kecilkan semua  

Teks -- Psalms 50:1-23 (NET)

Tampilkan Strong
Konteks
Psalm 50
50:1 A psalm by Asaph. El, God, the Lord speaks, and summons the earth to come from the east and west. 50:2 From Zion, the most beautiful of all places, God comes in splendor. 50:3 Our God approaches and is not silent; consuming fire goes ahead of him and all around him a storm rages. 50:4 He summons the heavens above, as well as the earth, so that he might judge his people. 50:5 He says: “Assemble my covenant people before me, those who ratified a covenant with me by sacrifice!” 50:6 The heavens declare his fairness, for God is judge. (Selah) 50:7 He says: “Listen my people! I am speaking! Listen Israel! I am accusing you! I am God, your God! 50:8 I am not condemning you because of your sacrifices, or because of your burnt sacrifices that you continually offer me. 50:9 I do not need to take a bull from your household or goats from your sheepfolds. 50:10 For every wild animal in the forest belongs to me, as well as the cattle that graze on a thousand hills. 50:11 I keep track of every bird in the hills, and the insects of the field are mine. 50:12 Even if I were hungry, I would not tell you, for the world and all it contains belong to me. 50:13 Do I eat the flesh of bulls? Do I drink the blood of goats? 50:14 Present to God a thank-offering! Repay your vows to the sovereign One! 50:15 Pray to me when you are in trouble! I will deliver you, and you will honor me!” 50:16 God says this to the evildoer: “How can you declare my commands, and talk about my covenant? 50:17 For you hate instruction and reject my words. 50:18 When you see a thief, you join him; you associate with men who are unfaithful to their wives. 50:19 You do damage with words, and use your tongue to deceive. 50:20 You plot against your brother; you slander your own brother. 50:21 When you did these things, I was silent, so you thought I was exactly like you. But now I will condemn you and state my case against you! 50:22 Carefully consider this, you who reject God! Otherwise I will rip you to shreds and no one will be able to rescue you. 50:23 Whoever presents a thank-offering honors me. To whoever obeys my commands, I will reveal my power to deliver.”
Paralel   Ref. Silang (TSK)   ITL  

Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Asaph father of Joah, Hezekiah's recorder,son of Berechiah the Levite; music minister under David,father of Zichri; a Levite ancestor of some returnees,an official over the (Persian) king's forest in Judah
 · Israel a citizen of Israel.,a member of the nation of Israel
 · Selah a musical notation for crescendo or emphasis by action (IBD)
 · Zion one of the hills on which Jerusalem was built; the temple area; the city of Jerusalem; God's people,a town and citidel; an ancient part of Jerusalem


Topik/Tema Kamus: Asaph | Praise | Psalms | PSALMS, BOOK OF | PHILOSOPHY | SACRIFICE, IN THE OLD TESTAMENT, 3 | God | Formalism | Offerings | Wicked | Judgment | Animals | Vows | Lies and Deceits | Theft | Thankfulness | Hypocrisy | Impenitence | ORDER | LAW IN THE OLD TESTAMENT | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 50:1 - Called All the inhabitants of the earth, from one end to the other: whom he here summons to be witnesses of his proceedings in this solemn judgment, between ...

All the inhabitants of the earth, from one end to the other: whom he here summons to be witnesses of his proceedings in this solemn judgment, between him and his people, which is here poetically represented. For here is a tribunal erected, the judge coming to it, the witnesses and delinquents summoned, and at last the sentence given.

Wesley: Psa 50:2 - Zion The place where he was supposed to reside, and where he would now sit in judgment.

The place where he was supposed to reside, and where he would now sit in judgment.

Wesley: Psa 50:2 - The perfection The most amiable place of the whole world, because, of the presence and worship, and blessing of God.

The most amiable place of the whole world, because, of the presence and worship, and blessing of God.

Wesley: Psa 50:2 - Shined Hath manifested himself in a glorious manner.

Hath manifested himself in a glorious manner.

Wesley: Psa 50:3 - Our God The prophet speaks this in the persons of the worshippers of God. Though he be our God, yet he will come to execute judgment upon us.

The prophet speaks this in the persons of the worshippers of God. Though he be our God, yet he will come to execute judgment upon us.

Wesley: Psa 50:3 - Cease Or delay to sit in judgment.

Or delay to sit in judgment.

Wesley: Psa 50:3 - Tempestuous This is a farther description of that terrible majesty, wherewith God would clothe himself when he came to his tribunal.

This is a farther description of that terrible majesty, wherewith God would clothe himself when he came to his tribunal.

Wesley: Psa 50:4 - Call To the inhabitants of them, all angels and men, whom he calls in for witnesses of the equity of his proceedings.

To the inhabitants of them, all angels and men, whom he calls in for witnesses of the equity of his proceedings.

Wesley: Psa 50:5 - Gather O ye angels, summon and fetch them to my tribunal. Which is poetically spoken, to continue the metaphor, and representation of the judgment.

O ye angels, summon and fetch them to my tribunal. Which is poetically spoken, to continue the metaphor, and representation of the judgment.

Wesley: Psa 50:5 - My saints The Israelites, whom God had chosen and separated them from all the nations of the earth, to be an holy and peculiar people to himself, and they also ...

The Israelites, whom God had chosen and separated them from all the nations of the earth, to be an holy and peculiar people to himself, and they also had solemnly devoted themselves to God; all which aggravated their apostacy.

Wesley: Psa 50:5 - Those Who have entered into covenant with me, and have ratified that covenant by sacrifice. This seems to be added, to acquaint them with the proper nature,...

Who have entered into covenant with me, and have ratified that covenant by sacrifice. This seems to be added, to acquaint them with the proper nature, use and end of sacrifices, which were principally appointed to be signs and seals of the covenant made between God and his people; and consequently to convince them of their great mistake in trusting to their outward sacrifices, when they neglected the very life and soul of them, which was the keeping of their covenant with God.

Wesley: Psa 50:6 - Declare God will convince the people of his righteousness, and of their own wickedness, by thunders and lightnings, and storms, or other dreadful signs wrough...

God will convince the people of his righteousness, and of their own wickedness, by thunders and lightnings, and storms, or other dreadful signs wrought by him in the heavens.

Wesley: Psa 50:6 - Himself In his own person. God will not now reprove them, by his priests or prophets, but in an extraordinary manner from heaven.

In his own person. God will not now reprove them, by his priests or prophets, but in an extraordinary manner from heaven.

Wesley: Psa 50:7 - Hear Having brought in God, as coming to judgment, he now gives an account of the process and sentence of the judge.

Having brought in God, as coming to judgment, he now gives an account of the process and sentence of the judge.

Wesley: Psa 50:7 - Testify I will declare my charge against thee.

I will declare my charge against thee.

Wesley: Psa 50:7 - Thy God Not only in general, but in a special manner, by that solemn covenant made at Sinai; whereby I avouched thee to be my peculiar people, and thou didst ...

Not only in general, but in a special manner, by that solemn covenant made at Sinai; whereby I avouched thee to be my peculiar people, and thou didst avouch me to be thy God.

Wesley: Psa 50:8 - I will not This is not the principal matter of my charge, that thou hast neglected sacrifices which thou shouldst have offered.

This is not the principal matter of my charge, that thou hast neglected sacrifices which thou shouldst have offered.

Wesley: Psa 50:9 - Bullock Be not so foolish, as to imagine that thou dost lay any obligations upon me by thy sacrifices.

Be not so foolish, as to imagine that thou dost lay any obligations upon me by thy sacrifices.

Wesley: Psa 50:11 - The fowls Such as are wild and fly up and down upon mountains.

Such as are wild and fly up and down upon mountains.

Wesley: Psa 50:14 - Offer If thou wouldest know what sacrifices I prize, and indispensably require, in the first place, it is that of thankfulness, proportionable to my great a...

If thou wouldest know what sacrifices I prize, and indispensably require, in the first place, it is that of thankfulness, proportionable to my great and numberless favours; which doth not consist barely in verbal acknowledgments, but proceeds from an heart deeply affected with God's mercies, and is accompanied with such a course of life, as is well - pleasing to God.

Wesley: Psa 50:14 - Vows Those substantial vows and promises, which were the very soul of their sacrifices.

Those substantial vows and promises, which were the very soul of their sacrifices.

Wesley: Psa 50:15 - Call And make conscience of that great duty of fervent prayer, which is an acknowledgment of thy subjection to me, and of thy trust and dependance upon me.

And make conscience of that great duty of fervent prayer, which is an acknowledgment of thy subjection to me, and of thy trust and dependance upon me.

Wesley: Psa 50:15 - Glorify Thou shalt have occasion to glorify me for thy deliverance.

Thou shalt have occasion to glorify me for thy deliverance.

Wesley: Psa 50:16 - But With what confidence darest thou make mention of my grace and favour, in giving thee such a covenant and statutes.

With what confidence darest thou make mention of my grace and favour, in giving thee such a covenant and statutes.

Wesley: Psa 50:21 - Kept silence I did not express my displeasure against thee in such judgments as thou didst deserve.

I did not express my displeasure against thee in such judgments as thou didst deserve.

Wesley: Psa 50:21 - Thoughtest Thou didst misconstrue my patience and long - suffering, as if it had proceeded from my approbation of thy evil courses.

Thou didst misconstrue my patience and long - suffering, as if it had proceeded from my approbation of thy evil courses.

Wesley: Psa 50:21 - Set in order I will bring to thy remembrance, and lay upon thy conscience all thy sins.

I will bring to thy remembrance, and lay upon thy conscience all thy sins.

Wesley: Psa 50:23 - Glorifieth He and he only gives me the honour that I require, and not he who loads my altar with sacrifices.

He and he only gives me the honour that I require, and not he who loads my altar with sacrifices.

JFB: Psa 50:1-4 - -- In the grandeur and solemnity of a divine judgment, God is introduced as instructing men in the nature of true worship, exposing hypocrisy, warning th...

In the grandeur and solemnity of a divine judgment, God is introduced as instructing men in the nature of true worship, exposing hypocrisy, warning the wicked, and encouraging the pious. (Psa. 50:1-23)

The description of this majestic appearance of God resembles that of His giving the law (compare Exo 19:16; Exo 20:18; Deu 32:1).

JFB: Psa 50:4 - above Literally, "above" (Gen 1:7).

Literally, "above" (Gen 1:7).

JFB: Psa 50:4 - heavens . . . earth For all creatures are witnesses (Deu 4:26; Deu 30:19; Isa 1:2).

For all creatures are witnesses (Deu 4:26; Deu 30:19; Isa 1:2).

JFB: Psa 50:5 - my saints (Psa 4:3).

(Psa 4:3).

JFB: Psa 50:5 - made Literally, "cut"

Literally, "cut"

JFB: Psa 50:5 - a covenant, &c. Alluding to the dividing of a victim of sacrifice, by which covenants were ratified, the parties passing between the divided portions (compare Gen 15:...

Alluding to the dividing of a victim of sacrifice, by which covenants were ratified, the parties passing between the divided portions (compare Gen 15:10, Gen 15:18).

JFB: Psa 50:6 - -- The inhabitants of heaven, who well know God's character, attest His righteousness as a judge.

The inhabitants of heaven, who well know God's character, attest His righteousness as a judge.

JFB: Psa 50:7 - I will testify That is, for failure to worship aught.

That is, for failure to worship aught.

JFB: Psa 50:7 - thy God And so, by covenant as well as creation, entitled to a pure worship.

And so, by covenant as well as creation, entitled to a pure worship.

JFB: Psa 50:8-15 - However scrupulous in external worship, it was offered as if they conferred an obligation in giving God His own, and with a degrading view of Him as needing it [Psa 50:9-13]. Reproving them for such foolish and blasphemous notions, He teaches them to offer, or literally, "sacrifice," thanksgiving, and pay, or perform, their vows That is, to bring, with the external symbolical service, the homage of the heart, and faith, penitence, and love. To this is added an invitation to se...

That is, to bring, with the external symbolical service, the homage of the heart, and faith, penitence, and love. To this is added an invitation to seek, and a promise to afford, all needed help in trouble.

JFB: Psa 50:16-20 - the wicked That is, the formalists, as now exposed, and who lead vicious lives (compare Rom 2:21, Rom 2:23). They are unworthy to use even the words of God's law...

That is, the formalists, as now exposed, and who lead vicious lives (compare Rom 2:21, Rom 2:23). They are unworthy to use even the words of God's law. Their hypocrisy and vice are exposed by illustrations from sins against the seventh, eighth, and ninth commandments.

JFB: Psa 50:21-22 - -- God, no longer (even in appearance) disregarding such, exposes their sins and threatens a terrible punishment.

God, no longer (even in appearance) disregarding such, exposes their sins and threatens a terrible punishment.

JFB: Psa 50:22 - forget God This denotes unmindfulness of His true character.

This denotes unmindfulness of His true character.

JFB: Psa 50:23 - offereth praise (Psa 50:14), so that the external worship is a true index of the heart.

(Psa 50:14), so that the external worship is a true index of the heart.

JFB: Psa 50:23 - ordereth . . . aright Acts in a straight, right manner, opposed to turning aside (Psa 25:5). In such, pure worship and a pure life evince their true piety, and they will en...

Acts in a straight, right manner, opposed to turning aside (Psa 25:5). In such, pure worship and a pure life evince their true piety, and they will enjoy God's presence and favor.

Clarke: Psa 50:1 - The mighty God, even the Lord, hath spoken The mighty God, even the Lord, hath spoken - Here the essential names of God are used: אל אלהים יהוה El , Elohim , Yehovah , hath spoken...

The mighty God, even the Lord, hath spoken - Here the essential names of God are used: אל אלהים יהוה El , Elohim , Yehovah , hath spoken. The six first verses of this Psalm seem to contain a description of the great judgment: to any minor consideration or fact it seems impossible, with any propriety, to restrain them. In this light I shall consider this part of the Psalm, and show: -

First, The preparatives to the coming of the great Judge. El Elohim Jehovah hath spoken, and called the earth - all the children of men from the rising of the sun unto the going down thereof. Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, ( מכלל יפי michlal yophi , the beauty where all perfection is comprised), God hath shined, Psa 50:1, Psa 50:2

1.    He has sent his Spirit to convince men of sin, righteousness, and judgment

2.    He has sent his Word; has made a revelation of himself; and has declared both his law and his Gospel to mankind: "Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God hath shined,"Psa 50:2. For out of Zion the law was to go forth, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem. Isa 2:3

Secondly, The accompaniments

1.    His approach is proclaimed, Psa 50:3 : "Our God shall come.

2.    The trumpet proclaims his approach: "He shall not keep silence.

3.    Universal nature shall be shaken, and the earth and its works be burnt up: "A fire shall devour before him and it shall be very tempestuous round about him,"Psa 50:3

Thirdly, The witnesses are summoned and collected, and collected from all quarters; some from heaven, and some from earth

1.    Guardian angels

2.    Human associates: "He shall call to the heavens from above, and to the earth, that he may judge his people,"Psa 50:4

Fourthly, The procedure. As far as it respects the righteous, orders are issued: "Gather my saints,"those who are saved from their sins and made holy, "together unto me."And that the word saints might not be misunderstood it is explained by "those that have made a covenant with me by sacrifice;"those who have entered into union with God, through the sacrificial offering of the Lord Jesus Christ. All the rest are passed over in silence. We are told who they are that shall enter into the joy of their Lord, viz., only the saints, those who have made a covenant with God by sacrifice. All, therefore, who do not answer this description are excluded from glory

Fifthly, The final issue: all the angelic hosts and all the redeemed of the Lord, join in applauding acclamation at the decision of the Supreme Judge. The heavens (for the earth is no more, it is burnt up) shall declare his righteousness, the exact justice of the whole procedure, where justice alone has been done without partiality, and without severity, nor could it be otherwise, for God is Judge himself. Thus the assembly is dissolved; the righteous are received into everlasting glory, and the wicked turned into hell, with all those who forget God. Some think that the sentence against the wicked is that which is contained, Psa 50:16-22. See the analysis at the end, and particularly on the six first verses, in which a somewhat different view of the subject is taken.

Clarke: Psa 50:7 - Hear, O my people Hear, O my people - As they were now amply informed concerning the nature and certainty of the general judgment, and were still in a state of probat...

