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Teks -- Psalms 88:1-18 (NET)

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Psalm 88
88:1 A song, a psalm written by the Korahites; for the music director; according to the machalath-leannoth style; a well-written song by Heman the Ezrachite. O Lord God who delivers me! By day I cry out and at night I pray before you. 88:2 Listen to my prayer! Pay attention to my cry for help! 88:3 For my life is filled with troubles and I am ready to enter Sheol. 88:4 They treat me like those who descend into the grave. I am like a helpless man, 88:5 adrift among the dead, like corpses lying in the grave, whom you remember no more, and who are cut off from your power. 88:6 You place me in the lowest regions of the pit, in the dark places, in the watery depths. 88:7 Your anger bears down on me, and you overwhelm me with all your waves. (Selah) 88:8 You cause those who know me to keep their distance; you make me an appalling sight to them. I am trapped and cannot get free. 88:9 My eyes grow weak because of oppression. I call out to you, O Lord, all day long; I spread out my hands in prayer to you. 88:10 Do you accomplish amazing things for the dead? Do the departed spirits rise up and give you thanks? (Selah) 88:11 Is your loyal love proclaimed in the grave, or your faithfulness in the place of the dead? 88:12 Are your amazing deeds experienced in the dark region, or your deliverance in the land of oblivion? 88:13 As for me, I cry out to you, O Lord; in the morning my prayer confronts you. 88:14 O Lord, why do you reject me, and pay no attention to me? 88:15 I am oppressed and have been on the verge of death since my youth. I have been subjected to your horrors and am numb with pain. 88:16 Your anger overwhelms me; your terrors destroy me. 88:17 They surround me like water all day long; they join forces and encircle me. 88:18 You cause my friends and neighbors to keep their distance; those who know me leave me alone in the darkness.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Ezrahite a descendant of Ezrah
 · Korah a man who led a rebellion against Moses and Aaron.,son of Esau and Oholibamah,son of Eliphaz son of Esau,son of Izhar son of Kohath son of Levi,son of Hebron of Judah,son of Izhar (Amminadab) son of Kohath son of Levi
 · Leannoth possibly a tune: 'The Suffering of Affliction' (NIV marg)
 · Mahalath daughter of Ishmael; wife of her cousin Esau,grand-daughter of David; wife of Rehoboam,a musical term (perhaps 'a sad tone' NASB marg.)
 · Maskil a literary or musical term
 · Pit the place of the dead
 · pit the place of the dead
 · Selah a musical notation for crescendo or emphasis by action (IBD)
 · Sheol the place of the dead


Topik/Tema Kamus: JOB, BOOK OF | EZRAHITE | LEANNOTH | Psalms | MAHALATH | Korah | Heman | Mahalath Leannoth Maschil | PSALMS, BOOK OF | Music | SONG | Music, Instrumental | Afflictions and Adversities | Death | Prayer | DECEASE, IN THE OLD TESTAMENT AND APOCYPHRA | Hades | SHEOL | Dead | Friends | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 88:4 - Counted l am given up by my friends for a lost man.

l am given up by my friends for a lost man.

Wesley: Psa 88:5 - Free Well nigh discharged from the warfare of the present life, and entered as a member into the society of the dead.

Well nigh discharged from the warfare of the present life, and entered as a member into the society of the dead.

Wesley: Psa 88:5 - Whom Thou seemest to neglect and bury in oblivion.

Thou seemest to neglect and bury in oblivion.

Wesley: Psa 88:7 - Waves With they judgments, breaking in furiously upon me like the waves of the sea.

With they judgments, breaking in furiously upon me like the waves of the sea.

Wesley: Psa 88:10 - Wonders In raising them to life.

In raising them to life.

Wesley: Psa 88:10 - To praise thee In this world?

In this world?

Wesley: Psa 88:12 - Forgetfulness In the grave, where men are forgotten by their nearest relations.

In the grave, where men are forgotten by their nearest relations.

Wesley: Psa 88:13 - Prevent Come to thee before the dawning of the day, or the rising of the sun.

Come to thee before the dawning of the day, or the rising of the sun.

Wesley: Psa 88:17 - Water As the waters of the sea encompass him who is in the midst of it.

As the waters of the sea encompass him who is in the midst of it.

JFB: Psa 88:1-2 - -- Upon Mahalath--either an instrument, as a lute, to be used as an accompaniment (Leannoth, "for singing") or, as others think, an enigmatic title (see ...

Upon Mahalath--either an instrument, as a lute, to be used as an accompaniment (Leannoth, "for singing") or, as others think, an enigmatic title (see on Psa 5:1, Psa 22:1, and Psa 45:1, titles), denoting the subject--that is, "sickness or disease, for humbling," the idea of spiritual maladies being often represented by disease (compare Psa 6:5-6; Psa 22:14-15, &c.). On the other terms, see on Psa 42:1 and Psa 32:1. Heman and Ethan (see on Psa 89:1, title) were David's singers (1Ch 6:18, 1Ch 6:33; 1Ch 15:17), of the family of Kohath. If the persons alluded to (1Ki 4:31; 1Ch 2:6), they were probably adopted into the tribe of Judah. Though called a song, which usually implies joy (Psa 83:1), both the style and matter of the Psalm are very despondent; yet the appeals to God evince faith, and we may suppose that the word "song" might be extended to such compositions. (Psa. 88:1-18)

Compare on the terms used, Psa 22:2; Psa 31:2.

JFB: Psa 88:3 - grave Literally, "hell" (Psa 16:10), death in wide sense.

Literally, "hell" (Psa 16:10), death in wide sense.

JFB: Psa 88:4 - go . . . pit Of destruction (Psa 28:1).

Of destruction (Psa 28:1).

JFB: Psa 88:4 - as a man Literally, "a stout man," whose strength is utterly gone.

Literally, "a stout man," whose strength is utterly gone.

JFB: Psa 88:5 - Free . . . dead Cut off from God's care, as are the slain, who, falling under His wrath, are left, no longer sustained by His hand.

Cut off from God's care, as are the slain, who, falling under His wrath, are left, no longer sustained by His hand.

JFB: Psa 88:6 - -- Similar figures for distress in Psa 63:9; Psa 69:3.

Similar figures for distress in Psa 63:9; Psa 69:3.

JFB: Psa 88:7 - -- Compare Psa 38:2, on first, and Psa 42:7, on last clause.

Compare Psa 38:2, on first, and Psa 42:7, on last clause.

JFB: Psa 88:8 - -- Both cut off from sympathy and made hateful to friends (Psa 31:11).

Both cut off from sympathy and made hateful to friends (Psa 31:11).

JFB: Psa 88:9 - Mine eye mourneth Literally, "decays," or fails, denoting exhaustion (Psa 6:7; Psa 31:9).

Literally, "decays," or fails, denoting exhaustion (Psa 6:7; Psa 31:9).

JFB: Psa 88:9 - I . . . called (Psa 86:5, Psa 86:7).

JFB: Psa 88:9 - stretched out For help (Psa 44:20).

For help (Psa 44:20).

JFB: Psa 88:10 - shall the dead The remains of ghosts.

The remains of ghosts.

JFB: Psa 88:10 - arise Literally, "rise up," that is, as dead persons.

Literally, "rise up," that is, as dead persons.

JFB: Psa 88:11-12 - -- Amplify the foregoing, the whole purport (as Psa 6:5) being to contrast death and life as seasons for praising God.

Amplify the foregoing, the whole purport (as Psa 6:5) being to contrast death and life as seasons for praising God.

JFB: Psa 88:13 - prevent Meet--that is, he will diligently come before God for help (Psa 18:41).

Meet--that is, he will diligently come before God for help (Psa 18:41).

JFB: Psa 88:14 - -- On the terms (Psa 27:9; Psa 74:1; Psa 77:7).

On the terms (Psa 27:9; Psa 74:1; Psa 77:7).

JFB: Psa 88:15 - from . . . youth up All my life.

All my life.

JFB: Psa 88:16-17 - -- The extremes of anguish and despair are depicted.

The extremes of anguish and despair are depicted.

JFB: Psa 88:18 - into darkness Better omit "into"--"mine acquaintances (are) darkness," the gloom of death, &c. (Job 17:13-14).

Better omit "into"--"mine acquaintances (are) darkness," the gloom of death, &c. (Job 17:13-14).

Clarke: Psa 88:1 - O Lord God of my salvation O Lord God of my salvation - This is only the continuation of prayers and supplications already often sent up to the throne of grace.

O Lord God of my salvation - This is only the continuation of prayers and supplications already often sent up to the throne of grace.

Clarke: Psa 88:2 - Let my prayer come before thee Let my prayer come before thee - It is weak and helpless, though fervent and sincere: take all hinderances out of its way, and let it have a free pa...

Let my prayer come before thee - It is weak and helpless, though fervent and sincere: take all hinderances out of its way, and let it have a free passage to thy throne. One of the finest thoughts in the Iliad of Homer concerns prayer; I shall transcribe a principal part of this incomparable passage - incomparable when we consider its origin: -

Και γαρ τε Λιται εισι Διος κουραι μεγαλοιο

Χωλαι τε, ῥυσσαι τε, παραβλωπες τοφθαλμω·

Αἱ ῥα τε και μετοπισθΑτης αλεγουσι κιουσαι·

Ἡ δΑτη σθεναρη τε και αρτιπος· οὑνεκα πασας

Πολλον ὑπεκπροθεει, φθανει δε τε πασαν επαιαν

Βλαπτουςανθρωπους· αἱ δεξακεονται ποισσω·

Ὁς μεν ταιδεσεται κουρας Διος, ασσον ιουσας

Τονδε μεγωνησαν, και τεκλυον ευξαμενοιο

Ὁς δε κανῃνηται, και τε στερεως αποειπῃ

Λισσονται δαρα ταιγε Δια Κρονιωνα κιουσαι

Τῳ Ατην ἁμἑπεσθαι, ἱνα βλαφθεις αποτιση

Αλλ, Αχιλευ, πορε και συ Διος κουρησιν ἑπεσθαι

Τιμην, ῃτ αλλων περ επιγναμπτει φρενας εσθλων

Iliad., 9:498-510

Prayers are Jove’ s daughters; wrinkled, lame, slant-eyed

Which, though far distant, yet with constant pac

Follow offense. Offence, robust of limb

And treading firm the ground, outstrips them all

And over all the earth, before them run

Hurtful to man: they, following, heal the hurt

Received respectfully when they approach

They yield us aid, and listen when we pray

But if we slight, and with obdurate hear

Resist them, to Saturnian Jove they cry

Against, us supplicating, that offens

May cleave to us for vengeance of the wrong

Thou, therefore, O Achilles! honor yiel

To Jove’ s own daughters, vanquished as the brav

Have ofttimes been, by honor paid to thee

Cowper

On this allegory the translator makes the following remarks: "Wrinkled, because the countenance of a man, driven to prayer by a consciousness of guilt, is sorrowful and dejected. Lame, because it is a remedy to which men recur late, and with reluctance. Slant-eyed, either because in that state of humiliation they fear to lift up their eyes to heaven, or are employed in taking a retrospect of their past misconduct. The whole allegory, considering when and where it was composed, forms a very striking passage."Prayer to God for mercy must have the qualifications marked above

