall bind thee with them // and thou shall not go out among them But thou, O son of man, behold, they shall put bands upon thee,.... Or, "bands shall be put upon thee"; either visionally, or really; not by angels, b...

But thou, O son of man, behold, they shall put bands upon thee,.... Or, "bands shall be put upon thee"; either visionally, or really; not by angels, but by the Jews, who, taking the prophet for a madman by his motions and gestures; would bind him, and keep him within doors: or figuratively this may be understood of the sins of the people, their rebellion and obstinacy, which hindered the prophet from prophesying among them as yet; and so this is observed to conciliate his mind to the divine order, to shut up himself for a while in his own house, and be silent: or else by these bonds may be meant the divine order itself, which restrained him from doing his office as yet. So the Targum,

"behold, I have appointed the words of my mouth upon thee, as a band of ropes with which they bind;''

and shall bind thee with them; which some think is emblematical of the Jews being bound by the Chaldeans:

and thou shall not go out among them; to converse with them, or prophesy unto them. The Septuagint version renders it, "shall not go out from the midst of them"; as if he should be taken out of his own house by the Jews, and be bound by them, and kept among them, and not able to get away from them; but it is to be understood of his being bound in his own house, and not able to go out of that to them; and may signify, that in like manner the Jews should not be able to go out of Jerusalem when besieged by the Chaldeans.

Gill: Eze 3:26 - And I will make thy tongue cleave to the roof of thy mouth // that thou shall be dumb // and shall not be to them a reprover // for they are a rebellious house And I will make thy tongue cleave to the roof of thy mouth, that thou shall be dumb,.... Which is to be understood not literally, as if he was real...

And I will make thy tongue cleave to the roof of thy mouth,

that thou shall be dumb,.... Which is to be understood not literally, as if he was really struck dumb, as Zechariah was; see Eze 4:9; but that such silence should be charged upon him by the Lord, that he should be as if his tongue cleaved to the roof of his mouth, as Kimchi interprets it, and as if he was a dumb man: and so the Septuagint version renders it, "I will bind thy tongue"; lay an embargo upon it, that is, it shall be silent; and this sense is confirmed by what follows:

and shall not be to them a reprover; which was in judgment to them, and a giving them up to their own hearts' lusts; for, though reproofs were disagreeable to them, and they chose to be without them, yet they were necessary for them, and might have been useful to them; but they provoking the Lord, he takes away his word from them, and commands his prophet to be silent, and let them alone, to go on in their sins without control; which was a sore judgment upon them:

for they are a rebellious house; See Gill on Eze 2:5.

Gill: Eze 3:27 - But when I speak with thee // I will open thy mouth // and thou shalt say unto them, thus saith the Lord God // he that heareth, let him hear // and he that forbeareth, let him forbear // for they are a rebellious house But when I speak with thee,.... Either when I have made an end of speaking to thee, when I have told thee all my mind, and have given thee all the ins...

But when I speak with thee,.... Either when I have made an end of speaking to thee, when I have told thee all my mind, and have given thee all the instructions and prophecies thou art to deliver out; or when I shall speak to thee again, and give thee orders to speak:

I will open thy mouth; loose thy tongue, cause thee to break silence, and thou shall speak freely and fully all that I command thee; fulness of matter, and freedom of speech, are both from the Lord; liberty and opportunity of speaking are at his pleasure; and when he speaks his servants must prophesy, Amo 3:8;

and thou shalt say unto them, thus saith the Lord God; so and so, whatsoever he is pleased to order to be spoken; not that the following words are what were to be said to the people; but they are said to the prophet for his own use, that he might not be uneasy at the unfruitfulness and failure of his ministry:

he that heareth, let him hear; if any will hearken to what is sent to them, as few of them will, it is very well:

and he that forbeareth, let him forbear; or, "he that ceaseth, let him cease" y; he that ceaseth from hearing, let him do so, do not mind it, or be discouraged at it:

for they are a rebellious house; See Gill on Eze 2:5. The Targum is,

"he that receiveth, let him receive instruction; and he that ceaseth, let him cease from sinning, for it is a rebellious people.''

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NET Notes: Eze 3:1 Heb “eat what you find.”

NET Notes: Eze 3:3 I ate it. A similar idea of consuming God’s word is found in Jer 15:16 and Rev 10:10, where it is also compared to honey and may be specifically...

NET Notes: Eze 3:5 The conjunction “but” is not in the Hebrew text, but is implied from the context.

NET Notes: Eze 3:6 The MT reads “if not” but most ancient versions translate only “if.” The expression occurs with this sense in Isa 5:9; 14:24. ...

NET Notes: Eze 3:7 Heb “hard of forehead and stiff of heart.”