Hear, O my people - As they were now amply informed concerning the nature and certainty of the general judgment, and were still in a state of probation, Asaph proceeds to show them the danger to which they were exposed, and the necessity of repentance and amendment, that when that great day should arrive, they might be found among those who had made a covenant with God by sacrifice. And he shows them that the sacrifice with which God would be well pleased was quite different from the bullocks, he-goats, etc., which they were in the habit of offering. In short, he shows here that God has intended to abrogate those sacrifices, as being no longer of any service: for when the people began to trust in them, without looking to the thing signified, it was time to put them away. When the people began to pay Divine honors to the brazen serpent, though it was originally an ordinance of God’ s appointment for the healing of the Israelites, it was ordered to be taken away; called nehushtan, a bit of brass; and broken to pieces. The sacrifices under the Jewish law were of God’ s appointment; but now that the people began to put their trust in them, God despised them.

Clarke: Psa 50:8 - I will not reprove thee I will not reprove thee - I do not mean to find fault with you for not offering sacrifices; you have offered them, they have been continually before...

I will not reprove thee - I do not mean to find fault with you for not offering sacrifices; you have offered them, they have been continually before me: but you have not offered them in the proper way.

Clarke: Psa 50:10 - Every beast of the forest is mine Every beast of the forest is mine - Can ye suppose that ye are laying me under obligation to you, when ye present me with a part of my own property?

Every beast of the forest is mine - Can ye suppose that ye are laying me under obligation to you, when ye present me with a part of my own property?

Clarke: Psa 50:12 - The world is mine, and the fullness thereof The world is mine, and the fullness thereof - Ye cannot, therefore, give me any thing that is not my own.

The world is mine, and the fullness thereof - Ye cannot, therefore, give me any thing that is not my own.

Clarke: Psa 50:13 - Will I eat the flesh of bulls Will I eat the flesh of bulls - Can ye be so simple as to suppose that I appointed such sacrifices for my own gratification? All these were signific...

Will I eat the flesh of bulls - Can ye be so simple as to suppose that I appointed such sacrifices for my own gratification? All these were significative of a spiritual worship, and of the sacrifice of that Lamb of God which, in the fullness of time, was to take away, in an atoning manner, the sin of the world.

Clarke: Psa 50:14 - Offer unto God thanksgiving; and pay thy vows unto the Most High Offer unto God thanksgiving; and pay thy vows unto the Most High - זבח zebach , "sacrifice unto God, אלהים Elohim , the תודה todah , ...

Offer unto God thanksgiving; and pay thy vows unto the Most High - זבח zebach , "sacrifice unto God, אלהים Elohim , the תודה todah , thank-offering,"which was the same as the sin-offering, viz. a bullock, or a ram, without blemish; only there were, in addition, "unleavened cakes mingled with oil, and unleavened wafers anointed with oil; and cakes of fine flour mingled with oil and fried,"Lev 7:12

Clarke: Psa 50:14 - And pay thy vows And pay thy vows - נדריך nedareycha , "thy vow-offering, to the Most High."The neder or vow-offering was a male without blemish, taken from am...

And pay thy vows - נדריך nedareycha , "thy vow-offering, to the Most High."The neder or vow-offering was a male without blemish, taken from among the beeves, the sheep, or the goats. Compare Lev 22:19 with Psa 50:22. Now these were offerings, in their spiritual and proper meaning, which God required of the people: and as the sacrificial system was established for an especial end - to show the sinfulness of sin, and the purity of Jehovah, and to show how sin could be atoned for, forgiven, and removed; this system was now to end in the thing that it signified, - the grand sacrifice of Christ, which was to make atonement, feed, nourish, and save the souls of believers unto eternal life; to excite their praise and thanksgiving; bind them to God Almighty by the most solemn vows to live to him in the spirit of gratitude and obedience all the days of their life. And, in order that they might be able to hold fast faith and a good conscience, they were to make continual prayer to God, who promised to hear and deliver them, that they might glorify him, Psa 50:15

From the Psa 50:16 to the Psa 50:22 Asaph appears to refer to the final rejection of the Jews from having any part in the true covenant sacrifice.

Clarke: Psa 50:16 - But unto the wicked But unto the wicked - The bloodthirsty priests, proud Pharisees, and ignorant scribes of the Jewish people.

But unto the wicked - The bloodthirsty priests, proud Pharisees, and ignorant scribes of the Jewish people.

Clarke: Psa 50:17 - Seeing thou hatest instruction Seeing thou hatest instruction - All these rejected the counsel of God against themselves; and refused to receive the instructions of Christ.

Seeing thou hatest instruction - All these rejected the counsel of God against themselves; and refused to receive the instructions of Christ.

Clarke: Psa 50:18 - When thou sawest a thief When thou sawest a thief - Rapine, adulteries, and adulterous divines, were common among the Jews in our Lord’ s time. The Gospels give full pr...

When thou sawest a thief - Rapine, adulteries, and adulterous divines, were common among the Jews in our Lord’ s time. The Gospels give full proof of this.

Clarke: Psa 50:21 - These things hast thou done These things hast thou done - My eye has been continually upon you, though my judgments have not been poured out: and because I was silent, thou did...

These things hast thou done - My eye has been continually upon you, though my judgments have not been poured out: and because I was silent, thou didst suppose I was such as thyself; but I will reprove thee, etc. I will visit for these things.

Clarke: Psa 50:22 - Now consider this Now consider this - Ye have forgotten your God, and sinned against him. He has marked down all your iniquities, and has them in order to exhibit aga...

Now consider this - Ye have forgotten your God, and sinned against him. He has marked down all your iniquities, and has them in order to exhibit against you. Beware, therefore, lest he tear you to pieces, when there is none to deliver; for none can deliver you but the Christ you reject. And how can ye escape, if ye neglect so great a salvation?

Clarke: Psa 50:23 - Whoso offereth praise Whoso offereth praise - These are the very same words as those in Psa 50:14, זבח תודה ; and should be read the same way independently of the...

Whoso offereth praise - These are the very same words as those in Psa 50:14, זבח תודה ; and should be read the same way independently of the points, zebach todah, "sacrifice the thank-offering."Jesus is the great eucharistic sacrifice; offer him up to God in your faith and prayers. By this sacrifice is God glorified, for in him is God well pleased; and it was by the grace or good pleasure of God that he tasted death for every man

Clarke: Psa 50:23 - Ordereth his conversation Ordereth his conversation - שם דרך sam derech , Disposeth his way. - Margin. Has his way There, שם דרך sham derech , as many MSS. and ol...

Ordereth his conversation - שם דרך sam derech , Disposeth his way. - Margin. Has his way There, שם דרך sham derech , as many MSS. and old editions have it; or makes that his custom

Clarke: Psa 50:23 - Will I show the salvation of God Will I show the salvation of God - אראנו arennu , I will cause him to see בישע beyesha , into the salvation of God; into God’ s meth...

Will I show the salvation of God - אראנו arennu , I will cause him to see בישע beyesha , into the salvation of God; into God’ s method of saving sinners by Christ. He shall witness my saving power even to the uttermost; such a salvation as it became a God to bestow, and as a fallen soul needs to receive; the salvation from all sin, which Christ has purchased by his death. I sall scheu til him, the hele of God ; that es Jeshu, that he se him in the fairehed of his majeste - Old Psalter

Calvin: Psa 50:1 - The God of gods, even Jehovah, 1.The God of gods, even Jehovah, 241 hath spoken The inscription of this psalm bears the name of Asaph; but whether he was the author of it, or mer...

1.The God of gods, even Jehovah, 241 hath spoken The inscription of this psalm bears the name of Asaph; but whether he was the author of it, or merely received it as chief singer from the hand of David, cannot be known. This, however, is a matter of little consequence. The opinion has been very generally entertained, that the psalm points to the period of the Church’s renovation, and that the design of the prophet is to apprise the Jews of the coming abrogation of their figurative worship under the Law. That the Jews were subjected to the rudiments of the world, which continued till the Church’s majority, and the arrival of what the apostle calls “the fullness of times,” (Gal 4:4,) admits of no doubt; the only question is, whether the prophet must here be considered as addressing the men of his own age, and simply condemning the abuse and corruption of the legal worship, or as predicting the future kingdom of Christ? From the scope of the psalm, it is sufficiently apparent that the prophet does in fact interpret the Law to his contemporaries, with a view of showing them that the ceremonies, while they existed, were of no importance whatever by themselves, or otherwise than connected with a higher meaning. Is it objected, that God never called the whole world except upon the promulgation of the Gospel, and that the doctrine of the Law was addressed only to one peculiar people? the answer is obvious, that the prophet in this place describes the whole world as convened not for the purpose of receiving one common system of faith, but of hearing God plead his cause with the Jews in its presence. The appeal is of a parallel nature with others which we find in Scripture:

“Give ear, O ye heavens! and I will speak; and hear, O earth! the words of my mouths” (Deu 32:1;)

or as in another place,

“I call heaven and earth to record this day against you, that I have set before you life and death,” (Deu 30:19;)

and again Isaiah,

“Hear, O heaven! and give ear, O earth! for the Lord hath spoken,” (Isa 1:2.) 242

This vehement mode of address was required in speaking to hypocrites, that they might be roused from their complacent security, and their serious attention engaged to the message of God. The Jews had special need to be awakened upon the point to which reference is here made. Men are naturally disposed to outward show in religion, and, measuring God by themselves, imagine that an attention to ceremonies constitutes the sum of their duty. There was a strong disposition among the Jews to rest in an observance of the figures of the Law, and it is well known with what severity the prophets all along reprehended this superstition, by which the worst and most abandoned characters were led to arrogate a claim to piety, and hide their abominations under the specious garb of godliness. The prophet, therefore, required to do more than simply expose the defective nature of that worship which withdraws the attention of men from faith and holiness of heart to outward ceremonies; it was necessary that, in order to check false confidence and banish insensibility, he should adopt the style of severe reproof. God is here represented as citing all the nations of the earth to his tribunal, not with the view of prescribing the rule of piety to an assembled world, or collecting a church for his service, but with the design of alarming the hypocrite, and terrifying him out of his self-complacency. It would serve as a spur to conviction, thus to be made aware that the whole world was summoned as a witness to their dissimulation, and that they would be stripped of that pretended piety of which they were disposed to boast. It is with a similar object that he addresses Jehovah as the God of gods, to possess their minds with a salutary terror, and dissuade them from their vain attempts to elude his knowledge. That this is his design will be made still more apparent from the remaining context, where we are presented with a formidable description of the majesty of God, intended to convince the hypocrite of the vanity of those childish trifles with which he would evade the scrutiny of so great and so strict a judge.

To obviate an objection which might be raised against his doctrine in this psalm, that it was subversive of the worship prescribed by Moses, the prophet intimates that this judgment which he announced would be in harmony with the Law. When God speaks out of Zion he necessarily sanctions the authority of the Law; and the Prophets, when at any time they make use of this form of speech, declare themselves to be interpreters of the Law. That holy mountain was not chosen of man’s caprice, and therefore stands identified with the Law. The prophet thus cuts off any pretext which the Jews might allege to evade his doctrine, by announcing that such as concealed their wickedness, under the specious covert of ceremonies, would not be condemned of God by any new code of religion, but by that which was ministered originally by Moses. He gives Zion the honorable name of the perfection of beauty, because God had chosen it for his sanctuary, the place where his name should be invoked, and where his glory should be manifested in the doctrine of the Law.

Calvin: Psa 50:3 - Our God shall come, and shall not keep silence 3.Our God shall come, and shall not keep silence 243 He repeats that God would come, in order to confirm his doctrine, and more effectually arouse th...

3.Our God shall come, and shall not keep silence 243 He repeats that God would come, in order to confirm his doctrine, and more effectually arouse them. He would come, and should not always keep silence, lest they should be encouraged to presume upon his forbearance. Two reasons may be assigned why the prophet calls God our God He may be considered as setting himself, and the comparatively small number of the true fearers of the Lord, in opposition to the hypocrites whom he abhors, claiming God to be his God, and not theirs, as they were disposed to boast; or rather, he speaks as one of the people, and declares that the God who was coming to avenge the corruptions of his worship was the same God whom all the children of Abraham professed to serve. He who shall come, as if he had said, is our God, the same in whom we glory, who established his covenant with Abraham, and gave us his Law by the hand of Moses. He adds, that God would come with fire and tempest, in order to awaken a salutary fear in the secure hearts of the Jews, that they might learn to tremble at the judgments of God, which they had hitherto regarded with indifference and despised, and in allusion to the awful manifestation which God made of himself from Sinai, (Exo 19:16; see also Heb 12:18.) The air upon that occasion resounded with thunders and the noise of trumpets, the heavens were illuminated with lightnings, and the mountain was in flames, it being the design of God to procure a reverential submission to the Law which he announced. And it is here intimated, that God would make a similarly terrific display of his power, in coming to avenge the gross abuses of his holy religion.

Calvin: Psa 50:4 - He shall call to the heavens from above 4.He shall call to the heavens from above It is plain from this verse for what purpose God, as he had already announced, would call upon the earth. T...

4.He shall call to the heavens from above It is plain from this verse for what purpose God, as he had already announced, would call upon the earth. This was to witness the settlement of his controversy with his own people the Jews, against whom judgment was to be pronounced, not in the ordinary manner as by his prophets, but with great solemnity before the whole world. The prophet warns the hypocritical that they must prepare to be driven from their hiding-place, that their cause would be decided in the presence of men and angels, and that they would he dragged without excuse before that dreadful assembly. It may be asked, why the prophet represents the true fearers of the Lord as cited to his bar, when it is evident that the remonstrance which follows in the psalm is addressed to the hypocritical and degenerate portion of the Jews? To this I answer, that God here speaks of the whole Church, for though a great part of the race of Abraham had declined from the piety of their ancestors, yet he has a respect to the Jewish Church, as being his own institution. He speaks of them as his meek ones, to remind them of what they ought to be in consistency with their calling, and not as if they were all without exception patterns of godliness. The form of the address conveys a rebuke to those amongst them whose real character was far from corresponding with their profession. Others have suggested a more refined interpretation, as if the meaning were, Separate the small number of my sincere worshippers from the promiscuous multitude by whom my name is profaned, lest they too should afterwards be seduced to a vain religion of outward form. I do not deny that this agrees with the scope of the prophet. But I see no reason why a church, however universally corrupted, provided it contain a few godly members, should not be denominated, in honor of this remnant, the holy people of God. Interpreters have differed upon the last clause of the verse: Those who strike a covenant with me over sacrifices, Some think over is put for besides, or beyond, and that God commends his true servants for this, that they acknowledged something more to be required in his covenant than an observance of outward ceremonies, and were not chargeable with resting in the carnal figures of the Law. 244 Others think that the spiritual and true worship of God is here directly opposed to sacrifices; as if it had been said, Those who, instead of sacrifices, keep my covenant in the right and appointed manner, by yielding to me the sincere homage of their heart. But in my opinion, the prophet is here to be viewed as pointing out with commendation the true and genuine use of the legal worship; for it was of the utmost consequence that it should be known what was the real end for which God appointed sacrifices under the Law. The prophet here declares that sacrifices were of no value whatever except as seals of God’s covenant, an interpretative handwriting of submission to it, or in general as means employed for ratifying it. There is an allusion to the custom then universally prevalent of interposing sacrifices, that covenants might be made more solemn, and be more religiously observed. 245 In like manner, the design with which sacrifices were instituted by God was to bind his people more closely to himself, and to ratify and confirm his covenant. The passage is well worthy of our particular notice, as defining those who are to be considered the true members of the Church. They are such, on the one hand, as are characterised by the spirit of meekness, practising righteousness in their intercourse with the world; and such, on the other, as close in the exercise of a genuine faith with the covenant of adoption which God has proposed to them. This forms the true worship of God, as he has himself delivered it to us from heaven; and those who decline from it, whatever pretensions they may make to be considered a church of God, are excommunicated from it by the Holy Spirit. As to sacrifices or other ceremonies, they are of no value, except in so far as they seal to us the pure truth of God. All such rites, consequently, as have no foundation in the word of God, are unauthorised, and that worship which has not a distinct reference to the word is but a corruption of things sacred.

Calvin: Psa 50:6 - And the heavens shall declare his righteousness 6.And the heavens shall declare his righteousness The Jews were vain enough to imagine that their idle and fantastic service was the perfection of ri...

6.And the heavens shall declare his righteousness The Jews were vain enough to imagine that their idle and fantastic service was the perfection of righteousness; but they are here warned by the prophet, that God, who had seemed to connive at their folly, was about to reveal his own righteousness from heaven, and expose their miserable devices. “Think you,” as if he had said, “that God can take delight in the mockery of your deluded services? Though you send up the smoke of them to heaven, God will make known his righteousness in due time from above, and vindicate it from the dishonors done to it by your wicked inventions. The heavens themselves will attest your perfidy in despising true holiness, and corrupting the pure worship of God. He will no longer suffer your gratuitous aspersions of his character, as if he took no notice of the enmity which lurks under your pretended friendship.” There is thus a cogency in the prophet’s manner of treating his subject. Men are disposed to admit that God is judge, but, at the same time, to fabricate excuses for evading his judgment, and it was therefore necessary that the sentence which God was about to pronounce should be vindicated from the vain cavils which might be brought against it.

