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Teks -- Genesis 46:1-34 (NET)

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The Family of Jacob goes to Egypt
46:1 So Israel began his journey, taking with him all that he had. When he came to Beer Sheba he offered sacrifices to the God of his father Isaac. 46:2 God spoke to Israel in a vision during the night and said, “Jacob, Jacob!” He replied, “Here I am!” 46:3 He said, “I am God, the God of your father. Do not be afraid to go down to Egypt, for I will make you into a great nation there. 46:4 I will go down with you to Egypt and I myself will certainly bring bring you back from there. Joseph will close your eyes.” 46:5 Then Jacob started out from Beer Sheba, and the sons of Israel carried their father Jacob, their little children, and their wives in the wagons that Pharaoh had sent along to transport him. 46:6 Jacob and all his descendants took their livestock and the possessions they had acquired in the land of Canaan, and they went to Egypt. 46:7 He brought with him to Egypt his sons and grandsons, his daughters and granddaughters– all his descendants. 46:8 These are the names of the sons of Israel who went to Egypt– Jacob and his sons: Reuben, the firstborn of Jacob. 46:9 The sons of Reuben: Hanoch, Pallu, Hezron, and Carmi. 46:10 The sons of Simeon: Jemuel, Jamin, Ohad, Jakin, Zohar, and Shaul (the son of a Canaanite woman). 46:11 The sons of Levi: Gershon, Kohath, and Merari. 46:12 The sons of Judah: Er, Onan, Shelah, Perez, and Zerah (but Er and Onan died in the land of Canaan). The sons of Perez were Hezron and Hamul. 46:13 The sons of Issachar: Tola, Puah, Jashub, and Shimron. 46:14 The sons of Zebulun: Sered, Elon, and Jahleel. 46:15 These were the sons of Leah, whom she bore to Jacob in Paddan Aram, along with Dinah his daughter. His sons and daughters numbered thirty-three in all. 46:16 The sons of Gad: Zephon, Haggi, Shuni, Ezbon, Eri, Arodi, and Areli. 46:17 The sons of Asher: Imnah, Ishvah, Ishvi, Beriah, and Serah their sister. The sons of Beriah were Heber and Malkiel. 46:18 These were the sons of Zilpah, whom Laban gave to Leah his daughter. She bore these to Jacob, sixteen in all. 46:19 The sons of Rachel the wife of Jacob: Joseph and Benjamin. 46:20 Manasseh and Ephraim were born to Joseph in the land of Egypt. Asenath daughter of Potiphera, priest of On, bore them to him. 46:21 The sons of Benjamin: Bela, Beker, Ashbel, Gera, Naaman, Ehi, Rosh, Muppim, Huppim and Ard. 46:22 These were the sons of Rachel who were born to Jacob, fourteen in all. 46:23 The son of Dan: Hushim. 46:24 The sons of Naphtali: Jahziel, Guni, Jezer, and Shillem. 46:25 These were the sons of Bilhah, whom Laban gave to Rachel his daughter. She bore these to Jacob, seven in all. 46:26 All the direct descendants of Jacob who went to Egypt with him were sixty-six in number. (This number does not include the wives of Jacob’s sons.) 46:27 Counting the two sons of Joseph who were born to him in Egypt, all the people of the household of Jacob who were in Egypt numbered seventy. 46:28 Jacob sent Judah before him to Joseph to accompany him to Goshen. So they came to the land of Goshen. 46:29 Joseph harnessed his chariot and went up to meet his father Israel in Goshen. When he met him, he hugged his neck and wept on his neck for quite some time. 46:30 Israel said to Joseph, “Now let me die since I have seen your face and know that you are still alive.” 46:31 Then Joseph said to his brothers and his father’s household, “I will go up and tell Pharaoh, ‘My brothers and my father’s household who were in the land of Canaan have come to me. 46:32 The men are shepherds; they take care of livestock. They have brought their flocks and their herds and all that they have.’ 46:33 Pharaoh will summon you and say, ‘What is your occupation?’ 46:34 Tell him, ‘Your servants have taken care of cattle from our youth until now, both we and our fathers,’ so that you may live in the land of Goshen, for everyone who takes care of sheep is disgusting to the Egyptians.”
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Ard son of Benjamin,son of Bela of Benjamin
 · Areli son of Gad son of Jacob
 · Arodi son of Gad son of Jacob
 · Asenath daughter of Potiphera, an Egyptian priest; wife of Joseph
 · Ashbel son of Benjamin son of Israel
 · Asher a tribe of Israel that came from Asher; son of Jacob and Zilpah,the man; son of Jacob and Zilpah,a tribe of Israel or its land
 · Becher son of Benjamin son of Israel,son of Ephraim son of Israel
 · Beer-Sheba a famous well, its town and district in southern Judah
 · Beer-sheba a famous well, its town and district in southern Judah
 · Bela a town near the south end of the Dead Sea,son of Beor; first king of Edom,son of Benjamin son of Israel,son of Azaz; a leader in the tribe of Reuben
 · Benjamin the tribe of Benjamin of Israel
 · Beriah members of the clan of Beriah
 · Bilhah Rachel's maid; third wife of Jacob; mother of Dan and Naphtali,a town of Simeon and Judah inhabited by the clan of Shime-i
 · Canaan the region ofeast Mediterranean coastal land from Arvad (modern Lebanon) south to Gaza,the coast land from Mt. Carmel north to the Orontes River
 · Canaanite residents of the region of Canaan
 · Carmi son of Zimri (Zerah Judah); father of Achan of Moses time,son of Hezron (Perez Judah); ancestor of Bezalel of Moses time,son of Reuben son of Jacob
 · Dan residents of the town of Dan; members of the tribe of Dan,the tribe of Dan as a whole; the descendants of Dan in Israel
 · Dinah daughter of Jacob and Leah
 · Egypt descendants of Mizraim
 · Egyptians descendants of Mizraim
 · Ehi son of Benjamin son of Israel
 · Elon father of Basemath/Adah, the Hittite wife of Esau,son of Zebulun son of Israel,a town in the territory of Dan somewhere west of Jerusalem,a judge of Israel of the tribe of Zebulun
 · Ephraim the tribe of Ephraim as a whole,the northern kingdom of Israel
 · Er a son of Joshua; the father of Elmadam; an ancestor of Jesus.,son of Judah by the daughter of Shua the Canaanite,son of Shelah the son of Judah
 · Eri members of the clan of Eri of Gad
 · Ezbon son of Gad son of Jacob,son of Bela son of Benjamin
 · Gad the tribe of Israel descended from Gad, the son of Jacob,the man; the son of Jacob and Zilpah,the tribe of Gad in Israel,a prophet and long time advisor to King David
 · Gera son of Ehud the judge son of Gera I son Bela son of Benjamin.
 · Gershon the clan of Gershom/Gershon of the tribe of Levi
 · Goshen a region in Egypt,a region of Egypt in the eastern part of the Nile delta,a town in the hill country of Judah
 · Guni son of Naphtali of Israel,a man of the tribe of Gad


Topik/Tema Kamus: Joseph | GENESIS, 1-2 | DISCREPANCIES, BIBLICAL | GENESIS, 3 | GENEALOGY, 8 part 1 | Jacob | Israel | GENEALOGY, 8 part 2 | South | Hezron | Gad | Tola | Reuben | Serah | Merari | Zohar | Naaman | Jachin | Zebulun | Sered | selebihnya
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Wesley: Gen 46:1 - And Israel came to Beer sheba, and offered sacrifices to the God of his father Isaac - He chose that place in remembrance of the communion which his father and grandfather ha...

sheba, and offered sacrifices to the God of his father Isaac - He chose that place in remembrance of the communion which his father and grandfather had with God in that place. In his devotion he had an eye to God as the God of his father Isaac, that is, a God in covenant with him, for by Isaac the covenant was entailed upon him. He offered sacrifices, extraordinary sacrifices, besides those at his stated times. These sacrifices were offered, By way of thanksgiving for the late blessed change of the face of his family, for the good news he had received concerning Joseph, and the hopes he had of seeing him. By way of petition for the presence of God with him in his intended journey. By way of consultation. Jacob would not go on 'till he had asked God's leave.

Wesley: Gen 46:2 - And God spake unto Israel in the visions of the night (Probably the next night after he had offered his sacrifices.) Those who desire to keep up communion with God, shall find that it never fails on his s...

(Probably the next night after he had offered his sacrifices.) Those who desire to keep up communion with God, shall find that it never fails on his side. If we speak to him as we ought, he will not fail to speak to us. God called him by his name, by his old name, Jacob, Jacob, to mind him of his low estate. Jacob, like one well acquainted with the visions of the Almighty, answers, Here am I - Ready to receive orders. And what has God to say to him?

Wesley: Gen 46:3 - I am God, the God of thy father That is, I am what thou ownest me to be: thou shalt find me a God of divine wisdom and power engaged for thee: and thou shalt find me the God of thy f...

That is, I am what thou ownest me to be: thou shalt find me a God of divine wisdom and power engaged for thee: and thou shalt find me the God of thy father, true to the covenant made with him.

Wesley: Gen 46:3 - Fear not to go down into Egypt It seems though Jacob, upon the first intelligence of Joseph's life and glory in Egypt, resolved without any hesitation I will go and see him, yet upo...

It seems though Jacob, upon the first intelligence of Joseph's life and glory in Egypt, resolved without any hesitation I will go and see him, yet upon second thoughts he saw difficulties in it. He was old, 130 years old; it was a long journey, and he was unfit to travel. He feared lest his sons should be tainted with the idolatry of Egypt, and forget the God of their fathers. Probably he thought of what God had said to Abraham concerning the bondage and affliction of his seed. He could not think of laying his bones in Egypt. But whatever his discouragements were, this was enough to answer them all, Fear not to go down into Egypt.

Wesley: Gen 46:4 - I will go down with thee into Egypt Those that go where God sends them shall certainly have God with them.

Those that go where God sends them shall certainly have God with them.

Wesley: Gen 46:4 - And I will surely bring thee up again Tho' Jacob died in Egypt, yet this promise was fulfilled, In the bringing up of his body to be buried in Canaan. In the bringing up of his seed to be ...

Tho' Jacob died in Egypt, yet this promise was fulfilled, In the bringing up of his body to be buried in Canaan. In the bringing up of his seed to be settled in Canaan. Whatever low and darksome valley we are called into, we may be confident if God go down with us, he will surely bring us up again. If he go with us down to death, he will surely bring us up again to glory.

Wesley: Gen 46:4 - And Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes That is a promise that Joseph should live as long as he lived, that he should be with him at his death, and close his eyes with all possible tendernes...

That is a promise that Joseph should live as long as he lived, that he should be with him at his death, and close his eyes with all possible tenderness. Probably Jacob, in the multitude of his thoughts within him, had been wishing that Joseph might do this last office of love for him; and God thus answered him in the letter of his desire. Thus God sometimes gratifies the innocent wishes of his people, and makes not only their death happy, but the very circumstances of it agreeable.

Wesley: Gen 46:7 - All his seed 'Tis probable they continued to live together in common with their father, and therefore when he went they all went; which perhaps they were the more ...

'Tis probable they continued to live together in common with their father, and therefore when he went they all went; which perhaps they were the more willing to do, because, tho' they had heard that the land of Canaan was promised them, yet to this day they had none of it in possession. We have here a particular account of the names of Jacob's family; his sons sons, most of which are afterwards mentioned, as heads of houses in the several tribes. See Num 26:5, &c. Issachar called his eldest son Tola, which signifies a worm, probably because when he was born he was a little weak child, not likely to live, and yet there sprang from him a very numerous off - spring, 1Ch 7:2.

Wesley: Gen 46:7 - The whole number that went down into Egypt were sixty six, to which add Joseph and his two sons, who were there before, and Jacob himself, the head of the family, and you have the number of seventy. 'Twas...

six, to which add Joseph and his two sons, who were there before, and Jacob himself, the head of the family, and you have the number of seventy. 'Twas now 215 years since God had promised Abraham to make of him a great nation, Gen 12:2, and yet that branch of his seed, on which the promise was entailed, was as yet increased but to seventy, of which this particular account is kept, that the power of God in multiplying these seventy to so vast a multitude, even in Egypt, may be the more illustrious. When he pleases, A little one shall become a thousand.

Wesley: Gen 46:30 - Now let me die Not but that it was farther desirable to live with Joseph, and to see his honour and usefulness; but he had so much satisfaction in this first meeting...

Not but that it was farther desirable to live with Joseph, and to see his honour and usefulness; but he had so much satisfaction in this first meeting, that he thought it too much to desire or expect any more in this world.

JFB: Gen 46:1 - Israel took his journey with all that he had That is, his household; for in compliance with Pharaoh's recommendation, he left his heavy furniture behind. In contemplating a step so important as t...

That is, his household; for in compliance with Pharaoh's recommendation, he left his heavy furniture behind. In contemplating a step so important as that of leaving Canaan, which at his time of life he might never revisit, so pious a patriarch would ask the guidance and counsel of God. With all his anxiety to see Joseph, he would rather have died in Canaan without that highest of earthly gratifications than leave it without the consciousness of carrying the divine blessing along with him.

JFB: Gen 46:1 - came to Beer-sheba That place, which was in his direct route to Egypt, had been a favorite encampment of Abraham (Gen 21:33) and Isaac (Gen 26:25), and was memorable for...

That place, which was in his direct route to Egypt, had been a favorite encampment of Abraham (Gen 21:33) and Isaac (Gen 26:25), and was memorable for their experience of the divine goodness; and Jacob seems to have deferred his public devotions till he had reached a spot so consecrated by covenant to his own God and the God of his fathers.

JFB: Gen 46:2 - God spake unto Israel Here is a virtual renewal of the covenant and an assurance of its blessings. Moreover, here is an answer on the chief subject of Jacob's prayer and a ...

Here is a virtual renewal of the covenant and an assurance of its blessings. Moreover, here is an answer on the chief subject of Jacob's prayer and a removal of any doubt as to the course he was meditating. At first the prospect of paying a personal visit to Joseph had been viewed with unmingled joy. But, on calmer consideration, many difficulties appeared to lie in the way. He may have remembered the prophecy to Abraham that his posterity was to be afflicted in Egypt and also that his father had been expressly told not to go [Gen 15:13; Gen 26:2]; he may have feared the contamination of idolatry to his family and their forgetfulness of the land of promise. These doubts were removed by the answer of the oracle, and an assurance given him of great and increasing prosperity.

JFB: Gen 46:3 - I will there make of thee a great nation How truly this promise was fulfilled, appears in the fact that the seventy souls who went down into Egypt increased [Exo 1:5-7], in the space of two h...

How truly this promise was fulfilled, appears in the fact that the seventy souls who went down into Egypt increased [Exo 1:5-7], in the space of two hundred fifteen years, to one hundred eighty thousand.

JFB: Gen 46:4 - I will also surely bring thee up again As Jacob could not expect to live till the former promise was realized, he must have seen that the latter was to be accomplished only to his posterity...

As Jacob could not expect to live till the former promise was realized, he must have seen that the latter was to be accomplished only to his posterity. To himself it was literally verified in the removal of his remains to Canaan; but, in the large and liberal sense of the words, it was made good only on the establishment of Israel in the land of promise.

JFB: Gen 46:4 - Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes Shall perform the last office of filial piety; and this implied that he should henceforth enjoy, without interruption, the society of that favorite so...