Prayer comes from God. He desires to save us: this desire is impressed on our hearts by his Spirit, and reflected back to himself. Thus says the allegory, "Prayers are the daughters of Jupiter."But they are lame, as reflected light is much less intense and vivid than light direct. The desire of the heart is afraid to go into the presence of God, because the man knows, feels, that he has sinned against goodness and mercy. They are wrinkled - dried up and withered, with incessant longing: even the tears that refresh the soul are dried up and exhausted. They are slant-eyed; look aside through shame and confusion; dare not look God in the face. But transgression is strong, bold, impudent, and destructive: it treads with a firm step over the earth, bringing down curses on mankind. Prayer and repentance follow, but generally at a distance. The heart, being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin does not speedily relent. They, however, follow: and when, with humility and contrition, they approach the throne of grace, they are respectfully received. God acknowledges them as his offspring, and heals the wounds made by transgression. If the heart remain obdurate, and the man will not humble himself before his God, then his transgression cleaves to him, and the heartless, lifeless prayers which he may offer in that state, presuming on God’ s mercy, will turn against him; and to such a one the sacrificial death and mediation of Christ are in vain. And this will be the case especially with the person who, having received an offense from another, refuses to forgive. This latter circumstance is that to which the poet particularly refers. See the whole passage, with its context.

Clarke: Psa 88:4 - I am counted with them, etc. I am counted with them, etc. - I am as good as dead; nearly destitute of life and hope.

I am counted with them, etc. - I am as good as dead; nearly destitute of life and hope.

Clarke: Psa 88:5 - Free among the dead Free among the dead - במתים צפשי bammethim chophshi , I rather think, means stripped among the dead. Both the fourth and fifth verses seem...

Free among the dead - במתים צפשי bammethim chophshi , I rather think, means stripped among the dead. Both the fourth and fifth verses seem to allude to a field of battle: the slain and the wounded, are found scattered over the plain; the spoilers come among them, and strip, not only the dead, but those also who appear to be mortally wounded, and cannot recover, and are so feeble as not to be able to resist. Hence the psalmist says, "I am counted with them that go down into the pit; I am as a man that hath no strength,"Psa 88:4. And I am stripped among the dead, like the mortally wounded ( חללים chalalim ) that lie in the grave. "Free among the dead,"inter mortuos liber, has been applied by the fathers to our Lord’ s voluntary death: all others were obliged to die, he alone gave up his life, and could take it again, Joh 10:18. He went into the grave, and came out when he chose. The dead are bound in the grave; he was free, and not obliged to continue in that state as they were

Clarke: Psa 88:5 - They are cut off from thy hand They are cut off from thy hand - An allusion to the roll in which the general has the names of all that compose his army under their respective offi...

They are cut off from thy hand - An allusion to the roll in which the general has the names of all that compose his army under their respective officers. And when one is killed, he is erased from this register, and remembered no more, as belonging to the army; but his name is entered among those who are dead, in a separate book. This latter is termed the black book, or the book of death; the other is called the book of life, or the book where the living are enrolled. From this circumstance, expressed in different parts of the sacred writings, the doctrine of unconditional reprobation and election has been derived. How wonderful!

Clarke: Psa 88:7 - Thou hast afflicted me with all thy waves Thou hast afflicted me with all thy waves - The figures in this verse seem to be taken from a tempest at sea. The storm is fierce, and the waves cov...

Thou hast afflicted me with all thy waves - The figures in this verse seem to be taken from a tempest at sea. The storm is fierce, and the waves cover the ship.

Clarke: Psa 88:8 - Thou hast made me an abonmination Thou hast made me an abonmination - This verse has been supposed to express the state of a leper, who, because of the infectious nature of his disea...

Thou hast made me an abonmination - This verse has been supposed to express the state of a leper, who, because of the infectious nature of his disease, is separated from his family - is abominable to all, and at last shut up in a separate house, whence he does not come out to mingle with society.

Clarke: Psa 88:10 - Wilt thou show wonders to the dead! Wilt thou show wonders to the dead! - מתים methim , dead men

Wilt thou show wonders to the dead! - מתים methim , dead men

Clarke: Psa 88:10 - Shall the dead Shall the dead - רפאים rephaim , "the manes or departed spirits.

Shall the dead - רפאים rephaim , "the manes or departed spirits.

Clarke: Psa 88:10 - Arise and praise thee? Arise and praise thee? - Any more in this life? The interrogations in this and the two following verses imply the strongest negations.

Arise and praise thee? - Any more in this life? The interrogations in this and the two following verses imply the strongest negations.

Clarke: Psa 88:11 - Or thy faithfulness in destruction? Or thy faithfulness in destruction? - Faithfulness in God refers as well to his fulfilling his threatenings as to his keeping his promises. The wick...

Or thy faithfulness in destruction? - Faithfulness in God refers as well to his fulfilling his threatenings as to his keeping his promises. The wicked are threatened with such punishments as their crimes have deserved; but annihilation is no punishment. God therefore does not intend to annihilate the wicked; their destruction cannot declare the faithfulness of God.

Clarke: Psa 88:12 - The land of forgetfulness? The land of forgetfulness? - The place of separate spirits, or the invisible world. The heathens had some notion of this state. They feigned a river...

The land of forgetfulness? - The place of separate spirits, or the invisible world. The heathens had some notion of this state. They feigned a river in the invisible world, called Lethe, Ληθη, which signifies oblivion, and that those who drank of it remembered no more any thing relative to their former state

Animae, quibus altera fat

Corpora debentur, lethaei ad fluminis unda

Securos latices et longa oblivia potant

Virg. Aen. 6: 713

To all those souls who round the river wai

New mortal bodies are decreed by fate

To yon dark stream the gliding ghosts repair

And quaff deep draughts of long oblivion there.

Clarke: Psa 88:13 - Shall my prayer prevent thee Shall my prayer prevent thee - It shall get before thee; I will not wait till the accustomed time to offer my morning sacrifice, I shall call on the...

Shall my prayer prevent thee - It shall get before thee; I will not wait till the accustomed time to offer my morning sacrifice, I shall call on thee long before others come to offer their devotions.

Clarke: Psa 88:14 - Why castest thou off my soul? Why castest thou off my soul? - Instead of my soul, several of the ancient Versions have my prayer. Why dost thou refuse to hear me, and thus abando...

Why castest thou off my soul? - Instead of my soul, several of the ancient Versions have my prayer. Why dost thou refuse to hear me, and thus abandon me to death?

Clarke: Psa 88:15 - From my youth up From my youth up - I have always been a child of sorrow, afflicted in my body, and distressed in my mind. There are still found in the Church of God...

From my youth up - I have always been a child of sorrow, afflicted in my body, and distressed in my mind. There are still found in the Church of God persons in similar circumstances; persons who are continually mourning for themselves and for the desolations of Zion. A disposition of this kind is sure to produce an unhealthy body; and indeed a weak constitution may often produce an enfeebled mind; but where the terrors of the Lord prevail, there is neither health of body nor peace of mind.

Clarke: Psa 88:16 - Thy fierce wrath goeth over me Thy fierce wrath goeth over me - It is a mighty flood by which I am overwhelmed.

Thy fierce wrath goeth over me - It is a mighty flood by which I am overwhelmed.

Clarke: Psa 88:17 - They came round about me daily like water They came round about me daily like water - Besides his spiritual conflicts, he had many enemies to grapple with. The waves of God’ s displeasu...

They came round about me daily like water - Besides his spiritual conflicts, he had many enemies to grapple with. The waves of God’ s displeasure broke over him, and his enemies came around him like water, increasing more and more, rising higher and higher, till he was at last on the point of being submerged in the flood.

Clarke: Psa 88:18 - Lover and friend Lover and friend - I have no comfort, and neither friend nor neiphbour to sympathize with me

Lover and friend - I have no comfort, and neither friend nor neiphbour to sympathize with me

Clarke: Psa 88:18 - Mine acquaintance into darkness Mine acquaintance into darkness - All have forsaken me; or מידעי מחשך meyuddai machsach , "Darkness is my companion."Perhaps he may refer ...

Mine acquaintance into darkness - All have forsaken me; or מידעי מחשך meyuddai machsach , "Darkness is my companion."Perhaps he may refer to the death of his acquaintances; all were gone; there was none left to console him! That man has a dismal lot who has outlived all his old friends and acquaintances; well may such complain. In the removal of their friends they see little else than the triumphs of death. Khosroo, an eminent Persian poet, handles this painful subject with great delicacy and beauty in the following lines: -

Ruftem sauee khuteereh bekerestem beza

Az Hijereh Doostan ke aseer fana shudend :

Guftem Eeshah Kuja shudend ?ve Khaty

Dad az sada jouab Eeshan Kuja

"Weeping, I passed the place where lay my friend

Captured by death; in accents wild I cried

Where are they? And stern Fate, by Echoes voice

Returned in solemn sound the sad Where are they?

J. B. C

Calvin: Psa 88:1 - O Jehovah! God of my salvation! 1.O Jehovah! God of my salvation! Let me call upon you particularly to notice what I have just now stated, that although the prophet simply, and with...

1.O Jehovah! God of my salvation! Let me call upon you particularly to notice what I have just now stated, that although the prophet simply, and without hyperbole, recites the agony which he suffered from the greatness of his sorrows, yet his purpose was at the same time to supply the afflicted with a form of prayer that they might not faint under any adversities, however severe, which might befall them. We will hear him by and by bursting out into vehement complaints on account of the grievousness of his calamities; but he seasonably fortifies himself by this brief exordium, lest, carried away with the heat of his feelings, he might become chargeable with complaining and murmuring against God, instead of humbly supplicating Him for pardon. By applying to Him the appellation of the God of his salvation, casting, as it were, a bridle upon himself, he restrains the excess of his sorrow, shuts the door against despair, and strengthens and prepares himself for the endurance of the cross. When he speaks of his crying and importunity, he indicates the earnestness of soul with which he engaged in prayer. He may not, indeed, have given utterance to loud cries; but he uses the word cry, with much propriety’, to denote the great earnestness of his prayers. The same thing is implied when he tells us that he continued crying days and nights. Nor are the words before thee superfluous. It is common for all men to complain when under the pressure of grief; but they are far from pouring out their groanings before God. Instead of this, the majority of mankind court retirement, that they may murmur against him, and accuse him of undue severity; while others pour forth their cries into the air at random. Hence we gather that it is a rare virtue to set God before our eyes, that we may address our prayers to him.

