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Teks -- Genesis 7:1-24 (NET)

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7:1 The Lord said to Noah, “Come into the ark, you and all your household, for I consider you godly among this generation. 7:2 You must take with you seven of every kind of clean animal, the male and its mate, two of every kind of unclean animal, the male and its mate, 7:3 and also seven of every kind of bird in the sky, male and female, to preserve their offspring on the face of the earth. 7:4 For in seven days I will cause it to rain on the earth for forty days and forty nights, and I will wipe from the face of the ground every living thing that I have made.” 7:5 And Noah did all that the Lord commanded him. 7:6 Noah was 600 years old when the floodwaters engulfed the earth. 7:7 Noah entered the ark along with his sons, his wife, and his sons’ wives because of the floodwaters. 7:8 Pairs of clean animals, of unclean animals, of birds, and of everything that creeps along the ground, 7:9 male and female, came into the ark to Noah, just as God had commanded him. 7:10 And after seven days the floodwaters engulfed the earth. 7:11 In the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in the second month, on the seventeenth day of the month– on that day all the fountains of the great deep burst open and the floodgates of the heavens were opened. 7:12 And the rain fell on the earth forty days and forty nights. 7:13 On that very day Noah entered the ark, accompanied by his sons Shem, Ham, and Japheth, along with his wife and his sons’ three wives. 7:14 They entered, along with every living creature after its kind, every animal after its kind, every creeping thing that creeps on the earth after its kind, and every bird after its kind, everything with wings. 7:15 Pairs of all creatures that have the breath of life came into the ark to Noah. 7:16 Those that entered were male and female, just as God commanded him. Then the Lord shut him in. 7:17 The flood engulfed the earth for forty days. As the waters increased, they lifted the ark and raised it above the earth. 7:18 The waters completely overwhelmed the earth, and the ark floated on the surface of the waters. 7:19 The waters completely inundated the earth so that even all the high mountains under the entire sky were covered. 7:20 The waters rose more than twenty feet above the mountains. 7:21 And all living things that moved on the earth died, including the birds, domestic animals, wild animals, all the creatures that swarm over the earth, and all humankind. 7:22 Everything on dry land that had the breath of life in its nostrils died. 7:23 So the Lord destroyed every living thing that was on the surface of the ground, including people, animals, creatures that creep along the ground, and birds of the sky. They were wiped off the earth. Only Noah and those who were with him in the ark survived. 7:24 The waters prevailed over the earth for 150 days.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Ham a man and nation; son of Noah,a country occupied by the descendants of Ham
 · Japheth son of Noah
 · Noah a son of Lamech and the father of Shem, Ham, and Japheth,son of Lamech; builder of the ark,daughter of Zelophehad
 · Shem the father of Arphaxad; a son of Noah; an ancestor of Jesus,son of Noah


Topik/Tema Kamus: Flood | Noah | Religion | Judgments | God | Judgments of God | Miracles | Deluge | Ark | Rain | Animals | Antediluvians | GENESIS, 1-2 | Seven | CLEAN | Heaven | NUMBER | MALE | Month | DAY AND NIGHT | selebihnya
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MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable , Guzik

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Wesley: Gen 7:1 - -- Here is a gracious invitation of Noah and his family into a place of safety, now the flood of waters was coming.

Here is a gracious invitation of Noah and his family into a place of safety, now the flood of waters was coming.

Wesley: Gen 7:1 - For thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation Those are righteous indeed that are righteous before God; that have not only the form of godliness by which they appear righteous before men, who may ...

Those are righteous indeed that are righteous before God; that have not only the form of godliness by which they appear righteous before men, who may easily be imposed upon; but the power of it, by which they approve themselves to God, who searcheth the heart.

Wesley: Gen 7:2 - -- Here are necessary orders given concerning the brute creatures that they were to be preserved alive with Noah in the ark. He must carefully preserve e...

Here are necessary orders given concerning the brute creatures that they were to be preserved alive with Noah in the ark. He must carefully preserve every species, that no tribe, no, not the least considerable, might entirely perish out of the creation. Observe in this: God's care for man. Doth God take care for oxen? 1Co 9:9, or was it not rather for man's sake that this care was taken? Even the unclean beasts were preserved alive in the ark, that were least valuable. For God's tender mercies are over all his works, and not only over those that are of most use. Yet more of the clean were preserved than of the unclean.

Because the clean were most for the service of man; and therefore in favour to him, more of them were preserved and are still propagated. Thanks be to God there are not herds of lions as there are of oxen, nor flocks of tigers as there are of sheep. Because the clean were for sacrifice to God; and therefore, in honour to him, more of them were preserved, three couple for breed, and the odd seventh for sacrifice, Gen 8:20.