Shall perform the last office of filial piety; and this implied that he should henceforth enjoy, without interruption, the society of that favorite son.

JFB: Gen 46:5 - And Jacob rose up from Beer-sheba To cross the border and settle in Egypt. However refreshed and invigorated in spirit by the religious services at Beer-sheba, he was now borne down by...

To cross the border and settle in Egypt. However refreshed and invigorated in spirit by the religious services at Beer-sheba, he was now borne down by the infirmities of advanced age; and, therefore, his sons undertook all the trouble and toil of the arrangements, while the enfeebled old patriarch, with the wives and children, was conveyed by slow and leisurely stages in the Egyptian vehicles sent for their accommodation.

JFB: Gen 46:6 - goods, which they had gotten in the land Not furniture, but substance--precious things.

Not furniture, but substance--precious things.

JFB: Gen 46:7 - daughters As Dinah was his only daughter, this must mean daughters-in-law.

As Dinah was his only daughter, this must mean daughters-in-law.

JFB: Gen 46:7 - all his seed brought he with him Though disabled by age from active superintendence, yet, as the venerable sheik of the tribe, he was looked upon as their common head and consulted in...

Though disabled by age from active superintendence, yet, as the venerable sheik of the tribe, he was looked upon as their common head and consulted in every step.|| 01395||1||20||0||@all the souls of the house of Jacob, which came into Egypt, were threescore and ten==--Strictly speaking, there were only sixty-six went to Egypt; but to these add Joseph and his two sons, and Jacob the head of the clan, and the whole number amounts to seventy. In the speech of Stephen (Act 7:14) the number is stated to be seventy-five; but as that estimate includes five sons of Ephraim and Manasseh (1Ch 7:14-20), born in Egypt, the two accounts coincide.

JFB: Gen 46:28 - he sent Judah before him unto Joseph This precautionary measure was obviously proper for apprising the king of the entrance of so large a company within his territories; moreover, it was ...

This precautionary measure was obviously proper for apprising the king of the entrance of so large a company within his territories; moreover, it was necessary in order to receive instruction from Joseph as to the locale of their future settlement.

JFB: Gen 46:29-30 - Joseph made ready his chariot The difference between chariot and wagon was not only in the lighter and more elegant construction of the former, but in the one being drawn by horses...

The difference between chariot and wagon was not only in the lighter and more elegant construction of the former, but in the one being drawn by horses and the other by oxen. Being a public man in Egypt, Joseph was required to appear everywhere in an equipage suitable to his dignity; and, therefore, it was not owing either to pride or ostentatious parade that he drove his carriage, while his father's family were accommodated only in rude and humble wagons.

JFB: Gen 46:29-30 - presented himself unto him In an attitude of filial reverence (compare Exo 22:17). The interview was a most affecting one--the happiness of the delighted father was now at its h...

In an attitude of filial reverence (compare Exo 22:17). The interview was a most affecting one--the happiness of the delighted father was now at its height; and life having no higher charms, he could, in the very spirit of the aged Simeon, have departed in peace [Luk 2:25, Luk 2:29].

JFB: Gen 46:31-34 - Joseph said, . . . I will go up, and show Pharaoh It was a tribute of respect due to the king to inform him of their arrival. And the instructions which he gave them were worthy of his character alike...

It was a tribute of respect due to the king to inform him of their arrival. And the instructions which he gave them were worthy of his character alike as an affectionate brother and a religious man.

Clarke: Gen 46:1 - And came to Beer-sheba And came to Beer-sheba - This place appears to be mentioned, not only because it was the way from Hebron, where Jacob resided, to Egypt, whither he ...

And came to Beer-sheba - This place appears to be mentioned, not only because it was the way from Hebron, where Jacob resided, to Egypt, whither he was going, but because it was a consecrated place, a place where God had appeared to Abraham, Gen 21:33, and to Isaac, Gen 26:23, and where Jacob is encouraged to expect a manifestation of the same goodness: he chooses therefore to begin his journey with a visit to God’ s house; and as he was going into a strange land, he feels it right to renew his covenant with God by sacrifice. There is an old proverb which applies strongly to this case: "Prayers and provender never hinder any man’ s journey. He who would travel safely must take God with him.

Clarke: Gen 46:3 - Fear not to go down into Egypt Fear not to go down into Egypt - It appears that there had been some doubts in the patriarch’ s mind relative to the propriety of this journey;...

Fear not to go down into Egypt - It appears that there had been some doubts in the patriarch’ s mind relative to the propriety of this journey; he found, from the confession of his own sons, how little they were to be trusted. But every doubt is dispelled by this Divine manifestation. 1. He may go down confidently, no evil shall befall him. 2. Even in Egypt the covenant shall be fulfilled, God will make of him there a great nation. 3. God himself will accompany him on his journey, be with him in the strange land, and even bring back his bones to rest with those of his fathers. 4. He shall see Joseph, and this same beloved son shall be with him in his last hours, and do the last kind office for him. Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes. It is not likely that Jacob would have at all attempted to go down to Egypt, had he not received these assurances from God; and it is very likely that he offered his sacrifice merely to obtain this information. It was now a time of famine in Egypt, and God had forbidden his father Isaac to go down to Egypt when there was a famine there, Gen 26:1-3; besides, he may have had some general intimation of the prophecy delivered to his grandfather Abraham, that his seed should be afflicted in Egypt, Gen 15:13, Gen 15:14; and he also knew that Canaan, not Egypt, was to be the inheritance of his family, Genesis 12, etc. On all these accounts it was necessary to have the most explicit directions from God, before he should take such a journey.

Clarke: Gen 46:7 - All his seed brought he with him into Egypt All his seed brought he with him into Egypt - When Jacob went down into Egypt he was in the one hundred and thirtieth year of his age, two hundred a...

All his seed brought he with him into Egypt - When Jacob went down into Egypt he was in the one hundred and thirtieth year of his age, two hundred and fifteen years after the promise was made to Abraham, Gen 12:1-4, in the year of the world 2298, and before Christ.

Clarke: Gen 46:8 - These are the names of the children of Israel These are the names of the children of Israel - It may be necessary to observe here, First, that several of these names are expressed differently el...

These are the names of the children of Israel - It may be necessary to observe here, First, that several of these names are expressed differently elsewhere, Jemuel for Nemuel, Jachin for Jarib, Gershon for Gershom, etc.; compare Num 26:12; 1Ch 4:24. But it is no uncommon case for the same person to have different names, or the same name to be differently pronounced; See Clarke on Gen 25:18 (note). Secondly, that it is probable that some names in this list are brought in by prolepsis or anticipation, as the persons were born (probably) during the seventeen years which Jacob sojourned in Egypt, see Gen 46:12. Thirdly, that the families of some are entered more at large than others because of their peculiar respectability, as in the case of Judah, Joseph, and Benjamin; but see the tables under Gen 46:20.

Clarke: Gen 46:12 - The sons of Pharez were Hezron and Hamul The sons of Pharez were Hezron and Hamul - It is not likely that Pharez was more than ten years of age when he came into Egypt, and if so he could n...

The sons of Pharez were Hezron and Hamul - It is not likely that Pharez was more than ten years of age when he came into Egypt, and if so he could not have had children; therefore it is necessary to consider Hezron and Hamul as being born during the seventeen years that Jacob sojourned in Egypt, See Clarke on Gen 46:8 (note): and it appears necessary, for several reasons, to take these seventeen years into the account, as it is very probable that what is called the going down into Egypt includes the seventeen years which Jacob spent there.

Clarke: Gen 46:20 - Unto Joseph - were born Manasseh and Ephraim Unto Joseph - were born Manasseh and Ephraim - There is a remarkable addition here in the Septuagint, which must be noticed: Εγενοντο δε ...

Unto Joseph - were born Manasseh and Ephraim - There is a remarkable addition here in the Septuagint, which must be noticed: Εγενοντο δε υἱοι Μανασση, οὑς ετεκεν αυτῳ ἡ παλλακη ἡ Συρα, τον Μαχιρ· Μαχιρ δε εγεννησε τον Γαλααδ. Υἱοι δε Εφραιμ αδελφου Μανασσῃ, Σουταλααμ και Τααμ. Υἱοι δε Σουταλααμ, Εδεμ· These were the sons of Manasseh whom his Syrian concubine bore unto him: Machir; and Machir begat Galaad. The sons of Ephraim, Manasseh’ s brother, were Sutalaam and Taam; and the sons of Sutalaam, Edem. These add five persons to the list, and make out the number given by Stephen, Act 7:14, which it seems he had taken from the text of the Septuagint, unless we could suppose that the text of Stephen had been altered to make it correspond to the Septuagint, of which there is not the slightest evidence from ancient MSS. or versions. The addition in the Septuagint is not found in either the Hebrew or the Samaritan at present; and some suppose that it was taken either from Num 26:29, Num 26:35, or 1Ch 7:14-20, but in none of these places does the addition appear as it stands in the Septuagint, thought some of the names are found interspersed. Various means have been proposed to find the seventy persons in the text, and to reconcile the Hebrew with the Septuagint and the New Testament. A table given by Scheuchzer, extracted from the Memoires de Trevoux, gives the following general view

Reuben and his four sons 5
Simeon and his six sons 7
Levi and his three sons 4
Judah and his seven sons and grandsons 8
Issachar and his four sons 5
Zebulun and his three sons 4
Total sons of Jacob and Leah 33
Gad and his seven sons 8
Asher and his seven sons and grandsons 8
Total sons of Jacob and Zilpah 16
Joseph and his two sons 3
Benjamin and his ten sons 11
Total sons of Jacob and Rachel 14
Dan and his son 2
Naphtali and his four sons 5
Total sons of Jacob and Bilhah 7
Total sons of Jacob and his four wives 70

"To harmonize this with the Septuagint and St. Stephen, Act 7:14, to the number sixty-six (all the souls that came out of Jacob’ s loins, Gen 46:26) add nine of the patriarchs’ wives, Judah’ s wife being already dead in Canaan, (Gen 38:12), Benjamin being supposed to be as yet unmarried, and the wife of Joseph being already in Egypt, and therefore out of the case: the number will amount to seventy-five, which is that found in the Acts."- Universal History

Dr. Hales’ method is more simple, and I think more satisfactory: "Moses states that all the souls that came with Jacob into Egypt which issued from his loins, (except his sons wives), were sixty-six souls, Gen 46:26; and this number is thus collected

Jacob’ s children, eleven sons and one daughter12
Reuben’ s sons4
Simeon’ s sons6
Levi’ s sons3
Judah’ s three sons and two grandsons5
Issachar’ s sons4
Zebulun’ s sons3
Gad’ s sons7
Asher’ s four sons, one daughter, and two grandsons7
Dan’ s son1
Naphtali’ s sons4
Benjamin’ s sons10
Total66

"If to these sixty-six children, and grandchildren, and great grandchildren, we add Jacob himself, Joseph and his two sons, the amount is seventy, the whole amount of Jacob’ s family which settled in Egypt

"In this statement the wives of Jacob’ s sons, who formed part of the household, are omitted; but they amounted to nine, for of the twelve wives of the twelve sons of Jacob, Judah’ s wife was dead, Gen 38:12, and Simeon’ s also, as we may collect from his youngest son Shaul by a Canannitess, Gen 46:10, and Joseph’ s wife was already in Egypt. These nine wives, therefore, added to the sixty-six, give seventy-five souls the whole amount of Jacob’ s household that went down with him to Egypt; critically corresponding with the statement in the New Testament, that ‘ Joseph sent for his father Jacob and all his kindred, amounting to seventy-five souls.’ The expression all his kindred, including the wives which were Joseph’ s kindred, not only by affinity, but also by consanguinity, being probably of the families of Esau, Ishmael, or Keturah. Thus does the New Testament furnish an admirable comment on the Old."- Analysis, vol. ii., p. 159

It is necessary to observe that this statement, which appears on the whole the most consistent, supposes that Judah was married when about fourteen years of age, his son Er at the same age, Pharez at the same, Asher and his fourth son Beriah under twenty, Benjamin about fifteen, and Joseph’ s sons and grandsons about twenty. But this is not improbable, as the children of Israel must all have married at a very early age, to have produced in about two hundred and fifteen years no less than six hundred thousand persons above twenty years old, besides women and children.

Clarke: Gen 46:28 - He sent Judah before him unto Joseph He sent Judah before him unto Joseph - Judah was certainly a man of sense, and also an eloquent man; and of him Joseph must have had a very favorabl...

He sent Judah before him unto Joseph - Judah was certainly a man of sense, and also an eloquent man; and of him Joseph must have had a very favorable opinion from the speech he delivered before him, Gen 44:18, etc.; he was therefore chosen as the most proper person to go before and announce Jacob’ s arrival to his son Joseph

Clarke: Gen 46:28 - To direct his face unto Goshen To direct his face unto Goshen - The land of Goshen is the same, according to the Septuagint, as the land of Rameses, and Goshen itself the same as ...

To direct his face unto Goshen - The land of Goshen is the same, according to the Septuagint, as the land of Rameses, and Goshen itself the same as Heroopolis, ‘ Ἡρωων πολις Heroonpolis , the city of heroes, a name by which it went in the days of the Septuagint, and which it still retained in the time of Josephus, for he makes use of the same term in speaking of this place. See Clarke on Gen 46:34 (note).

Clarke: Gen 46:29 - And Joseph made ready his chariot And Joseph made ready his chariot - מרכבתו mercabto . In Gen 41:43, we have the first mention of a chariot, and if the translation be correc...

And Joseph made ready his chariot - מרכבתו mercabto . In Gen 41:43, we have the first mention of a chariot, and if the translation be correct, it is a proof that the arts were not in a rude state in Egypt even at this early time. When we find wagons used to transport goods from place to place, we need not wonder that these suggested the idea of forming chariots for carrying persons, and especially those of high rank and authority. Necessity produces arts, and arts and science produce not only an increase of the conveniences but also of the refinements and luxuries of life. It has been supposed that a chariot is not intended here; for as the word מרכבה mercabah , which we and most of the ancient versions translate chariot, comes from רכב rachab , he rode, saddling his horse may be all that is intended. But it is more likely to signify a chariot, as the verb אסר asar , which signifies to bind, tie, or yoke, is used; and not חבש chabash , which signifies to saddle

Clarke: Gen 46:29 - Fell on his neck Fell on his neck - See Gen 45:14.

Fell on his neck - See Gen 45:14.

Clarke: Gen 46:30 - Now let me die, since I have seen thy face Now let me die, since I have seen thy face - Perhaps old Simeon had this place in view when, seeing the salvation of Israel, he said, Lord, now lett...

Now let me die, since I have seen thy face - Perhaps old Simeon had this place in view when, seeing the salvation of Israel, he said, Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, etc., Luk 2:29.

Clarke: Gen 46:34 - Thy servants trade hath been about cattle Thy servants trade hath been about cattle - "The land of Goshen, called also the land of Rameses, lay east of the Nile, by which it was never overfl...