Calvin: Psa 88:3 - For my soul is filled with troubles 3.For my soul is filled with troubles These words contain the excuse which the prophet pleads for the excess of his grief. They imply that his contin...

3.For my soul is filled with troubles These words contain the excuse which the prophet pleads for the excess of his grief. They imply that his continued crying did not proceed from softness or effeminacy of spirit, but that from a due consideration of his condition, it would be found that the immense accumulation of miseries with which he was oppressed was such as might justly extort from him these lamentations. Nor does he speak of one kind of calamity only; but of calamities so heaped one upon another that his heart was filled with sorrow, till it could contain no more. He next particularly affirms that his life was not far from the grave. This idea he pursues and expresses in terms more significant in the following verse, where he complains that he was, as it were, dead. Although he breathed still among the living, yet the many deaths with which he was threatened on all sides were to him so many graves by which he expected to be swallowed up in a moment. And he seems to use the word גבר , geber, which is derived from גבר , gabar, he prevailed, or was strong, 509 in preference to the word which simply signifies man, — the more emphatically to show that his distresses were so great and crushing as to have been sufficient to bring down the strongest man.

Calvin: Psa 88:5 - Free among the dead, lie the slain who lie in the grave 5.Free among the dead, lie the slain who lie in the grave The prophet intended to express something more distressing and grievous than common death. ...

5.Free among the dead, lie the slain who lie in the grave The prophet intended to express something more distressing and grievous than common death. First, he says, that he was free among the dead, because he was rendered unfit for all the business which engages human life, and, as it were, cut off from the world. The refined interpretation of Augustine, that Christ is here described, and that he is said to be free among the dead, because he obtained the victory over death by a special privilege, that it might not have dominion over him, has no connection with the meaning of the passage. 510 The prophet is rather to be understood as affirming, that having finished the course of this present life, his mind had become disengaged from all worldly solicitude; his afflictions having deprived him of all feeling. 511 In the next place, comparing himself with those who have been wounded, he bewails his condition as worse than if, enfeebled by calamities, he were going down to death by little and little; for we are naturally inspired with horror at the prospect of a violent death.

What he adds, that he is forgotten of God, and cut off from his hand or guardianship, is apparently harsh and improper, since it is certain that the dead are no less under the Divine protection than the living. Even wicked Balaam, whose purpose it was to turn light into darkness, was, nevertheless, constrained to cry out,

“Let me die the death of the righteous,
and let my last end be like his,” (Num 23:10.)

To say, then, that God is no longer mindful of man after he is dead, might seem to be the language of a heathen. To this it may be answered, That the prophet speaks according to the opinion of the generality of men; just as the Scriptures, in like manner, when treating of the providence of God, accommodate their style to the state of the world as presented to the eye, because our thoughts ascend only by slow degrees to the future and invisible world. I, however, think, that he rather gave utterance to those confused conceptions which arise in the mind of a man under affliction, than that he had an eye to the opinion of the ignorant and uninstructed part of mankind. Nor is it wonderful that a man endued with the Spirit of God was, as it were, so stunned and stupified when sorrow overmastered him, as to allow unadvised words to escape from his lips. Although faith in the truth that God extends his care both to the living and the dead is deeply rooted in the hearts of all his genuine servants, yet sorrow often so overclouds their minds as to exclude from them for the time all remembrance of his providence. From perusing the complaints of Job, we may perceive, that when the minds of the godly are preoccupied with sorrow, they do not immediately pierce to the consideration of the secret providence of God, which yet has been before the subject of their careful meditation, and the truth of which they bear engraven on their hearts. Although the prophet, then, was persuaded that the dead also are under the Divine protection, yet, in the first paroxysm of his grief, he spoke less advisedly than he ought to have done; for the light of faith was, as it were, extinguished in him, although, as we shall see, it soon after shone forth. This it will be highly useful particularly to observe, that, should we be at any time weakened by temptation, we may, nevertheless, be kept from falling into despondency or despair.

Calvin: Psa 88:6 - Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit 6.Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit The Psalmist now acknowledges more distinctly, that whatever adversities he endured proceeded from the Divine h...

6.Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit The Psalmist now acknowledges more distinctly, that whatever adversities he endured proceeded from the Divine hand. Nor indeed will any man sincerely betake himself to God to seek relief without a previous persuasion that it is the Divine hand which smites him, and that nothing happens by chance. It is observable that the nearer the prophet approaches God the more is his grief embittered; for nothing is more dreadful to the saints than the judgment of God.

Calvin: Psa 88:7 - NO PHRASE Some translate the first clause of the 7th verse, Thy indignation hath approached upon me; and the Hebrew word סמך , samach, is sometimes to ...

Some translate the first clause of the 7th verse, Thy indignation hath approached upon me; and the Hebrew word סמך , samach, is sometimes to be taken in this sense. But from the scope of the passage, it must necessarily be understood here, as in many other places, in the sense of to surround, or to lie heavy upon; for when the subject spoken of is a man sunk into a threefold grave, it would be too feeble to speak of the wrath of God as merely approaching him. The translation which I have adopted is peculiarly suitable to the whole drift of the text. It views the prophet as declaring, that he sustained the whole burden of God’s wrath; seeing he was afflicted with His waves. Farther, as so dreadful a flood did not prevent him from lifting up his heart and prayers to God, we may learn from his example to cast the anchor of our faith and prayers direct into heaven in all the perils of shipwreck to which we may be exposed.

Calvin: Psa 88:8 - Thou hast removed my acquaintances from me 8.Thou hast removed my acquaintances from me He was now destitute of all human aid, and that also he attributes to the anger of God, in whose power...

8.Thou hast removed my acquaintances from me He was now destitute of all human aid, and that also he attributes to the anger of God, in whose power it is either to bend the hearts of men to humanity, or to harden them, and render them cruel. This is a point well worthy of our attention; for unless we bear in mind that our destitution of human aid in any case is owing to God’s withdrawing his hand, we agitate ourselves without end or measure. We may indeed justly complain of the ingratitude or cruelty of men whenever they defraud us of the just claims of duty which we have upon them; but still this will avail us nothing, unless we are thoroughly convinced that God, being displeased with us, takes away the means of help which he had destined for us; just as it is easy for him, whenever he pleases, to incline the hearts of all men to stretch forth their hand to succor us. The prophet, as an additional and still more grievous element in his distressed condition, tells us that his friends abhorred him. 512 Finally, he concludes by observing, that he could perceive no way of escape from his calamities: I am shut up that I cannot go forth. 513

Calvin: Psa 88:9 - My eye mourneth because of my affliction 9.My eye mourneth because of my affliction To prevent it from being supposed that he was iron-hearted, he again repeats that his afflictions were so ...

9.My eye mourneth because of my affliction To prevent it from being supposed that he was iron-hearted, he again repeats that his afflictions were so severe and painful as to produce manifest traces of his sorrow, even in his countenance and eyes — a plain indication of the low condition to which he was reduced. But he, notwithstanding, testifies that he was not drawn away from God, like many who, secretly murmuring in their hearts, and, to use a proverbial expression, chafing upon the bit, have nothing farther from their thoughts than to disburden their cares into the bosom of God, in order to derive comfort from Him. In speaking of the stretching out of his hands, he puts the sign for the thing signified. I have elsewhere had an opportunity of explaining the import of this ceremony, which has been in common use in all ages.

Calvin: Psa 88:10 - Wilt thou perform a miracle for the dead? 10.Wilt thou perform a miracle for the dead? By these words the prophet intimates, that God, if he did not make haste to succor him, would be too lat...

10.Wilt thou perform a miracle for the dead? By these words the prophet intimates, that God, if he did not make haste to succor him, would be too late, there being scarce anything betwixt him and death; and that therefore this was the critical juncture, if God was inclined to help him, for should the present opportunity not be embraced another would not occur. He asks how long God meant to delay, — if he meant to do so till death intervened, that he might raise the dead by a miracle? He does not speak of the resurrection at the last day, which will surpass all other miracles, as if he called it in question; yet he cannot be vindicated from the charge of going to excess, for it does not belong to us to prescribe to God the season of succouring us. We impeach his power if we believe not that it is as easy for him to restore life to the dead as to prevent, in proper season, the extreme danger which may threaten us from actually lighting upon us. Great as has been the constancy of the saints, it has always had some mixture of the infirmity of the flesh, which has rendered it necessary for God, in the exercise of his fatherly clemency, to bear with the sin with which even their very virtues have been to a degree contaminated. When the Psalmist asks, Shall thy loving-kindness be declared in the grave? he does not mean that the dead are devoid of consciousness; but he pursues the same sentiment which he had previously stated, That it is a more seasonable time to succor men, whilst in the midst of danger they are as yet crying, than to raise them up from their graves when they are dead. He reasons from what ordinarily happens; it not being God’s usual way to bring the dead out of their graves to be witnesses and publishers of his goodness. To God’s loving-kindness or mercy he annexes his truth or faithfulness; for when God delivers his servants he gives a confirmation of his faithfulness to his promises. And, on the other hand, he is influenced to make his promises by nothing but his own pure goodness. When the prophet affirms, that the divine faithfulness as well as the divine goodness, power, and righteousness, are not known in the land of forgetfulness, some deluded persons foolishly wrest the statement to support a gross error, as if it taught that men were annihilated by death. He speaks only of the ordinary manner in which help is extended by God, who has designed this world to be as a stage on which to display his goodness towards mankind.

Calvin: Psa 88:11 - But to thee have I cried, O Jehovah! 13.But to thee have I cried, O Jehovah! There may have been a degree of intemperateness in the language of the prophet, which, as I have granted, can...

13.But to thee have I cried, O Jehovah! There may have been a degree of intemperateness in the language of the prophet, which, as I have granted, cannot be altogether vindicated; but still it was a sign of rare faith and piety to persevere as he did with never-failing earnestness in prayer. This is what is meant when he says, that he made haste in the morning; by which he would have us not to imagine that he slowly and coldly lingered till he was constrained by dire necessity. At the same time, he modestly intimates by these words, that his pining away in long continued miseries was not owing to his own sluggishness, as if he had not sought God. This is an example particularly worthy of notice, that we may not become discouraged if it happen sometimes that our prayers are for a time unsuccessful, although they may proceed from the heart, and may be assiduously persevered in.