Wesley: Gen 7:4 - Yet seven days and I will cause it to rain It shall be seven days yet before I do it, After the 120 years were expired, God grants them a reprieve of seven days longer, both to shew how slow he...

It shall be seven days yet before I do it, After the 120 years were expired, God grants them a reprieve of seven days longer, both to shew how slow he is to anger, and to give them some farther space for repentance. But all in vain; these seven days were trifled away after all the rest, they continued secure until the day that the flood came. While Noah told them of the judgment at a distance, they were tempted to put off their repentance: but now he is ordered to tell them that it is at the door; that they have but one week more to turn them in, to see if that will now at last awaken them to consider the things that belong to their peace. But it is common for those that have been careless for their souls during the years of their health, when they have looked upon death at a distance, to be as careless during the days, the seven days of their sickness, when they see it approaching, their hearts being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Wesley: Gen 7:7 - And Noah went in with his sons, and his wife, and his sons wives And the brute creatures readily went in with him. The same hand that at first brought them to Adam to be named, now brought them to Noah to be preserv...

And the brute creatures readily went in with him. The same hand that at first brought them to Adam to be named, now brought them to Noah to be preserved.

Wesley: Gen 7:11 - -- The six hundredth year of Noah's life, was 1656 years from the creation. In the second month, the seventeenth day of the month - Which is reckoned to ...

The six hundredth year of Noah's life, was 1656 years from the creation. In the second month, the seventeenth day of the month - Which is reckoned to be about the beginning of November; so that Noah had had a harvest just before, from which to victual his ark.

Wesley: Gen 7:11 - The same day the fountains of the great deep were broken up There needed no new creation of waters; God has laid up the deep in store - houses, Psa 33:7, and now he broke up those stores. God had, in the creati...

There needed no new creation of waters; God has laid up the deep in store - houses, Psa 33:7, and now he broke up those stores. God had, in the creation, set bars and doors to the waters of the sea, that they might not return to cover the earth, Psa 104:9; Job 38:9-11, and now he only removed these ancient mounds and fences, and the waters of the sea returned to cover the earth, as they had done at first, Gen 1:9.

Wesley: Gen 7:11 - And the windows of heaven were opened And the waters which were above the firmament were poured out upon the world; those treasures which God has reserved against the time of trouble, the ...

And the waters which were above the firmament were poured out upon the world; those treasures which God has reserved against the time of trouble, the day of battle and war, Job 38:22-23. The rain, which ordinarily descends in drops, then came down in streams. We read, Job 26:8. That God binds up the waters in his thick clouds, and the cloud is not rent under them; but now the bond was loosed, the cloud was rent, and such rains descended as were never known before or since.

Wesley: Gen 7:12 - It rained without intermission or abatement, forty days and forty nights And that upon the whole earth at once.

And that upon the whole earth at once.

Wesley: Gen 7:14 - And every beast after his kind According to the phrase used in the history of the creation, Gen 1:21, Gen 1:24-25, to intimate, that just as many species as were created at first we...

According to the phrase used in the history of the creation, Gen 1:21, Gen 1:24-25, to intimate, that just as many species as were created at first were saved now, and no more.

Wesley: Gen 7:20 - The mountains were covered Therefore there were mountains before the flood.

Therefore there were mountains before the flood.

Wesley: Gen 7:21 - All flesh died, all in whose nostrils was the breath of life, of all that was on the dry land, every living substance And why so? Man only had done wickedly, and justly is God's hand against him, but these sheep what have they done? I answer, 1. We are sure God did th...

And why so? Man only had done wickedly, and justly is God's hand against him, but these sheep what have they done? I answer, 1. We are sure God did them no wrong. He is the sovereign Lord of all life, for he is the sole fountain and author of it. He that made them as he pleased, might unmake them when he pleased, and who shall say unto him, What dost thou? 2. God did admirably serve the purposes of his own glory by their destruction, as well as by their creation. Herein his holiness and justice were greatly magnified: by this it appears that he hates sin, and is highly displeased with sinners, when even the inferior creatures, because they are the servants of man, and part of his possession, and because they have been abused to be the servants of sin, are destroyed with him. It was likewise an instance of God's wisdom. As the creatures were made for man when he was made, so they were multiplied for him when he was multiplied; and therefore, now mankind was reduced to so small a number, it was fit that the beasts should proportionable be reduced, otherwise they would have had the dominion, and would have replenished the earth, and the remnant of mankind that was left would have been overpowered by them.