Thy servants trade hath been about cattle - "The land of Goshen, called also the land of Rameses, lay east of the Nile, by which it was never overflowed, and was bounded by the mountains of the Thebaid on the south, by the Nile and Mediterranean on the west and north, and by the Red Sea and desert of Arabia on the east. It was the Heliopolitan nome or district, and its capital was called On. Its proper name was Geshen, the country of grass or pasturage, or of the shepherds, in opposition to the rest of the land which was sown after having been overflowed by the Nile."- Bruce. As this land was both fruitful and pleasant, Joseph wished to fix his family in that part of Egypt; hence he advises them to tell Pharaoh that their trade had been in cattle from their youth: and because every shepherd is an abomination to the Egyptians, hence he concluded that there would be less difficulty to get them quiet settlement in Goshen, as they would then be separated from the Egyptians, and consequently have the free use of all their religious customs. This scheme succeeded, and the consequence was the preservation both of their religion and their lives, though some of their posterity did afterwards corrupt themselves; see Eze 20:8; Amo 5:26. As it is well known that the Egyptians had cattle and flocks themselves, and that Pharaoh even requested that some of Joseph’ s brethren should be made rulers over his cattle, how could it be said, as in Gen 46:34, Every shepherd is an abomination unto the Egyptians? Three reasons may be assigned for this

1.    Shepherds and feeders of cattle were usually a sort of lawless, free-booting bandits, frequently making inroads on villages, etc., carrying off cattle, and whatever spoils they could find. This might probably have been the case formerly, for it is well known it has often been the case since. On this account such persons must have been universally detested

2.    They must have abhorred shepherds if Manetho’ s account of the hycsos or king-shepherds can be credited. Hordes of marauders under this name, from Arabia, Syria, and Ethiopia, (whose chief occupation, like the Bedouin Arabs of the present day, was to keep flocks), made a powerful irruption into Egypt, which they subdued and ruled with great tyranny for 259 years. Now, though they had been expelled from that land some considerable time before this, yet their name, and all persons of a similar occupation, were execrated by the Egyptians, on account of the depredations and long-continued ravages they had committed in the country

3.    The last and probably the best reason why the Egyptians abhorred such shepherds as the Israelites were, was, they sacrificed those very animals, the ox particularly, and the Sheep, which the Egyptians held sacred. Hence the Roman historian Tacitus, speaking of the Jews, says: " Caeso Ariete velut in contumelia Ammonis; Bos quoque immolatur, quem Aegyptii Apim colunt .""They sacrifice the ram in order to insult Jupiter Ammon, and they sacrifice the ox, which the Egyptians worship under the name of Apis."Though some contend that this idolatry was not as yet established in Egypt, and that the king-shepherds were either after the time of Joseph, or that Manetho by them intends the Israelites themselves; yet, as the arguments by which these conjectures are supported are not sufficient to overthrow those which are brought for the support of the contrary opinions, and as there was evidently an established religion and priesthood in Egypt before Joseph’ s time, (for we find the priests had a certain portion of the land of Egypt which was held so sacred that Joseph did not attempt to buy it in the time of the famine, when he bought all the land which belonged to the people, Gen 47:20-22), and as that established priesthood was in all likelihood idolatrous, and as the worship of Apis under the form of an ox was one of the most ancient forms of worship in Egypt, we may rest tolerably certain that it was chiefly on this account that the shepherds, or those who fed on and sacrificed these objects of their worship, were an abomination to the Egyptians. Calmet has entered into this subject at large, and to his notes I must refer those readers who wish for farther information. See Clarke on Gen 43:32 (note)

On the principal subject of this chapter, the going down of Jacob and his family into Egypt, Bishop Warburton, in his Divine Legation of Moses, makes the following judicious reflections: "The promise God made to Abraham, to give his posterity the land of Canaan, could not be performed till that family was grown strong enough to take and keep possession of it. In the meantime, therefore, they were necessitated to reside among idolaters, and to reside unmixed; but whoever examines their history will see that the Israelites had ever a violent propensity to join themselves to Gentile nations, and practice their manners. God therefore, in his infinite wisdom, brought them into Egypt, and kept them there during this period, the only place where they could remain for so long a time safe and unconfounded with the natives, the ancient Egyptians being by numerous institutions forbidden all fellowship with strangers, and bearing besides a particular aversion to the profession of the Israelites, who were shepherds. Thus the natural dispositions of the Israelites, which in Egypt occasioned their superstitions, and in consequence the necessity of a burdensome ritual, would in any other country have absorbed them into Gentilism, and confounded them with idolaters. From the Israelites going into Egypt arises a new occasion to adore the footsteps of Eternal Wisdom in his dispensations to his chosen people."

Calvin: Gen 46:1 - And Israel took his journey 1.And Israel took his journey. Because the holy man is compelled to leave the land of Canaan and to go elsewhere, he offers, on his departure, a sacr...

1.And Israel took his journey. Because the holy man is compelled to leave the land of Canaan and to go elsewhere, he offers, on his departure, a sacrifice to the Lord, for the purpose of testifying that the covenant which God had made with his fathers was confirmed and ratified to himself. For, though he was accustomed to exercise himself in the external worship of God, there was yet a special reason for this sacrifice. And, doubtless, he had then peculiar need of support, lest his faith should fail: for he was about to be deprived of the inheritance promised to him, and of the sight of that land which was the type and the pledge of the heavenly country. Might it not come into his mind that he had hitherto been deluded with a vain hope? Therefore, by renewing the memory of the divine covenant, he applies a suitable remedy against falling from the faith. For this reason, he offers a sacrifice on the very boundaries of that land, as I have just said; that we might know it to be something more than usual. And he presents this worship to the God of his fathers, to testify that, although he is departing from that land, into which Abraham had been called; yet he does not thereby cut himself off from the God in whose worship he had been educated. It was truly a remarkable proof of constancy, that when cast out by famine into another region, so that he might not even be permitted to sojourn in the land of which he was the lawful lord; he yet retains, deeply impressed on his mind, the hope of his hidden right. It was not without subjecting himself to odium that he differed openly from other nations, by worshipping the God of his fathers. But what profit was there in having a religion different from all others? Seeing, then, that he does not repent of having worshipped the God of his fathers, and that he now also perseveres in fear and reverence towards him; we hence infer how deeply he was rooted in true piety. By offering a sacrifice, he both increases his own strength, and makes profession of his faith; because, although piety is not bound to external symbols, yet he will not neglect those helps, the use of which he has found to be, by no means, superfluous.

Calvin: Gen 46:2 - And God spake unto Israel 2.And God spake unto Israel. In this manner, God proves that the sacrifice of Jacob was acceptable to him, and again stretches out his hand to ratify...

2.And God spake unto Israel. In this manner, God proves that the sacrifice of Jacob was acceptable to him, and again stretches out his hand to ratify anew his covenant. The vision by night availed for the purpose of giving greater dignity to the oracle. Jacob indeed, inasmuch as he was docile and ready to yield obedience to God, did not need to be impelled by force and terror; yet, because he was a man encompassed with flesh, it was profitable for him that he should be affected as with the glory of a present God, in order that the word might penetrate more effectually into his heart. It is, however, proper to recall to memory what I have said before, that the word was joined with it; because a silent vision would have profited little or nothing. We know that superstition eagerly snatches at mere spectres; by which means it presents God in a form of its own. But since no living image of God can exist without the word, whenever God has appeared to his servants, he has also spoken to them. Wherefore, in all outward signs, let us be ever attentive to his voice, if we would not be deluded by the wiles of Satan. But if those visions, in which the majesty of God shines, require to be animated by the word, then they who obtrude signs, invented at the will of men, upon the Church, exhibit nothing else than the empty pomps of a profane theater. Just as in the Papacy, those things which are called sacraments, are lifeless phantoms which draw away deluded souls from the true God. Let this mutual connection, then, be observed, that the vision which gives greater dignity to the word, precedes it; and that the word follows immediately, as if it were the soul of the vision. And there is no question that this was an appearance of the visible glory of God, which did not leave Jacob in suspense and hesitation; but which, by removing his doubt, firmly sustained him, so that he confidently embraced the oracle.

Calvin: Gen 46:3 - Jacob, Jacob 3.Jacob, Jacob. The design of the repetition was to render him more attentive. For, by thus familiarly addressing him, God more gently insinuates him...

3.Jacob, Jacob. The design of the repetition was to render him more attentive. For, by thus familiarly addressing him, God more gently insinuates himself into his mind: as, in the Scripture, he kindly allures us, that he may prepare us to become his disciples. The docility of the holy man appears hence, that as soon as he is persuaded that God speaks, he replies that he is ready to receive with reverence whatever may be spoken, to follow wheresoever he may be called, and to undertake whatever may be commanded. Afterwards, a promise is added, by which God confirms and revives the faith of his servant. Whereas, the descent into Egypt was to him a sad event, he is bidden to be of good and cheerful mind; inasmuch as the Lord would always be his keeper, and after having increased him there to a great nation, would bring him back again to the place, whence he now compelled him to depart. And, indeed, Jacob’s chief consolation turned on this point; that he should not perpetually wander up and down as an exile, but should, at length, enjoy the expected inheritance. For, since the possession of the land of Canaan was the token of the Divine favor, of spiritual blessings, and of eternal felicity; if holy Jacob was defrauded of this, it would have availed him little or nothing to have riches, and all kinds of wealth and power heaped upon him, in Egypt. The return promised him is not, however, to be understood of his own person, but refers to his posterity. Now, as Jacob, relying on the promise, is commanded boldly to go down into Egypt; so it is the duty of all the pious, after his example, to derive such strength from the grace of God, that they may gird themselves to obey his commands. The title by which God here distinguishes himself, is attached to the former oracles which Jacob had received by tradition from his fathers. For why does he not rather call himself the Creator of heaven and earth, than the God of Isaac or of Abraham, except for this reason, that the dominion over the land of Canaan depends on the previous covenant, which he now ratifies anew? At the same time also, he encourages his servant by examples drawn from his own family, lest he should cease to proceed with constancy in his calling. For, when he had seen that his father Isaac, and had heard that his grandfather Abraham, though long surrounded by great troubles, never gave way to any temptations, it ill became him to be overcome by weariness in the same course; especially since, in the act of dying, they handed their lamp to their posterity, and took diligent care to leave the light of their faith to survive them in their family. In short, Jacob is taught that he must not seek, in crooked and diverse paths, that God whom he had learned, from his childhood, to regard as the Ruler of the family of Abraham; provided it did not degenerate from his piety. Moreover, we have elsewhere stated how far, in this respect, the authority of the Fathers ought to prevail. For it was not the design of God, either that Jacob should subject himself to men, or should approve, without discrimination, whatever was handed down from his ancestors, — seeing that he so often condemns in the Jews, a foolish imitation of their fathers, — but his design was to keep Jacob in the true knowledge of himself.

Calvin: Gen 46:4 - And Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes 4.And Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes. This clause was added for the sake of showing greater indulgence. For though Jacob, in desiring that...

4.And Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes. This clause was added for the sake of showing greater indulgence. For though Jacob, in desiring that, when he died, his eyes should be closed by the hand of Joseph, showed that some infirmity of the flesh was involved in the wish; yet God is willing to comply with it, for the sake of moderating the grief of a fresh banishment. Moreover, we know that the custom of closing the eyes was of the greatest antiquity; and that this office was discharged by one most closely connected with the deceased either by blood or affection.

Calvin: Gen 46:5 - And Jacob rose up 5.And Jacob rose up. By using the words “rose up,” Moses seems to denote that Jacob received new vigor from the vision. For although the former p...

5.And Jacob rose up. By using the words “rose up,” Moses seems to denote that Jacob received new vigor from the vision. For although the former promises were not forgotten, yet the addition of the recent memorial came most opportunely, in order that he, bearing the land of Canaan in his heart, might endure his absence from it with equanimity. When it is said that he took with him all that he had acquired, or possessed in the land of Canaan, it is probable that his servants and handmaids came together with his cattle. 178 But, on his departure, no mention is made of them: nay, a little afterwards, when Moses enumerates the separate heads of each tribe, he says that only seventy souls came with him. Should any one say that Jacob had been compelled to liberate his slaves, on account of the famine, or that he lost them through some misfortune to us unknown, the conjecture is unsatisfactory; for it is most incredible that he, who had been an industrious master of a family, and had abounded in the earthly blessings of God, should have become so entirely destitute, that not even one little servant remained to him. It is more probable that, when the children of Israel were themselves employed in servile works, they were then deprived of their servants in Egypt; or, at least, a sufficient number was not left them, to inspire them with confidence in any enterprise. And although, in the account of their deliverance, Moses is silent respecting their servants, yet it may be easily gathered from other passages, that they did not depart without servants.

Calvin: Gen 46:8 - These are the names of the children of Israel 8.These are the names of the children of Israel. He recounts the sons and grandsons of Jacob, till he arrives at their full number. The statement tha...

8.These are the names of the children of Israel. He recounts the sons and grandsons of Jacob, till he arrives at their full number. The statement that there were but seventy souls, while Stephen (Act 7:14) adds five more, is made, I doubt not, by an error of the transcribers. For the solution of Augustine is weak, that Stephen, by a prolepsis, enumerates also three who afterwards were born in Egypt; for he must then have formed a far longer catalogue. Again, this interpretation is repugnant to the design of the Holy Spirit, as we shall hereafter see: because the subject here treated of, is not respecting the number of children Jacob left behind him at his death, but respecting the number of his family on the day when he went down into Egypt. He is said to have brought with him, or to have found there, seventy souls born unto him, in order that the comparison of this very small number, with that immense multitude which the Lord afterwards led forth, might the more fully illustrate His wonderful benediction. But that the error is to be imputed to the transcribers, is hence apparent, that with the Greek interpreters, it has crept only into one passage, while, elsewhere, they agree with the Hebrew reckoning. And it was easy when numerals were signified by marks, for one passage to be corrupted. I suspect also that this happened from the following cause, that those who had to deal with the Scripture were generally ignorant of the Hebrew language; so that, conceiving the passage in the Acts to be vitiated, they rashly changed the true number. If any one, however, chooses rather to suppose that Luke in this instance accommodated himself to the rude and illiterate, who were accustomed to the Greek version, I do not contend with them. 179 In the words of Moses there is, indeed, no ambiguity, nor is there any reason why so small a matter, in which there is no absurdity, should give us any trouble; for it is not wonderful, that, in this mode of notation, one letter should have been put in the place of another. It is more to the purpose, to examine wherefore this small number of persons is recorded by Moses. For, the more improbable it appears, that seventy men, in no lengthened space of time, should have grown to such a multitude; so much the more clearly does the grace of God shine forth. And this is also the reason why he so frequently mentions this number. For it was, by no means, according to human apprehension, a likely method of propagating the Church, that Abraham should live childless even to old age; that, after the death of Isaac, Jacob alone should remain; that he, being increased with a moderate family, should be shut up in a corner of Egypt, and that there an incredible number of people should spring up from this dry fountain. 180 When Moses declares that Shaul, one of the sons of Simon, was born of a Canaanitish woman, while he does not even mention the mothers of the other sons, his intention, I doubt not, is to fix a mark of dishonor on his race. For the holy Fathers were on their guard, not to mix in marriage with that nation, from which they were separated by the decree of heaven. When Moses, having put down the names of Leah’s sons, says there were thirty-three souls, whereas he has only mentioned thirty-two; I understand that Jacob himself is to be reckoned the first in order. The statement that he had so many sons or daughters by Leah does not oppose this conclusion. For although, strictly speaking, his discourse is concerning sons, yet he commences with the head of the family. I reject the interpretation of the Hebrews, who suppose Jochebed the mother of Moses to be included, as being overstrained. A question suggests itself concerning the daughters, whether there were more than two. If Dinah alone were named, it might be said that express mention was made of her, because of the notorious fact which had happened to her. But since Moses enumerates another female in the progeny of Aser, I rather conjecture that these had remained unmarried, or single; for no mention is made of those who were wives.