Calvin: Psa 88:14 - Wherefore, O Jehovah! wilt thou reject my soul? 14.Wherefore, O Jehovah! wilt thou reject my soul? These lamentations at first sight would seem to indicate a state of mind in which sorrow without a...

14.Wherefore, O Jehovah! wilt thou reject my soul? These lamentations at first sight would seem to indicate a state of mind in which sorrow without any consolation prevailed; but they contain in them tacit prayers. The Psalmist does not proudly enter into debate with God, but mournfully desires some remedy to his calamities. This kind of complaint justly deserves to be reckoned among the unutterable groanings of which Paul makes mention in Rom 8:26. Had the prophet thought himself rejected and abhorred by God, he certainly would not have persevered in prayer. But here he sets forth the judgment of the flesh, against which he strenuously and magnanimously struggled, that it might at length be manifest from the result that he had not prayed in vain. Although, therefore, this psalm does not end with thanksgiving, but with a mournful complaint, as if there remained no place for mercy, yet it is so much the more useful as a means of keeping us in the duty of prayer. The prophet, in heaving these sighs, and discharging them, as it were, into the bosom of God, doubtless ceased not to hope for the salvation of which he could see no signs by the eye of sense. He did not call God, at the opening of the psalm, the God of his salvation, and then bid farewell to all hope of succor from him.

Calvin: Psa 88:15 - NO PHRASE The reason why he says that he was ready to die 518 from his youth, (verse 15,) is uncertain, unless it may be considered a probable conjecture t...

The reason why he says that he was ready to die 518 from his youth, (verse 15,) is uncertain, unless it may be considered a probable conjecture that he was severely tried in a variety of ways, so that his life, as it were, hung by a thread amidst various tremblings and fears. Whence also we gather that God’s wraths and terrors, of which he speaks in the 16th verse, were not of short continuance. He expresses them in the 17th verse as having encompassed him daily. Since nothing is more dreadful than to conceive of God as angry with us, he not improperly compares his distress to a flood. Hence also proceeded his doubting. 519 for a sense of the divine anger must necessarily have agitated his mind with sore disquietude. But it may be asked, How can this wavering agree with faith? It is true, that when the heart is in perplexity and doubt, or rather is tossed hither and thither, faith seems to be swallowed up. But experience teaches us, that faith, while it fluctuates amidst these agitations, continues to rise again from time to time, so as not to be overwhelmed; and if at any time it is at the point of being stifled, it is nevertheless sheltered and cherished, for though the tempests may become never so violent, it shields itself from them by reflecting that God continues faithful, and never disappoints or forsakes his own children.

TSK: Psa 88:1 - Maschil // Heman // Lord // I have Maschil : etc. or, A Psalm of Heman the Ezrahite, giving instruction, Supposed to have been written by Heman, son of Zerah, and grandson of Judah, on ...

Maschil : etc. or, A Psalm of Heman the Ezrahite, giving instruction, Supposed to have been written by Heman, son of Zerah, and grandson of Judah, on the oppression of the Hebrews in Egypt.

Heman : 1Ki 4:31; 1Ch 2:6

Lord : Psa 27:1, Psa 27:9, Psa 51:14, Psa 62:7, Psa 65:5, Psa 68:19, Psa 79:9, Psa 140:7; Gen 49:18; Isa 12:2; Luk 1:47, Luk 2:30; Tit 2:10, Tit 2:13, Tit 3:4-7

I have : Psa 22:2, Psa 86:3; Neh 1:6; Isa 62:6; Luk 2:37, Luk 18:7; 1Th 3:10; 2Ti 1:3

TSK: Psa 88:2 - -- Psa 79:11, Psa 141:1, Psa 141:2; 1Ki 8:31; Lam 3:8

TSK: Psa 88:3 - soul // life soul : Psa 88:14, Psa 88:15, Psa 22:11-21, Psa 69:17-21, Psa 77:2, Psa 143:3, Psa 143:4; Job 6:2-4; Isa 53:3, Isa 53:10, Isa 53:11; Lam 3:15-19; Mat 2...

TSK: Psa 88:4 - counted // as a man counted : Psa 28:1, Psa 30:9, Psa 143:7; Job 17:1; Isa 38:17, Isa 38:18; Eze 26:20; Jon 2:6; 2Co 1:9 as a man : Psa 31:12, Psa 109:22-24; Rom 5:6; 2Co...

TSK: Psa 88:5 - Free // whom // cut // from thy hand Free : Isa 14:9-12, Isa 38:10-12; Eze 32:18-32 whom : Psa 136:23; Gen 8:1, Gen 19:29 cut : Psa 88:16, Psa 31:22; Job 6:9, Job 11:10; Isa 53:8 from thy...

Free : Isa 14:9-12, Isa 38:10-12; Eze 32:18-32

whom : Psa 136:23; Gen 8:1, Gen 19:29

cut : Psa 88:16, Psa 31:22; Job 6:9, Job 11:10; Isa 53:8

from thy hand : or, by thy hand

TSK: Psa 88:6 - lowest // darkness // deeps lowest : Psa 40:2, Psa 86:13; Deu 32:22 darkness : Psa 143:3; Pro 4:19; Lam 3:2; Joh 12:46; Jud 1:6, Jud 1:13 deeps : Psa 69:15, Psa 130:1

TSK: Psa 88:7 - Thy wrath // with Thy wrath : Psa 38:1, Psa 90:7, Psa 102:10; Job 6:4, Job 10:16; Joh 3:36; Rom 2:5-9; 1Pe 2:24; Rev 6:16, Rev 6:17 with : Psa 42:7; Jon 2:3

TSK: Psa 88:8 - put // made // I am shut put : Psa 88:18, Psa 31:11, Psa 143:4; 1Sa 23:18-20; Job 19:13-19; Joh 11:57 made : Isa 49:7, Isa 63:3; Zec 11:8; Mat 27:21-25; Joh 15:23, Joh 15:24 I...

TSK: Psa 88:9 - Mine // called // stretched Mine : Psa 38:10, Psa 42:3, Psa 102:9; Job 16:20, Job 17:7; Lam 3:48, Lam 3:49; Joh 11:35 called : Psa 88:1, Psa 55:17, Psa 86:3 stretched : Psa 44:20...

TSK: Psa 88:10 - Wilt thou // shall Wilt thou : The interrogations in these verses imply the strongest negations. Psa 6:5, Psa 30:9, Psa 115:17, Psa 118:17; Isa 38:18, Isa 38:19; Mar 5:3...

Wilt thou : The interrogations in these verses imply the strongest negations. Psa 6:5, Psa 30:9, Psa 115:17, Psa 118:17; Isa 38:18, Isa 38:19; Mar 5:35, Mar 5:36

shall : Job 14:7-12; Isa 26:19; Eze 37:1-14; Luk 7:12-16; 1Co 15:52-57

TSK: Psa 88:11 - in destruction in destruction : Psa 55:23, Psa 73:18; Job 21:30, Job 26:6; Pro 15:11; Mat 7:13; Rom 9:22; 2Pe 2:1

TSK: Psa 88:12 - dark // in the land dark : Psa 143:3; Job 10:21, Job 10:22; Isa 8:22; Mat 8:12; Jud 1:13 in the land : Psa 88:5, Psa 31:12; Ecc 2:16, Ecc 8:10, Ecc 9:5

TSK: Psa 88:13 - and in // prevent thee and in : Psa 5:3, Psa 119:147, Psa 119:148; Mar 1:35 prevent thee : ""Come before thee.""See note on Psa 21:3.

and in : Psa 5:3, Psa 119:147, Psa 119:148; Mar 1:35

prevent thee : ""Come before thee.""See note on Psa 21:3.

TSK: Psa 88:14 - Lord // hidest Lord : Psa 43:2, Psa 77:7-9; Mat 27:46 hidest : Psa 13:1, Psa 44:24, Psa 69:17; Job 13:24

TSK: Psa 88:15 - afflicted // while afflicted : Psa 73:14; Job 17:1, Job 17:11-16; Isa 53:3 while : Psa 22:14, Psa 22:15; Job 6:4, Job 7:11-16; Isa 53:10; Zec 13:7; Luk 22:44

TSK: Psa 88:16 - fierce // cut me fierce : Psa 38:1, Psa 38:2, Psa 89:46, Psa 90:7, Psa 90:11, Psa 102:10; Isa 53:4-6; Rom 8:32; Gal 3:13; Rev 6:17 cut me : Isa 53:8; Dan 9:26

TSK: Psa 88:17 - They // daily They : Psa 22:16, Psa 42:7, Psa 69:1, Psa 69:2, Psa 116:3; Job 16:12, Job 16:13, Job 30:14, Job 30:15; Lam 3:5-7; Mat 27:39-44 daily : or, all the day

TSK: Psa 88:18 - Lover // mine acquaintance Lover : Psa 88:8, Psa 31:11, Psa 38:11; Job 19:12-15 mine acquaintance : A figurative expression to denote that he now never saw them.

Lover : Psa 88:8, Psa 31:11, Psa 38:11; Job 19:12-15

mine acquaintance : A figurative expression to denote that he now never saw them.

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Poole: Psa 88:3 - My soul My soul properly so called; for that he was under great troubles of mind from a sense of God’ s wrath and departure from him, is evident from Ps...

My soul properly so called; for that he was under great troubles of mind from a sense of God’ s wrath and departure from him, is evident from Psa 88:14-16 .

Poole: Psa 88:4 - -- I am given up by my friends and acquaintance for a lost man.

I am given up by my friends and acquaintance for a lost man.

Poole: Psa 88:5 - Free among the dead // Whom thou rememberest no more // From thy hand // are cut off Free among the dead well nigh discharged from the warfare of the present life, and entered es a member into the society of the dead; as Israelitish s...

Free among the dead well nigh discharged from the warfare of the present life, and entered es a member into the society of the dead; as Israelitish servants, when they were made flee, were thereby made denizens of the commonwealth of Israel. I expect no other freedom from my miseries but that which death gives, as Job 3:17,18 .

Whom thou rememberest no more whom thou seemest wholly to neglect and to bury in oblivion; for he speaks of these matters not as they are in truth, for he knew very well that forgetfulness was not incident to God, and that God did remember all the dead, and would call them to an account, but only as to sense and appearance, and the opinion of the world, and the state and things of this life.