Calvin: Psa 50:7 - Hear, O my people! and I will speak 7.Hear, O my people! and I will speak Hitherto the prophet has spoken as the herald of God, throwing out several expressions designed to alarm the mi...

7.Hear, O my people! and I will speak Hitherto the prophet has spoken as the herald of God, throwing out several expressions designed to alarm the minds of those whom he addressed. But from this to the end of the psalm God himself is introduced as the speaker; and to show the importance of the subject, he uses additional terms to awaken attention, calling them his own people, that he might challenge the higher authority to his words, and intimating, that the following address is not of a mere ordinary description, but an expostulation with them for the infraction of his covenant. Some read, I will testify against thee. But the reference, as we may gather from the common usage of Scripture, seems rather to be to a discussion of mutual claims. God would remind them of his covenant, and solemnly exact from them, as his chosen people, what was due according to the terms of it. He announces himself to be the God of Israel, that he may recall them to allegiance and subjection, and the repetition of his name is emphatical: as if he had said, When you would have me to submit to your inventions, how far is this audacity from that honor and reverence which belong to me? I am God, and therefore my majesty ought to repress presumption, and make all flesh keep silence when I speak; and among you, to whom I have made myself known as your God, I have still stronger claims to homage.

Calvin: Psa 50:8 - I will not reprove thee for thy sacrifices, etc 8.I will not reprove thee for thy sacrifices, etc God now proceeds to state the charge which he adduced against them. He declares, that he attached n...

8.I will not reprove thee for thy sacrifices, etc God now proceeds to state the charge which he adduced against them. He declares, that he attached no value whatsoever to sacrifices in themselves considered. Not that he asserts this rite of the Jews to have been vain and useless, for in that case it never would have been instituted by God; but there is this difference betwixt religious exercises and others, that they can only meet the approbation of God when performed in their true spirit and meaning. On any other supposition they are deservedly rejected. Similar language we will find employed again and again by the prophets, as I have remarked in other places, and particularly in connection with the fortieth psalm. Mere outward ceremonies being therefore possessed of no value, God repudiates the idea that he had ever insisted upon them as the main thing in religion, or designed that they should be viewed in any other light than as helps to spiritual worship. Thus in Jer 7:22, he denies that he had issued any commandment regarding sacrifices; and the prophet Micah says,

“Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil? and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy?” — (Mic 6:7)

“I desire mercy,” he says in another place, (Hos 6:6,) “and not sacrifice.” The same doctrine is every where declared by the prophets. I might refer especially to the prophecies of Isaiah, chapter Isa 1:12. The sacrifices of the ungodly are not only represented as worthless and rejected by the Lord, but as peculiarly calculated to provoke his anger. Where a right use has been made of the institution, and they have been observed merely as ceremonies for the confirmation and increase of faith, then they are described as being essentially connected with true religion; but when offered without faith, or, what is still worse, under the impression of their meriting the favor of God for such as continue in their sins, they are reprobated as a mere profanation of divine worship. It is evident, then, what God means when he says, I will not reprove thee for thy sacrifices; he looked to something beyond these. The last clause of the verse may be understood as asserting that their burnt-offerings were before the eyes of the Lord to the producing even of satiety and disgust, as we find him saying, (Isa 1:13,) that they were “an abomination unto him.” There are some, however, who consider the negative in the beginning of the verse as applying to both clauses, and that God here declares that he did not design to reckon with them for any want of regularity in the observance of their sacrifices. It has been well suggested by some, that the relative may be understood, Thy burnt-offerings which are continually before me; as if he had said, According to the Law these are imperative; but I will bring no accusation against you at this time for omitting your sacrifices. 247

Calvin: Psa 50:9 - I will take no calf out thy house 9.I will take no calf out thy house Two reasons are given in this and the succeeding verses to prove that he cannot set any value upon sacrifices. Th...

9.I will take no calf out thy house Two reasons are given in this and the succeeding verses to prove that he cannot set any value upon sacrifices. The first is, that supposing him to depend upon these, he needs not to be indebted for them to man, having all the fullness of the earth at his command; and the second, that he requires neither food nor drink as we do for the support of our infirm natures. Upon the first of these he insists in the ninth and three following verses, where he adverts to his own boundless possessions, that he may show his absolute independence of human offerings. He then points at the wide distinction betwixt himself and man, the latter being dependent for a frail subsistence upon meat and drink, while he is the self-existent One, and communicates life to all beside. There may be nothing new in the truths here laid down by the Psalmist; but, considering the strong propensity we have by nature to form our estimate of God from ourselves, and to degenerate into a carnal worship, they convey a lesson by no means unnecessary, and which contains profound wisdom, that man can never benefit God by any of his services, as we have seen in Psa 16:2, “My goodness extendeth not unto thee.” In the second place, God says that he does not require any thing for his own us but that, as he is sufficient in his own perfection, he has consulted the good of man in all that he has enjoined. We have a passage in Isaiah to a similar effect,

“The heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool: where is the house that ye build unto me, and where is the place of my rest? For all these things hath mine hand made.” — (Isa 66:1,)

In these words

God asserts his absolute independence; for while the world had a beginning, he himself was from eternity. From this it follows, that as he subsisted when there was nothing without him which could contribute to his fullness, he must have in himself a glorious all-sufficiency.

Calvin: Psa 50:14 - NO PHRASE These verses cast light upon the preceding context. Had it been stated in unqualified terms that sacrifices were of no value, we might have been perp...

These verses cast light upon the preceding context. Had it been stated in unqualified terms that sacrifices were of no value, we might have been perplexed to know why in that case they were instituted by God; but the difficulty disappears when we perceive that they are spoken of only in comparison with the true worship of God. From this we infer, that when properly observed, they were far from incurring divine condemnation. There is in all men by nature a strong and ineffaceable conviction that they ought to worship God. Indisposed to worship him in a pure and spiritual manner, it becomes necessary that they should invent some specious appearance as a substitute; and however clearly they may be persuaded of the vanity of such conduct, they persist in it to the last, because they shrink from a total renunciation of the service of God. Men have always, accordingly, been found addicted to ceremonies until they have been brought to the knowledge of that which constitutes true and acceptable religion. Praise and prayer are here to be considered as representing the whole of the worship of God, according to the figure synecdoche. The Psalmist specifies only one part of divine worship, when he enjoins us to acknowledge God as the Author of all our mercies, and to ascribe to him the praise which is justly due unto his name: and adds, that we should betake ourselves to his goodness, cast all our cares into his bosom, and seek by prayer that deliverance which he alone can give, and thanks for which must afterwards be rendered to him. Faith, self-denial, a holy life, and patient endurance of the cross, are all sacrifices which please God. But as prayer is the offspring of faith, and uniformly accompanied with patience and mortification of sin, while praise, where it is genuine, indicates holiness of heart, we need not wonder that these two points of worship should here be employed to represent the whole. Praise and prayer are set in opposition to ceremonies and mere external observances of religion, to teach us, that the worship of God is spiritual. Praise is first mentioned, and this might seem an inversion of natural order. But in reality it may be ranked first without any violation of propriety. An ascription to God of the honor due unto his name lies at the foundation of all prayer, and application to him as the fountain of goodness is the most elementary exercise of faith. Testimonies of his goodness await us ere yet we are born into the world, and we may therefore be said to owe the debt of gratitude before we are called to the necessity of supplication. Could we suppose men to come into the world in the full exercise of reason and judgment, their first act of spiritual sacrifice should be that of thanksgiving. There is no necessity, however, for exercising our ingenuity in defense of the order here adopted by the Psalmist, it being quite sufficient to hold that he here, in a general and popular manner, describes the spiritual worship of God as consisting in praise, prayer, and thanksgiving. In the injunction here given, to pay our vows, there is an allusion to what was in use under the ancient dispensation,

“What shall I render unto the Lord for all his benefits towards me? I will take the cup of salvation, and call upon the name of the Lord.” Psa 116:12

What the words inculcate upon the Lord’s people is, in short, gratitude, which they were then in the habit of testifying by solemn sacrifices. But we shall now direct our attention more particularly to the important point of the doctrine which is set before us in this passage. And the first thing deserving our notice is, that the Jews, as well as ourselves, were enjoined to yield a spiritual worship to God. Our Lord, when he taught that this was the only acceptable species of worship, rested his proof upon the one argument, that “God is a spirit,” (Joh 4:24.) He was no less a spirit, however, under the period of the legal ceremonies than after they were abolished; and must, therefore, have demanded then the same mode of worship which he now enjoins. It is true that he subjected the Jews to the ceremonial yoke, but in this he had a respect to the age of the Church; as afterwards, in the abrogation of it, he had an eye to our advantage. In every essential respect the worship was the same. The distinction was one entirely of outward form, God accommodating himself to their weaker and unripe apprehensions by the rudiments of ceremony, while he has extended a simple form of worship to us who have attained a maturer age since the coming of Christ. In himself there is no alteration. The idea entertained by the Manicheans, that the change of dispensation necessarily inferred a change in God himself, was as absurd as it would be to arrive at a similar conclusion from the periodical alterations of the seasons. These outward rites are, therefore, in themselves of no importance, and acquire it only in so far as they are useful in confirming our faith, so that we may call upon the name of the Lord with a pure heart. The Psalmist, therefore, justly denounces the hypocrites who gloried in their ostentatious services, and declares that they observed them in vain. It may occur to some, that as sacrifices sustained a necessary place under the Law, they could not be warrantably neglected by the Jewish worshipper; but by attending to the scope of the Psalmist, we may easily discover that he does not propose to abrogate them so far as they were helps to piety, but to correct that erroneous view of them, which was fraught with the deepest injury to religion.

Calvin: Psa 50:15 - NO PHRASE In the fifteenth verse we have first an injunction to prayer, then a promise of its being answered, and afterwards a call to thanksgiving. We are enj...

In the fifteenth verse we have first an injunction to prayer, then a promise of its being answered, and afterwards a call to thanksgiving. We are enjoined to pray in the day of trouble, but not with the understanding that we are to pray only then, for prayer is a duty incumbent upon us every day, and every moment of our lives. Be our situation ever so comfortable and exempt from disquietude, we must never cease to engage in the exercise of supplication, remembering that, if God should withdraw his favor for a moment, we would be undone. In affliction, however our faith is more severely tried, and there is a propriety in specifying it as the season of prayer; the prophet pointing us to God as the only resort and means of safety in the day of our urgent necessity. A promise is subjoined to animate us in the duty, disposed as we are to be overwhelmed by a sense of the majesty of God, or of our own unworthiness. Gratitude is next enjoined, in consideration of God’s answer to our prayers. Invocation of the name of God being represented in this passage as constituting a principal part of divine worship, all who make pretensions to piety will feel how necessary it is to preserve the pure and uncorrupted form of it. We are forcibly taught the detestable nature of the error upon this point entertained by the Papists, who transfer to angels and to men an honor which belongs exclusively to God. They may pretend to view these in no other light than as patrons, who pray for them to God. But it is evident that these patrons are impiously substituted by them in the room of Christ, whose mediation they reject. It is apparent, besides, from the form of their prayers, that they recognize no distinction between God and the very least of their saints. They ask the same things from Saint Claudius which they ask from the Almighty, and offer the prayer of our Lord to the image of Catherine. I am aware that the Papists justify their invocation of the dead, by denying that their prayers to them amount to divine worship. They talk so much about the kind of worship which they call latria, that is, the worship which they give to God alone, as to make it appear, that in the invocation of angels and saints they give none of it to them. 250 But it is impossible to read the words of the Psalmist, now under our consideration, without perceiving that all true religion is gone unless God alone is called upon. Were the Papists asked whether it were lawful to offer sacrifices to the dead, they would immediately reply in the negative. They grant to this day that sacrifice could not lawfully be offered to Peter or to Paul, for the common sense of mankind would dictate the profanity of such an act. And when we here see God preferring the invocation of his name to all sacrifices, is it not plain to demonstration, that those who call upon the dead are chargeable with the grossest impiety? From this it follows, that the Papists, let them abound as they may in their genuflections before God, rob him of the chief part of his glory when they direct their supplications to the saints. 251 The express mention which is made in these verses of affliction is fitted to comfort the weak and the fearful believer. When God has withdrawn the outward marks of his favor, a doubt is apt to steal into our minds whether he really cares for our salvation. So far is this from being well founded, that adversity is sent to us by God, just to stir us up to seek him and to call upon his name. Nor should we overlook the fact, that our prayers are only acceptable when we offer them in compliance with the commandment of God, and are animated to them by a consideration of the promise which he has extended. The argument which the Papists have drawn from the passage, in support of their multiplied vows, is idle and unwarrantable. The Psalmist, as we have already hinted, when he enjoins the payment of their vows, refers only to solemn thanksgiving, whereas they trust in their vows as meriting salvation. They contract vows, beside, which have no divine warrant, but, on the contrary, are explicitly condemned by the word of God.

Calvin: Psa 50:16 - But unto the wicked, etc 16.But unto the wicked, etc He now proceeds to direct his censures more openly against those whose whole religion lies in an observance of ceremonies...

16.But unto the wicked, etc He now proceeds to direct his censures more openly against those whose whole religion lies in an observance of ceremonies, with which they attempt to blind the eyes of God. An exposure is made of the vanity of seeking to shelter impurity of heart and life under a veil of outward services, a lesson which ought to have been received by all with true consent, but which was peculiarly ungrateful to Jewish ears. It has been universally confessed, that the worship of God is pure and acceptable only when it proceeds from a sincere heart. The acknowledgement has been extorted from the poets of the heathen, and it is known that the profligate were wont to be excluded from their temples and from participation in their sacrifices. And yet such is the influence of hypocrisy in choking and obliterating even a sentiment so universally felt as this, that men of the most abandoned character will obtrude themselves into the presence of God, in the confidence of deceiving him with their vain inventions. This may explain the frequency of the warnings which we find in the prophets upon this subject, declaring to the ungodly again and again, that they only aggravate their guilt by assuming the semblance of piety. Loudly as the Spirit of God has asserted, that a form of godliness, unaccompanied by the grace of faith and repentance, is but a sacrilegious abuse of the name of God; it is yet impossible to drive the Papists out of the devilish delusion, that their idlest services are sanctified by what they call their final intention. They grant that none but such as are in a state of grace can possess the meritum de condigno; 252 but they maintain that the mere outward acts of devotion, without any accompanying sentiments of the heart, may prepare a person at least for the reception of grace. And thus, if a monk rise from the bed of his adultery to chant a few psalms without one spark of godliness in his breast, or if a whore-monger, a thief, or any foresworn villain, seeks to make reparation for his crimes by mass or pilgrimage, they would be loath to consider this lost labor. By God, on the other hand, such a disjunction of the form from the inward sentiment of devotion is branded as sacrilege. In the passage before us, the Psalmist sets aside and refutes a very common objection which might be urged. Must not, it might be said, those sacrifices be in some respect acceptable to God which are offered up in his honor? He shows that, on the contrary, they entail guilt upon the parties who present them, inasmuch as they lie to God, and profane his holy name. He checks their presumption with the words, What hast thou to do to declare my statutes? that is, to pretend that you are one of my people, and that you have a part in my covenant. Now, if God in this manner rejects the whole of that profession of godliness, which is unaccompanied by purity of heart, how shall we expect him to treat the observance of mere ceremonies, which hold quite an inferior place to the declaration of the statutes of God?

Calvin: Psa 50:17 - Also thou hatest correction 17.Also thou hatest correction Here hypocrites are challenged with treacherous duplicity in denying, by their life and their works, that godliness wh...