Calvin: Gen 46:28 - And he sent Judah before him unto Joseph 28.And he sent Judah before him unto Joseph. Because Goshen 181 had been selected by Joseph as the abode of his father and his brethren, Jacob now de...

28.And he sent Judah before him unto Joseph. Because Goshen 181 had been selected by Joseph as the abode of his father and his brethren, Jacob now desires, that, on his coming, he may find the place prepared for him: for the expression which Moses uses, implies, not that he requires a house to be built and furnished for him, but only that he may be permitted there to pitch his tent without molestation. For it was necessary that some unoccupied place should be assigned him; lest, by taking possession of the pastures or fields of the inhabitants, he might give them an occasion for exciting a tumult.

In the meeting of Jacob with his son Joseph, Moses describes their vehement feeling of joy, to show that the holy Fathers were not destitute of natural affection. It must, however, be remembered that, although the affections spring from good principles, yet they always contract some evil, from the corrupt propensity of the flesh; and have chiefly this fault, that they always exceed their bounds: whence it follows, that they do not need to be eradicated, but to be kept within due bounds.

Calvin: Gen 46:31 - I will go up and show Pharaoh 31.I will go up and show Pharaoh. After Joseph had gone forth to meet his father for the purpose of doing him honor, he also provides what will be us...

31.I will go up and show Pharaoh. After Joseph had gone forth to meet his father for the purpose of doing him honor, he also provides what will be useful for him. On this account, he advises Jacob to declare that he and all his family were keepers of cattle, to the end that he might obtain, from the king, a dwelling-place for them, in the land of Goshen. Now although his moderation deserves commendation on the ground, that he usurps no authority to himself, but that, as one of the common people, he waits the pleasure of the king: he yet may be thought craftily to have devised a pretext, by which he might circumvent the king. We see what he desired. Seeing that the land of Goshen was fertile, and celebrated for its rich pastures; this advantage so allured his mind, that he wished to fix his father there: but then, keeping out of Pharaoh’s sight the richness of the land, he puts forth another reason; namely, that Jacob with his sons, were men held in abomination, and that, therefore, he was seeking a place of seclusion, in which they might dwell apart from the Egyptians. It is not, however, very difficult to untie this knot. The fertility of the land of Goshen was so fully known to the king, that no room was left for fraud or calming, (though kings are often too profuse, and foolishly waste much, because they know not what they grant,) yea, Pharaoh, of his own accord, had offered them, unsolicited, the best and choicest place in the kingdom. Therefore this bounty of his was not elicited from him by stratagem; because he was free to form his own judgment respecting what he would give. And truly Joseph, in order that he might act modestly, felt it necessary to seek a habitation in Goshen, on this pretext. For it would have been absurd, or at least inconsiderate, for men who were obscure and strangers, to desire an abode in the best and most convenient place for themselves, as if they possessed a right to choose for themselves. Joseph, therefore, having regard to his own modesty and that of his father, adduces another cause, which was yet a true one. For seeing that the Egyptians held the occupation of shepherds in abhorrence, 182 he explains to the king that this would be a suitable retreat for his brethren. Herein was no dissimulation, because, in no other place, was a quiet habitation accessible to them. Nevertheless, though it was hard for the holy Fathers to be thus opprobriously rejected, and, as it were, to be loathed by a whole nation; yet this ignominy with which they were branded, was most profitable to themselves. For, had they been mingled with the Egyptians, they might have been scattered far and wide; but now, seeing that they are objects of detestation, and are thought unworthy to be admitted to common society, they learn, in this state of separation from others, to cherish more fervently mutual union between themselves; and thus the body of the Church, which God had set apart from the whole world, is not dispersed. So the Lord often permits us to be despised or rejected by the world, that being liberated and cleansed from its pollution, we may cultivate holiness. Finally, he does not suffer us to be bound by chains to the earth, in order that we may be borne upward to heaven.

Defender: Gen 46:27 - threescore and ten "The souls that came with Jacob into Egypt, which came out of his loins" are said to total sixty-six, whereas the totals as given for his four wives (...

"The souls that came with Jacob into Egypt, which came out of his loins" are said to total sixty-six, whereas the totals as given for his four wives (Gen 46:15, Gen 46:18, Gen 46:22, Gen 46:25) add to seventy. These, however, include Joseph and his two sons (Gen 46:19-20), accounting for sixty-nine. Since Jacob himself is included in the seventy of this verse, there was probably an unnamed daughter of Leah (Gen 46:15 mentions "daughters," but only Dinah is named) who died on the trek into Egypt or soon after. Thus the total stands at seventy as indicated in Gen 46:27."

TSK: Gen 46:1 - Beersheba // and offered // unto am 2298, bc 1706 Beersheba : Gen 21:14, Gen 21:31, Gen 21:33, Gen 26:22, Gen 26:23, Gen 28:10; 1Sa 3:20 and offered : Gen 4:4, Gen 8:20, Gen 12:8, Gen...

TSK: Gen 46:2 - in the visions // Jacob in the visions : Gen 15:1, Gen 15:13, Gen 22:11; Num 12:6, Num 24:4; 2Ch 26:5; Job 4:13, Job 33:14, Job 33:15; Dan 2:19; Act 9:10, Act 10:3, Act 16:9 ...

TSK: Gen 46:3 - the God // fear not // I will the God : Gen 28:13 fear not : Gen 15:1, Gen 15:13, Gen 26:2, Gen 26:3; Isa 41:10, Isa 43:1, Isa 43:2; Jer 40:9; Act 27:24 I will : Gen 12:2, Gen 13:1...

TSK: Gen 46:4 - will go // and I will // and Joseph will go : Gen 28:15, Gen 48:21; Isa 43:1, Isa 43:2 and I will : Gen 15:14-16, Gen 50:5, Gen 50:13, Gen 50:24, Gen 50:25; Exo 3:8 and Joseph : This las...

will go : Gen 28:15, Gen 48:21; Isa 43:1, Isa 43:2

and I will : Gen 15:14-16, Gen 50:5, Gen 50:13, Gen 50:24, Gen 50:25; Exo 3:8

and Joseph : This last and most solemn office, as Mr. Hewlett observes, that could be paid to a parent, was generally performed by the nearest relation of the deceased. This promise must have given great consolation to the venerable patriarch’ s mind. Gen 50:1

TSK: Gen 46:5 - Jacob // in the wagons Jacob : Act 7:15 in the wagons : Gen 31:17, Gen 31:18, Gen 45:19, Gen 45:21, Gen 45:27; Exo 10:24, Exo 10:26

TSK: Gen 46:6 - into Egypt into Egypt : Gen 15:13; Num 20:15; Deu 10:22, Deu 26:5; Jos 24:4; 1Sa 12:8; Psa 105:23; Isa 52:4; Act 7:15

TSK: Gen 46:8 - the names // Reuben the names : Gen. 29:1-30:43, Gen 35:23, 49:1-33; Exo 1:1-5, Exo 6:14-18; 1Chr. 2:1-55, 8:1-40 Reuben : Gen 29:32, Gen 35:22, Gen 35:23, Gen 49:3, Gen ...

the names : Gen. 29:1-30:43, Gen 35:23, 49:1-33; Exo 1:1-5, Exo 6:14-18; 1Chr. 2:1-55, 8:1-40

Reuben : Gen 29:32, Gen 35:22, Gen 35:23, Gen 49:3, Gen 49:4; Exo 6:14; Num 1:5, Num 1:20, Num 1:21, Num 2:10-13, Num 26:5-11; Deu 33:6; 1Ch 2:1-10

TSK: Gen 46:10 - Simeon // Jemuel // Jachin // Zohar // Canaanitish Simeon : Gen 29:33, Gen 34:25, Gen 34:30, Gen 49:5-7; Exo 6:15; Num 1:6, Num 1:22, Num 1:23, Num 2:12, Num 2:13, Num 26:12, Num 26:13; 1Ch 2:1, 4:24-4...

Simeon : Gen 29:33, Gen 34:25, Gen 34:30, Gen 49:5-7; Exo 6:15; Num 1:6, Num 1:22, Num 1:23, Num 2:12, Num 2:13, Num 26:12, Num 26:13; 1Ch 2:1, 4:24-43

Jemuel : or, Nemuel

Jachin : or, Jarib

Zohar : or, Zerah, 1Ch 4:24

Canaanitish : Gen 28:1

TSK: Gen 46:11 - Levi // Gershon Levi : Gen 29:34, Gen 49:5-7; Exo 6:16; Num 3:17-22, 4:1-49, 8:1-26, Num 26:57, Num 26:58; Deu 33:8-11; 1Ch 2:1, 1Ch 2:11, 1Ch 2:16, 1Ch 6:1-3, 22:1-2...

Levi : Gen 29:34, Gen 49:5-7; Exo 6:16; Num 3:17-22, 4:1-49, 8:1-26, Num 26:57, Num 26:58; Deu 33:8-11; 1Ch 2:1, 1Ch 2:11, 1Ch 2:16, 1Ch 6:1-3, 22:1-26:32

Gershon : or, Gershom, 1Ch 6:16

TSK: Gen 46:12 - Judah Judah : Gen 29:35, Gen 38:1-3, Gen 38:7, Gen 38:10, Gen 38:24-30, Gen 49:8-12; Num 1:7, Num 1:26, Num 1:27, Num 26:19-21; Deu 33:7; Jdg 1:2; 1Ch 2:1, ...

TSK: Gen 46:13 - Issachar // Phuvah // Job Issachar : Gen 30:14-18, Gen 35:23, Gen 49:14, Gen 49:15; Num 1:8, Num 1:28-30, Num 26:23-25; Deu 33:18; 1Ch 2:1, 1Ch 7:1-5, 1Ch 12:32 Phuvah : or, Pu...

TSK: Gen 46:14 - Zebulun Zebulun : Gen 30:19, Gen 30:20, Gen 49:13; Num 1:9, Num 1:30, Num 1:31, Num 26:26, Num 26:27; Deu 33:18, Deu 33:19; 1Ch 2:1

TSK: Gen 46:15 - Leah // Padanaram // with his Leah : Gen 29:32-35, Gen 30:17-21, Gen 35:23, Gen 49:3-15; Exo 1:2, Exo 1:3; Num. 1:1-54, 10:1-36; Num. 26:1-65; 1Ch 2:1 Padanaram : Gen 25:20 with hi...

Leah : Gen 29:32-35, Gen 30:17-21, Gen 35:23, Gen 49:3-15; Exo 1:2, Exo 1:3; Num. 1:1-54, 10:1-36; Num. 26:1-65; 1Ch 2:1

Padanaram : Gen 25:20

with his : Gen 30:21, 34:1-31

TSK: Gen 46:16 - sons of // Ziphion // Ezbon // Arodi sons of : Gen 30:11, Gen 35:26, Gen 49:19; Num 1:11, Num 1:24, Num 1:25, Num 26:15-17; Deu 33:20, Deu 33:21; 1Ch 2:2; 1Ch 5:11-16 Ziphion : or, Zephon...

sons of : Gen 30:11, Gen 35:26, Gen 49:19; Num 1:11, Num 1:24, Num 1:25, Num 26:15-17; Deu 33:20, Deu 33:21; 1Ch 2:2; 1Ch 5:11-16

Ziphion : or, Zephon

Ezbon : or, Ozni

Arodi : or, Arod, Num 26:15-17

TSK: Gen 46:17 - Asher Asher : Gen 30:13, Gen 35:26, Gen 49:20; Num 1:13, Num 1:40, Num 1:41, Num 26:44-46; Deu 33:24; 1Ch 2:2; 1Ch 7:30-40

TSK: Gen 46:18 - Zilpah Zilpah : Gen 29:24, Gen 30:9-13, Gen 35:26; Exo 1:4

TSK: Gen 46:19 - Rachel // Joseph Rachel : Gen 29:18, Gen 30:24, Gen 35:16-18, Gen 35:24, Gen 44:27; Exo 1:3, Exo 1:5; 1Ch 2:2 Joseph : Gen. 37:1-36, 39:1-23, 40:1-45:28, 47:1-31, Gen ...

Rachel : Gen 29:18, Gen 30:24, Gen 35:16-18, Gen 35:24, Gen 44:27; Exo 1:3, Exo 1:5; 1Ch 2:2

Joseph : Gen. 37:1-36, 39:1-23, 40:1-45:28, 47:1-31, Gen 49:22-27, Gen 50:1-14; Num 1:36, Num 1:37, Num 26:38-41; Deu 33:12-17

TSK: Gen 46:20 - Manasseh // priest Manasseh : Gen 41:50-52, Gen 48:4, Gen 48:5, Gen 48:13, Gen 48:14, Gen 48:20; Num 1:32-35, Num 26:28-37; Deu 33:13-17; 1Ch 5:23-26, 7:14-29 priest : o...

TSK: Gen 46:21 - the sons // Ehi // Muppim // Huppim the sons : Gen 49:27; Num 1:11, Num 1:36, Num 1:37; Deu 33:12; 1Ch 7:6-12, 1Ch 8:1-7 Ehi : Num 26:38, Ahiram Muppim : Num 26:39, Shupham, 1Ch 7:12, Sh...

the sons : Gen 49:27; Num 1:11, Num 1:36, Num 1:37; Deu 33:12; 1Ch 7:6-12, 1Ch 8:1-7

Ehi : Num 26:38, Ahiram

Muppim : Num 26:39, Shupham, 1Ch 7:12, Shuppim

Huppim : Num 26:39, Hupham

TSK: Gen 46:23 - Dan // Hushim Dan : Gen 30:6, Gen 35:25, Gen 49:16, Gen 49:17; Num 1:12, Num 1:38, Num 1:39, Num 10:25; Deu 33:22; 1Ch 2:2, 1Ch 7:12; 1Ch 12:35 Hushim : Num 26:42, ...

TSK: Gen 46:24 - Naphtali // Jahzeel Naphtali : Gen 30:7, Gen 30:8, Gen 35:25, Gen 49:21; Num 1:15, Num 1:42, Num 1:43, Num 26:48-50; Deu 33:23; 2Ki 15:29; 1Ch 2:2, 1Ch 12:34 Jahzeel : 1C...

TSK: Gen 46:25 - Bilhah Bilhah : Gen 29:29, Gen 30:3-8, Gen 35:22, Gen 35:25; Exo 1:2

TSK: Gen 46:26 - loins loins : Heb. thigh, Gen 35:11; Exo 1:5; Jdg 8:30

loins : Heb. thigh, Gen 35:11; Exo 1:5; Jdg 8:30

TSK: Gen 46:27 - threescore and ten threescore and ten : Threescore and six were before mentioned (Gen 46:26), so that Joseph and his two sons, together with Jacob himself, complete the ...

threescore and ten : Threescore and six were before mentioned (Gen 46:26), so that Joseph and his two sons, together with Jacob himself, complete the seventy persons here enumerated; and the number in Gen 46:15, Gen 46:18, Gen 46:22, and Gen 46:25 amount to that number. The addition of five persons in the LXX in Gen 46:20, was either the cause or the consequence of another difference here; for in that version the number is seventy-five (Gen 46:15, Gen 46:18, Gen 46:22, Gen 46:25). Exo 1:5, Exo 24:1; Deu 10:22; Act 7:14

TSK: Gen 46:28 - Judah // to direct // Goshen Judah : Gen 43:8, 44:16-34, Gen 49:8 to direct : Gen 31:21 Goshen : Goshen seems to have been a city, after which the land of Goshen was called. The ...