From thy hand from the care and conduct of thy providence, which is to be understood as the former clause. Or, by thy hand . But our translation seems better to agree both with the foregoing branch, which it explains and improves, and with the order of the words; for it seems improper, after he had represented the persons as dead, and in their graves, to add that they

are cut off to wit, by death.

Poole: Psa 88:6 - -- Either, first, in the grave; the same thing being expressed in divers words; or, secondly, in hopeless and remediless calamities.

Either, first, in the grave; the same thing being expressed in divers words; or, secondly, in hopeless and remediless calamities.

Poole: Psa 88:7 - Thy wrath // With all thy waves Thy wrath either, first, the sense of thy wrath; or rather, secondly, the effects of it; as the next clause explains this. With all thy waves with ...

Thy wrath either, first, the sense of thy wrath; or rather, secondly, the effects of it; as the next clause explains this.

With all thy waves with thy judgments, breaking in furiously upon me like the waves of the sea.

Poole: Psa 88:8 - I am shut up I am so sad a spectacle of thy vengeance that my friends avoid and detest me, lest by conversing with me they should either be filled with terrors, ...

I am so sad a spectacle of thy vengeance that my friends avoid and detest me, lest by conversing with me they should either be filled with terrors, which men naturally abhor, or be made partakers of my guilt or plagues.

I am shut up either in the pit or deep, mentioned Psa 88:6 , or in my own house or chamber, being afraid or ashamed to go abroad.

Poole: Psa 88:9 - -- Understand, without effect ; for thou dost not hear nor answer me.

Understand, without effect ; for thou dost not hear nor answer me.

Poole: Psa 88:10 - Wilt thou show wonders to the dead // Praise thee Wilt thou show wonders to the dead to wit, in raising them to live again in this world? as it is in the next clause. I know that thou wilt not. And t...

Wilt thou show wonders to the dead to wit, in raising them to live again in this world? as it is in the next clause. I know that thou wilt not. And therefore now hear and help me, or it will be too late.

Praise thee to wit, amongst mortal men in this world.

Poole: Psa 88:11 - -- I am not without hopes that thou hast a true kindness for me, and wilt faithfully perform thy gracious promises made to me, and to all that love the...

I am not without hopes that thou hast a true kindness for me, and wilt faithfully perform thy gracious promises made to me, and to all that love thee and call upon thee in truth. But then this must be done speedily, or I shall be utterly incapable of such a mercy.

Poole: Psa 88:12 - In the dark // In the land of forgetfulness In the dark in the grave, which is called the land of darkness , Job 10:21,22 . In the land of forgetfulness in the grave; so called, either, firs...

In the dark in the grave, which is called the land of darkness , Job 10:21,22 .

In the land of forgetfulness in the grave; so called, either, first, Actively, because there men forget and neglect all the concerns of this life, being indeed but dead carcasses without any sense or remembrance. Or rather, secondly, Passively, because there men are forgotten not only by men, as is noted, Job 24:20 Psa 31:12 , but by God himself, as he complained, Psa 88:5 .

Poole: Psa 88:13 - -- i.e. Early, come to thee, before the ordinary time of morning prayer, or before the dawning of the day, or the rising of the sun. The sense is, Thou...

i.e. Early, come to thee, before the ordinary time of morning prayer, or before the dawning of the day, or the rising of the sun. The sense is, Though I have hitherto got no answer to my prayers, yet I will not give over praying nor hoping for an answer.

Poole: Psa 88:14 - -- This proceeding seems not to agree with the benignity of thy nature, nor with the manner of thy dealing with thy people.

This proceeding seems not to agree with the benignity of thy nature, nor with the manner of thy dealing with thy people.

Poole: Psa 88:15 - From my youth up // I suffer thy terrors From my youth up my whole life hath been filled with a succession of deadly calamities. O Lord, take some pity upon me, and let me have a little brea...

From my youth up my whole life hath been filled with a succession of deadly calamities. O Lord, take some pity upon me, and let me have a little breathing space before I die.

I suffer thy terrors upon my mind and conscience, which do accompany and aggravate my outward miseries.

Poole: Psa 88:17 - -- As the waters of the sea encompass him which is in the midst and bottom of it.

As the waters of the sea encompass him which is in the midst and bottom of it.

Poole: Psa 88:18 - See Poole "Psa 88:8" See Poole "Psa 88:8" .

See Poole "Psa 88:8" .

PBC: Psa 88:1 - -- See PB: Ps 77:1

See PB: Ps 77:1

PBC: Psa 88:10 - -- See Philpot: WONDERS SHOWN TO THE DEAD

See Philpot: WONDERS SHOWN TO THE DEAD

Haydock: Psa 88:1 - Israel The perpetuity of the Church of Christ, in consequence of the promises of God: which notwithstanding, God permits her to suffer sometimes most grievou...

The perpetuity of the Church of Christ, in consequence of the promises of God: which notwithstanding, God permits her to suffer sometimes most grievous afflictions.

Israel. The Lord our king, (1 Kings viii. 7.) will protect us, (Haydock) or He will defend our King David, and his posterity, as he then promised to him, ver. 5, 20. These verses may be thus connected, as the psalmist had been led to praise the wonderful works of God, and now returns to his promises. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 88:1 - Ezrahite Ezrahite. Septuagint, &c., " Israelite, " as in the former psalm. The Jews think that Ethan or Eman lived during the Egyptian bondage. But this ps...

Ezrahite. Septuagint, &c., " Israelite, " as in the former psalm. The Jews think that Ethan or Eman lived during the Egyptian bondage. But this psalm was rather composed by one of the captives at Babylon who bewails the destruction of the kingdom of Juda, under Sedecias. After he had detailed the promises of God, (ver. 39.; Calmet) David might write it in the person (Haydock) of Ethan, or Idithun, 1 Paralipomenon xxv., and 3 Kings. iv. 31. (Worthington) ---

Most of the Fathers explain it of Christ's kingdom. See Psalm cxxxi. 11., and Jeremias xxxiii. 17. (Calmet) ---

The sceptre or administration of affairs was to continue in the tribe of Juda till his coming, as it really did, though kings were not always at the head of the people. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 88:2 - The // Truth The. Septuagint and Houbigant, " Thy mercies, Lord." --- Truth. Notwithstanding our distress, I know thou wilt perform thy promises. (Calmet)

The. Septuagint and Houbigant, " Thy mercies, Lord." ---

Truth. Notwithstanding our distress, I know thou wilt perform thy promises. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 88:3 - For thou // Heaven // Truth // In them For thou. Hebrew, "I." Yet St. Jerome agrees with the Septuagint, (Berthier) though he is quoted by Calmet as conformable with Aquila, &c., Dixi. ...

For thou. Hebrew, "I." Yet St. Jerome agrees with the Septuagint, (Berthier) though he is quoted by Calmet as conformable with Aquila, &c., Dixi. ---

Heaven and earth shall pass away sooner than God's word. (Haydock) ---

If we do not see how his promises are accompanied we must confess our ignorance, or throw the blame on the sins of the nation: but never call in question the divine mercy. (Calmet) ---

Truth. I will perform what I have promised to thee. (Menochius) ---

The apostles, represented by the heavens, have, by their preaching, established by the Church for ever. (Worthington) ---

In them, is not in the Septuagint, St. Augustine, &c. (Calmet) ---

Houbigant would remove Dixisti, "for thou," &c., to ver. 4. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 88:4 - Elect Elect. Abraham, and the whole body of the people to whom the Messias had been promised. David was assured that he should spring from his family, ve...

Elect. Abraham, and the whole body of the people to whom the Messias had been promised. David was assured that he should spring from his family, ver. 52. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 88:5 - Generation Generation. David's posterity occupied the throne for a long time, (Haydock) and subsisted till the coming of Christ; so that if any conqueror of ...

Generation. David's posterity occupied the throne for a long time, (Haydock) and subsisted till the coming of Christ; so that if any conqueror of that family had then appeared, the Jews would not have hesitated to admit, that this prediction was fulfilled. It is there misfortune to understand the text in this sense, whereas God spoke of the spiritual kingdom of his Son, which is to be perpetual. They can never answer the argument which the Fathers urged in the 4th century, and which has attained fresh strength from the longer duration of misery under which the royal family of David has been depressed. It is plain, that it has enjoyed no power from many ages, and as God's word is invariable, He could not have promised an everlasting earthly dominion. (Berthier) ---

The temporal kingdom of David decayed at the captivity, and is now wholly destroyed. But Christ was of this family, and established the Church, his spiritual kingdom, which shall continue unto the end. (Worthington) ---

His ministers exercise a power, which is founded on truth and justice. See 2 Kings vii. 9. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 88:6 - Saints Saints. These alone, (Haydock) the heavens or angels, worthily proclaim thy praises. (Haydock) --- Preachers announce the same in the Church, (S...

Saints. These alone, (Haydock) the heavens or angels, worthily proclaim thy praises. (Haydock) ---

Preachers announce the same in the Church, (St. Augustine) "the communion of saints, " as none are found out of her society. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 88:7 - Sons Sons. Angels (Calmet) to God the Son. None is like him. (St. Jerome) --- Lucifer fell by aiming at it. I will be like to the Most High, Isai...

Sons. Angels (Calmet) to God the Son. None is like him. (St. Jerome) ---

Lucifer fell by aiming at it. I will be like to the Most High, Isaias xiv. 14.

Haydock: Psa 88:8 - About About. God eclipses every created beauty. (Haydock) --- The angels themselves tremble before him. (Calmet)

About. God eclipses every created beauty. (Haydock) ---

The angels themselves tremble before him. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 88:9 - Truth Truth. He often praises this attribute, as if to excuse himself for asking, why God had debased the throne of David? (Calmet) --- God cannot be di...

Truth. He often praises this attribute, as if to excuse himself for asking, why God had debased the throne of David? (Calmet) ---

God cannot be divested of this perfection. (Du Hamel)

Haydock: Psa 88:10 - Power Power. Hebrew, "pride." Thou canst raise a storm, or restore a calm. (Calmet)

Power. Hebrew, "pride." Thou canst raise a storm, or restore a calm. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 88:11 - Proud one Proud one. Hebrew Rahab, Egypt or Pharao, Psalm lxxxvi. 4., and Isaias li. 9. (Calmet) He alludes to the plagues inflicted on the Egyptians, &c....

Proud one. Hebrew Rahab, Egypt or Pharao, Psalm lxxxvi. 4., and Isaias li. 9. (Calmet) He alludes to the plagues inflicted on the Egyptians, &c. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 88:13 - Sea Sea. Hebrew, "the right," (Calmet) which here denotes the south, (Psalm cvi. 3.; Menochius) as Hermon may do the east, (Du Hamel) with reference t...