17.Also thou hatest correction Here hypocrites are challenged with treacherous duplicity in denying, by their life and their works, that godliness which they have professed with the lip. Their contempt of God he proves from their want of reverential deference to his Word; subjection to the Word of God, and cordial submission to his precepts and instructions, being the surest test of religious principle. One way in which hypocrisy usually displays itself is, by the ingenious excuses it invents for evading the duty of obedience. The Psalmist points to this as the mainspring of their ungodliness, that they had cast the Word of God behind their back, while he insinuates that the principle from which all true worship flows is the obedience of faith. He adverts also to the cause of their perversity, which lies in the unwillingness of their corrupt heart to suffer the yoke of God. They have no hesitation in granting that whatever proceeds from the mouth of God is both true and right; this honor they are willing to concede to his Word; but in so far as it proposes to regulate their conduct, and restrain their sinful affections, they dislike and detest it. Our corruption, indisposing us to receive correction, exasperates us against the Word of God; nor is it possible that we can ever listen to it with true docility and meekness of mind, till we have been brought to give ourselves up to be ruled and disciplined by its precepts. The Psalmist next proceeds to specify some of those works of ungodliness, informing us that hypocrites, who were addicted to theft and adultery, mixed up and polluted the holy name of God with their wickedness. By adverting only to some species of vices, he would intimate, in general, that those who have despised correction, and hardened themselves against instruction, are prepared to launch into every excess which corrupt desire or evil example may suggests. He makes mention, first, of thefts; then of adulteries; and, thirdly, of calumnies or false reproaches. Most interpreters render תרף , tirets, to run, although others derive it from רצה , ratsah, rendering it to consent. Either translation agrees sufficiently with the scope of the Psalmist, and the preference may be left to the reader’s own choice. The charge here brought against hypocrites, that they put forth their mouth to evil, may include not merely slander, but all the different kinds of speaking which injure their neighbors, for it immediately follows, my tongue frameth deceit It is well known in what a variety of ways the lying and deceitful tongue may inflict injury and pain. When it is added, Thou sittest, etc., the allusion may be to one who sits for the passing of a formal judgment; as if it had been said, Thou defamest thy brethren under pretext of issuing a just sentence. 253 Or there may be a reference to petty calumny; such as men maliciously indulge in, and in which they pass their time as they sit at ease in their houses. 254 It seems more probable, however, that he refers to the higher crime of accusing the innocent and righteous in open court, and bringing false charges against them. Brethren, and the children of their mother, 255 are mentioned, the more emphatically to express the cruelty of their calumnies, when they are represented as violating the ties of nature, and not even sparing the nearest relations.

Calvin: Psa 50:21 - These things hast thou done 21.These things hast thou done Hypocrites, until they feel the hand of God against them, are ever ready to surrender themselves to a state of securit...

21.These things hast thou done Hypocrites, until they feel the hand of God against them, are ever ready to surrender themselves to a state of security, and nothing is more difficult than to awaken their apprehensions. By this alarming language the Psalmist aims at convincing them of the certainty of destruction should they longer presume upon the forbearance of God, and thus provoke his anger the more, by imagining that he can favor the practice of sin. The greatest dishonor which any can cast upon his name is that of impeaching his justice. This hypocrites may not venture to do in an open manner, but in their secret and corrupt imagination they figure God to be different from what he is, that they may take occasion from his conceived forbearance to indulge a false peace of mind, and escape the disquietude which they could not fail to feel were they seriously persuaded that God was the avenger of sin. We have a sufficient proof in the supine security which hypocrites display, that they must have formed such false conceptions of God. They not only exclude from their thoughts his judicial character, but think of him as the patron and approver of their sins. The Psalmist reprehends them for abusing the goodness and clemency of God, in the way of cherishing a vain hope that they may transgress with impunity. He warns them, that ere long they will be dragged into the light, and that those sins which they would have hidden from the eyes of God would be set in all their enormity before their view. He will set the whole list of their sins in distinct order, for so I understand the expression, to set in order, before their view, and force them upon their observation.

Calvin: Psa 50:22 - Now consider this, ye that forget God 22.Now consider this, ye that forget God Here we have more of that severe expostulation which is absolutely necessary in dealing with hardened hypocr...

22.Now consider this, ye that forget God Here we have more of that severe expostulation which is absolutely necessary in dealing with hardened hypocrites, who otherwise will only deride all instruction. While, however, the Psalmist threatens and intends to alarm them, he would, at the same time, hold out to them the hope of pardon, upon their hastening to avail themselves of it. But to prevent them from giving way to delay, he warns them of the severity, as well as the suddenness, of the divine judgments. He also charges them with base ingratitude, in having forgotten God. And here what a remarkable proof have we of the grace of God in extending the hope of mercy to those corrupt men, who had so impiously profaned his worship, who had so audaciously and sacrilegiously mocked at his forbearance, and who had abandoned themselves to such scandalous crimes! In calling them to repentance, without all doubt he extends to them the hope of God being reconciled to them, that they may venture to appear in the presence of his majesty. And can we conceive of greater clemency than this, thus to invite to himself, and into the bosom of the Church, such perfidious apostates and violators of his covenant, who had departed from the doctrine of godliness in which they had been brought up? Great as it is, we would do well to reflect that it is no greater than what we have ourselves experienced. We, too, had apostatized from the Lord, and in his singular mercy has he brought us again into his fold. It should not escape our notice, that the Psalmist urges them to hasten their return, as the door of mercy will not always stand open for their admission — a needful lesson to us all! lest we allow the day of our merciful visitation to pass by, and be left, like Esau, to indulge in unavailing lamentations, (Gen 27:34.) So much is implied when it is said, God shall seize upon you, and there shall be none to deliver 257

Calvin: Psa 50:23 - Whoso offereth praise will glorify me 23.Whoso offereth praise will glorify me This is the third time that the Psalmist has inculcated the truth, that the most acceptable sacrifice in God...

23.Whoso offereth praise will glorify me This is the third time that the Psalmist has inculcated the truth, that the most acceptable sacrifice in God’s sight is praise, by which we express to him the gratitude of our hearts for his blessings. The repetition is not a needless one, and that on two accounts. In the first place, there is nothing with which we are more frequently chargeable than forgetfulness of the benefits of the Lord. Scarcely one out of a thousand attracts our notice; and if it does, it is only slightly, and, as it were, in passing. And, secondly, we do not assign that importance to the duty of praise which it deserves. We are apt to neglect it as something trivial, and altogether commonplace; whereas it constitutes the chief exercise of godliness, in which God would have us to be engaged during the whole of our life. In the words before us, the sacrifice of praise is asserted to form the true and proper worship of God. The words, will glorify me, imply that God is then truly and properly worshipped, and the glory which he requires yielded to him, when his goodness is celebrated with a sincere and grateful heart; but that all the other sacrifices to which hypocrites attach such importance are worthless in his estimation, and no part whatsoever of his worship. Under the word praise, however, is comprehended, as I have already noticed, both faith and prayer. There must be an experience of the goodness of the Lord before our mouths can be opened to praise him for it, and this goodness can only be experienced by faith. Hence it follows, that the whole of spiritual worship is comprehended under what is either presupposed in the exercise of praise, or flows from it. Accordingly, in the words which immediately follow, the Psalmist calls upon those who desired that their services should be approved of God, to order their way aright By the expression here used of ordering one’s way, some understand repentance or confession of sin to be meant; others, the taking out of the way such things as may prove grounds of offense, or obstacles in the way of others. It seems more probable that the Psalmist enjoins them to walk in the right way as opposed to that in which hypocrites are found, and intimates that God is only to be approached by those who seek him with a sincere heart and in an upright manner. By the salvation of God, I do not, with some, understand a great or signal salvation. God speaks of himself in the third person, the more clearly to satisfy them of the fact, that he would eventually prove to all his genuine worshippers how truly he sustained the character of their Savior.

Defender: Psa 50:12 - the world is mine This is another assertion that the entire earth as well as all its living creatures (Psa 50:10, Psa 50:11), belong to God as their Creator. No man own...

This is another assertion that the entire earth as well as all its living creatures (Psa 50:10, Psa 50:11), belong to God as their Creator. No man owns anything that has not been loaned to him by God, who expects an accounting some day (1Co 4:7)."

TSK: Psa 50:1 - mighty // even // hath spoken // called mighty : Psa 145:3-6; Gen 17:1; Jos 22:22; Neh 9:6, Neh 9:32; Isa 9:6; Jer 10:6, Jer 32:18, Jer 32:19 even : 1Ki 18:21, 1Ki 18:36, 1Ki 18:37; Isa 37:2...

TSK: Psa 50:2 - Out // perfection // God Out : Psa 68:24; Isa 12:6, Isa 26:21; Hos 5:15; Hab 2:20; Heb 12:22-26 perfection : Psa 48:2, Psa 87:2, Psa 87:3, Psa 80:17; Son 5:16; Zec 9:17 God : ...

TSK: Psa 50:3 - Our // keep // a fire // it shall Our : Psa 48:14, Psa 68:20; Rev 22:20 keep : Psa 50:21, Psa 83:1; Isa 42:13, Isa 42:14, Isa 65:6, Isa 65:7 a fire : Psa 97:3; Exo 19:18; Lev 10:2; Num...

TSK: Psa 50:4 - call // judge call : Psa 50:6; Deu 4:36, Deu 30:19, Deu 31:28, Deu 32:1; Isa 1:2; Mic 6:1, Mic 6:2 judge : Psa 96:13, Psa 98:9; Isa 11:3, Isa 11:4; Joh 5:22, Joh 5:...

TSK: Psa 50:5 - Gather // my saints // made Gather : Mat 24:31; 1Th 4:16, 1Th 4:17; 2Th 2:1 my saints : Psa 97:10; Deu 33:2, Deu 33:3; Pro 2:8; Isa 13:3; Zec 14:5; 1Co 6:2, 1Co 6:3; 1Th 3:13; Ju...

TSK: Psa 50:6 - heavens // God // Selah heavens : Psa 97:6; Rom 2:5; Rev 16:5-7, Rev 19:2 God : Psa 75:7; Gen 18:25; Joh 5:22, Joh 5:23; Rom 14:9-12; 2Co 5:10; Rev 20:11, Rev 20:12 Selah : P...

TSK: Psa 50:7 - Hear // O my // testify // I am Hear : Psa 81:8; Isa 1:18; Jer 2:4, Jer 2:5, Jer 2:9; Mic 6:1-8 O my : Psa 81:10-12; Exo 19:5, Exo 19:6; Deu 26:17, Deu 26:18; 1Sa 12:22-25 testify : ...

TSK: Psa 50:8 - -- Psa 40:6-8, Psa 51:16; Isa. 1:11-31; Jer 7:21-23; Hos 6:6; Heb 10:4-10

TSK: Psa 50:9 - -- Isa 43:23, Isa 43:24; Mic 6:6-8; Act 17:25; Heb 10:4-6

TSK: Psa 50:10 - every // cattle every : Psa 8:6-8, Psa 104:24, Psa 104:25; Gen 1:24, Gen 1:25, Gen 2:19, Gen 8:17, Gen 9:2, Gen 9:3; 1Ch 29:14-16; Job 40:15-24; Jer 27:5, Jer 27:6; D...

TSK: Psa 50:11 - know // wild // mine know : Psa 104:12, Psa 147:9; Gen 1:20-22; Job 38:41, Job 39:13-18, Job 39:26-30; Mat 6:26; Mat 10:29-31; Luk 12:24 wild : Isa 56:9; Eze 14:15, Eze 14...

TSK: Psa 50:12 - world // fulness world : Psa 24:1, Psa 24:2, Psa 115:15, Psa 115:16; Exo 19:5; Deu 10:14; Job 41:11; 1Co 10:26-28 fulness : Psa 104:24, Psa 145:15, Psa 145:16; Gen 1:1...

TSK: Psa 50:14 - Offer // pay Offer : Psa 50:23, Psa 69:30, Psa 69:31, Psa 107:21, Psa 107:22, Psa 147:1; Hos 14:2; 1Th 5:18; Heb 13:15; 1Pe 2:5, 1Pe 2:9 pay : Psa 56:12, Psa 76:11...

TSK: Psa 50:15 - call // deliver // glorify call : Psa 77:2, Psa 91:15, Psa 107:6-13, Psa 107:19, Psa 107:28; 2Ch 33:12, 2Ch 33:13; Job 22:27; Zec 13:9; Luk 22:44; Act 16:25; Jam 5:13 deliver : ...

TSK: Psa 50:16 - wicked // What // thou shouldest wicked : Isa 48:22, Isa 55:6, Isa 55:7; Eze 18:27 What : Pro 26:7; Isa 1:11-15, Isa 48:1, Isa 48:2, Isa 58:1-7; Jer 7:4-7; Mat 7:3-5, Mat 7:22, Mat 7:...

TSK: Psa 50:17 - hatest // castest hatest : Pro 1:7, Pro 1:28, Pro 1:29, Pro 5:12, Pro 5:13, Pro 8:36, Pro 12:1; Joh 3:20; Rom 1:28, Rom 2:21, Rom 2:23; 2Th 2:10-12; 2Ti 4:3, 2Ti 4:4 ca...

TSK: Psa 50:18 - consentedst // hast been partaker // partaker consentedst : Pro 1:10-19; Isa 5:23; Mic 7:3; Rom 1:32; Eph 5:11-13 hast been partaker : Heb. thy portion was, Lev 20:10; Job 31:9-11; Pro 2:16-19, Pr...

consentedst : Pro 1:10-19; Isa 5:23; Mic 7:3; Rom 1:32; Eph 5:11-13

hast been partaker : Heb. thy portion was, Lev 20:10; Job 31:9-11; Pro 2:16-19, Pro 7:19-23; Jer 5:8, Jer 5:9; Heb 13:4

partaker : Mat 23:30; 1Ti 5:22

TSK: Psa 50:19 - givest // tongue givest : Heb. sendest, Psa 52:3-4; Jer 9:5 tongue : Psa 5:9, Psa 10:7, Psa 12:2, Psa 12:3, Psa 36:3, Psa 36:4, Psa 55:12, Psa 55:21, Psa 64:3-5; Isa 5...

TSK: Psa 50:20 - speakest // slanderest // thine own speakest : Psa 31:18; Mat 5:11; Luk 22:65 slanderest : Lev 19:16; Pro 10:18; 1Ti 3:11; Tit 2:3; Rev 12:10 thine own : Mat 10:21

speakest : Psa 31:18; Mat 5:11; Luk 22:65

slanderest : Lev 19:16; Pro 10:18; 1Ti 3:11; Tit 2:3; Rev 12:10

thine own : Mat 10:21

TSK: Psa 50:21 - I kept // thoughtest // that I was altogether such an one as thyself // will // set I kept : Psa 50:3, Psa 109:1-3; Ecc 8:11, Ecc 8:12; Isa 26:10, Isa 57:11; Rom 2:4, Rom 2:5; 2Pe 3:9 thoughtest : Psa 73:11, Psa 94:7-11; Num 23:19; Is...

I kept : Psa 50:3, Psa 109:1-3; Ecc 8:11, Ecc 8:12; Isa 26:10, Isa 57:11; Rom 2:4, Rom 2:5; 2Pe 3:9

thoughtest : Psa 73:11, Psa 94:7-11; Num 23:19; Isa 40:15-18

that I was altogether such an one as thyself : Or, as Bishop Horsley renders, ""that I AM (Eheyeh ) is such an one as thyself.""Exo 3:14

will : Psa 50:8; Pro 29:1; Rev 3:19

set : Psa 90:8; Ecc 12:14; Amo 8:7; 1Co 4:5

TSK: Psa 50:22 - consider // forget // I tear // none consider : Deu 32:18; Ecc 7:14; Eze 18:28; Hag 1:5; Luk 15:17 forget : Psa 9:17, Psa 10:4; Job 8:13; Isa 51:13; Jer 2:32; Hos 4:6 I tear : Hos 5:14, H...

TSK: Psa 50:23 - Whoso // to him // ordereth his conversation // salvation Whoso : Psa 50:14, Psa 50:15, Psa 22:23, Psa 27:6, Psa 86:9, Psa 86:12; Rom 12:1, Rom 15:6, Rom 15:9; Gal 1:24; 1Pe 2:9 to him : Psa 24:4, Psa 24:5, P...

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Psa 50:2 - The perfection of beauty The place where he was supposed to reside, and where he would now sit in judgment; or from whence he would come to a more public and conspicuous pla...

The place where he was supposed to reside, and where he would now sit in judgment; or from whence he would come to a more public and conspicuous place, where all the world might see and hear the transactions.

The perfection of beauty the most beautiful and amiable place of the whole world, because of the presence, and worship, and blessing of God, which was there, and there only. God hath shined, i.e. hath appeared or manifested himself in a glorious manner, as judges do when they come to the judgment-seat.

Poole: Psa 50:3 - Our God // Shall come // And shall not keep silence // It shall be very tempestuous round about him Our God: these words are used here, as they are also Heb 12:29 , emphatically. The prophet speaks this in the person of the Israelites and worshipper...

Our God: these words are used here, as they are also Heb 12:29 , emphatically. The prophet speaks this in the person of the Israelites and worshippers of God, whereof he was one, and thereby takes off their fond pretence, as if because God was their God , in covenant with them, and nearly related to them by Abraham his friend for ever, he would bear with their miscarriages, and would not deal so severely with them as some fancied; which also was their conceit, Jer 7:4 , &c.; Mat 3:9,10 . No, saith he, though he be our God, yet he will come to execute judgment upon us.