Judah : Gen 43:8, 44:16-34, Gen 49:8

to direct : Gen 31:21

Goshen : Goshen seems to have been a city, after which the land of Goshen was called. The LXX render it by Ηρωωνπολις , Heroonpolis , ""city of Heroon;""which by some writers is simply called Heroum, and is by the ancient geographers placed in the eastern part of Egypt, not far from the Arabian Gulf. Gen 46:34, Gen 45:10, Gen 47:1

TSK: Gen 46:29 - his chariot // fell on his chariot : Gen 41:43, Gen 45:19, Gen 45:21 fell on : Gen 33:4, Gen 45:14; Luk 15:20; Act 20:37

TSK: Gen 46:30 - -- Gen 45:28; Luk 2:29, Luk 2:30

TSK: Gen 46:31 - -- Gen 45:16-20, Gen 47:1-3; Act 18:3; Heb 2:11

TSK: Gen 46:32 - shepherds // their trade hath been to feed cattle // and they shepherds : Gen 4:2, Gen 31:18, Gen 37:2, Gen 47:3; Exo 3:1; 1Sa 16:11, 1Sa 17:15; Psa 78:70-72; Isa 40:11; Zec 13:5 their trade hath been to feed cat...

shepherds : Gen 4:2, Gen 31:18, Gen 37:2, Gen 47:3; Exo 3:1; 1Sa 16:11, 1Sa 17:15; Psa 78:70-72; Isa 40:11; Zec 13:5

their trade hath been to feed cattle : Heb. they are men of cattle, Gen 46:34, Gen 9:20; 1Ki 9:27, 1Ki 18:5, 1Ki 18:6

and they : Gen 45:10

TSK: Gen 46:33 - What is What is : Gen 46:32, Gen 47:2-4; Jon 1:8

TSK: Gen 46:34 - Thy servants’ // for every Thy servants’ : Gen 46:32, Gen 30:35, Gen 34:5, Gen 37:12 for every : From the fragments of Manetho, preserved in Josephus and Africanus, it app...

Thy servants’ : Gen 46:32, Gen 30:35, Gen 34:5, Gen 37:12

for every : From the fragments of Manetho, preserved in Josephus and Africanus, it appears that hordes of marauders, call hycassos , or shepherd kings, whose chief occupation, like the Bedouin Arabs of the present day, was to keep flocks, made a powerful irruption into Egypt, which they subdued, and ruled, by a succession of kings, with great tyranny for 259 years. Hence the persons, and even the very name of shepherds were execrated, and held in the greatest odium by the Egyptians. Gen 43:32; Exo 8:26

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Gen 46:1 - The God of his father Isaac The God of his father Isaac whom Isaac honoured and served, and who had constantly protected and provided for Isaac, and confirmed his covenant with ...

The God of his father Isaac whom Isaac honoured and served, and who had constantly protected and provided for Isaac, and confirmed his covenant with him. He mentions Isaac rather than Abraham, partly for Isaac’ s honour, to show that though Isaac was much inferior to Abraham in gifts and graces, yet God was no less Isaac’ s than Abraham’ s God, and therefore would be his God also, notwithstanding his unworthiness; and partly for his own comfort, because Isaac was Jacob’ s immediate parent, and had transferred the blessing of the covenant from Esau to Jacob, and the validity of that translation depended upon Isaac’ s interest in God.

Poole: Gen 46:2 - In the visions of the night // Jacob, Jacob In the visions of the night i.e. in that way or manner of visions which God affordeth to men by night, and in their sleep. See Gen 20:3 Job 33:15,16 ...

In the visions of the night i.e. in that way or manner of visions which God affordeth to men by night, and in their sleep. See Gen 20:3 Job 33:15,16 Mt 1:20 2:13,19 Ac 16:9 18:9 , &c.

Jacob, Jacob he doubles the name both in token of his friendship and familiarity with him, and to raise Jacob’ s attention. Compare Gen 22:11 1Sa 3:10 .

Poole: Gen 46:3 - -- Here were many causes of fear; lest he should do evil in forsaking the promised and blessed land, and going to a place which had been incommodious t...

Here were many causes of fear; lest he should do evil in forsaking the promised and blessed land, and going to a place which had been incommodious to his grandfather, Gen 12:15 , and forbidden to his father, Gen 26:2 ; lest he should expose his children to manifold perils, as of being infected with the vices, and particularly the idolatry, which reigned there above all other countries, and of being inveigled by the pleasantness and eminent fruitfulness of that soil, to give up themselves to all manner of pleasures, and to settle themselves there, and give over all thoughts of returning to Canaan, and of being brought into that grievous bondage and affliction which was spoken of Gen 15:13 ; and lest some mischief should befall him or his in so long and dangerous a journey.

Poole: Gen 46:4 - I will bring thee up again // Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes I will bring thee up again though not in thy person, yet in thy body, Gen 47:29,30 50:5,13 ; and in thy posterity, which are a part of thyself, or th...

I will bring thee up again though not in thy person, yet in thy body, Gen 47:29,30 50:5,13 ; and in thy posterity, which are a part of thyself, or thyself multiplied.

Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes shall close thy eyes; which office was usually performed by the nearest and dearest relations of the dying party among the Jews, Greeks, and Romans. Hereby Jacob is assured that he should die in peace, and that Joseph both now was alive, and should survive his father.

Poole: Gen 46:6 - In the land of Canaan In the land of Canaan and in Mesopotamia. But Canaan only is here mentioned, because here they got the far greatest part of them, which by a synecd...

In the land of Canaan and in Mesopotamia. But Canaan only is here mentioned, because here they got the far greatest part of them, which by a synecdoche is put for the whole.

Poole: Gen 46:7 - His daughters His daughters either his daughter Dinah, the plural number for the singular, as Gen 46:23 21:7 Num 26:8 , or Dinah and her daughters; for grandchildr...

His daughters either his daughter Dinah, the plural number for the singular, as Gen 46:23 21:7 Num 26:8 , or Dinah and her daughters; for grandchildren are commonly called their grandfather’ s children, or sons or daughters; or his daughters-in-law, his son’ s wives.

Poole: Gen 46:8 - -- This genealogy is both here and elsewhere described exactly and particularly, as well to show the faithfulness of God in the performance of his prom...

This genealogy is both here and elsewhere described exactly and particularly, as well to show the faithfulness of God in the performance of his promise concerning the vast multiplication of Abraham’ s seed, and that in so short a time, as to distinguish the tribes; which was of great importance, and necessary for the disposal of the kingdom and priesthood, and above all, for the discovery of the true Messias. Compare this following catalogue with that Num 26:1-65 1Ch 6:1-8:40 .

Poole: Gen 46:10 - Ohad // The son of a Canaanitish woman Ohad is not mentioned in those parallel places, because he was then dead, and that without issue. The son of a Canaanitish woman which is here ment...

Ohad is not mentioned in those parallel places, because he was then dead, and that without issue.

The son of a Canaanitish woman which is here mentioned as a brand upon him, and as an intimation that the rest of them, except Judah, married to persons of a better race.

Poole: Gen 46:12 - Er and Onan died in the land of Canaan // Hezron and Hamul // Object // Answ Er and Onan died in the land of Canaan and therefore are not contained in the following number, Gen 46:15 . Hezron and Hamul though they seem to ha...

Er and Onan died in the land of Canaan and therefore are not contained in the following number, Gen 46:15 .

Hezron and Hamul though they seem to have been born in Egypt, yet are here set down amongst those who came into Egypt, because they came thither in their father’ s loins, as Levi is said to pay tithes in Abraham, Heb 7:9 . And the children may as well be said to come thither in their parents, as their father Jacob is said to return from thence, Gen 46:4 , in his children.

Object. If this be the sense, why should these two be mentioned rather than the grandchildren of the other brethren, who came into Egypt in the same manner?

Answ This may be done either,

1. From some special excellency or eminency in them above the rest, as Hezron was eminent for being the progenitor of the Messiah, and Hamul might be so for some other cause, though unknown to us. Or,

2. Because they were the first grandchildren that were born in Egypt, and it may be all that were born whilst Jacob lived there, and therefore are not unfitly named with Jacob, and allotted to him; as Joseph’ s two eldest sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, were by Jacob appropriated to himself, and reckoned as his immediate sons, when all the rest of Joseph’ s sons were excluded from that privilege, Gen 48:5,6 . And the like may be said of the other two grandchildren mentioned Gen 46:17 .

Poole: Gen 46:15 - Which she bare unto Jacob in Padan-aram // All the souls of his sons and his daughters // Daughters Which she bare unto Jacob in Padan-aram: this is true properly and immediately of the sons, who were indeed born there, but improperly and mediately ...

Which she bare unto Jacob in Padan-aram: this is true properly and immediately of the sons, who were indeed born there, but improperly and mediately of the grandchildren, which are as truly said to be born of Leah in Padan as to be born of her at all, because they were indeed born of them which were born of her, and that in Padan.

All the souls of his sons and his daughters to wit, which came into Egypt as before; so that Er and Onan are excluded, as dying before this journey into Egypt, Gen 46:12 .

Daughters is here put for daughter, as Gen 46:7 , because Dinah was all the daughters which Jacob had. Heb. all the souls, sons and daughters being reckoned together with their father.

Poole: Gen 46:21 - -- Whereof part seem to be born before his coming to Egypt, and part in Egypt, Benjamin being now but twenty and four years old.

Whereof part seem to be born before his coming to Egypt, and part in Egypt, Benjamin being now but twenty and four years old.

Poole: Gen 46:26 - Loins // Threescore and six Loins Heb. thigh, which is here put for the secret parts between the thighs, which are called sometimes the feet, as Gen 49:10 Deu 28:57 Eze 16...

Loins Heb. thigh, which is here put for the secret parts between the thighs, which are called sometimes the feet, as Gen 49:10 Deu 28:57 Eze 16:25 , for the like reason, because they are between the feet. From this eastern manner of speech came that passage in the Greek fables, concerning Bacchus being born out of Jupiter’ s thigh.

Threescore and six so many they are, excluding Jacob, as the common parent, and Joseph and his two sons, as being in Egypt before Jacob’ s coming thither; which four being included they make up seventy, as it is Gen 46:27 .

Poole: Gen 46:27 - which came with Jacob into Egypt He doth not say, which came with Jacob into Egypt because some of them came thither before him, and others with him, some in their persons, and so...

He doth not say,

which came with Jacob into Egypt because some of them came thither before him, and others with him, some in their persons, and some in their parents. As for the difficulty arising from comparing this place with Act 7:14 , it will be more fit to speak of it when we come to that place.

Poole: Gen 46:28 - To direct his face unto Goshen To direct his face unto Goshen Heb. to prepare, or to teach him, the way before his face, i.e. before his coming to Goshen; i.e. to show h...

To direct his face unto Goshen Heb. to prepare, or to teach him, the way before his face, i.e. before his coming to Goshen; i.e. to show him where it was, and into what part of it he should come and settle himself; or to give notice unto Joseph of his approach, before his face or coming into Goshen.

Poole: Gen 46:29 - -- Doubtless Joseph fell down before him with all that reverence which children owe to their parents, and in this posture Jacob falls upon his neck, &c...

Doubtless Joseph fell down before him with all that reverence which children owe to their parents, and in this posture Jacob falls upon his neck, &c. Of which posture see Gen 33:4 45:14 Luk 15:20 Act 20:37 .

Poole: Gen 46:30 - -- Now I expect no greater happiness upon earth, and therefore am content to die. Compare Luk 2:29 .

Now I expect no greater happiness upon earth, and therefore am content to die. Compare Luk 2:29 .

Poole: Gen 46:34 - Every shepherd is an abomination unto the Egyptians In this design and choice Joseph shows both his prudence and piety. He brings them not to court, where it had been easy for him to have put them all...

In this design and choice Joseph shows both his prudence and piety. He brings them not to court, where it had been easy for him to have put them all into the best places and offices of the court; and as he is not ashamed to own himself a brother to shepherds, which were contemptible among the Egyptians, so he seeks not to advance them higher, but continues them in their employment, and placeth them in Goshen: whereby,

1. He kept them together, which was very convenient for them in many respects.

2. He secured them both from envy, and, as far as he could, from the corruption of their religion and manners, which was likely to follow their mixture with the Egyptians, and especially their being at the court.

3. He put them into a capacity of returning to Canaan, when God gave them opportunity.

Every shepherd is an abomination unto the Egyptians either,

1. Because they did both kill and eat those creatures which the Egyptians adored. Or,

2. Because of the fresh remembrance of the horrid cruelties lately committed there by the Phoenician shepherds, who, as some very ancient writers affirm, were seated in Egypt in great numbers, and had arrived to great power, and waged a cruel war with other Egyptians, wherein they wasted divers cities, and burned their temples, and barbarously murdered a multitude of people. And therefore it is no wonder if the calling of shepherds was grown out of use and credit among them. True it is, the Egyptians had some sheep, and other cattle, Gen 47:6,17 Ex 8:26 9:3 , which they kept for delight or profit by their milk, wool, &c., or for sale to others, but they did not use them, as other shepherds generally did, kill and eat them. And it is probable that they committed even the keeping of their sheep and cattle to those strangers which were dispersed among them, and looked upon the employment as too vile and mean for any Egyptian. And though Pharaoh offered it to Joseph’ s brethren as a favour to be

rulers over his cattle Gen 47:6 , that might proceed only from hence, because he saw them firmly resolved upon that course of life, and therefore could not bestow any higher preferment upon them.

Haydock: Gen 46:1 - The well of the oath The well of the oath. Bersabee.

The well of the oath. Bersabee.

Haydock: Gen 46:3 - Fear not Fear not. He might be apprehensive, lest his children should be depraved, living among idolaters, or prefer Egypt before the promised land. He was ...

Fear not. He might be apprehensive, lest his children should be depraved, living among idolaters, or prefer Egypt before the promised land. He was also afraid to undertake this journey without consulting God. (Menochius)

Haydock: Gen 46:4 - Thence // Eyes Thence; in thy posterity. Septuagint add at last, or after a long time. Jacob's bones were brought back and buried in Chanaan. (Calmet) --- Eye...

Thence; in thy posterity. Septuagint add at last, or after a long time. Jacob's bones were brought back and buried in Chanaan. (Calmet) ---

Eyes, as he is the most dear to thee. Parents closed the eyes of their children in death. The Romans opened them again when the corpse was upon the funeral pire; thinking it a mark of disrespect for the eyes to be shut to heaven; "ut neque ab homine supremum eos spectari fas sit, & cœlo non ostendi, nefas. " (Pliny, xi. 37.)

Haydock: Gen 46:7 - Daughters Daughters. Dina, and grand-daughter Sara, (ver. 17,) and his sons' wives, &c. (Calmet) --- We may observe, that all here mentioned were not born at...

Daughters. Dina, and grand-daughter Sara, (ver. 17,) and his sons' wives, &c. (Calmet) ---

We may observe, that all here mentioned were not born at the time when Jacob went down into Egypt, but they were before he or Joseph died; that is, during the space of 17 or 71 years. See St. Augustine, q. 151, 173. (Menochius) ---

The names of the Hebrew and Septuagint vary some little from the Vulgate, which may be attributed to the difference of pronunciation, or to the same person having many names. The number is also different in the Septuagint as the authors of that version have, perhaps, inserted some names taken from other parts of Scripture, to remove any apparent contradiction. The genealogies of Juda, Joseph, and Benjamin, are carried farther than the rest, as those families were of greater consequence.