Sea. Hebrew, "the right," (Calmet) which here denotes the south, (Psalm cvi. 3.; Menochius) as Hermon may do the east, (Du Hamel) with reference to Thabor, which lies to the west, though this seems unusual. (Calmet) (Berthier) ---

The north, &c., more probably refers to the limits of the promised land, from Libanus to the Indian or Mediterranean sea; and from Hermon, on the north-eastern part, to Thabor, on the west. (Haydock) ---

These two mountains were particularly fertile, and seemed to rejoice. (Berthier) ---

They "shall praise thy name," Greek: euphemesousi. (Symmachus) (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 88:14 - Might Might. Others can make no resistance with all their armies.

Might. Others can make no resistance with all their armies.

Haydock: Psa 88:15 - Preparation // Face Preparation. Hebrew, "basis." --- Face. Like guards. (Menochius) --- He extols the mercy, and still more the fidelity of God. (Calmet) --- Wh...

Preparation. Hebrew, "basis." ---

Face. Like guards. (Menochius) ---

He extols the mercy, and still more the fidelity of God. (Calmet) ---

Whether he punished, or reward, all tends to promote his glory, and is perfectly just. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 88:16 - Jubilation Jubilation. Hebrew, "how to sound the trumpet," which was the office of priests. They marched near the ark, as it were under the eyes of God. (Cal...

Jubilation. Hebrew, "how to sound the trumpet," which was the office of priests. They marched near the ark, as it were under the eyes of God. (Calmet) ---

Those who consider, and adore the ways of Providence, are blessed, (Worthington) and secure. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 88:18 - Horn Horn. Power and kingdom. (Worthington) --- He speaks like a virtuous Levite, who acknowledges that all good came from the Lord. (Haydock) --- He...

Horn. Power and kingdom. (Worthington) ---

He speaks like a virtuous Levite, who acknowledges that all good came from the Lord. (Haydock) ---

He cannot speak of temporal blessings alone. (Berthier)

Gill: Psa 88:1 - O Lord God of my salvation // I have cried day and night before thee O Lord God of my salvation,.... The author both of temporal and spiritual salvation; see Psa 18:46 from the experience the psalmist had had of the Lor...

O Lord God of my salvation,.... The author both of temporal and spiritual salvation; see Psa 18:46 from the experience the psalmist had had of the Lord's working salvation for him in times past, he is encouraged to hope that he would appear for him, and help him out of his present distress; his faith was not so low, but that amidst all his darkness and dejection he could look upon the Lord as his God, and the God of salvation to him; so our Lord Jesus Christ, when deserted by his Father, still called him his God, and believed that he would help him, Psa 22:1.

I have cried day and night before thee, or "in the day I have cried, and in the night before thee"; that is, as the Targum paraphrases it,

"in the night my prayer was before thee.''

prayer being expressed by crying shows the person to be in distress, denotes the earnestness of it, and shows it to be vocal; and it being both in the day and in the night, that it was without ceasing. The same is said by Christ, Psa 22:2 and is true of him, who in the days of his flesh was frequent in prayer, and especially in the night season, Luk 6:12 and particularly his praying in the garden the night he was betrayed may be here referred to, Mat 26:38.

Gill: Psa 88:2 - Let my prayer come before thee // incline thine ear unto my cry Let my prayer come before thee,.... Not before men, as hypocrites desire, but before the Lord; let it not be shut out, but be admitted; and let it com...

Let my prayer come before thee,.... Not before men, as hypocrites desire, but before the Lord; let it not be shut out, but be admitted; and let it come with acceptance, as it does when it ascends before God, out of the hands of the angel before the throne, perfumed with the much incense of his mediation, Rev 8:3,

incline thine ear unto my cry; hearken to it, receive it, and give an answer to it; Christ's prayers were attended with strong crying, and were always received and heard, Heb 5:7.

Gill: Psa 88:3 - For my soul is full of troubles // innumerable evils compassed him about // and my life draweth nigh unto the grave For my soul is full of troubles,.... Or "satiated or glutted" e with them, as a stomach full of meat that can receive no more, to which the allusion i...

For my soul is full of troubles,.... Or "satiated or glutted" e with them, as a stomach full of meat that can receive no more, to which the allusion is; having been fed with the bread of adversity and the water of affliction, so that he had his fill of trouble: every man is full of trouble, of one kind or another, Job 14:1 especially the saint, who besides his outward troubles has inward ones, arising from indwelling sin, the temptations of Satan, and divine desertions, which was now the case of the psalmist: this may be truly applied to Christ, who himself said, when in the garden, "my soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death", Mat 26:38, he was a man of sorrows all his days, but especially at that time, and when upon the cross, forsaken by his Father, and sustaining his wrath: "his soul" was then "filled with evil things" f, as the words may be rendered:

innumerable evils compassed him about, Psa 40:12, the sins of his people, those evil things, were imputed to him; the iniquity of them all was laid upon him, as was also the evil of punishment for them; and then he found trouble and sorrow enough:

and my life draweth nigh unto the grave: a phrase expressive of a person's being just ready to die, Job 33:22 as the psalmist now thought he was, Psa 88:5, it is in the plural number "my lives" g; and so may not only denote the danger he was in of his natural life, but of his spiritual and eternal life, which he might fear, being in darkness and desertion, would be lost, though they could not; yea, that he was near to "hell" itself, for so the word h may be rendered; for when the presence of God is withdrawn, and wrath let into the conscience, a person in his own apprehension seems to be in hell as it were, or near it; see Jon 2:2. This was true of Christ, when he was sorrowful unto death, and was brought to the dust of it, and under divine dereliction, and a sense of the wrath of God, as the surety of his people.

Gill: Psa 88:4 - I am counted with them that go down into the pit // I am as a man that hath no strength I am counted with them that go down into the pit,.... With the dead, with them that are worthy of death, with malefactors that are judicially put to d...

I am counted with them that go down into the pit,.... With the dead, with them that are worthy of death, with malefactors that are judicially put to death, and are not laid in a common grave, but put into a pit together: thus Christ was reckoned and accounted of by the Jews; the sanhedrim counted him worthy of death; and the common people cried out Crucify him; and they did crucify him between two malefactors; and so he was numbered or counted with transgressors, and as one of them, Isa 53:3.

I am as a man that hath no strength; for his "strength" was "dried up like a potsherd", Psa 22:15, though he was the mighty God, and, as man, was made strong by the Lord for himself.

Gill: Psa 88:5 - Free among the dead // like the slain that lie in the grave, whom thou rememberest no more // and they are cut off from thy hand Free among the dead,.... If he was a freeman, it was only among the dead, not among the living; if he was free of any city, it was of the city of the ...

Free among the dead,.... If he was a freeman, it was only among the dead, not among the living; if he was free of any city, it was of the city of the dead; he looked upon himself as a dead man, as one belonging to the state of the dead, who are free from all relations, and from all business and labour, and removed from all company and society; he thought himself quite neglected, of whom there was no more care and notice taken than of a dead man:

like the slain that lie in the grave, whom thou rememberest no more; in a providential way, as in life, to clothe them, and feed them, and protect and preserve them; in which sense God is said to be mindful of men, Psa 8:4, who when dead have no need to be minded, and remembered in such a manner; otherwise God does remember the dead, and takes care of their dust, and will raise them again; and especially he remembers his own people, those that sleep in Jesus, who will be thought of in the resurrection morn, and will be raised first, and brought with Christ; see Job 14:13,

and they are cut off from thy hand; that is, the slain that lie in the grave, the dead that are buried there; these are cut off from the hand of Providence, they needing no supplies from thence as in the time of life. The Targum is,

"and they are separated from the face of thy majesty.''

or "they are cut off by thine hand" i; by the immediate hand of God, in a judicial way; so Christ in his death was like one of these, he was cut off in a judicial way, not for his own sins, but for the transgressions of his people, Isa 53:8.

Gill: Psa 88:6 - Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit // in the deeps Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit,.... The Targum interprets it of "captivity which was like unto the lowest pit;'' and so Jarchi and Kimchi. ...

Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit,.... The Targum interprets it of

"captivity which was like unto the lowest pit;''

and so Jarchi and Kimchi. Some understand it of a prison or dungeon, into which the psalmist was put; it may be interpreted of the pit of the grave, into which Christ was laid; though he continued in it not so long as to see corruption; from that prison and judgment he was quickly taken, Psa 16:10, "in darkness"; both corporeal and spiritual, Mat 27:45, and it is in the Hebrew text "in darknesses" k, denoting both:

in the deeps; in the deep waters of affliction, sorrows, and sufferings; see Psa 69:1. The allusion is to a dark and deep pit, under ground, such as in the eastern countries they used to put their captives and prisoners into in the night, and take them out in the morning; and which custom continues still among the Turks. Leo Africanus l says he has seen three thousand Christian captives together, clothed in a woollen sack, and chained to one another; and in the night put into pits or ditches under ground; see Zec 9:11.

Gill: Psa 88:7 - The wrath lieth hard upon me // and thou hast afflicted me with all thy waves // Selah The wrath lieth hard upon me,.... So some good men apprehend, when they are under afflictive dispensations of Providence, and are left of God, and hav...

The wrath lieth hard upon me,.... So some good men apprehend, when they are under afflictive dispensations of Providence, and are left of God, and have not his immediate presence, and the discoveries of his love; though fury is not in him, nor does any wrath in reality fall upon them, only it seems so to them; see Psa 38:1, but the wrath of God did really lie with all the effects of it upon Christ, as the surety of his people, when he was made sin, and a curse for them; see Psa 89:38,

and thou hast afflicted me with all thy waves; the afflictions of God's people are compared to waves and billows of the sea, which are many, and come one upon the back of another, and threaten to overwhelm and sink; see Psa 42:7 and so the sufferings of Christ are signified by waters coming into him, and floods overflowing him; and hence they are called a baptism, Psa 69:1, and these were brought upon him by the Lord; he spared him not; he laid the whole chastisement, all the punishment due to the sins of his people, on him; he caused every wave to come upon him, and him to endure all sorrows and sufferings the law and justice of God could require.

Selah. See Gill on Psa 3:2.

Gill: Psa 88:8 - Thou hast put away mine acquaintance far from me // thou hast made me an abomination unto them // I am shut up, and I cannot come forth Thou hast put away mine acquaintance far from me,.... His familiar friends, who were well known to him, and he to them: it is a mercy and privilege to...