Shall come either,

1. From heaven, his dwelling-place, to Zion, to sit in judgment there. Or,

2. Out of Zion to some other place, as was said on Psa 50:2 .

And shall not keep silence: so the sense is, he will no longer forbear or connive at the hypocrisy and profaneness of the professors of the true religion, but will now speak to them in his wrath, and will effectually reprove and chastise them. But because the psalmist is not now describing what God did or would say against them, which he doth below, Psa 50:7 , &c., but as yet continues in his description of the preparation or coming of the Judge to his throne, it seems more proper to translate the words, as some do, he will not cease , (for this verb signifies not only a cessation from speech, but from motion or action, as it doth 2Sa 19:11 Psa 83:1 Isa 42:14,15 ) i.e. not neglect or delay to come. So here is the same thing expressed, both affirmatively and negatively, (as is frequent in Scripture, whereof divers instances have been formerly given,) for the greater assurance of the truth of the thing.

It shall be very tempestuous round about him: this is a further description of that terrible majesty wherewith God clothed himself when he came to his tribunal, in token of that just severity which, he would use in his proceedings with them. He alludes to the manner of God’ s appearance at Sinai, Ex 19 , and intimates to them, that although Zion was a place of grace and blessing to all true Israelites, yet God would be as dreadful there to the hypocrites among them, as ever he was at Sinai. See Isa 33:14 .

Poole: Psa 50:4 - -- Either to heaven and earth themselves, and so it is a figure called prosopopoeia ; or to the inhabitants of them, all angels and men, whom he cal...

Either to heaven and earth themselves, and so it is a figure called prosopopoeia ; or to the inhabitants of them, all angels and men, whom he calls in for witnesses and judges of the equity of his present proceedings. Compare Deu 4:26 Deu 31:28 32:1 . That he may judge his people, to wit, in their presence and hearing.

Poole: Psa 50:5 - My saints // Those that have made a covenant with me by sacrifice O ye angels, summon and fetch them to my tribunal; which is poetically spoken; not as if they were actually to do so, but only to continue the metap...

O ye angels, summon and fetch them to my tribunal; which is poetically spoken; not as if they were actually to do so, but only to continue the metaphor and representation of the judgment here mentioned.

My saints the delinquents, the Israelites, whom he calls saints ; partly, because they were all by profession a holy people , as they are called, Deu 14:2 ; partly, by an irony, intimating how unworthy they were of that name; and partly, as an argument or evidence against them, because God had chosen and separated them from all the nations of the earth, to be a holy and peculiar people to himself, and they also had solemnly and frequently consecrated and devoted themselves to God, and to his faithful service; all which did greatly aggravate their present apostacy.

Those that have made a covenant with me by sacrifice i.e. which have entered into covenant with me, and have ratified that covenant with me by sacrifice, not only in their parents, Exo 24:4 , &c., but also in their own persons from time to time, even as oft as they offer sacrifices to me. This clause seems to be added here, to acquaint them with the proper nature, use, and end of sacrifices, which were principally appointed to be signs and seals of the covenant made between God and his people; and consequently to convince them of their great mistake and wickedness in trusting to their outward sacrifices, when they neglect the very life and soul of them, which was the keeping of their covenant with God; and withal to diminish that overweaning conceit which they had of sacrifices, and to prepare the way for the abolition of them, as being only necessary to confirm the covenant; which being once for all confirmed by the blood of Christ, they might without any inconvenience be laid aside and abrogated.

Poole: Psa 50:6 - The heavens shall declare his righteousness // God is Judge himself The heavens shall declare his righteousness which they were called to witness, Psa 50:4 . So was the earth also. But here he mentions the heavens onl...

The heavens shall declare his righteousness which they were called to witness, Psa 50:4 . So was the earth also. But here he mentions the heavens only, as I humbly conceive, because they were the most impartial and considerable witness in the case; for men upon earth might be false witnesses, either through ignorance and mistake, or through prejudice, and partiality, and passion: but the angels understand things more thoroughly and certainly, and are so exactly pure and sinless, that they neither can nor will tell a lie for God; and therefore their testimony is more valuable. Or the meaning is, that God would convince the people of his righteousness, and of their own wickedness, by terrible thunders and lightnings, and storms, or other dreadful signs wrought by him in the heaven or the air; by which he did convince his people in two like cases, Deu 5:22,23 , &c.; 1Sa 12:17-19 .

God is Judge himself in his own person, or immediately. God will not now reprove them, or contend with them, by his priests or prophets, with whom they may easily strive, as they used to do, but he will do it in an immediate and extraordinary manner from heaven; and therefore they shall be forced to acknowledge his righteousness, and their own unrighteousness; as they must needs do, when the contest is between them and that God who is the great Judge of the world, and cannot possibly do any unrighteous thing, Job 34:13 Rom 3:6 , who exactly knows all their hearts and works, and cannot be deceived nor contradicted.

Poole: Psa 50:7 - I will testify against thee // Even thy God Having brought in God as coming to judgment with them, he now gives an account of the process and of the sentence of the Judge, whose words are cont...

Having brought in God as coming to judgment with them, he now gives an account of the process and of the sentence of the Judge, whose words are contained in this and the following verses.

I will testify against thee I will plead with thee, and declare my charge or indictment against thee.

Even thy God not only in general, as thou art my creature, but in a special manner, by many singular favours and obligations, and by that solemn covenant made at Sinai; whereby I avouched thee to be my peculiar people, and thou didst avouch me to be thy God, Deu 26:17,18 .

Poole: Psa 50:8 - To have been I do not charge thee, or at least this is not the principal matter of my charge, that thou hast neglected sacrifices which thou shouldst have offere...

I do not charge thee, or at least this is not the principal matter of my charge, that thou hast neglected sacrifices which thou shouldst have offered; for although thou hast many times omitted thy duty in that kind, yet I have greater things than these to charge thee with.

To have been or, they have been . I confess thou hast been frequent in that work, and hast laid too great a stress upon it, and satisfied thy conscience with it, as if thereby thou hadst made me amends for the errors of thy life.

Poole: Psa 50:9 - -- But be not so vain and foolish as to imagine that thou dost lay any obligations upon me by thy sacrifices; or that I required them because I had nee...

But be not so vain and foolish as to imagine that thou dost lay any obligations upon me by thy sacrifices; or that I required them because I had need of them, or took any pleasure in them for themselves, or for my own satisfaction by them.

Poole: Psa 50:10 - -- I would command or dispose them at my pleasure, without thy leave or assistance, even the cattle which feed upon innumerable hills, or in valleys an...

I would command or dispose them at my pleasure, without thy leave or assistance, even the cattle which feed upon innumerable hills, or in valleys and fields.

Poole: Psa 50:11 - I know where they are // The fowls of the mountains I know where they are and whence I can easily fetch them when I think good. The fowls of the mountains not only tame and domestic fowls, but even s...

I know where they are and whence I can easily fetch them when I think good.

The fowls of the mountains not only tame and domestic fowls, but even such as are wild and fly up and down upon mountains; which though out of man’ s reach, are at God’ s command.

Poole: Psa 50:12 - I would not tell thee // The fulness thereof If I wanted or desired any thing, as I do not, being the all-sufficient God, I would not tell thee that thou mightest supply my wants. The fulnes...

If I wanted or desired any thing, as I do not, being the all-sufficient God,

I would not tell thee that thou mightest supply my wants.

The fulness thereof i.e. all those creatures wherewith it is replenished.

Poole: Psa 50:13 - -- If I did want anything, hast thou such carnal and gross conceptions of me, that I need or delight in the blood of brute creature.

If I did want anything, hast thou such carnal and gross conceptions of me, that I need or delight in the blood of brute creature.

Poole: Psa 50:14 - thanksgiving // Thy vows // their sacrifices and burnt-offerings If thou wouldst know what sacrifices I most prize, and indispensably require, in the first place, it is that of thankfulness and praise proportionab...

If thou wouldst know what sacrifices I most prize, and indispensably require, in the first place, it is that of thankfulness and praise proportionable to my great, and glorious, and numberless favours; which doth not consist barely in verbal acknowledgments, but proceeds from a heart truly and deeply affected with God’ s mercies, and is accompanied with such a course of life as is gratified or well-pleasing to God; all which is plainly comprehended in

thanksgiving as that duty is explained in other Scriptures.

Thy vows either,

1. Ceremonial vows, the sacrifices which thou hast vowed to God. Or rather,

2. Moral vows; for the things here mentioned are directly opposed unto sacrifices, and preferred before them; for having disparaged, and in some sort rejected,

their sacrifices and burnt-offerings Psa 50:8 , it is not likely that he should have a better opinion of, or value for, their vowed sacrifices; which were of an inferior sort. He seems therefore to understand those substantial vows, and promises, and covenants, which were the very soul of their sacrifices, and to which their sacrifices were but appurtenances and seals, as was noted above, on Psa 50:5 , whereby they did avouch the Lord to be their God, and to walk in his ways , &c., as it is expressed, Deu 26:17 , and engaged themselves to love, and serve, and obey the Lord according to that solemn vow and covenant which they entered into at Sinai, Exo 24:3,7,8 , which they oft renewed, and indeed did implicitly repeat in all their sacrifices, which were appointed for this very end, to confirm this covenant.

Poole: Psa 50:15 - In the day of trouble // Thou shalt glorify me And make conscience of that great duty of constant and fervent prayer to me; which is an acknowledgment of thy subjection to me, and of thy trust an...

And make conscience of that great duty of constant and fervent prayer to me; which is an acknowledgment of thy subjection to me, and of thy trust and dependence upon me, and therefore is pleasing to me.

In the day of trouble when trouble comes, do not avoid it by sinful shifts, not’ trust to creatures for relief, as hypocrites generally do, but give glory to me, by relying upon my promises, and expect help from me by hearty and unfeigned prayer.

Thou shalt glorify me: this is mentioned, either,

1. As a privilege; thou shalt have occasion to praise and glorify me for thy deliverance. Or,

2. As a further duty; thou shalt give me the glory of thy deliverance by praising me for it, and improving it to my service and glory.

Poole: Psa 50:16 - Unto the wicked Unto the wicked i.e. the same ungodly and hypocritical professors whom he calleth saints, Psa 50:5 , in regard of their profession, and here wicked i...

Unto the wicked i.e. the same ungodly and hypocritical professors whom he calleth saints, Psa 50:5 , in regard of their profession, and here wicked in respect of their practice, and the truth of the thing. God saith: he told them what he would not reprove them for, Psa 50:8 , and why, Psa 50:9,10 , &c.; now he tells them for what he did reprove and condemn them, even for a vain and false profession of religion. With what confidence darest thou make mention of or boast of God’ s grade and favour vouchsafed unto time, in giving thee such a covenant and statutes, pretending to embrace them, and to give up thyself to the observation of them? This concerns not only the teachers, (of whom some understand these words,) but all the Israelites in general; of whom he rather seems to speak.

Poole: Psa 50:17 - Castest my words behind thee Seeing thy practice contradicts thy profession, and makes thee a notorious and impudent liar. Though with thy mouth thou showest much love (as is ...

Seeing thy practice contradicts thy profession, and makes thee a notorious and impudent liar. Though with thy mouth thou showest much love (as is said of them, Eze 33:31 ) to my statutes and counsels, yet in truth thou hatest them, as they are curbs to thy beloved lusts, and instruments of thy just condemnation, and a manifest reproach to thy conversation. Or,

seeing thou hatest reproof as this word is oft rendered. And this, above all other parts of God’ s word, is most hateful to ungodly men, Pro 9:8 Pro 12:1 15:10,12 Am 5:10 . And therefore this is fitly alleged as an evidence of their wickedness.

Castest my words behind thee as men do things which they abhor or despise.

Poole: Psa 50:18 - Sawest // Thou consentedst // Partaker with adulterers Sawest or, didst observe , or consider ; when he came into thy presence and company, and thou didst understand and consider his ways, and his succe...

Sawest or, didst observe , or consider ; when he came into thy presence and company, and thou didst understand and consider his ways, and his success and impunity, and he invited thee to a participation of his profit.

Thou consentedst with him; or, as many render it, then didst run with him ; thou didst readily and greedily associate thyself with him in his unrighteous courses. Thou didst yield to his motions, and that with great complacency and diligence.

Partaker with adulterers by joining with them in their lewd and filthy practices.

Poole: Psa 50:19 - Thou givest // To evil // Frameth deceit Thou givest Heb. thou sendest forth , to wit, free; for the word is used of men’ s dismissing their wives or their servants, whom they left to ...

Thou givest Heb. thou sendest forth , to wit, free; for the word is used of men’ s dismissing their wives or their servants, whom they left to their freedom. Thou hast an unbridled tongue, and castest off all restraints of God’ s law, and of thy own conscience, and givest thy tongue liberty to speak what thou pleasest, though it be offensive and dishonourable to God, and injurious to thy neighbour, or to thy own soul; which is justly produced as an evidence of their hypocrisy.

To evil either to sinful or mischievous speeches.

Frameth deceit i.e. uttereth lies or fair words, wherewith to circumvent those who deal with them.

Poole: Psa 50:20 - Thy brother // Thou slanderest Thou dost not only speak evil in a sudden passion, or upon some great provocation, but this is thy constant and deliberate practice and business, wh...

Thou dost not only speak evil in a sudden passion, or upon some great provocation, but this is thy constant and deliberate practice and business, which thou dost pursue with great facility and complacency; all which this phrase implies.

Thy brother strictly so called, as the next clause explains it; which is a great aggravation of the sin, and a proof of his inveterate and obstinate wickedness.

Thou slanderest takest away his good name, which is better than all riches; yea, than life itself; which is contrary to my express and oft-repeated commands.

Poole: Psa 50:21 - I kept silence // I will reprove thee // Set them in order before thine eyes I kept silence I did not express my displeasure against thee in such grievous judgments as thou didst deserve. Or, I was deaf ; I carried myself lik...

I kept silence I did not express my displeasure against thee in such grievous judgments as thou didst deserve. Or, I was deaf ; I carried myself like one that did not hear thy sinful speeches, nor see or take any notice of thy wicked actions. And thou didst misconstrue and abuse this my patience and long-suffering, as if it had proceeded from my ignorance, or regardlessness, or approbation of thy evil courses, which I seemed by my connivance to justify or allow, and thereupon didst grow more audacious and impudent in sin. See Ecc 11:9 Isa 26:10 Rom 2:4,5 .

I will reprove thee not with verbal, but real reproofs, i.e. by severe punishments, as this word is used, Job 13:10 Psa 6:1 38:1 39:11 , and oft elsewhere. I will quickly undeceive and convince thee of the contrary to thy cost.

Set them in order before thine eyes I will bring to thy remembrance, and lay upon thy conscience, all thy sins, in full number and in their order, with all their circumstances; and thou shalt then see and know that I diligently observed and hated them all, and that none of them shall go unpunished.

Poole: Psa 50:22 - Ye that forget God // Lest I tear you in pieces // And there be none to deliver Ye that forget God ye hypocritical and ungodly Israelites, who have forgotten (as Moses foretold you would do, Deu 32:18 ) the God that formed you...

Ye that forget God ye hypocritical and ungodly Israelites, who have forgotten (as Moses foretold you would do, Deu 32:18 ) the God that formed you , and made you his people, and forgotten his mercies and judgments, by which you should have been instructed, and the covenant which you made with him, and by which you stand obliged to him.

Lest I tear you in pieces lest my patience be turned into fury, and I proceed to take vengeance on you.

And there be none to deliver or, for (as the Hebrew particle is oft rendered) there is none that can or will deliver you . None can rescue you from the power of mine anger.

Poole: Psa 50:23 - Praise // Glorifieth me // That ordereth his conversation aright // aright // Will I show // The salvation of God Praise or, thanksgiving as this word is rendered, Psa 50:14 . See Poole "Psa 50:14" . Glorifieth me he and he only gives me the honour that I re...

Praise or, thanksgiving as this word is rendered, Psa 50:14 . See Poole "Psa 50:14" .

Glorifieth me he and he only gives me the honour that I require and prize, and not he who loads my altar with a multitude of sacrifices; whereby you vainly and falsely conceit that you please and glorify me, although in the mean time you live in the gross neglect of the more important duties of piety, and justice, and charity; whereas in truth you greatly dishonour me, and my worship and service, by your infamous lives.

That ordereth his conversation aright Heb. that composeth or disposeth the way or manner of his (which pronoun is frequently understood) life, i.e. that lives orderly, and according to rule; for sinners are said to walk disorderly, 2Th 3:6,7,11 , and by chance, as it is in the Hebrew text, Lev 26:21,23 , which is opposed to order; and the Scripture owns no order but what God prescribes or approves; and therefore this word

aright is justly added in our translation.