Haydock: Gen 46:9 - Hesron Hesron and Charmi were probably born in Egypt, as Ruben had only two sons, chap. xlii. 37. (Philo.)

Hesron and Charmi were probably born in Egypt, as Ruben had only two sons, chap. xlii. 37. (Philo.)

Haydock: Gen 46:10 - Jamuel // Jachin Jamuel. Numbers xxvi. 12, he is called Namuel. --- Jachin is Jarid, 1 Paralipomenon iv. 24. (Calmet)

Jamuel. Numbers xxvi. 12, he is called Namuel. ---

Jachin is Jarid, 1 Paralipomenon iv. 24. (Calmet)

Haydock: Gen 46:12 - Were born Were born, afterwards. (Menochius)

Were born, afterwards. (Menochius)

Haydock: Gen 46:15 - Syria // Thirty-three Syria. This must be restrained to her seven children. --- Thirty-three, comprising Lia, or Jacob; but without Her and Onan, who were dead. (Calme...

Syria. This must be restrained to her seven children. ---

Thirty-three, comprising Lia, or Jacob; but without Her and Onan, who were dead. (Calmet)

Haydock: Gen 46:20 - Ephraim Ephraim. The Septuagint take in here the children of both, Numbers xxvi. 29, 35.

Ephraim. The Septuagint take in here the children of both, Numbers xxvi. 29, 35.

Haydock: Gen 46:21 - Benjamin Benjamin. Ten in number; though the Septuagint have only nine, and suppose that some of them were his grandchildren. He was 33 (or 24, Menochius) y...

Benjamin. Ten in number; though the Septuagint have only nine, and suppose that some of them were his grandchildren. He was 33 (or 24, Menochius) years old. (Calmet) ---

Grotius thinks three names have been made out of two; Echi, Ros, and mophim, out of Ahiram and Supham, as we read, Numbers xxvi. 38.

Haydock: Gen 46:23 - Sons Sons. The Arabic has son. Husim is Suham, (Numbers xxvi. 42,) by change and transposition of letters. (Kennicott)

Sons. The Arabic has son. Husim is Suham, (Numbers xxvi. 42,) by change and transposition of letters. (Kennicott)

Haydock: Gen 46:26 - Sixty-six Sixty-six; not including Jacob, Joseph, and his two children, who make up 70, ver. 27. (Deuteronomy x. 22.) The Septuagint taking in Joseph's grand...

Sixty-six; not including Jacob, Joseph, and his two children, who make up 70, ver. 27. (Deuteronomy x. 22.) The Septuagint taking in Joseph's grandchildren, read 75; in which they are followed by St. Stephen, Acts. vii. 14. See St. Jerome q. Heb. (Calmet) ---

St. Augustine cannot account for these grand-children and great grand-children of Joseph being mentioned as coming with Jacob into Egypt, since some of them were not born during his life-time. He suspects some hidden mystery. (Worthington) See ver. 7. ---

Some think St. Stephen excludes Jacob, Joseph, and his sons; and included the 64 men, with 11 wives. (Du Hamel)

Haydock: Gen 46:34 - Abomination Abomination. See chap. xliii. 32. The source of this hatred against foreign shepherds, was probably because, about 100 years before Abraham, the sh...

Abomination. See chap. xliii. 32. The source of this hatred against foreign shepherds, was probably because, about 100 years before Abraham, the shepherd-kings, Hycussos, had got possession of a great part of Egypt, and were at last expelled by the kings of Thebais. See Manetho ap. Eusebius, Præp. x. 13. Another reason why they hated foreigners was, because they slew and eat sheep, &c., which they themselves adored. The Egyptians kept sheep for this purpose, and for the benefits to be derived from their wool, &c., chap. xlvii. 17. (Calmet) ---

Joseph took advantage of this disposition of the inhabitants, to keep his brethren at a distance from them, that they might not be perverted. He does not introduce them at court, that no jealousy might be excited. He shews that he is not ashamed of his extraction. (Menochius)

Gill: Gen 46:1 - And Israel took his journey with all that he had // and came to Beersheba // and offered sacrifices to the God of his father Isaac And Israel took his journey with all that he had,.... Set forward in it immediately, as soon as possible after he had resolved to take it, and with hi...

And Israel took his journey with all that he had,.... Set forward in it immediately, as soon as possible after he had resolved to take it, and with him he took all his children and grandchildren, and all his cattle and goods; which shows that he took his journey not only to see his son Joseph, but to continue in Egypt, at least during the years of famine, as his son desired he would, otherwise there would have been no occasion of taking all along with him:

and came to Beersheba: where he and his ancestors Abraham and Isaac had formerly lived; a place where sacrifices had often been offered up, and the worship of God performed, and much communion enjoyed with him. This is said to be sixteen miles from Hebron n, where Jacob dwelt, and according to Musculus was six German miles from it:

and offered sacrifices to the God of his father Isaac; which were attended with prayer and praise; with praise for hearing that his son Joseph was alive, and with prayer that he might have a good, safe, and prosperous journey.

Gill: Gen 46:2 - And God spake unto Israel in the visions of the night // and said, Jacob, Jacob // and he said, here am I And God spake unto Israel in the visions of the night,.... He appeared to Jacob as he lay upon his bed in the night season, and with an articulate voi...

And God spake unto Israel in the visions of the night,.... He appeared to Jacob as he lay upon his bed in the night season, and with an articulate voice spoke to him as follows:

and said, Jacob, Jacob: not "Israel", the more honourable name he had given him, but Jacob, putting him in mind of his former low estate; and doubling this name, either out of love and affection to him, as Jarchi intimates; or rather in order to awake him, at least to stir up his attention to what he was about to say to him:

and he said, here am I; signifying his readiness to hearken to him in what he should say to him, and to obey him in whatsoever he should command him.

Gill: Gen 46:3 - And he said, I am God, the God of thy father // fear not to go down into Egypt // for I will there make of thee a great nation And he said, I am God, the God of thy father,.... His father Isaac, who was now dead, and who is the rather mentioned, because in him Abraham's seed ...

And he said, I am God, the God of thy father,.... His father Isaac, who was now dead, and who is the rather mentioned, because in him Abraham's seed was to be called, and in his line the promise both of the land of Canaan, and of the Messiah, ran, and from him Jacob received the blessing; and this might be a confirmation of it to him, in that Jehovah calls himself his God; he first declares himself to be his God, and so able to perform whatever he should promise him, and his father's God, who would show him favour, as he had to him:

fear not to go down into Egypt; Jacob might have many fears arise in his mind about this journey, as interpreters generally observe; as lest it should not be agreeable to the will of God, since his father Isaac was forbidden to go into Egypt, when in like circumstances with him, Gen 26:1; as well as he, might fear it would be too great a journey for him in his old age, some evil would befall him, or he die by the way and not see his son; or lest going with his family thither, and there continuing for some time, they might be tempted with the pleasantness and fruitfulness of the land, and settle there, and forget and neglect the promised land of Canaan; and especially lest they should be drawn into the idolatry of the Egyptians, and forsake the worship of the true God; and very probably he might call to mind the prophecy delivered to Abraham, of his seed being strangers and servants, and afflicted in a land not theirs for the space of four hundred years, Gen 15:13; and Jacob might fear this step he was now taking would bring on, as indeed it did, the completion of this prediction, by which his offspring would be oppressed and diminished. The Targum of Jonathan makes this to be Jacob's principal fear;"fear not to go down into Egypt, because of the business of the servitude decreed with Abraham;''as also he might fear his going thither might seem to be a giving up his title to, and expectation of the promised land: to remove which fears the following is said:

for I will there make of thee a great nation: as he did; for though in process of time his seed were greatly afflicted here, yet the more they were afflicted, the more they multiplied; and their increase in Egypt was vastly greater than it had been in a like space of time before; for in the space of two hundred fifteen years before their descent into Egypt, they were become no more than seventy persons, whereas in the like number of years in Egypt, they became 600,000, besides children; see Gen 46:27 Exo 12:37.

Gill: Gen 46:4 - I will go down with thee into Egypt // and I will also surely bring thee up again // and Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes I will go down with thee into Egypt,.... Which was enough to silence all his fears; for if the presence of God went with him to protect and defend hid...

I will go down with thee into Egypt,.... Which was enough to silence all his fears; for if the presence of God went with him to protect and defend hide, to bless and prosper him, and to direct, support, and comfort, he had nothing to fear from any quarter:

and I will also surely bring thee up again: Jarchi takes this to be a promise that he should be buried in the land of Canaan, which had its fulfilment, when his corpse was carried out of Egypt to Machpelah, and there interred; but rather this refers to the bringing up of his posterity from thence in due time, for which Jacob might be most solicitous, and so the Targum of Jonathan,"and I will bring up thy children from thence:"

and Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes: and so close them when he was dead; this, as Aben Ezra says, was a custom of the living to the dead, and it used to be done by the nearest relations and friends, though now with us commonly by strangers, or those that are not akin: this was a custom among the Greeks and Romans, as appears from Homer o, Virgil p, Ovid q, and other writers r; and so, among the Jews, Tobias is said to shut the eyes of his wife's father and mother, and to bury them honourably,"Where he became old with honour, and he buried his father and mother in law honourably, and he inherited their substance, and his father Tobit's.'' (Tobit 14:13)Of the Vulgate Latin version: Maimonides s reckons this of closing the eyes of the dead, among the rites used towards them, and so in the Talmud t: now by this expression Jacob was assured that Joseph was alive, and that he should live to see him, and that Joseph would outlive him, and do this last office for him; and, as Ben Melech observes, by this he had the good news told him that Joseph should remain behind him, to sustain and support his sons, and his sons' sons, all the years that he should live after him.

Gill: Gen 46:5 - And Jacob rose up from Beersheba // and the sons of Israel carried Jacob their father, and their little ones, and their wives, in the wagons which Pharaoh had sent to carry him And Jacob rose up from Beersheba,.... In high spirits, and proceeded on in his journey, being encouraged and animated by the promises of God now made ...

And Jacob rose up from Beersheba,.... In high spirits, and proceeded on in his journey, being encouraged and animated by the promises of God now made unto him:

and the sons of Israel carried Jacob their father, and their little ones, and their wives, in the wagons which Pharaoh had sent to carry him; it may be wondered at that Joseph did not send his chariot to fetch his father; it could not be for want of due respect and honour to him, but it may be such a carriage was not fit for so long a journey, and especially to travel in, in some parts of the road through which they went: no mention being made of Jacob's wives, it may be presumed they were all now dead; it is certain Rachel was, see Gen 35:19; and it is more than probable that Leah died before this time, since Jacob says he buried her himself in Machpelah in Canaan, Gen 49:31; and it is very likely also that his two concubine wives Bilhah and Zilpah were also dead, since no notice is taken of them.

Gill: Gen 46:6 - And they took their cattle, and their goods, which they had gotten in the land of Canaan // and came into Egypt, Jacob, and all his seed with him And they took their cattle, and their goods, which they had gotten in the land of Canaan,.... Some interpreters add, by way of explanation, and in Mes...

And they took their cattle, and their goods, which they had gotten in the land of Canaan,.... Some interpreters add, by way of explanation, and in Mesopotamia; much of Jacob's substance being yet there, though the greatest part was got in Canaan, and so that is put for the whole; and Jarchi supposes that Jacob gave all that he got in Padanaram to Esau for his part in the cave of Machpelah, and therefore mention is only made of his substance in Canaan; but there is no need of any such additions or suppositions, since the text only speaks of the substance of Jacob's sons, and what they had was only gotten in Canaan, into which they came very young; all which they brought with them as being their property, and not obliged to leave it behind to strangers; though they were bid not to regard their stuff, yet they were not willing to live upon others, but upon their own, and as much as they could independent of others; and that they might not be upbraided hereafter that they came into Egypt poor and destitute of everything:

and came into Egypt, Jacob, and all his seed with him; safe and well.

Gill: Gen 46:7 - His sons, and his sons' sons with him // and his daughters // and his sons' daughters // and all his seed brought he with him into Egypt His sons, and his sons' sons with him,.... His eleven sons, and their sons, his grandchildren: and his daughters; his own daughter Dinah, and his d...

His sons, and his sons' sons with him,.... His eleven sons, and their sons, his grandchildren:

and his daughters; his own daughter Dinah, and his daughters in law, the wives of his sons; for these came with him into Egypt, as appears from Gen 46:5; though the plural may be put for the singular, as in Gen 46:23,

and his sons' daughters; and mention is made of Sarah the daughter of Asher, Gen 46:17; Jarchi adds, Jochebed, the daughter of Levi, but it is certain she was born in Egypt, Num 26:59,

and all his seed brought he with him into Egypt; left none behind him in Canaan, son or daughter; no mention is made of servants, though no doubt many came along with him: the design of the historian is to give an account of Jacob's children, who they were, and their number, when they came into Egypt, that the increase of them might be observed.

Gill: Gen 46:8 - And these are the names of the children of Israel which came into Egypt // Jacob and his sons // Reuben, Jacob's firstborn And these are the names of the children of Israel which came into Egypt,.... Not meaning precisely Jacob's seed and offspring, but the body of the pe...

And these are the names of the children of Israel which came into Egypt,.... Not meaning precisely Jacob's seed and offspring, but the body of the people of Israel, as they were when they went into Egypt, including Jacob himself:

Jacob and his sons; for he went with them to Egypt, and was the head and principal of them:

Reuben, Jacob's firstborn; see Gen 29:32.

Gill: Gen 46:9 - And the sons of Reuben, Hanoch, and Phallu, and Hezron, and Carmi. And the sons of Reuben, Hanoch, and Phallu, and Hezron, and Carmi. From whom came the families named after them, of which they were the heads, Num 26:...

And the sons of Reuben, Hanoch, and Phallu, and Hezron, and Carmi. From whom came the families named after them, of which they were the heads, Num 26:5.

Gill: Gen 46:10 - And the sons of Simeon // Jemuel, and Jamin, and Ohad, and Jachin, and Zohar // and Shaul the son of a Canaanitish woman And the sons of Simeon,.... Who was the second son of Jacob: Jemuel, and Jamin, and Ohad, and Jachin, and Zohar; the first of these is called Nemue...

And the sons of Simeon,.... Who was the second son of Jacob:

Jemuel, and Jamin, and Ohad, and Jachin, and Zohar; the first of these is called Nemuel, Num 26:12; the third, Ohad, is omitted in the places referred to, he dying without children, as may be supposed, and so was not the head of any family; and the fourth, Jachin, is called Jarib, 1Ch 4:24; and the fifth is called Zerah, in the above place, by a transposition of letters:

and Shaul the son of a Canaanitish woman; whom Simeon married, very probably after the death of his first wife, by whom he had the above five sons, or she was his concubine: many Jewish writers u say, this was Dinah, married to a Canaanite, but this is impossible: according to the Targum of Jonathan, this Shaul was Zimri, who did the work of the Canaanites at Shittim, Num 25:14, which is not at all likely, the distance of time will not admit of it.

Gill: Gen 46:11 - And the sons of Levi, Gershon, Kohath, and Merari. And the sons of Levi, Gershon, Kohath, and Merari. From these sprung the priests and Levites, see Num 3:1.