Thou hast put away mine acquaintance far from me,.... His familiar friends, who were well known to him, and he to them: it is a mercy and privilege to have good acquaintance, and hearty faithful friends, to converse and advise with, whether about things civil or religious; and it is an affliction to be deprived of them; and oftentimes in distress and adversity they drop and fail, which is an additional trouble: this was the ease of Job and of David, Job 19:13 and here of Heman, who attributes it to God, as done by him; as also Job does, in the place referred to; for as it is the Lord that gives favour in the sight of men, he can take it away when he pleases: this is true of Christ, and the like is said of him, Psa 69:8, and by his "acquaintance", familiars, and friends, may be meant his apostles, who, upon his being apprehended, forsook him, and fled; who, though they were not all alienated in their affections, yet stood at a distance from him; Peter, though he followed him, it was afar off, and at last he denied him; and others of acquaintance and intimates stood afar off, beholding was done to him on the cross; and his familiar friend, Judas, lifted up his heel against him, and basely betrayed him, Mat 26:50,

thou hast made me an abomination unto them; to some of them, as to Judas, and to many that hosanna'd him into Jerusalem, and within a few days cried "Crucify him, crucify him", Mat 21:9 compare with this Isa 53:3.

I am shut up, and I cannot come forth; the Targum renders it,

"shut up in the house of prison,''

in a prison; and so some literally understand it of the author of the psalm being in a prison, or dungeon, in the time of the captivity: but it is rather to be understood of some bodily disease, by which he was detained a prisoner at home, and of his being bound in fetters, and held in the cords of affliction; which was as a prison to him, and in which when the Lord "shuts up a man, there can be no opening", Job 36:8, or else of soul troubles, being in great darkness and desertion; so that his soul was as in a prison, and could not come forth in the free exercise of grace, and needed the free Spirit of God to set him at liberty; see Psa 142:7, this may be applied to Christ, when in the hands of Judas, and the hand of soldiers with him, who took him, and bound him, and led him to the high priest; and when he was encompassed with bulls of Bashan, and enclosed by the assembly of the wicked, as he hung on the cross, Psa 22:12.

Gill: Psa 88:9 - Mine eye mourneth by reason of affliction // Lord, I have called daily upon thee, I have stretched out my hands unto thee Mine eye mourneth by reason of affliction,.... Or dropped tears, as the Targum, by which grief was vented; see Psa 6:7. Lord, I have called daily u...

Mine eye mourneth by reason of affliction,.... Or dropped tears, as the Targum, by which grief was vented; see Psa 6:7.

Lord, I have called daily upon thee, I have stretched out my hands unto thee; in prayer, as the Targum adds, this being a prayer gesture: notwithstanding his troubles continued and increased, he did not leave off praying, though he was not immediately heard and answered, which is what is tacitly complained of, as in Psa 22:2. Christ, in his troubles in the garden, and on the cross, prayed for himself, for divine support and assistance, as man; for his friends, disciples, and apostles, and for all that should believe in him through them; and even for his enemies.

Gill: Psa 88:10 - Wilt thou show wonders to the dead // shall the dead arise and praise thee // Selah Wilt thou show wonders to the dead?.... The Lord does show wonders to some that are spiritually dead, dead in Adam, dead in law, dead in trespasses an...

Wilt thou show wonders to the dead?.... The Lord does show wonders to some that are spiritually dead, dead in Adam, dead in law, dead in trespasses and sins, by quickening them; whereby the wonders of his grace and love, and of his power, and the exceeding greatness of it, are displayed; for the conversion and quickening of a dead sinner is a marvellous event, like that of; raising Lazarus from the dead, and causing Ezekiel's dry bones to live: likewise the Lord will show wonders to those that are corporeally dead, by raising them from the dead; which work, though not incredible, yet is very wonderful, and can only be accounted for by the attributes of Divine Omniscience and Omnipotence: yea, he would, and he has shown wonders to Christ, when dead, by raising him up again, and giving him glory, and that before he saw corruption, and as the head and representative of his people; and by raising many of the saints also, after his resurrection:

shall the dead arise and praise thee? the spiritually dead, when they are made alive, and rise out of their graves of sin, praise the Lord for the exertion of his grace and power upon them; which is one end of their being formed anew, quickened, and converted; and those that are corporeally dead, such of them as shall rise again to everlasting life, their mouths will be filled with everlasting praise: but here the author of the psalm suggests, that in a little time he should be among the dead, unless he had speedy help and deliverance from his troubles; to whom wonders are not shown, but to the living; and who ordinarily do not rise again to this mortal state, to praise the Lord in it: or, considering them as the words of Christ, he suggests, that none of the above things would be done, unless he was a conqueror over death and the grave, and was raised from thence himself; and so these expostulations carry in them the nature of a prayer, even of the prayer of Christ, as man, to be assisted in overcoming all his enemies, and to be raised from the dead, as Cocceius and others think: the Greek and Vulgate Latin versions are,

"shall physicians rise again?''

of whom the Jews had a bad opinion; See Gill on 2Ch 16:12.

Selah. See Gill on Psa 3:2.

Gill: Psa 88:11 - Shall thy lovingkindness be declared in the grave // or thy faithfulness in destruction Shall thy lovingkindness be declared in the grave?.... Where he saw himself now going, and where should he be detained, and not raised out of it, the ...

Shall thy lovingkindness be declared in the grave?.... Where he saw himself now going, and where should he be detained, and not raised out of it, the lovingkindness of God to him, as his Son, and as man and Mediator, and to his people in the gift and mission of him to be their Saviour and Redeemer, how would that be declared and made known? now it is, Christ being raised, and his ministers having a commission from him to preach the Gospel, in which the lovingkindness of God is abundantly manifested:

or thy faithfulness in destruction? the grave, so called from dead bodies being cast into it, and wasted, consumed, and destroyed in it: the meaning may be, that should he be laid in the grave, and there putrefy and rot, and not be raised again, where would be the faithfulness of God to his purposes, to his covenant and promises, to him his Son, and to his people?

Gill: Psa 88:12 - Shall thy wonders be known in the dark // and thy righteousness in the land of forgetfulness Shall thy wonders be known in the dark?.... A description of the grave again; see Job 10:21, The sense may be, should he continue in the dark and sile...

Shall thy wonders be known in the dark?.... A description of the grave again; see Job 10:21, The sense may be, should he continue in the dark and silent grave, how would the wonders of the grace of God, of electing, redeeming, justifying, pardoning, and adopting grace, be made known; the wonders of Christ's person and offices, and the wondrous things, and doctrines of the Gospel, relating thereunto? as the glory of these would be eclipsed, there would be none to publish them:

and thy righteousness in the land of forgetfulness? the grave, where the dead lie, who, having lost all sense of things, forget what were done in this world, and they themselves are quickly forgotten by the living; and had Christ continued in this state, and had not risen again to our justification, how would his justifying righteousness have been revealed, as it is from faith to faith in the Gospel, which is therefore called the word and ministration of righteousness?

Gill: Psa 88:13 - But unto thee have I cried, O Lord // and in the morning shall my prayer prevent thee But unto thee have I cried, O Lord,.... Formerly, and had been heard, answered, and relieved, and which was an encouragement to cry again to him in hi...

But unto thee have I cried, O Lord,.... Formerly, and had been heard, answered, and relieved, and which was an encouragement to cry again to him in his distress; Christ was always heard, Joh 11:42, or, now, in his present case, yet was not heard, at least not immediately answered; which was the case of the Messiah, when forsaken by his God and Father, Psa 22:1, yet still determines to continue praying, as follows:

and in the morning shall my prayer prevent thee; not before the Lord is awake, and can hear; for he neither slumbers nor sleeps, and he always hears: but the meaning is, that he would pray before he entered upon another business; this should be the first thing in the morning he would do, and this he would do before others did, or he himself used to do; before the usual time of morning prayer; signifying, he would pray to him very early, which is expressive of his vehemency, fervency, and importunity and earnestness, and what a sense he had of his case, and of his need of divine help: so Christ rose early in the morning, a great while before day, to pray, Mar 1:35. See Gill on Psa 5:4.

Gill: Psa 88:14 - Lord, why castest thou off my soul Lord, why castest thou off my soul?.... Here begins his prayer, which he determined to present early in the morning, and consists of expostulations, a...

Lord, why castest thou off my soul?.... Here begins his prayer, which he determined to present early in the morning, and consists of expostulations, and a representation of his distressed case: this shows that he was under soul desertion, and which was what so greatly afflicted him; imagining that his soul was cast off by the Lord, and had no more share in his affection, and was no more under his care, and in his sight: such expostulations of the saints, the church, and people of God, in a like case, are elsewhere met with, Psa 43:3 and may be applied to Christ, when his soul was exceeding sorrowful unto death, and was made an offering for sin; and particularly when he was forsaken by his Father: the Targum is,

"why hast thou forsaken my soul?''

and rises the word "sabachtha", which Christ did when on the cross, Mat 27:46, the Septuagint version is,

"wherefore, O Lord, dost thou reject my prayers?''

"why hidest thou thy face from me?" which is a denial of sensible communion, a withdrawing the influences and communications of divine grace for a time; and which sometimes is the case of the best of men, as Job, David, and others; and is very grieving and distressing to them; and, for the most part, is on account of sin; it is sin which separates between God and his people, and causes him to hide his face from them, or not grant them his gracious presence: this was the case of Christ, who knew no sin, while he was suffering for the sins of his people; see Psa 69:17 compared with Mat 27:46.

Gill: Psa 88:15 - I am afflicted // I am poor // and ready to die, from my youth up // while I suffer thy terrors // I am distracted I am afflicted,.... In body and mind, from within and from without, by Satan, by the men of the world, and by the Lord himself; which is the common lo...

I am afflicted,.... In body and mind, from within and from without, by Satan, by the men of the world, and by the Lord himself; which is the common lot of God's people, Psa 34:19 and was the case of the Messiah, who was afflicted both with the tongues and hands of men, by words, by blows, and by the temptations of Satan; and was smitten and afflicted of God, by divine justice, as the sinner's surety: see Psa 22:24 or

I am poor a; which as it is a character, which, for the most part, agrees with the saints, who are the poor of this world God has chosen, to whom the Gospel is sent, and by whom it is received, and who are effectually called by it, so likewise belongs to Christ, Zec 9:9,

and ready to die, from my youth up; a sickly unhealthful person from his infancy, and often in danger of death; which last was certainly the case of Christ in his infancy, through the malice of Herod; and many times afterwards, when grown up, through the attempts of the Jews to take away his life: some render it, "I am ready to die through concussion", or "shaking" b; meaning some very rough and severe dispensation of Providence, such an one as Job expresses by shaking him to pieces, Job 16:12 and was literally true of Christ, when his body was so shaken by the jog of the cross, that all his bones were put out of joint, Psa 22:14.

while I suffer thy terrors; or "bear" c them, or "carry", even terrible afflictions, in which he had terrible apprehensions of the wrath of God in them, of death they would issue in, and of an awful judgment that should follow that; all which are called the terrors of the Lord, Job 6:4, and which the saints, when left to God, have some dreadful apprehensions of: such were the terrors of the Lord the Messiah endured, when in a view of the sins of his people being laid upon him, and of the wrath of God coming on him for them, his sweat was, as it were, great drops of blood falling to the ground, Luk 22:44. Compare with this Psa 18:4.