NET Notes: Eze 3:8 Heb “strong, resolute.”

NET Notes: Eze 3:9 Heb “of their faces.”

NET Notes: Eze 3:11 Heb “to the sons of your people.”

NET Notes: Eze 3:12 This translation accepts the emendation suggested in BHS of בְּרוּם (bÿrum) for בָּ&#...

NET Notes: Eze 3:14 In Ezekiel God’s “hand” being on the prophet is regularly associated with communication or a vision from God (1:3; 3:14, 22; 8:1; 37...

NET Notes: Eze 3:15 A similar response to a divine encounter is found in Acts 9:8-9.

NET Notes: Eze 3:16 This phrase occurs about fifty times in the book of Ezekiel.

NET Notes: Eze 3:17 The literal role of a watchman is described in 2 Sam 18:24; 2 Kgs 9:17.

NET Notes: Eze 3:18 Heb “his blood I will seek from your hand.” The expression “seek blood from the hand” is equivalent to requiring the death pen...

NET Notes: Eze 3:19 Verses 17-19 are repeated in Ezek 33:7-9.

NET Notes: Eze 3:20 Or “stumbling block.” The Hebrew term refers to an obstacle in the road in Lev 19:14.

NET Notes: Eze 3:21 Heb “the righteous man.”

NET Notes: Eze 3:22 Ezekiel had another vision at this location, recounted in Ezek 37.

NET Notes: Eze 3:23 Or “canal.”

NET Notes: Eze 3:24 Heb “he.”

NET Notes: Eze 3:26 Heb “you will not be to them a reprover.” In Isa 29:21 and Amos 5:10 “a reprover” issued rebuke at the city gate.

NET Notes: Eze 3:27 Heb “the listener will listen, the refuser will refuse.” Because the word for listening can also mean obeying, the nuance may be that the ...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:1 Moreover he said to me, Son of man, eat what thou findest; ( a ) eat this scroll, and go speak to the house of Israel. ( a ) By which is meant that n...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:8 Behold, I have made thy ( b ) face strong against their faces, and thy forehead strong against their foreheads. ( b ) God promises his assistance to ...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:10 Moreover he said to me, Son of man, all my words that I shall speak to thee ( c ) receive in thy heart, and hear with thy ears. ( c ) He shows what i...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:12 Then the spirit lifted me up, and I heard behind me a voice of a great rushing, [saying], ( d ) Blessed [be] the glory of the LORD from his place. ( ...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:14 So the spirit lifted me up, and took me away, and I ( e ) went in bitterness, in the heat of my spirit; but the hand of the LORD was strong upon me. ...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:15 Then I came to them of the captivity at ( f ) Telabib, that dwelt by the river of Chebar, and I sat where they sat, and remained there overwhelmed amo...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:17 Son of man, I have made thee a ( h ) watchman to the house of Israel: therefore hear the word at my mouth, and give them warning from me. ( h ) Of th...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:20 Again, When a ( i ) righteous [man] doth turn from his righteousness, and commit iniquity, and I lay a ( k ) stumblingblock before him, he shall die: ...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:22 And the ( m ) hand of the LORD was there upon me; and he said to me, Arise, go forth into the plain, and I will there talk with thee. ( m ) That is, ...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:23 Then I arose, and went forth into the plain: and, behold, the ( n ) glory of the LORD stood there, as the glory which I saw by the river of Chebar: an...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:24 Then the spirit entered into me, and ( o ) set me upon my feet, and spoke with me, and said to me, Go, ( p ) shut thyself within thy house. ( o ) Rea...

Geneva Bible: Eze 3:26 And I will make thy tongue ( q ) cleave to the roof of thy mouth, that thou shalt be dumb, and shalt not be to them a reprover: for they [are] a rebel...

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MHCC: Eze 3:1-11 - --Ezekiel was to receive the truths of God as the food for his soul, and to feed upon them by faith, and he would be strengthened. Gracious souls can re...

MHCC: Eze 3:12-21 - --This mission made the holy angels rejoice. All this was to convince Ezekiel, that the God who sent him had power to bear him out in his work. He was o...

MHCC: Eze 3:22-27 - --Let us own ourselves for ever indebted to the mediation of Christ, for the blessed intercourse between God and man; and a true believer will say, I am...

Matthew Henry: Eze 3:1-15 - -- These verses are fitly joined by some translators to the foregoing chapter, as being of a piece with it and a continuation of the same vision. The p...

Matthew Henry: Eze 3:16-21 - -- These further instructions God gave to the prophet at the end of seven days, that is, on the seventh day after the vision he had; and it is very p...