And the sons of Levi, Gershon, Kohath, and Merari. From these sprung the priests and Levites, see Num 3:1.

Gill: Gen 46:12 - And the sons of Judah, Er, and Onan, and Shelah, and Pharez // and Zarah // but Er and Onan died in the land of Canaan // and the sons of Pharez were Hezron and Hamul And the sons of Judah, Er, and Onan, and Shelah, and Pharez, and Zarah,.... Five of them: but Er and Onan died in the land of Canaan; and so did...

And the sons of Judah, Er, and Onan, and Shelah, and Pharez,

and Zarah,.... Five of them:

but Er and Onan died in the land of Canaan; and so did not go with Jacob into Egypt; and which is observed that they might not be reckoned among them, though it was proper to take notice of them in the genealogy:

and the sons of Pharez were Hezron and Hamul; some think that these could not be born in Canaan, but in Egypt; and that they are mentioned among those that went down to Egypt, because they went there in the loins of their father, and to supply the places of Er and Onan, who died before, and have the honour to be here named, because they might be the first of Jacob's great grandchildren born there; though others suppose that Pharez was at this time fourteen years of age, and instances are given of some, who before that age have been fathers of children; the difficulty is not easily solved: the Targum of Jonathan expressly says,"Shelah and Zarah did not beget children in Canaan, but there were two sons of Pharez who went down into Egypt, Hezron and Hamul.''

Gill: Gen 46:13 - And the sons of Issachar, Tola, and Phuvah; and Job, and Shimron. And the sons of Issachar, Tola, and Phuvah; and Job, and Shimron. The first of these was the father of a numerous race in the days of David, their num...

And the sons of Issachar, Tola, and Phuvah; and Job, and Shimron. The first of these was the father of a numerous race in the days of David, their number was 22,600; See Gill on 1Ch 7:2; the second is called Puah, and the third Jashub, and the fourth Shimrom, 1Ch 7:1; and were all the heads of families, as appears from the places referred to.

Gill: Gen 46:14 - And the sons of Zebulun, Sered, and Elon, and Jahleel. And the sons of Zebulun, Sered, and Elon, and Jahleel. Whose names are the same in Num 26:26.

And the sons of Zebulun, Sered, and Elon, and Jahleel. Whose names are the same in Num 26:26.

Gill: Gen 46:15 - These are the sons of Leah, which she bare unto Jacob in Padanaram // with his daughter Dinah // all the souls of his sons and daughters were thirty and three These are the sons of Leah, which she bare unto Jacob in Padanaram,.... Which must be restrained to the six sons only, who were properly Leah's, and n...

These are the sons of Leah, which she bare unto Jacob in Padanaram,.... Which must be restrained to the six sons only, who were properly Leah's, and not to their sons' sons, for they were not born in Padanaram, but in Canaan:

with his daughter Dinah; who also was by Leah:

all the souls of his sons and daughters were thirty and three; that is, together with himself, or otherwise it will be difficult to give the exact number; if all before mentioned are to be reckoned there will be thirty four, wherefore some are for excluding Dinah; but she is not only expressly mentioned, but is the only one intended by his daughters here, the plural being put for the singular; and there is as much reason for retaining her here, as Sarah the daughter of Asher hereafter: some think Er and Onan are to be excluded, as indeed they are, because they died in the land of Canaan, and then there will be but thirty two; wherefore some are for adding Jochebed the daughter of Levi, but she is neither mentioned in the genealogy, nor did she go with Jacob into Egypt, but was born in Egypt long after: it seems best therefore to take Jacob himself into the account, as several Jewish writers do w, and who is expressly named and set at the head of this account, Gen 46:8, which will make thirty three.

Gill: Gen 46:16 - And the sons of Gad // Ziphion, and Haggi, Shuni, and Ezbon, and Eri, and Arodi, and Areli And the sons of Gad,.... A son of Jacob by Zilpah, Leah's maid; for the historian, before he proceeds to give an account of his sons by Rachel, finish...

And the sons of Gad,.... A son of Jacob by Zilpah, Leah's maid; for the historian, before he proceeds to give an account of his sons by Rachel, finishes the account of all his sons by Leah and her maid:

Ziphion, and Haggi, Shuni, and Ezbon, and Eri, and Arodi, and Areli; in all seven; the same number is given, and in the same order, Num 26:15.

Gill: Gen 46:17 - And the sons of Asher // Jimnah, and Ishuah, and Isui, and Beriah, and Serah their sister // and the sons of Beriah, Heber and Malchiel And the sons of Asher,.... Another son of Jacob by Leah's maid Zilpah, whose sons were: Jimnah, and Ishuah, and Isui, and Beriah, and Serah their s...

And the sons of Asher,.... Another son of Jacob by Leah's maid Zilpah, whose sons were:

Jimnah, and Ishuah, and Isui, and Beriah, and Serah their sister; who is called Sarah, Num 26:46, and by the Septuagint here. She seems to have been a person of some note, being so particularly remarked in both places:

and the sons of Beriah, Heber and Malchiel; this Beriah seems to be the youngest son of Asher, and yet had two sons; who, as the Targum of Jonathan adds, went down into Egypt; he must marry, and have sons when very young; the thing is not impossible: See Gill on Gen 46:12;

Gill: Gen 46:18 - These are the sons of Zilpah, whom Laban gave to Leah his daughter // and these she bare unto Jacob, even sixteen souls These are the sons of Zilpah, whom Laban gave to Leah his daughter,.... To be her maid, when she was married to Jacob, by whom he had Gad and Asher: ...

These are the sons of Zilpah, whom Laban gave to Leah his daughter,.... To be her maid, when she was married to Jacob, by whom he had Gad and Asher:

and these she bare unto Jacob, even sixteen souls; not that Zilpah bare sixteen children to Jacob, for she bore but two; but the children and grandchildren of these two with them made sixteen.

Gill: Gen 46:19 - The sons Rachel, Jacob's wife // Joseph and Benjamin The sons Rachel, Jacob's wife,.... The wife of his affection and choice, his principal wife, yea, his only lawful wife; Zilpah and Bilhah were his con...

The sons Rachel, Jacob's wife,.... The wife of his affection and choice, his principal wife, yea, his only lawful wife; Zilpah and Bilhah were his concubines, and as for Leah, she was imposed and forced upon him:

Joseph and Benjamin; the first was in Egypt already, the other now went down with Jacob.

Gill: Gen 46:20 - And unto Joseph in the land of Egypt were born Manasseh and Ephraim // which Asenath the daughter of Potipherah, priest of On, bare unto him And unto Joseph in the land of Egypt were born Manasseh and Ephraim,.... And therefore not to be reckoned with those that went down with Jacob thither...

And unto Joseph in the land of Egypt were born Manasseh and Ephraim,.... And therefore not to be reckoned with those that went down with Jacob thither; for which reason the clause, "in the land of Egypt", is inserted, see Gen 41:50,

which Asenath the daughter of Potipherah, priest of On, bare unto him; here again the Targum of Jonathan makes Asenath to be the daughter of Dinah, who it says was educated in the house of Potipherah prince of Tanis; See Gill on Gen 41:50.

Gill: Gen 46:21 - And the sons of Benjamin // were Belah, and Becher, and Ashbel, Gera, and Naaman, Ehi, and Rosh // Muppim, and Huppim, and Ard And the sons of Benjamin,.... The second son of Jacob by his wife Rachel; whose sons were Belah, and Becher, and Ashbel, Gera, and Naaman, Ehi, an...

And the sons of Benjamin,.... The second son of Jacob by his wife Rachel; whose sons

were Belah, and Becher, and Ashbel, Gera, and Naaman, Ehi, and Rosh,

Muppim, and Huppim, and Ard; in all one hundred and ten. It is a difficulty to account for it, that Benjamin, Jacob's youngest son, often called a lad at this time, and generally supposed to be about twenty three or four years of age, should have so many sons: some think he had more wives than one, which is not likely, since we never read of any of Jacob's sons that had more than one at a time; and others, that his sons were born twins, and so had them in a little time, which is a much better solution of the difficulty: but others are of opinion, that though the greater part of them might be born in Canaan, yet others might be born in Egypt; and being denominated from the greater part, and that being put for the whole, may be reckoned among the descendants into Egypt; and even those that were in Egypt, being born while Jacob was alive, might be said to descend there in his loins; which may be the best of the ways proposed for removing this difficulty: though I should rather think they were all born before the descent into Egypt, the whole narrative seems to require this of them all; for otherwise many more might be, said to descend in the loins of Jacob, or in the loins of his sons, which would greatly increase the number of those said to go down with him, after mentioned: to which it may be added, that Benjamin was at least thirty two years of age, and so may very well be thought to have had these children before he went to Egypt.

Gill: Gen 46:22 - These are the sons of Rachel, which were born to Jacob // all the souls were fourteen These are the sons of Rachel, which were born to Jacob,.... That is, sons and grandsons: all the souls were fourteen; two sons, Joseph and Benjami...

These are the sons of Rachel, which were born to Jacob,.... That is, sons and grandsons:

all the souls were fourteen; two sons, Joseph and Benjamin; twelve grandsons, two of Joseph's, and ten of Benjamin's.

Gill: Gen 46:23 - And the sons of Dan, Hushim. And the sons of Dan, Hushim. He had but one son, wherefore the plural is put for the singular, see Gen 46:7; Aben Ezra thinks he had two sons, and tha...

And the sons of Dan, Hushim. He had but one son, wherefore the plural is put for the singular, see Gen 46:7; Aben Ezra thinks he had two sons, and that one of them was dead, and therefore not mentioned; but the other way best accounts for the expression; though, as Schmidt observes, the plural may be indefinitely put, and the sense be this, as for the sons of Dan, there was only one, whose name was Hushim. Dan was a son of Jacob by Bilhah, Rachel's maid, as the following was another.

Gill: Gen 46:24 - And the sons of Naphtali, Jahzeel, and Guni, and Jezer, and Shillem. And the sons of Naphtali, Jahzeel, and Guni, and Jezer, and Shillem. The last is called Shallum in 1Ch 7:13.

And the sons of Naphtali, Jahzeel, and Guni, and Jezer, and Shillem. The last is called Shallum in 1Ch 7:13.

Gill: Gen 46:25 - These are the sons of Bilhah, which Laban gave unto Rachel his daughter // and she bare these unto Jacob, all the souls were seven These are the sons of Bilhah, which Laban gave unto Rachel his daughter,.... To be her maid, when she was married to Jacob: and she bare these unt...

These are the sons of Bilhah, which Laban gave unto Rachel his daughter,.... To be her maid, when she was married to Jacob:

and she bare these unto Jacob, all the souls were seven; not that she bare seven sons to Jacob, she bore but two, Dan and Naphtali; but the children of these with them made seven, one of Dan's, and four of Naphtali's, who went down with Jacob into Egypt.

Gill: Gen 46:26 - All the souls that came with Jacob into Egypt // which came out of his loins // besides Jacob's sons' wives // all the souls were threescore and six All the souls that came with Jacob into Egypt,.... These are in parcels before mentioned, but here they are brought to a sum total; and by this phrase...

All the souls that came with Jacob into Egypt,.... These are in parcels before mentioned, but here they are brought to a sum total; and by this phrase are excluded those that died before, as Er and Onan, and those that were in Egypt before, as Joseph and his two sons; and I should think also all that were born in Egypt afterwards, even while Jacob was living: those reckoned are only such:

which came out of his loins: such as were his seed and offspring. This is observed for the sake of what follows, and to exclude them:

besides Jacob's sons' wives; these do not come into the account, because they did not spring from him:

all the souls were threescore and six; thirty two of Leah's, leaving out Er and Onan, sixteen of Zilpah's, fourteen of Rachel's, and seven of Bilhah's, make sixty nine; take out of them Joseph and his two sons, who were in Egypt before, and you have the exact number of sixty six.

Gill: Gen 46:27 - And the sons of Joseph, which were born in Egypt, were two souls // all the souls of the house of Jacob, which came into Egypt, were threescore and ten And the sons of Joseph, which were born in Egypt, were two souls,.... Ephraim and Manasseh; which is observed to show that they do not come into the ...

And the sons of Joseph, which were born in Egypt, were two souls,.... Ephraim and Manasseh; which is observed to show that they do not come into the above reckoning, but are to be taken into another that follows:

all the souls of the house of Jacob, which came into Egypt, were threescore and ten; here it may be observed, the phrase is varied; it is not said, "all the souls which came out of the loins of Jacob", but "all the souls of the house" or family of Jacob; all that that consisted of, and takes in Jacob himself, the head of his house or family; nor is it said, "which came with Jacob into Egypt", as before, but "which came into Egypt"; not which came with him thither, but yet were there by some means or another, as Joseph and his two sons; Joseph by being brought down, and sold there, and his two sons by being born there; if therefore Jacob, Joseph, and his two sons, are added to the above number of sixty six, it will make seventy; as for the account of Stephen, making the number seventy five; see Gill on Act 7:14.

Gill: Gen 46:28 - And he sent Judah before him unto Joseph // to direct his face unto Goshen // and they came into the land of Goshen And he sent Judah before him unto Joseph,.... Who was the more honourable of his sons, and in greater esteem with Jacob than his elder brethren were, ...

And he sent Judah before him unto Joseph,.... Who was the more honourable of his sons, and in greater esteem with Jacob than his elder brethren were, Reuben, Simeon, and Levi, who by their conduct had greatly displeased him: moreover, he was a man of a polite address, and had endeared himself to Joseph by his speech to him, in which he discovered so much affection both to his father, and his brother Benjamin, and was upon all accounts the fittest person to be sent to Joseph:

to direct his face unto Goshen; to inform Joseph of his father's coming, that a place might be prepared for him to dwell in, as both the Targums of Jonathan and Jerusalem paraphrase it; and particularly to direct what place in Goshen he would have him come to, and meet him at:

and they came into the land of Goshen; which was the first part of the land of Egypt that lay nearest to Canaan: the Greek version of the whole verse is,"he sent Judah before him to Joseph, to meet him at Heroopolis, or the city of the heroes, in the land of Rameses,''which is confirmed by Josephus x; See Gill on Gen 45:10.

Gill: Gen 46:29 - And Joseph made ready his chariot // and went up to meet Israel his father in Goshen // and presented himself unto him // and he fell on his neck, and wept on his neck a good while And Joseph made ready his chariot,.... Or "bound" y it, fastened the horses to it, harnessed them, and put them to; this he did not himself, as Jarchi...

And Joseph made ready his chariot,.... Or "bound" y it, fastened the horses to it, harnessed them, and put them to; this he did not himself, as Jarchi thinks, for the honour of his father; but rather, as Aben Ezra, by ordering his servants to do it:

and went up to meet Israel his father in Goshen; that being higher than the other part of Egypt, as it must be, if it was in Thebes, or upper Egypt, as some Jewish writers say z; and Fium, supposed to be the place the Israelites dwelt in, see Gen 47:11, stood very high a:

and presented himself unto him; alighted from his chariot, and came up to his father, and stood before him, and showed himself to him, declaring who he was:

and he fell on his neck, and wept on his neck a good while: either Jacob fell on the neck of Joseph, and wept over him a good while before he could speak to him, as the father of the prodigal son fell on his neck and kissed him, Luk 15:20; or, as Jarchi, Joseph fell on his father's neck, as he had done upon his brethren before, but wept over him longer; their embraces were no doubt mutual and extremely affectionate, that for a while they were not able to speak a word to each other.