I am distracted: not out of his mind, deprived of his senses, and without the use of reason; but his thoughts were distracted and confused, and his mind discomposed with the terrors of God upon him: the Hebrew word "aphunah" is only used in this place, and is difficult of interpretation, and is variously derived and rendered: some take it to be of the same root with "pen", which signifies "lest, perhaps" d; seeing persons in a panic are apt to use such expressions; perhaps, or it may be, such and such things will befall me; forming and framing in their minds ten thousand dreadful things, which they fear are coming upon them; so Aben Ezra and Kimchi; and is applied by Cocceius e to the solicitous care and fear of Christ concerning his body, the church, Heb 5:7 others derive it from "ophen", which signifies a wheel, and so may be rendered, "I am wheeled about" f; always in motion, and have no rest day nor night; as Christ was after his apprehension, being carried from place to place, and from bar to bar: others derive it from the Arabic word "aphan" g, which signifies to be in want of counsel and advice: Christ though, as God, needed no counsel, nor did he take counsel with any; and, as Mediator, is the wonderful Counsellor; yet, as man, he needed it, and had it from his Father, for which he blesses him, Psa 16:7, others from the Hebrew root "phanah", which signifies to look unto, as persons in a panic look here and there; and as Christ did when suffering, who looked, and there was none to help, Isa 63:5. The Syriac and Arabic versions render it "amazed", or "astonished", which is said of Christ, Mar 14:33, the Vulgate Latin version is "troubled", which also agrees with Christ, Joh 12:27 as he must needs be, when his enemies surrounded him, the sins of his people were upon him, the sword of justice awaked against him, and the wrath of God on him, as follows.

Gill: Psa 88:16 - Thy fierce wrath goeth over me // thy terrors have cut me off Thy fierce wrath goeth over me,.... Or "wraths" h, burning wrath; the whole of divine wrath, in all its fierceness, due to the sins of his people: the...

Thy fierce wrath goeth over me,.... Or "wraths" h, burning wrath; the whole of divine wrath, in all its fierceness, due to the sins of his people: these, like the mighty waves of the sea, passed over him, threatening to overwhelm him, Psa 89:38,

thy terrors have cut me off; from the presence of God, and out of his sight; as sometimes the Lord's people are ready to imagine, when forsaken by him, Psa 31:22 or from the land of the living, as the Messiah was, and in a judicial way, though not for any sin of his own, Isa 53:8.

Gill: Psa 88:17 - They came round about me daily like water // they compassed me about together They came round about me daily like water,.... That is, the terrors of the Lord, the sorrows of death and hell, Psa 18:4, this was the Messiah's case,...

They came round about me daily like water,.... That is, the terrors of the Lord, the sorrows of death and hell, Psa 18:4, this was the Messiah's case, when it was with him as is expressed Psa 69:1,

they compassed me about together; as waters coming from many places, from all quarters, meet together, and together surround a person or place in such circumstances was Christ, when the bulls of Bashan beset him around, and the assembly of the wicked enclosed him, and innumerable evils encompassed him about, Psa 22:12.

Gill: Psa 88:18 - Lover and friend hast thou put far from me // and mine acquaintance into darkness Lover and friend hast thou put far from me,.... This is mentioned in Psa 88:8, and is here repeated; and the account is closed with it, to show that t...

Lover and friend hast thou put far from me,.... This is mentioned in Psa 88:8, and is here repeated; and the account is closed with it, to show that this was a most aggravating circumstance of his affliction, and which bore exceeding hard upon him; and this must be a very uncomfortable case, to be in distress, whether of body or mind, and to have no kind friend near to yield the least help, relief, and comfort; so Christ's lovers and friends, his disciples, who loved him and he loved them, and reckoned them as his friends, and was a friend to them, when he was taken by his enemies, they all forsook him, and fled, Mat 26:56,

and mine acquaintance into darkness; either by death into the dark grave, which Job calls the land of darkness and shadow of death, Job 10:21, or being removed from him, so that he could not see them, it was all one to him as if they had been put into darkness, into some dark dungeon, or into the grave itself: or the words may be rendered, mine acquaintance are darkness i: this was the case of Christ, when on the cross; he had none near him, no acquaintance about him, but darkness; and darkness was over all the land for the space of three hours; and a darkness was on his soul, being forsaken by his Father; and the prince of darkness, with all the fiends of hell, were throwing their fiery darts at him, Mat 27:45. Thus ends this sorrowful and mournful song; a joyful one follows.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 88:1 Heb “[by] day I cry out, in the night before you.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:2 Heb “turn your ear.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:3 Heb “and my life approaches Sheol.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:4 Heb “I am like a man [for whom] there is no help.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:5 Heb “from your hand.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:6 The noun בּוֹר (bor, “pit,” “cistern”) is sometimes used of the grave and/or the realm of the de...

NET Notes: Psa 88:8 Heb “[I am] confined and I cannot go out.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:9 Heb “I spread out my hands to you.” Spreading out the hands toward God was a prayer gesture (see Exod 9:29, 33; 1 Kgs 8:22, 38; 2 Chr 6:12...

NET Notes: Psa 88:10 Heb “Rephaim,” a term that refers to those who occupy the land of the dead (see Isa 14:9; 26:14, 19).

NET Notes: Psa 88:11 Heb “in Abaddon,” a name for Sheol. The noun is derived from a verbal root meaning “to perish,” “to die.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:12 The rhetorical questions in vv. 10-12 expect the answer, “Of course not!”

NET Notes: Psa 88:14 Heb “[why] do you hide your face from me?”

NET Notes: Psa 88:15 Heb “I carry your horrors [?].” The meaning of the Hebrew form אָפוּנָה (’afunah), w...

NET Notes: Psa 88:16 Heb “passes over me.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:17 Heb “they encircle me together.”

NET Notes: Psa 88:18 Heb “those known by me, darkness.”

Geneva Bible: Psa 88:1 "A Song [or] Psalm for the sons of Korah, to the chief Musician upon Mahalath ( a ) Leannoth, Maschil of Heman the Ezrahite." O LORD God of my salvati...

Geneva Bible: Psa 88:5 ( c ) Free among the dead, like the slain that lie in the grave, whom thou rememberest no more: and they are cut off from thy ( d ) hand. ( c ) For h...

Geneva Bible: Psa 88:7 Thy wrath lieth hard upon me, and thou hast afflicted [me] with all thy ( e ) waves. Selah. ( e ) The storms of your wrath have overwhelmed me.

Geneva Bible: Psa 88:8 Thou hast put away mine ( f ) acquaintance far from me; thou hast made me an abomination unto them: ( g ) [I am] shut up, and I cannot come forth. ( ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 88:9 ( h ) Mine eye mourneth by reason of affliction: LORD, I have called daily upon thee, I have stretched out my hands unto thee. ( h ) My eyes and face...

Geneva Bible: Psa 88:10 Wilt thou shew ( i ) wonders to the dead? shall the dead arise [and] praise thee? Selah. ( i ) He shows that the time is more convenient for God to h...

Geneva Bible: Psa 88:12 Shall thy wonders be known in the dark? and thy righteousness in the land ( k ) of forgetfulness? ( k ) That is, in the grave, where only the body li...

Geneva Bible: Psa 88:15 I [am] afflicted and ready to die ( l ) from [my] youth up: [while] I suffer thy terrors I am distracted. ( l ) I am always in great dangers and sorr...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 88:1-9 - --The first words of the psalmist are the only words of comfort and support in this psalm. Thus greatly may good men be afflicted, and such dismal thoug...

MHCC: Psa 88:10-18 - --Departed souls may declare God's faithfulness, justice, and lovingkindness; but deceased bodies can neither receive God's favours in comfort, nor retu...

Matthew Henry: Psa 88:1-9 - -- It should seem, by the titles of this and the following psalm, that Heman was the penman of the one and Ethan of the other. There were two, of these...

Matthew Henry: Psa 88:10-18 - -- In these verses, I. The psalmist expostulates with God concerning the present deplorable condition he was in (Psa 88:10-12): " Wilt thou do a miracu...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 88:1-7 - -- The poet finds himself in the midst of circumstances gloomy in the extreme, but he does not despair; he still turns towards Jahve with his complaint...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 88:8-12 - -- The octastichs are now followed by hexastichs which belong together in pairs. The complaint concerning the alienation of his nearest relations sound...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 88:13-18 - -- He who complains thus without knowing any comfort, and yet without despairing, gathers himself up afresh for prayer. With ואני he contrasts him...

Constable: Psa 73:1--89:52 - --I. Book 3: chs 73--89 A man or men named Asaph wrote 17 of the psalms in this book (Pss. 73-83). Other writers w...

Constable: Psa 88:1-18 - --Psalm 88 This is one of the saddest of the psalms. It relates the prayer of a person who suffered intens...

Constable: Psa 88:1-8 - --1. The sufferer's affliction 88:1-9a 88:1-2 These verses are an introduction to what follows. The psalmist announced that he prayed unceasingly to the...

Constable: Psa 88:8-11 - --2. The sufferer's prayer 88:9b-12 Even though Heman had prayed for relief and restoration every ...

Constable: Psa 88:12-17 - --3. The sufferer's faith 88:13-18 For the third time Heman cried out to God for help (cf. vv. 1-2...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 88 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 88:1, A prayer containing a grievous complaint. Mahalath. Psa 53:1 *title

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

Poole: Psalms 88 (Pendahuluan Pasal) THE ARGUMENT This Psalm was composed upon a particular occasion, to wit, Heman’ s deep distress and dejection of mind almost to despair. But t...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 88 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 88:1-9) The psalmist pours out his soul to God in lamentation. (Psa 88:10-18) He wrestles by faith, in his prayer to God for comfort.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 88 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This psalm is a lamentation, one of the most melancholy of all the psalms; and it does not conclude, as usually the melancholy psalms do, with the ...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 88 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 88 A Song or Psalm for the sons of Korah, to the chief Musician upon Mahalath Leannoth, Maschil of Heman the Ezrahite. Of the...

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