Will I show Heb. I will make him to see , i.e. to enjoy, as that verb is oft used, as we have showed again and again.

The salvation of God i.e. my salvation; that true and everlasting happiness which I have prepared for all my faithful friends and servants, and for them only. So false is that position of some of the Jewish rabbins, that every Israelite hath a portion in the world to come .

Haydock: Psa 50:1 - -- The repentance and confession of David after his sin. The fourth penitential psalm.

The repentance and confession of David after his sin. The fourth penitential psalm.

Haydock: Psa 50:2 - Bethsabee Bethsabee. Septuagint, "Bersabee." Some copies add, "the wife of Urias." (Haydock) --- The rest of the title is in Hebrew, &c., so that it is one...

Bethsabee. Septuagint, "Bersabee." Some copies add, "the wife of Urias." (Haydock) ---

The rest of the title is in Hebrew, &c., so that it is one of the most authentic. Nathan did not give the admonition till about a year had elapsed after the transgression, (2 Kings xii.) when David was made to enter into himself, by a prophet inferior to himself. (Berthier) ---

After his departure, he is supposed to have composed this psalm, to testify his repentance to all the world. (Calmet) ---

He had also in view the state of the captives. (Theodoret, &c.) ---

The two last verses seem to have been added at Babylon, (Abenezra) as a similar addition has been made (Psalm cv. 47., and 1 Paralipomenon xvi. 35.; Calmet) by some inspired author. (Haydock) ---

David knew that something more than confession was requisite, and that he must submit to temporal punishments, even though the prophet had assured him that his sin was remitted. He prays to be washed still more from evil habits, ver. 4. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:3 - Thy great mercy // Mercies Thy great mercy. Such is the purport of the Hebrew chasdec, though (Haydock) the Chaldean and Syriac omit great. My sin requires the deepest co...

Thy great mercy. Such is the purport of the Hebrew chasdec, though (Haydock) the Chaldean and Syriac omit great. My sin requires the deepest compunction. I must strive to repair the scandal I have given. (Calmet) ---

Mercies. I stand in need of many sorts, mitigation of punishment, true sorrow and perseverance, and that I may make some amends for my bad example, &c. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:4 - Yet more Yet more, by baptism. (Eusebius; St. Ambrose, apol.) --- The true penitent never ceases to deplore his sins, like David, St. Peter, and St. Paul, E...

Yet more, by baptism. (Eusebius; St. Ambrose, apol.) ---

The true penitent never ceases to deplore his sins, like David, St. Peter, and St. Paul, Ecclesiasticus v. 5. The psalmist prays, that all the remains of sin may be obliterated, John xiii. 10. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:5 - Me Me. I do not forget it, but am covered with shame. (Calmet) --- Sin is our greatest enemy, and continually cries for vengeance. (Haydock) --- Wh...

Me. I do not forget it, but am covered with shame. (Calmet) ---

Sin is our greatest enemy, and continually cries for vengeance. (Haydock) ---

While David did not confess, his sin lay heavy upon him. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:6 - Only // Soli Deo reus est // Judged Only, or principally, who art the only God, (1 Timothy i. 17.; Worthington) the judge and witness of my crime. (Haydock) --- David was a king, and ...

Only, or principally, who art the only God, (1 Timothy i. 17.; Worthington) the judge and witness of my crime. (Haydock) ---

David was a king, and acknowledged no judge among men. (St. Ambrose, c. x.) ---

Soli Deo reus est. (Cassiodorus) ---

Urias, whom he had injured, was no more. (St. Augustine) ---

The action had been done in secret: (2 Kings xii. 12.) but many began to suspect, and to blaspheme. (Haydock) ---

Judged. St. Paul reads thus, (Romans iii. 4.) though the Hebrew be, "when thou judgest." St. Jerome has also judicaberis, so that we might infer, that the Hebrew is now incorrect, or that beshophtec means in judicare te. (Berthier) ---

Houbigant changes the order of the verse, "cleanse me from my sins, that thou mayst be blameless when thou comest into judgment: For I know," &c. (Haydock) ---

Susanna was preserved from sinning by the thought of God's presence, Daniel xiii. 25. ---

If David fell, he confessed his fault. (Berthier) ---

God is faithful to his promises, and desires the conversion of sinners, though some would represent him as cruel, and unconcerned about his creatures. The psalmist prevents this unjust inference, (Haydock) and proves, that God is both just and merciful. (Worthington) ---

He acknowledges his ingratitude, as the captives confess, that their sins have brought on them this chastisement, though they had not injured the Babylonians. (Theodoret) (Flaminius) (Calmet) ---

God had often promised pardon to those who truly repent. An appeal is made to his truth and mercy.

Haydock: Psa 50:7 - Sins Sins. Hebrew, "iniquity,....and in sin did my mother warm or conceive me." Original sin has a manifold deformity, and is the fatal root of other ...

Sins. Hebrew, "iniquity,....and in sin did my mother warm or conceive me." Original sin has a manifold deformity, and is the fatal root of other transgressions. See St. Augustine, Ench.; St. Thomas Aquinas, [Summa Theologiae] i. 2. q. 82. a. 2., est multiplex virtute. (Haydock) ---

The prophet speaks here undoubtedly of original sin. (Amama) ---

No text could be more express, as the Fathers and the Jews agree. Yet Grotius, whose opinions are almost always singular, and dangerous, maintains, that the expression is hyperbolical, and only implies, that David had been long subject to sin, even from his infancy, as Job was naturally of a merciful disposition, Job xxxi. 18. ---

Thus free-thinkers abuse the Scripture, and setting aside all authority, will only see what they think proper. (Calmet) ---

The weakness of man is a motive for pity: (Menochius) David pleads for it, yet allows, that the fault was entirely his own, and that he had grace sufficient to have avoided it. (Calmet) ---

The consideration of our sinful origin, ought to move us to beg, that we may be washed still more, and that we may not yield to our evil propensities. (Worthington) ---

We may resist them, and therefore David would not make vain excuses in sin, as God love the truth, and a sincere confession. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 50:8 - Uncertain // To me Uncertain. Hebrew, "in the interior," I am full of sin, and thou requirest that I should constantly adhere to virtue. See Job xiv. 1. --- To me. ...

Uncertain. Hebrew, "in the interior," I am full of sin, and thou requirest that I should constantly adhere to virtue. See Job xiv. 1. ---

To me. This increases my crime, (Calmet) as I cannot plead ignorance. (Menochius) ---

Those who have true faith, are more easily converted. But God gives to all some good, which he loves in them, and is ever ready to preserve his gifts, and to save his creatures. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:9 - Hyssop Hyssop, which was used in sprinkling lepers, &c., (Leviticus xiv. 6.) not that the like ceremony, or even sacrifice, would suffice to heal the wound ...

Hyssop, which was used in sprinkling lepers, &c., (Leviticus xiv. 6.) not that the like ceremony, or even sacrifice, would suffice to heal the wound of the soul. Sincere contrition, (ver. 18, 19.) and the virtue of Christ's blood, are necessary. (Calmet) (Hebrews ix. 19.) ---

The heat (Numbers xix.) and operation of this sovereign medicine was shewn to the prophet, John xix. (Worthington) ---

The sprinkling of the priest might be of service, if the heart was contrite, Hebrews ix. 13. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 50:10 - Rejoice Rejoice, when thou givest me an assurance of pardon. My bones, or virtue, shall then be restored. Hebrew, "the bones which thou hast broken may e...

Rejoice, when thou givest me an assurance of pardon. My bones, or virtue, shall then be restored. Hebrew, "the bones which thou hast broken may exult." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) ---

God gives contrition, after which the whole interior is filled with joy. (Berthier) ---

When the affections are purified, the soul takes delight in God's word, and revives. (Worthington) ---

The assurance of being pardoned, give her fresh alacrity in his service. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 50:11 - Face Face. Anger. If the sinner consider his fault, God will forget it. (Calmet) --- His justice requires that he should punish the impenitent. (Wort...

Face. Anger. If the sinner consider his fault, God will forget it. (Calmet) ---

His justice requires that he should punish the impenitent. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:12 - Create // Right // Bowels Create. Hebrew bera, a term never used but for a new production. Whatever comes immediately from God must be pure, and as David had fallen into i...

Create. Hebrew bera, a term never used but for a new production. Whatever comes immediately from God must be pure, and as David had fallen into impurity, he earnestly implores this gift. He prays for the new heart of flesh, Ezechiel xxxvi. 26. (Haydock) ---

Thou hast said, Behold, I make all things new, Apocalypse xxi. Oh that I may be included, that I may sing a new canticle, having become a new man! (2 Corinthians v. 17., and Ephesians iv. 24.) (Berthier) ---

Right. Hebrew, "constant," (Haydock) the Holy Spirit, thy inspiration, or that uprightness, of which I have been deprived. (Calmet) ---

Bowels, or interior. (Worthington) ---

These sentiments ought to animate priests, when they hear confessions. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:13 - Spirit Spirit of prophecy, which is not withdrawn, except for some crime. (Origen) (Huet. p. 35.) --- David had been without this privilege, till his rep...

Spirit of prophecy, which is not withdrawn, except for some crime. (Origen) (Huet. p. 35.) ---

David had been without this privilege, till his repentance. (St. Athanasius) ---

Yet St. Chrysostom and Theodoret maintain the contrary. (Calmet) ---

He prays for final perseverance, which is due to none, (Berthier) and that he may fall no more. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:14 - Salvation // Perfect Salvation, or thy salutary joy, (Berthier) "the joy of thy Jesus," (St. Jerome) for whom he prays, (St. Augustine) knowing that He will save his peo...

Salvation, or thy salutary joy, (Berthier) "the joy of thy Jesus," (St. Jerome) for whom he prays, (St. Augustine) knowing that He will save his people from their sins, and that there is salvation in no other name. (Haydock) ---

Perfect. Literally, "principal." Septuagint, "conducting;" such a spirit as may suit one who is to command. (Haydock) ---

This may denote sound reason, (4 Machabees; Philo Nobil) which keeps the passions under, (St. Chrysostom; Job xxx. 15.) or God himself, to whose Spirit all others shall be subservient. Rance often inculcated to his Monks, the importance of having this principal spirit, which includes every virtue, particularly of liberality, as the Hebrew nediba, implies. (Berthier) ---

"Thy free Spirit." (Protestants) ---

How earnest should we endeavour to be disentangled from all the chains of our passions! (Haydock) ---

David might also fear, lest he had forfeited the throne, like Saul, whom the Spirit left, 1 Kings x. 9., and xvi. 14. Kings affected to be styled liberal, Luke xxiii. 25. (Calmet) ---

He repeats his petition thrice, in allusion to the three persons in one God, (St. Augustine, &c.) and prays, that the Messias may still spring from him, notwithstanding his sins, and that he may have a constant and willing spirit to fall no more. (Worthington) ---

Principal, or liberal, may refer to the Holy Ghost, the fountain of all grace, or to the king, who ought to be generous. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 50:15 - Thee Thee. The sinner cannot testify his gratitude better, than by promoting the conversion of others. (Worthington) --- This is a sort of satisfaction...

Thee. The sinner cannot testify his gratitude better, than by promoting the conversion of others. (Worthington) ---

This is a sort of satisfaction. (Menochius) ---

While engaged in sin, David could not well exhort his subjects to repentance. His example was rather an inducement for them to transgress. (Berthier)--- But when they saw his grief, and knew that God had pardoned him, they were no longer tempted to despair. He also watched more carefully over their conduct.

Haydock: Psa 50:16 - Blood // Justice // Extol Blood, from death, which I have deserved. (St. Athanasius) --- That of Urias, and his companions, (Worthington) cries to heaven for vengeance, 2 Ki...

Blood, from death, which I have deserved. (St. Athanasius) ---

That of Urias, and his companions, (Worthington) cries to heaven for vengeance, 2 Kings xi. 24. (Haydock) ---Hence the word sanguinibus, is used. (Berthier) ---

Spare me, and my people. ---

Justice, which has given place to mercy. (Calmet) ---

The latter word is here used by Symmachus, and justice may have this meaning. (Theodoret) ---

Sixtus V reads exaltabit, instead of exultabit, which Septuagint Greek: agalliasetai, (Calmet) requires. Hebrew terannen, "shall sing aloud of." Protestants, "shall praise thy justice." (St. Jerome) ---

Extol agrees better with exaltabit, though both have nearly the same sense. (Haydock) ---

God's justice will pardon the penitent, as he has promised. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 50:18 - Sacrifice Sacrifice. If my crime were of such a nature as the be expiated by certain victims, I would surely have offered them: but my heart has offended , an...

Sacrifice. If my crime were of such a nature as the be expiated by certain victims, I would surely have offered them: but my heart has offended , and must do penance. (Calmet) ---

The legal victims were not of themselves sufficient to remit sin. (Menochius) ---

Contrition was necessary, Isaias lxvi. 2., and Ezechiel vi. 9. (Berthier) ---

The Scripture often prefers internal, before outward sacrifices. This of the heart must precede those of justice, and of praise. (Worthington) ---

The heart must be broken, to make place for love. Compunction is thrice urged. The two first terms in Hebrew are the same, "contrite," (Haydock) broken, or disconcerted. Greek: Kateklasthe philon etor. (Homer, Odyssey) (Menochius) ---

The captives might adopt this prayer, Daniel iii. 39. (Calmet) ---

External sacrifices are commended in the next verse, as they are good, (Haydock) being instituted by God. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 50:20 - Deal Deal. These two verses have no necessary connexion with the preceding: they may have been added by some prophet at Babylon, (Calmet) or David foresa...

Deal. These two verses have no necessary connexion with the preceding: they may have been added by some prophet at Babylon, (Calmet) or David foresaw the destruction of the city by the Chaldeans. (St. Chrysostom) ---

He might fear that his sin would draw ruin on the capital, as a much less offence did, and as in all ages, the sins of the rulers have fallen on their subjects, 2 Kings xxiv. (Haydock) ---

Though the place was not destitute of fortifications, (Calmet) he might pray that they might be completed, (Berthier) as they were by Solomon, who built the temple and various walls, so that David might very will add this conclusion, (3 Kings iii. 1., and ix. 15.; Haydock) alluding to the sacrifices which should be offered in the future temple. (Berthier) ---

He insinuates, that his pardon may prove beneficial to his people, and sues for it to be granted for their sakes. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 50:21 - Justice Justice; works of piety, (Psalm iv. 6.) or victims vowed or prescribed by the law; the same which are afterwards styled holocausts (Calmet) by two di...

Justice; works of piety, (Psalm iv. 6.) or victims vowed or prescribed by the law; the same which are afterwards styled holocausts (Calmet) by two different terms, hola and calil. (Haydock) ---

The latter includes fruits, &c. (Calmet) ---

While we are in sin, our good works are less acceptable. (Menochius)

Gill: Psa 50:1 - The mighty God // even the Lord, hath spoken // and called the earth from the rising of the sun unto the going down thereof The mighty God,.... In the Hebrew text it is "El", "Elohim", which Jarchi renders the "God of gods"; that is, of angels, who are so called, Psa 8:5; s...

The mighty God,.... In the Hebrew text it is "El", "Elohim", which Jarchi renders the "God of gods"; that is, of angels, who are so called, Psa 8:5; so Christ, who is God over all, is over them; he is their Creator, and the object of their worship, Heb 1:6; or of kings, princes, judges, and all civil magistrates, called gods, Psa 82:1; and so Kimchi interprets the phrase here "Judge of judges". Christ is King of kings, and Lord of lords, by whom they reign and judge, and to whom they are accountable. The Targum renders it "the mighty God"; as we do; which is the title and name of Christ in Isa 9:6; and well agrees with him, as appears by his works of creation, providence, and redemption, and by his government of his church and people; by all the grace, strength, assistance, and preservation they have from him now, and by all that glory and happiness they will be brought unto by him hereafter, when raised from the dead, according to his mighty power. It is added,

even the Lord, hath spoken: or "Jehovah", Some have observed, that these three names, El, Elohim, Jehovah, here mentioned, have three very distinctive accents set to them, and which being joined to a verb singular, דבר, "hath spoken", contains the mystery of the trinity of Persons in the unity of the divine Essence; see Jos 22:22; though rather all the names belong to Christ the Son of God, and who is Jehovah our righteousness, and to whom, he being the eternal Logos, speech is very properly ascribed. He hath spoken for the elect in the council and covenant of grace and peace, that they might be given to him; and on their behalf, that they might have grace and glory, and he might be their Surety, Saviour, and Redeemer. He hath spoken all things out of nothing in creation: he spoke with. Moses at the giving of the law on Mount Sinai: he, the Angel of God's presence, spoke for the Old Testament saints, and spoke good and comfortable words unto them: he hath spoken in his own person here on earth, and such words and with such authority as never man did; and he has spoken in his judgments and providences against the Jews; and he now speaks in his Gospel by his ministers: wherefore it follows,

and called the earth from the rising of the sun unto the going down thereof; which may be considered as a preface, exciting attention to what is after spoken, as being of moment and importance; see Deu 32:1; or as calling the earth, and so the heavens, Psa 50:4, to be witnesses of the justness and equity of his dealings with the Jews, for their rejection of him and his Gospel; see Deu 4:26; or rather as a call to the inhabitants of the earth to hear the Gospel; which had its accomplishment in the times of the apostles; when Christ having a people, not in Judea only, but in the several parts of the world from east to west, sent them into all the world with his Gospel, and by it effectually called them through his grace; and churches were planted everywhere to the honour of his name; compare with this Mal 1:11.