Gill: Gen 46:30 - And Israel said unto Joseph // now let me die, since I have seen thy face // because thou art yet alive And Israel said unto Joseph,.... He broke silence first: now let me die, since I have seen thy face; not that he was impatient to die, and not desi...

And Israel said unto Joseph,.... He broke silence first:

now let me die, since I have seen thy face; not that he was impatient to die, and not desirous to live any longer; for it could not but yield pleasure to him, and make the remainder of his life more comfortable to live with such a son, his darling, and now in so much honour and grandeur; but this he said to express his great satisfaction at the sight of him, that he could now be content to die, having all his heart could wish for, an interview with his beloved son:

because thou art yet alive; whom he had looked upon as dead, and the receiving him now was as life from the dead, and could not but fill him with the greatest joy, see Luk 15:23; Jacob lived after this seventeen years, Gen 47:28.

Gill: Gen 46:31 - And Joseph said unto his brethren, and to his father's house // I will go up and shew Pharaoh // and say unto him, my brethren, and my father's house, which were in the land of Canaan, are come unto me And Joseph said unto his brethren, and to his father's house,.... To them and their families, after he had paid his filial respects to his father, in ...

And Joseph said unto his brethren, and to his father's house,.... To them and their families, after he had paid his filial respects to his father, in honour, reverence, and affection:

I will go up and shew Pharaoh; acquaint him that his father and all his family were come to Egypt; he says, "I will go up"; which same phrase is used of him, Gen 46:29; when he came, and carries some difficulty in it how to account for it, that he should be said to go up when he came, and to go up when he returned. Some have thought of upper Egypt, others of the upper part of the Nile, and others, that Pharaoh's palace was situated on an eminence; but then, as it is to be supposed he went the same road he came, it would have been said, that when he came, he came down; what Ben Melech suggests seems most agreeable, I will go up to my chariot, mount that, and return to Pharaoh, and give him an account of his father's arrival, which it was very proper, prudent, and politic to do:

and say unto him, my brethren, and my father's house, which were in the land of Canaan, are come unto me; not merely to pay him a visit, but to continue there.

Gill: Gen 46:32 - And the men are shepherds // for their trade hath been to feed cattle // and they have brought their flocks and their herds, and all that they have And the men are shepherds,.... That was their occupation and employment, by which they got their livelihood. Joseph was not ashamed of the business h...

And the men are shepherds,.... That was their occupation and employment, by which they got their livelihood. Joseph was not ashamed of the business his father and brethren followed, even though mean; and besides, such men were an abomination to the Egyptians: this he thought proper to tell Pharaoh, lest he should think of putting them into some offices of the court or army, which would expose them to the envy of the Egyptians, and might endanger the corruption of their religion and manners, as well as be the means of separating them one from another, which he was careful to guard against, as Josephus b the historian suggests:

for their trade hath been to feed cattle; this was what they were brought up to from their youth, and were always employed in, and for which only they were fit:

and they have brought their flocks and their herds, and all that they have; in order to carry on the same business, and lead the same course of life.

Gill: Gen 46:33 - And it shall come to pass, when Pharaoh shall call you // and shall say, what is your occupation And it shall come to pass, when Pharaoh shall call you,.... Order them to come before him, to see them, and have some conversation with them: and s...

And it shall come to pass, when Pharaoh shall call you,.... Order them to come before him, to see them, and have some conversation with them:

and shall say, what is your occupation? or your works c, their business and employment, whether they exercised any manufacture or handicraft, and what it was.

Gill: Gen 46:34 - That ye shall say, thy servants' trade hath been about cattle // from our youth, even until now // both we, and also our fathers // that ye may dwell in the land of Goshen // for every shepherd is an abomination unto the Egyptians That ye shall say, thy servants' trade hath been about cattle,.... Breeding, feeding, and selling them: from our youth, even until now: this had be...

That ye shall say, thy servants' trade hath been about cattle,.... Breeding, feeding, and selling them:

from our youth, even until now: this had been their constant employment, they never followed any other:

both we, and also our fathers; their father, grandfather, and great grandfather, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, were all of the same occupation:

that ye may dwell in the land of Goshen; Joseph instructed his brethren to be very particular in the account of their occupation to Pharaoh, that it might be a direction to him how to dispose of them, and where to settle them, namely, in the land of Goshen; which was a country that abounded with good pasture, and so the fittest place for them to be fixed in: and besides this, Joseph had some other reasons for placing them there, as that they might be near to him, who might dwell at On or Heliopolis, to which place, or province, Goshen belonged; and that being also the nearest part of the land to Canaan, they might the more easily and sooner get away when there was an occasion for it; as well as he was desirous they should not be brought into the heart of the land, lest they should be corrupted with the superstition, and idolatry, and vices of the people; and being afar off, both from the court, and the body of the people, might be less subject to their contempt and insults, since it follows:

for every shepherd is an abomination unto the Egyptians; not because shepherds ate of the milk and flesh of the creatures they fed, which the Egyptians abstained from; for the Egyptians in those times did eat the flesh of slain beasts, see Gen 43:16; nor because they fed, and slew, and ate those creatures, which the Egyptians worshipped as gods, as Jarchi; for it does not appear that the Egyptians were so early worshippers of such creatures; nor is this phrase, "every shepherd", to be understood of any other than foreign shepherds; for one of the three sorts of the people of Egypt, as distinct from, and under the king, priests, and soldiers, according to Diodorus Siculus d, were shepherds, and were not despised on that account; for, as the same writer says, all the Egyptians were reckoned equally noble and honourable e; and such it is plain there were in Egypt, in the times of Joseph, see Gen 47:6; and goat herds were had in esteem and honour by those about Mendes, though swine herds were not f: wherefore this must be understood of foreign shepherds, the Egyptians having been greatly distressed by such, who either came out of Ethiopia, and lived by plunder and robbery g, or out of Phoenicia or Arabia; for, according to Manetho h, it was said that they were Arabians or Phoenicians who entered into Egypt, burnt their cities, &c. and set up kings of their own, called their Hycsi, or pastor kings: and therefore Joseph might the rather fear his brethren and father's family would be the more contemptible in that they came from Canaan, which was near to Arabia and Phoenicia; but Dr. Lightfoot i is of opinion, that the Egyptians, being plagued for Abraham's and Sarah's sake, made a law, that for the future none should converse with Hebrews, nor with foreign shepherds, so familiarly as to eat or drink with them.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Gen 46:1 Beer Sheba. See Gen 21:31; 28:10.

NET Notes: Gen 46:2 Heb “in visions of the night.” The plural form has the singular meaning, probably as a plural of intensity.

NET Notes: Gen 46:3 Heb “the God.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:4 Heb “and Joseph will put his hand upon your eyes.” This is a promise of peaceful death in Egypt with Joseph present to close his eyes.

NET Notes: Gen 46:5 Heb “arose.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:6 Heb “and they took their livestock and their possessions which they had acquired in the land of Canaan and they went to Egypt, Jacob and all his...

NET Notes: Gen 46:7 The Hebrew text adds “with him” here. This is omitted in the translation because it is redundant in English style (note the same phrase ea...

NET Notes: Gen 46:13 The MT reads “Iob,” but the Samaritan Pentateuch and some LXX mss read “Jashub” (see Num 26:24; 1 Chr 7:1).

NET Notes: Gen 46:15 Heb “all the lives of his sons and his daughters, thirty-three.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:16 The MT reads “Ziphion,” but see Num 26:15, the Samaritan Pentateuch and the LXX, all of which read “Zephon.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:20 On is another name for the city of Heliopolis.

NET Notes: Gen 46:21 The sons of Benjamin. It is questionable whether youthful Benjamin had ten sons by the time he went into Egypt, but it is not impossible. If Benjamin ...

NET Notes: Gen 46:23 This name appears as “Shuham” in Num 26:42. The LXX reads “Hashum” here.

NET Notes: Gen 46:26 The number sixty-six includes the seventy-one descendants (including Dinah) listed in vv. 8-25 minus Er and Onan (deceased), and Joseph, Manasseh, and...

NET Notes: Gen 46:27 The number seventy includes Jacob himself and the seventy-one descendants (including Dinah, Joseph, Manasseh, and Ephraim) listed in vv. 8-25, minus E...

NET Notes: Gen 46:28 Heb “to direct before him to Goshen.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:29 Heb “and he appeared to him.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:30 Heb “after my seeing your face that you are still alive.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:31 Heb “tell Pharaoh and say to him.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:32 Heb “for men of livestock they are.”

NET Notes: Gen 46:34 Heb “is an abomination.” The Hebrew word תּוֹעֵבָה (to’evah, “abominatio...

Geneva Bible: Gen 46:1 And Israel took his journey with all that he had, and came to Beersheba, and ( a ) offered sacrifices unto the God of his father Isaac. ( a ) By this...

Geneva Bible: Gen 46:4 I will ( b ) go down with thee into Egypt; and I will also surely ( c ) bring thee up [again]: and Joseph shall ( d ) put his hand upon thine eyes. (...

Geneva Bible: Gen 46:32 And the men [are] ( e ) shepherds, for their trade hath been to feed cattle; and they have brought their flocks, and their herds, and all that they ha...

Geneva Bible: Gen 46:34 That ye shall say, Thy servants' trade hath been about cattle from our youth even until now, both we, [and] also our fathers: that ye may dwell in the...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Gen 46:1-4 - --Even as to those events and undertakings which appear most joyful, we should seek counsel, assistance, and a blessing from the Lord. Attending on his ...

MHCC: Gen 46:5-27 - --We have here a particular account of Jacob's family. Though the fulfilling of promises is always sure, yet it is often slow. It was now 215 years sinc...

MHCC: Gen 46:28-34 - --It was justice to Pharaoh to let him know that such a family was come to settle in his dominions. If others put confidence in us, we must not be so ba...

Matthew Henry: Gen 46:1-4 - -- The divine precept is, In all thy ways acknowledge God; and the promise annexed to it is, He shall direct thy paths. Jacob has here a very great...

Matthew Henry: Gen 46:5-27 - -- Old Jacob is here flitting. Little did he think of ever leaving Canaan; he expected, no doubt, to die in his nest, and to leave his seed in actual...

Matthew Henry: Gen 46:28-34 - -- We have here, I. The joyful meeting between Jacob and his son Joseph, in which observe, 1. Jacob's prudence in sending Judah before him to Joseph, t...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 46:1-7 - -- " So Israel took his journey (from Hebron, Gen 37:14) with all who belonged to him, and came to Beersheba ."There, on the border of Canaan, where A...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 46:8-27 - -- The size of Jacob's family, which was to grow into a great nation, is given here, with evident allusion to the fulfilment of the divine promise with...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 46:28-34 - -- This list of the house of Jacob is followed by an account of the arrival in Egypt. Gen 46:28 Jacob sent his son Judah before him to Joseph, "to sh...

Constable: Gen 11:27--Exo 1:1 - --II. PATRIARCHAL NARRATIVES 11:27--50:26 One of the significant changes in the emphasis that occurs at this point...

Constable: Gen 37:2--Exo 1:1 - --E. What Became of Jacob 37:2-50:26 Here begins the tenth and last toledot in Genesis. Jacob remains a ma...

Constable: Gen 45:16--46:31 - --11. Israel's move to Egypt 45:16-46:30 Joseph's brothers returned to Jacob with news of Joseph's...

Constable: Gen 46:1-7 - --God's encouragement to move 46:1-7 The structure of chapters 46 and 47 is also chiastic....

Constable: Gen 46:8-27 - --Israel's household's move to Egypt 46:8-27 This section contains a list of the individua...

Constable: Gen 46:28-30 - --Israel's reunion with Joseph 46:28-30 This reunion recalls Jacob's former meeting with E...

Constable: Gen 46:31--47:28 - --12. Joseph's wise leadership 46:31-47:27 As a result of Joseph's presenting his family members t...

Constable: Gen 46:31--47:13 - --God's provision of land and food for Israel 46:31-47:12 The major purpose of this section is probably to show how God sustained and blessed Jacob's fa...

Guzik: Gen 46:1-34 - The Family of Jacob Comes to Egypt Genesis 46 - The Family of Jacob Comes to Egypt A. The family comes to Egypt. 1. (1-4) God speaks to Jacob on the way to Egypt. So Israel took his...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Bible Query: Gen 46:3-4 Q: In Gen 46:3-4, is God speaking to Joseph as an individual, or his descendants? A: Both. God is merging the two when he tells Jacob that "you" wil...

Bible Query: Gen 46:4 Q: In Gen 46:4, why did Jacob die in Egypt, since God promised he would take him out of there? A: People thought in terms of their descendants as we...

Bible Query: Gen 46:8-27 Q: In Gen 46:8-27, are there 12, 13, or 14 tribes? A: There were 12 sons of Israel (10 + Levi + Joseph) There were 12 fighting divisions and tribes w...

Bible Query: Gen 46:33 Q: In Gen 46:33, is there any extra-Biblical evidence that shepherds were detestable to the Egyptians? A: We do not have any direct proof, but we do...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) GENESIS, the book of the origin or production of all things, consists of two parts: the first, comprehended in the first through eleventh chapters, gi...

JFB: Genesis (Garis Besar) THE CREATION OF HEAVEN AND EARTH. (Gen 1:1-2) THE FIRST DAY. (Gen 1:3-5) SECOND DAY. (Gen 1:6-8) THIRD DAY. (Gen 1:9-13) FOURTH DAY. (Gen 1:14-19) FI...

TSK: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Book of Genesis is the most ancient record in the world; including the History of two grand and stupendous subjects, Creation and Providence; of e...

TSK: Genesis 46 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Gen 46:1, Jacob is comforted by God at Beer-sheba; Gen 46:5, Thence he with his company goes into Egypt; Gen 46:8, The number of his fami...

Poole: Genesis 46 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 46 Jacob sets out towards Egypt with his family and substance; offers saerifices at Beer-sheba; God appears to him in a vision, renewing hi...

MHCC: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) Genesis is a name taken from the Greek, and signifies " the book of generation or production;" it is properly so called, as containing an account of ...

MHCC: Genesis 46 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Gen 46:1-4) God's promises to Jacob. (v. 5-27) Jacob and his family go to Egypt. (Gen 46:28-34) Joseph meets his father and his brethren.

Matthew Henry: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The First Book of Moses, Called Genesis We have now before us the holy Bible, or book, for so bible ...

Matthew Henry: Genesis 46 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Jacob is here removing to Egypt in his old age, forced thither by a famine, and invited thither by a son. Here, I. God sends him thither (Gen 46:1...

Constable: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title Each book of the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Old Testam...

Constable: Genesis (Garis Besar) Outline The structure of Genesis is very clear. The phrase "the generations of" (toledot in Hebrew, from yalad m...

Constable: Genesis Bibliography Aalders, Gerhard Charles. Genesis. The Bible Student's Commentary series. 2 vols. Translated by William Hey...

Haydock: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF GENESIS. INTRODUCTION. The Hebrews now entitle all the Five Books of Moses, from the initial words, which originally were written li...

Gill: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO GENESIS This book, in the Hebrew copies of the Bible, and by the Jewish writers, is generally called Bereshith, which signifies "in...

Gill: Genesis 46 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO GENESIS 46 In this chapter we are told, that Jacob with all his family and substance took a journey to Egypt to see his son Joseph,...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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