Matthew Henry: Eze 3:22-27 - -- After all this large and magnificent discovery which God had made of himself to the prophet, and the full instructions he had given him how to deal ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Eze 3:1-3 - -- After the Lord had pointed out to the prophet the difficulties of the call laid upon him, He prepared him for the performance of his office, by insp...

Keil-Delitzsch: Eze 3:22-27 - -- Introduction to the first prophetic announcement. - Eze 3:22. And there came upon me there the hand of Jehovah, and He said to me, Up! go into the ...

Constable: Eze 1:1--3:27 - --I. Ezekiel's calling and commission chs. 1--3 Four elements that mark the commission narratives in the prophets ...

Constable: Eze 2:1--3:27 - --B. The Lord's charge to Ezekiel chs. 2-3 Having seen a vision of God's glory, Ezekiel was now ready to r...

Constable: Eze 2:8--3:12 - --3. The nature of Ezekiel's ministry 2:8-3:11 This pericope contains 10 commands, and it is the center of the chiasm in chapters 1-3. "The Lord's charg...

Constable: Eze 3:12-15 - --4. The conclusion of the vision 3:12-15 "Ezekiel's vision of God's glory had provided the needed perspective for his task (1:4-2:7). The message he wa...

Constable: Eze 3:16-21 - --5. Ezekiel's role in Israel 3:16-21 3:16 At the end of these seven days the Lord's word came to Ezekiel. "The word of the Lord came to me" is a key ph...

Constable: Eze 3:22-27 - --6. Ezekiel's muteness 3:22-27 3:22 While Ezekiel was among the exiles in Tel-abib, the Lord directed him to go out to the nearby plain where the Lord ...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Ezekiel (Pendahuluan Kitab) The name Ezekiel means "(whom) God will strengthen" [GESENIUS]; or, "God will prevail" [ROSENMULLER]. His father was Buzi (Eze 1:3), a priest, and he ...

JFB: Ezekiel (Garis Besar) EZEKIEL'S VISION BY THE CHEBAR. FOUR CHERUBIM AND WHEELS. (Eze. 1:1-28) EZEKIEL'S COMMISSION. (Eze 2:1-10) EZEKIEL EATS THE ROLL. IS COMMISSIONED TO ...

TSK: Ezekiel (Pendahuluan Kitab) The character of Ezekiel, as a Writer and Poet, is thus admirably drawn by the masterly hand of Bishop Lowth: " Ezekiel is much inferior to Jeremiah ...

TSK: Ezekiel 3 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Eze 3:1, Ezekiel eats the roll; Eze 3:4, God encourages him; Eze 3:15, God shews him the rule of prophecy; Eze 3:22, God shuts and opens ...

Poole: Ezekiel (Pendahuluan Kitab) BOOK OF THE PROPHET EZEKIEL THE ARGUMENT EZEKIEL was by descent a priest, and by commission a prophet, and received it from heaven, as will appea...

Poole: Ezekiel 3 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 3 Ezekiel is made to eat the roll, Eze 3:1-3 . God encourageth him in the discharge of his office Eze 3:4-14 : he is carried by the Spirit ...

MHCC: Ezekiel (Pendahuluan Kitab) Ezekiel was one of the priests; he was carried captive to Chaldea with Jehoiachin. All his prophecies appear to have been delivered in that country, a...

MHCC: Ezekiel 3 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Eze 3:1-11) The preparation of the prophet for his work. (Eze 3:12-21) His office, as that of a watchman. (Eze 3:22-27) The restraining and restori...

Matthew Henry: Ezekiel (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of the Prophet Ezekiel When we entered upon the writings of the prophets, which speak of the ...

Matthew Henry: Ezekiel 3 (Pendahuluan Pasal) In this chapter we have the further preparation of the prophet for the work to which God called him. I. His eating the roll that was presented to ...

Constable: Ezekiel (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title and Writer The title of this book comes from its writer, Ezekiel, t...

Constable: Ezekiel (Garis Besar) Outline I. Ezekiel's calling and commission chs. 1-3 A. The vision of God's glory ch. 1 ...

Constable: Ezekiel Ezekiel Bibliography Ackroyd, Peter R. Exile and Restoration. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1968. ...

Haydock: Ezekiel (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE PROPHECY OF EZECHIEL. INTRODUCTION. Ezechiel, whose name signifies the strength of God, was of the priestly race, and of the number of t...

Gill: Ezekiel (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO EZEKIEL This book is rightly placed after Jeremiah; since Ezekiel was among the captives in Chaldea, when prophesied; whereas Jerem...

Gill: Ezekiel 3 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO EZEKIEL 3 This chapter contains a further account of the prophet's call and mission; of his preparation of him for is work; of, the...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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