Gill: Psa 50:2 - Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God hath shined. Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God hath shined. Or "shall shine" p; the past for the future, as Kimchi observes; or "the perfection of the bea...

Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God hath shined. Or "shall shine" p; the past for the future, as Kimchi observes; or "the perfection of the beauty of God hath shined out of Zion" q; that is, Christ; he is the perfection of beauty; he is fairer than the children of men; he is more glorious than the angels in heaven: as Mediator, he is full of grace and truth, which makes him very lovely and amiable to his people: he is the express image of his Father's person; and the glory of all the divine perfections is conspicuous in his work of salvation, as well as in himself: now as he was to come out of Zion, Psa 14:7; that is, not from the fort of Zion, or city of Jerusalem; for he was to be born at Bethlehem; only he was to be of the Jews, and spring from them; so he shone out, or his appearance and manifestation in Israel was like the rising sun; see Mal 4:2; and the love and kindness of God in the mission and gift of him appeared and shone out in like manner, Tit 3:4; or else the Gospel may be meant, which has a beauty in it: it is a glorious Gospel, and holds forth the beauty and glory of Christ. All truth is lovely and amiable, especially evangelical truth: it has a divine beauty on it; it comes from God, and bears his impress; yea, it is a perfection of beauty: it contains a perfect plan of truth, and is able to make the man of God perfect; and this was to come out of Zion, Isa 2:3; and which great light first arose in Judea, and from thence shone out in the Gentile world, like the sun in all its lustre and glory, Tit 2:11; or, according to our version, "God hath shined out of Zion"; which, as Ben Melech on the text observes, is the perfection of beauty; see Lam 2:15; by which is meant the church under the Gospel dispensation, Heb 12:22; which, as in Gospel order, is exceeding beautiful; and as its members are adorned with the graces of the Spirit, by which they are all glorious within; and especially as they are clothed with the righteousness of Christ, and so are perfectly comely through the comeliness he hath put upon them and here it is that Christ, who is the great God, and our Saviour, shines forth upon his people, grants his gracious presence, and manifests himself in his ordinances, to their great joy and pleasure.

Gill: Psa 50:3 - Our God shall come // and shall not keep silence // a fire shall devour before him // and it shall be very tempestuous round about him Our God shall come,.... That is, Christ, who is truly and properly God, and who was promised and expected as a divine Person; and which was necessary ...

Our God shall come,.... That is, Christ, who is truly and properly God, and who was promised and expected as a divine Person; and which was necessary on account of the work he came about; and believers claim an interest in him as their God; and he is their God, in whom they trust, and whom they worship: and this coming of his is to be understood, not of his coming in the flesh; for though that was promised, believed, and prayed for, as these words are by some rendered, "may our God come" r; yet at his first coming he was silent, his voice was not heard in the streets, Mat 12:19; nor did any fire or tempest attend that: nor is it to be interpreted of his second coming, or coming to judgment; for though that also is promised, believed, and prayed for; and when he will not be silent, but by his voice will raise the dead, summon all before him, and pronounce the sentence on all; and the world, and all that is therein, will be burnt with fire, and a horrible tempest rained upon the wicked; yet it is better to understand it of his coming to set up his kingdom in the world, and to punish his professing people for their disbelief and rejection of him; see Mat 16:28;

and shall not keep silence; contain himself, bear with the Jews any longer, but come forth in his wrath against them; see Psa 50:21; and it may also denote the great sound of the Gospel, and the very public ministration of it in the Gentile world, at or before this time, for the enlargement of Christ's kingdom in it;

a fire shall devour before him; meaning either the fire of the divine word making its way among the Gentiles, consuming their idolatry, superstition, &c. or rather the fire of divine wrath coming upon the Jews to the uttermost and even it may be literally understood of the fire that consumed their city and temple, as was predicted, Zec 11:1;

and it shall be very tempestuous round about him; the time of Jerusalem's destruction being such a time of trouble as has not been since the world began, Mat 24:21.

Gill: Psa 50:4 - He shall call to the heavens from above, and to the earth // that he may judge his people He shall call to the heavens from above, and to the earth,.... To hear what he shall say, when he will no longer keep silence; and to be witnesses of ...

He shall call to the heavens from above, and to the earth,.... To hear what he shall say, when he will no longer keep silence; and to be witnesses of the justice of his proceedings; see Isa 1:2. The Targum interprets this of the angels above on high, and of the righteous on the earth below; and so Aben Ezra, Kimchi, and Ben Melech, explain it of the angels of heaven, and of the inhabitants of the earth;

that he may judge his people; not that they, the heavens and the earth, the inhabitants of either, may judge his people; but the Lord himself, as in Psa 50:6; and this designs not the judgment of the whole world, nor that of his own covenant people, whom he judges when he corrects them in love, that they might not be condemned with the world; when he vindicates them, and avenges them on their enemies, and when he protects and saves them; but the judgment of the Jewish nation, his professing people, the same that Peter speaks of, 1Pe 4:17.

Gill: Psa 50:5 - Gather my saints together unto me // those that have made a covenant with me by sacrifice Gather my saints together unto me,.... These words are spoken by Christ to the heavens and the earth; that is, to the angels, the ministers of the Gos...

Gather my saints together unto me,.... These words are spoken by Christ to the heavens and the earth; that is, to the angels, the ministers of the Gospel, to gather in, by the ministry of the word, his elect ones among the Gentiles; see Mat 24:30; called his "saints", who had an interest in his favour and lovingkindness, and were sanctified or set apart for his service and glory;

those that have made a covenant with me by sacrifice; or, "who have made my covenant by, or on sacrifice" s; the covenant of grace, which was made with Christ from everlasting, and which was confirmed by his blood and sacrifice; this his people may be said to make with God in him, he being their head, surety, and representative: now these covenant ones he will have gathered in to himself by the effectual calling, which is usually done by the ministry of the word; for this is not to be understood of the gathering of all nations to him, before him as a Judge; but of his special people to him as a Saviour, the "Shiloh", to whom the gathering of the people was to be, Gen 49:10.

Gill: Psa 50:6 - And the heavens shall declare his righteousness // for God is Judge himself // Selah And the heavens shall declare his righteousness,.... That is, either the heavens shall bear witness to his justice and equity in judging his people; o...

And the heavens shall declare his righteousness,.... That is, either the heavens shall bear witness to his justice and equity in judging his people; or the angels, the ministers of the Gospel, shall declare his justifying righteousness, which is revealed in it, to the saints and covenant ones they shall be a means of gathering in: or rather the justice of Christ in the destruction of the Jews shall be attested and applauded by angels and men, just as the righteousness of God in the destruction of the antichristian powers is celebrated by the angel of the waters, Rev 16:5;

for God is Judge himself. And not another, or by another; and therefore his judgments must be just and righteous, seeing he is just and true, loves righteousness, and is righteous in all his ways and works.

Selah; on this word; see Gill on Psa 3:2.

Gill: Psa 50:7 - Hear, O my people // and I will speak // O Israel, and I will testify against thee // I am God, even thy God Hear, O my people,.... This is an address to the people of the Jews, whom God had chosen to be his people above all others, and who professed themselv...

Hear, O my people,.... This is an address to the people of the Jews, whom God had chosen to be his people above all others, and who professed themselves to be his people; but now a "loammi", Hos 1:9, was about to be written upon them, being a people uncircumcised in heart and ears, refusing to hear the great Prophet of the church, him that spake from heaven;

and I will speak: by way of accusation and charge, and in judgment against them for their sins and transgressions;

O Israel, and I will testify against thee; or "to thee" t; to thy face produce witnesses, and bring sufficient evidence to prove the things laid to thy charge,

I am God, even thy God; which is an aggravation of their sin against him, and is the reason why they should hearken to him; see Psa 81:10.

Gill: Psa 50:8 - I will not reprove thee for thy sacrifices // or thy burnt offerings, to have been continually before me I will not reprove thee for thy sacrifices,.... For the neglect of them; this they were not chargeable with; and had they omitted them, a charge would...

I will not reprove thee for thy sacrifices,.... For the neglect of them; this they were not chargeable with; and had they omitted them, a charge would not have been brought against them on that account, since these were not what God commanded when he brought them out of Egypt, Jer 7:22; and were now abrogated; and when they were in force, acts of mercy, kindness, and beneficence, were preferred unto them, Hos 6:6;

or thy burnt offerings, to have been continually before me; or, "for thy burnt offerings are continually before me" u; so far were they from being reprovable for not bringing their sacrifices, that they were continually offering up before the Lord even multitudes of them, though to no purpose, being offered up without faith, and in hypocrisy; and could not take away sin, and make atonement for it; and besides, ought now to have ceased to be offered, Christ the great sacrifice being now offered up, as he was in the times to which this psalm belongs; see Isa 1:14; wherefore it follows:

Gill: Psa 50:9 - I will take no bullock out of thy house // nor he goats out of thy folds I will take no bullock out of thy house,.... That is, will accept of none; such sacrifices being no more agreeable to the will of God, Heb 10:5; the "...

I will take no bullock out of thy house,.... That is, will accept of none; such sacrifices being no more agreeable to the will of God, Heb 10:5; the "bullock" is mentioned, that being a principal creature used in sacrifice; as also the following,

nor he goats out of thy folds; the reasons follow.

Gill: Psa 50:10 - For every beast of the forest is mine // and the cattle upon a thousand hills; meaning all the cattle in the whole world. For every beast of the forest is mine,.... By creation and preservation; and therefore he stood in no need of their bullocks and he goats; and th...

For every beast of the forest is mine,.... By creation and preservation; and therefore he stood in no need of their bullocks and he goats;

and the cattle upon a thousand hills; meaning all the cattle in the whole world.

Gill: Psa 50:11 - I know all the fowls of the mountains // and the wild beasts of the field are mine I know all the fowls of the mountains,.... God not only knows them, but takes care of them; not a sparrow fails to the ground without his knowledge, a...

I know all the fowls of the mountains,.... God not only knows them, but takes care of them; not a sparrow fails to the ground without his knowledge, and all the fowls of the air are fed by him, Mat 10:29; and therefore needed not their turtledoves and young pigeons, which were the only fowls used in sacrifice;

and the wild beasts of the field are mine; which are mentioned in opposition to domestic ones, such as they had in their houses or folds, Psa 50:9.

Gill: Psa 50:12 - If I were hungry, I would not tell thee // for the world is mine, and the fulness thereof If I were hungry, I would not tell thee,.... Or "say to thee" w; ask for anything for the world is mine, and the fulness thereof; with which, was ...

If I were hungry, I would not tell thee,.... Or "say to thee" w; ask for anything

for the world is mine, and the fulness thereof; with which, was the former his case, he could satisfy himself; see Psa 24:1.

Gill: Psa 50:13 - Will I eat the flesh of bulls, or drink the blood of goats? Will I eat the flesh of bulls, or drink the blood of goats? That is, express a pleasure, take delight and satisfaction, in such kind of sacrifices, wh...

Will I eat the flesh of bulls, or drink the blood of goats? That is, express a pleasure, take delight and satisfaction, in such kind of sacrifices, which can never take away sin: no, I will not; wherefore other sacrifices, more agreeable to his nature, mind, and will, and to the Gospel dispensation, are next mentioned.

Gill: Psa 50:14 - Offer unto God thanksgiving // and pay thy vows unto the most High Offer unto God thanksgiving,.... Which is a sacrifice, Psa 50:23; and the Jews say x, that all sacrifices will cease in future time, the times of the ...

Offer unto God thanksgiving,.... Which is a sacrifice, Psa 50:23; and the Jews say x, that all sacrifices will cease in future time, the times of the Messiah, but the sacrifice of praise; and this should be offered up for all mercies, temporal and spiritual; and unto God, because they all come from him; and because such sacrifices are well pleasing to him, and are no other than our reasonable service, and agreeably to his will; and then are they offered up aright when they are offered up through Christ, the great High Priest, by whom they are acceptable unto God, and upon him the altar, which sanctifies every gift, and by faith in him, without which it is impossible to please God. Some render the word "confession" y; and in all thanksgivings it is necessary that men should confess their sins and unworthiness, and acknowledge the goodness of God, and ascribe all the glory to him; for to him, and him only, is this sacrifice to be offered: not to man; for that would be to sacrifice to his own net, and burn incense to his drag;

and pay thy vows unto the most High: meaning not ceremonial ones, as the vow of the Nazarite; nor to offer such and such a sacrifice, since these are distinguished from and opposed unto the sacrifices of the ceremonial law before mentioned; and much less monastic ones, as the vow of celibacy, and abstinence from certain meats at certain times; but moral, or spiritual and evangelical ones; such as devoting one's self to the Lord and to his service and worship, under the influence and in the strength of grace; signified by saying, I am the Lord's, and the giving up ourselves to him and to his churches, to walk with them in all his commands and ordinances, to which his love and grace constrain and oblige; see Isa 44:5; and particularly by them may be meant giving God the glory and praise of every mercy and deliverance, as was promised previous to it; hence those are put together, Psa 65:1. This Scripture does not oblige to the making of vows, but to the payment of them when made; see Ecc 5:4; and may refer to everything a man lays himself in a solemn manner under obligation to perform, especially in religious affairs.

Gill: Psa 50:15 - And call upon me in the day of trouble // I will deliver thee // and thou shall glorify me And call upon me in the day of trouble,.... This is another part of spiritual sacrifice or worship, which is much more acceptable to God than legal sa...

And call upon me in the day of trouble,.... This is another part of spiritual sacrifice or worship, which is much more acceptable to God than legal sacrifices. Invocation of God includes all parts of religious worship, and particularly designs prayer, as it does here, of which God, and he only, is the object; and which should be performed in faith, in sincerity, and with fervency; and though it should be made at all times, in private and in public, yet more especially should be attended to in a time of affliction, whether of soul or body, whether of a personal, family, or public kind, Jam 5:13; and the encouragement to it is,

I will deliver thee: that is, out of trouble: as he is able, so faithful is he that hath promised, and will do it. The obligation follows,

and thou shall glorify me; by offering praise, Psa 50:23; ascribing the glory of the deliverance to God, and serving him in righteousness and true holiness continually.

Gill: Psa 50:16 - But unto the wicked God saith // what hast thou to do to declare my statutes // or that thou shouldest take my covenant in thy mouth But unto the wicked God saith,.... By whom are meant, not openly profane sinners; but men under a profession of religion, and indeed who were teachers...

But unto the wicked God saith,.... By whom are meant, not openly profane sinners; but men under a profession of religion, and indeed who were teachers of others, as appears from the following expostulation with them: the Scribes, Pharisees, and doctors among the Jews, are designed; and so Kimchi interprets it of their wise men, who learnt and taught the law, but did not act according to it. It seems as if the preceding verses respected the truly godly among the Jews, who believed in Christ, and yet were zealous of the law; and retained legal sacrifices; as such there were, Act 21:20; and that these words, and what follow, are spoken to hypocrites among them, who sat in Moses's chair, and said, and did not; were outwardly righteous before men, but inwardly full of wickedness, destitute of the grace of God and righteousness of Christ;

what hast thou to do to declare my statutes; the laws of God, which were given to the people of Israel; some of which were of a moral, others of a ceremonial, and others of a judicial nature; and there were persons appointed to teach and explain these to the people, as the priests and Levites: now some of these were abrogated, and not to be declared at all in the times this psalm refers to; and as for others, those persons were very improper to teach and urge the observance of them, when they themselves did not keep them; and especially it was wrong in them to declare them to the people, for such purposes as they did, namely, to obtain life and righteousness by them;

or that thou shouldest take my covenant in thy mouth? which is to be understood, not of the covenant of works made with Adam, and now broke; nor of the pure covenant of grace, as administered under the Gospel dispensation, of which Christ is the Mediator, and the Gospel a transcript, since both were rejected by these persons; but the covenant at Mount Sinai, which was a typical one; and being in some sense faulty, was now antiquated, and ought to have ceased; and therefore these men are blamed for taking it in their mouths, and urging it on the people: and besides, they had no true sight of and faith in the thing exhibited by it; and moreover were not steadfast, nor did they continue in it, like their fathers before them, Psa 78:37, Heb 8:7.

Gill: Psa 50:17 - Seeing thou hatest instruction // and castest my words behind thee Seeing thou hatest instruction,.... Or "correction" z; to be reproved or reformed by the statutes and covenant they declared to others; they taught ot...

Seeing thou hatest instruction,.... Or "correction" z; to be reproved or reformed by the statutes and covenant they declared to others; they taught others, but not themselves, Rom 2:21; or evangelical instruction, the doctrines of grace, and of Christ; for, as concerning the Gospel, they were enemies, Rom 11:28; and since they were haters of that, they ought not to have been teachers of others;

and castest my words behind thee; the doctrines of the Gospel, which they despised and rejected with the utmost abhorrence, as loathsome, and not fit to be looked upon and into; and also the ordinances of it, the counsel of God, which they rejected against themselves, Act 13:45.

Gill: Psa 50:18 - When thou sawest a thief, then thou consentedst with him // and hast been a partaker with adulterers When thou sawest a thief, then thou consentedst with him,.... Or "didst run with him" a; joined and agreed with him in the commission of the same thin...

When thou sawest a thief, then thou consentedst with him,.... Or "didst run with him" a; joined and agreed with him in the commission of the same things; which was literally true of the Scribes and Pharisees: they devoured widows' houses, and robbed them of their substance, under a pretence of long prayers; they consented to the deeds of Barabbas, a robber, when they preferred him to Jesus Christ; and they joined with the thieves on the cross in reviling him: and, in a spiritual sense, they stole away the word of the Lord, every man from his neighbour; took away the key of knowledge from the people, and put false glosses upon the sacred writings;

and hast been a partaker with adulterers; these teachers of the law were guilty both of theft and adultery, Rom 2:21; they are called by our Lord an adulterous generation, Mat 12:39; and they were so in a literal sense; see Joh 8:4; and in a figurative one, adulterating the word of God, and handling it deceitfully.

Gill: Psa 50:19 - Thou givest thy mouth to evil // and thy tongue frameth deceit Thou givest thy mouth to evil,.... To speak evil things against Christ, his doctrines, ordinances, ministers and people; and to deliver out evil doctr...

Thou givest thy mouth to evil,.... To speak evil things against Christ, his doctrines, ordinances, ministers and people; and to deliver out evil doctrines, pernicious to the souls of men;

and thy tongue frameth deceit; puts and joins together deceitful words in a very artful manner, by which simple and unstable minds are beguiled.

Gill: Psa 50:20 - Thou sittest // and speakest against thy brother // thou slanderest thine own mother's son Thou sittest,.... Either in the chair of Moses, or on the seat of judgment, in the great sanhedrim of the nation; or, as Aben Ezra paraphrases it, "in...

Thou sittest,.... Either in the chair of Moses, or on the seat of judgment, in the great sanhedrim of the nation; or, as Aben Ezra paraphrases it, "in the seat of the scornful";

and speakest against thy brother; even to pass sentence upon him, to put him to death for professing faith in Christ, Mat 10:21;

thou slanderest thine own mother's son; the apostles and disciples of Christ, who were their brethren and kinsmen according to the flesh; and even our Lord Jesus Christ himself, who was bone of their bone, and flesh of their flesh.

Gill: Psa 50:21 - These things hast thou done // and I kept silence // thou thoughtest that I was altogether such an one as thyself // but I will reprove thee // and set them in order before thine eyes These things hast thou done,.... "These evil works", as the Targum; which they had done over and over again without remorse, with the greatest pleasur...

These things hast thou done,.... "These evil works", as the Targum; which they had done over and over again without remorse, with the greatest pleasure, and with promises of impunity to themselves. This is a confirmation of the charge made by the omniscient God, who saw and knew all their actions;

and I kept silence; spoke not by terrible things in righteousness, deferred the execution of judgment, exercised forbearance and patience, and gave space to repent; which being despised, they were hardened yet more and more in sin; see Ecc 8:11. This refers to the space of time between the crucifixion of Christ and the destruction of Jerusalem;

thou thoughtest that I was altogether such an one as thyself; either that he did not see the things committed by them in secret, as the things before mentioned, theft, adultery, slander, and detraction, commonly are; because they could not see such actions done by others: or that he took pleasure in them, as they did, and that he approved of their crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth, and of their contempt of his Gospel, and of the persecution of his followers;

but I will reprove thee: not verbally by the ministry of the word, much less effectually and savingly by his Spirit; nor in a way of fatherly correction and chastisement; but by sore judgments; by sending the Roman armies to burn their city and temple, and carry them captive;

and set them in order before thine eyes; that is, their sins, and thereby fully confute their vain imagination, that either he did not take notice of them, or else approved of them. This signifies a formal process against them, as in a court of judicature; bringing in a regular charge and accusation against them, and an orderly disposition of their sins, as to time, place, and circumstances, committed by them, and a strong evidence or thorough conviction of them, so as not to be denied and gainsaid by them: or a setting them in battle array, as in Job 6:4; in rank and file; sins being what war against men, and bring upon them utter ruin and destruction; as the sins of the Jews fought against them, and destroyed them; see Jer 2:19.

Gill: Psa 50:22 - Now consider this // ye that forget God // lest I tear you in pieces // and there be none to deliver Now consider this,.... The evils that had been committed, and repent of them; for repentance is an after thought and reconsideration of sin, and humil...

Now consider this,.... The evils that had been committed, and repent of them; for repentance is an after thought and reconsideration of sin, and humiliation for it; that the Lord, was not like them, not an approver of sin, but a reprover for it; and what would be their latter end, what all this would issue in, in case of impenitence;

ye that forget God; that there is a God, his being, perfections, word, works, and benefits;

lest I tear you in pieces; as a lion, leopard, or bear; see Hos 13:7; which was accomplished in the destruction of Jerusalem; when both their civil and ecclesiastical state were torn in pieces; their city and temple levelled with the ground, and not one stone left upon another; and they scattered about in the earth;

and there be none to deliver; which denotes their utter and irreparable ruin, till the time comes they shall turn to the Lord; see Isa 42:22.

Gill: Psa 50:23 - Whoso offereth praise // glorifieth me // and to him that ordereth his conversation aright // will I show the salvation of God Whoso offereth praise,...., Which is exhorted to; See Gill on Psa 50:14; glorifieth me; celebrates the divine perfections, gives God the glory of a...

Whoso offereth praise,...., Which is exhorted to; See Gill on Psa 50:14;

glorifieth me; celebrates the divine perfections, gives God the glory of all mercies; which honours him, and is more grateful and well pleasing to him than all burnt offerings and sacrifices;

and to him that ordereth his conversation aright; according to the rule of God's word, and as becomes the Gospel of Christ; who walks inoffensively to all, circumspectly and wisely in the world, and in love to the saints; in wisdom towards them that are without, and in peace with them that are within; who is a follower of God, of Christ, and of his people; and who lives so as to glorify God, and cause others to glorify him likewise: or that chooses for himself the right way, as Aben Ezra, the right way to eternal life; and the sense is, he that puts or sets his heart upon it, and is in pursuit after the evangelical way of life. To him

will I show the salvation of God; or, "cause to see" or "enjoy it" b; not only temporal salvation from time to time, but spiritual and eternal salvation; to see interest in it, and to possess it; and particularly Christ, the author of it, who is the salvation of God's providing, appointing, and sending, and whose glory is greatly concerned therein; see Isa 52:10.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 50:1 Heb “and calls [the] earth from the sunrise to its going.”

NET Notes: Psa 50:2 Comes in splendor. The psalmist may allude ironically to Deut 33:2, where God “shines forth” from Sinai and comes to superintend MosesR...

NET Notes: Psa 50:3 Heb “fire before him devours, and around him it is very stormy.”

NET Notes: Psa 50:4 The personified heavens and earth (see v. 1 as well) are summoned to God’s courtroom as witnesses against God’s covenant people (see Isa 1...

NET Notes: Psa 50:5 Heb “the cutters of my covenant according to sacrifice.” A sacrifice accompanied the covenant-making ceremony and formally ratified the ag...

NET Notes: Psa 50:6 Or “for God, he is about to judge.” The participle may be taken as substantival (as in the translation above) or as a predicate (indicatin...

NET Notes: Psa 50:7 Heb “Israel, and I will testify against you.” The imperative “listen” is understood in the second line by ellipsis (note the p...

NET Notes: Psa 50:8 Heb “and your burnt sacrifices before me continually.”

NET Notes: Psa 50:9 Or “I will not take.”

NET Notes: Psa 50:10 Heb “[the] animals on a thousand hills.” The words “that graze” are supplied in the translation for clarification. The term &#...

NET Notes: Psa 50:11 The precise referent of the Hebrew word, which occurs only here and in Ps 80:13, is uncertain. Aramaic, Arabic and Akkadian cognates refer to insects,...

NET Notes: Psa 50:13 The rhetorical questions assume an emphatic negative response, “Of course not!”

NET Notes: Psa 50:14 Heb “Most High.” This divine title (עֶלְיוֹן, ’elyon) pictures God as the exalted ru...

NET Notes: Psa 50:15 In vv. 7-15 the Lord makes it clear that he was not rebuking Israel because they had failed to offer sacrifices (v. 8a). On the contrary, they had bee...

NET Notes: Psa 50:16 Heb “What to you to declare my commands and lift up my covenant upon your mouth?” The rhetorical question expresses sarcastic amazement. T...

NET Notes: Psa 50:17 Heb “and throw my words behind you.”

NET Notes: Psa 50:18 Heb “and with adulterers [is] your portion.”

NET Notes: Psa 50:19 Heb “and your tongue binds together [i.e., “frames”] deceit.”

NET Notes: Psa 50:20 Heb “against the son of your mother you give a fault.”

NET Notes: Psa 50:21 Heb “and I will set in order [my case against you] to your eyes.” The cohortative form expresses the Lord’s resolve to accuse and ju...

NET Notes: Psa 50:22 Elsewhere in the psalms this verb is used (within a metaphorical framework) of a lion tearing its prey (see Pss 7:2; 17:12; 22:13).

NET Notes: Psa 50:23 Heb “and [to one who] sets a way I will show the deliverance of God.” Elsewhere the phrase “set a way” simply means “to ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:1 "A Psalm of ( a ) Asaph." The mighty God, [even] the LORD, hath spoken, and called the ( b ) earth from the rising of the sun unto the going down ther...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:2 Out of Zion, the ( c ) perfection of beauty, God hath shined. ( c ) Because God had chosen it to have his Name there called on and also his image shi...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:3 Our God shall come, and shall not keep silence: a ( d ) fire shall devour before him, and it shall be very tempestuous round about him. ( d ) As when...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:4 He shall call to the heavens from above, and to ( e ) the earth, that he may judge his people. ( e ) As witnessing against the hypocrites.

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:5 Gather my ( f ) saints together unto me; those that have made a covenant with me by ( g ) sacrifice. ( f ) God in respect to his elect calls the whol...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:8 I will not ( h ) reprove thee for thy sacrifices or thy burnt offerings, [to have been] continually before me. ( h ) For I pass not for sacrifices un...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:10 ( i ) For every beast of the forest [is] mine, [and] the cattle upon a thousand hills. ( i ) Though he delighted in sacrifice, yet he had no need for...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:13 ( k ) Will I eat the flesh of bulls, or drink the blood of goats? ( k ) Though man's life for the infirmity of it has need of food, yet God whose lif...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:14 Offer unto God thanksgiving; and ( l ) pay thy vows unto the most High: ( l ) Show yourself mindful of God's benefits by thanksgiving.

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:16 But unto the wicked God saith, ( m ) What hast thou to do to declare my statutes, or [that] thou shouldest take my covenant in thy mouth? ( m ) Why d...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:17 Seeing thou hatest ( n ) instruction, and castest my words behind thee. ( n ) To live according to my word.

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:18 When thou sawest a thief, then ( o ) thou consentedst with him, and hast been partaker with adulterers. ( o ) He shows what the fruits of them who co...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:20 Thou ( p ) sittest [and] speakest against thy brother; thou slanderest thine own mother's son. ( p ) He notes the cruelty of hypocrites who in their ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:21 These [things] hast thou done, and I kept silence; thou thoughtest that I was altogether [such an one] as thyself: [but] I will reprove thee, and ( q ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 50:23 Whoso offereth ( r ) praise glorifieth me: and to him that ( s ) ordereth [his] conversation [aright] will I ( t ) shew the salvation of God. ( r ) U...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 50:1-6 - --This psalm is a psalm of instruction. It tells of the coming of Christ and the day of judgment, in which God will call men to account; and the Holy Gh...

MHCC: Psa 50:7-15 - --To obey is better than sacrifice, and to love God and our neighbour better than all burnt-offerings. We are here warned not to rest in these performan...

MHCC: Psa 50:16-23 - --Hypocrisy is wickedness, which God will judge. And it is too common, for those who declare the Lord's statutes to others, to live in disobedience to t...

Matthew Henry: Psa 50:1-6 - -- It is probable that Asaph was not only the chief musician, who was to put a tune to this psalm, but that he was himself the penman of it; for we rea...

Matthew Henry: Psa 50:7-15 - -- God is here dealing with those that placed all their religion in the observances of the ceremonial law, and thought those sufficient. I. He lays dow...

Matthew Henry: Psa 50:16-23 - -- God, by the psalmist, having instructed his people in the right way of worshipping him and keeping up their communion with him, here directs his spe...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 50:1-3 - -- The theophany. The names of God are heaped up in Psa 50:1 in order to gain a thoroughly full-toned exordium for the description of God as the Judge ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 50:4-6 - -- The judgment scene. To the heavens above ( מעל , elsewhere a preposition, here, as in Gen 27:39; Gen 49:25, an adverb, desuper , superne ) and...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 50:7-15 - -- Exposition of the sacrificial Tôra for the good of those whose holiness consists in outward works. The forms strengthened by ah , in Psa 50:7, des...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 50:16-21 - -- The accusation of the manifest sinners. It is not those who are addressed in Psa 50:7, as Hengstenberg thinks, who are here addressed. Even the posi...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 50:22-23 - -- Epilogue of the divine discourse. Under the name שׁכחי אלוהּ are comprehended the decent or honourable whose sanctity relies upon outward w...

Constable: Psa 42:1--72:20 - --II. Book 2: chs. 42--72 In Book 1 we saw that all the psalms except 1, 2, 10, and 33 claimed David as their writ...

Constable: Psa 50:1-23 - --Psalm 50 This psalm pictures God seated in His heavenly throne room. He has two indictments against His ...

Constable: Psa 50:1-6 - --1. The heavenly Judge 50:1-6 50:1 Asaph pictured God as the cosmic Judge summoning all people to stand before Him. The titles Mighty One, God, and Yah...

Constable: Psa 50:7-15 - --2. Charge 1: formalistic worship 50:7-15 50:7 God spoke to His people as their God and as their Judge. They had sinned against Him. 50:8-13 He was no...

Constable: Psa 50:16-23 - --3. Charge 2: hypocritical living 50:16-23 50:16-17 The Lord also charged the wicked in Israel with professing allegiance to Him while disobeying Him. ...

Constable: Psa 50:22-23 - --4. A final warning 50:22-23 God let His people off with a warning. However, they should remember...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 50:16 Psa 50:16-23 contain a fearful word for a godless world that delights in entertainment glorifying theft, violence, adultery, and hatred. They assume ...

buka semua
Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 50:1, The majesty of God in the church; Psa 50:5, His order to gather his saints; Psa 50:7, The pleasure of God is not in ceremonies,...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

Poole: Psalms 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) THE ARGUMENT The design of this Psalm is, partly, to reprove and protest against the common miscarriages of many professors of religion, who satisf...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 50:1-6) The glory of God. (Psa 50:7-15) Sacrifices to be changed for prayers. (Psa 50:16-23) Sincere obedience required.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This psalm, as the former, is a psalm of instruction, not of prayer or praise; it is a psalm of reproof and admonition, in singing which we are to ...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 50 A Psalm of Asaph. This psalm is called a psalm of Asaph; either because it was composed by him under divine inspiration, s...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


TIP #29: Klik ikon untuk merubah popup menjadi mode sticky, untuk merubah mode sticky menjadi mode popup kembali. [SEMUA]
dibuat dalam 2.68 detik
dipersembahkan oleh
bible.org - YLSA