JFB: Gen 7:1 - And the Lord said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark The ark was finished; and Noah now, in the spirit of implicit faith, which had influenced his whole conduct, waited for directions from God.

The ark was finished; and Noah now, in the spirit of implicit faith, which had influenced his whole conduct, waited for directions from God.

JFB: Gen 7:2-3 - Of every clean beast . . . fowls Pairs of every species of animals, except the tenants of the deep, were to be taken for the preservation of their respective kinds. This was the gener...

Pairs of every species of animals, except the tenants of the deep, were to be taken for the preservation of their respective kinds. This was the general rule of admission, only with regard to those animals which are styled "clean," three pairs were to be taken, whether of beasts or birds; and the reason was that their rapid multiplication was a matter of the highest importance, when the earth should be renovated, for their utility either as articles of food or as employed in the service of man. But what was the use of the seventh? It was manifestly reserved for sacrifice; and so that both during Noah's residence in the ark, and after his return to dry land, provision was made for celebrating the rites of worship according to the religion of fallen man. He did not, like many, leave religion behind. He provided for it during his protracted voyage.

JFB: Gen 7:4 - For yet seven days A week for a world to repent! What a solemn pause! Did they laugh and ridicule his folly still? He whose eyes saw and whose heart felt the full amount...

A week for a world to repent! What a solemn pause! Did they laugh and ridicule his folly still? He whose eyes saw and whose heart felt the full amount of human iniquity and perverseness has told us of their reckless disregard (Luk 17:27).

JFB: Gen 7:9 - There went in two and two Doubtless they were led by a divine impulse. The number would not be so large as at first sight one is apt to imagine. It has been calculated that the...

Doubtless they were led by a divine impulse. The number would not be so large as at first sight one is apt to imagine. It has been calculated that there are not more than three hundred distinct species of beasts and birds, the immense varieties in regard to form, size, and color being traceable to the influence of climate and other circumstances.

JFB: Gen 7:16 - and the Lord shut him in Literally, "covered him round about." The "shutting him in" intimated that Noah had become the special object of divine care and protection, and that ...

Literally, "covered him round about." The "shutting him in" intimated that Noah had become the special object of divine care and protection, and that to those without the season of grace was over (Mat 25:10).

JFB: Gen 7:17 - the waters increased, and bare up the ark It seems to have been raised so gradually as to be scarcely perceptible to its occupants.

It seems to have been raised so gradually as to be scarcely perceptible to its occupants.

JFB: Gen 7:20 - Fifteen cubits upward . . . and the mountains were covered Twenty-two and a half feet above the summits of the highest hills. The language is not consistent with the theory of a partial deluge.

Twenty-two and a half feet above the summits of the highest hills. The language is not consistent with the theory of a partial deluge.

JFB: Gen 7:21 - all flesh died . . . fowl . . . cattle, and . . . creeping thing It has been a uniform principle in the divine procedure, when judgments were abroad on the earth, to include every thing connected with the sinful obj...

It has been a uniform principle in the divine procedure, when judgments were abroad on the earth, to include every thing connected with the sinful objects of His wrath (Gen 19:25; Exo 9:6). Besides, now that the human race was reduced to one single family, it was necessary that the beasts should be proportionally diminished, otherwise by their numbers they would have acquired the ascendancy and overmastered the few that were to repeople the world. Thus goodness was mingled with severity; the Lord exercises judgment in wisdom and in wrath remembers mercy.

JFB: Gen 7:24 - an hundred and fifty days A period of five months. Though long before that every living creature must have been drowned, such a lengthened continuance of the flood was designed...

A period of five months. Though long before that every living creature must have been drowned, such a lengthened continuance of the flood was designed to manifest God's stern displeasure at sin and sinners. Think of Noah during such a crisis. We learn (Eze 14:14) that he was a man who lived and breathed habitually in an atmosphere of devotion; and having in the exercise of this high-toned faith made God his refuge, he did not fear "though the waters roared and were troubled; though the mountains shook with the swelling thereof" [Psa 46:3].

Clarke: Gen 7:1 - Thee have I seen righteous Thee have I seen righteous - See the note on Gen 6:8

Thee have I seen righteous - See the note on Gen 6:8

Clarke: Gen 7:2 - Of every clean beast Of every clean beast - So we find the distinction between clean and unclean animals existed long before the Mosaic law. This distinction seems to ha...

Of every clean beast - So we find the distinction between clean and unclean animals existed long before the Mosaic law. This distinction seems to have been originally designed to mark those animals which were proper for sacrifice and food, from those that were not. See Leviticus 11.

Clarke: Gen 7:4 - For yet seven days For yet seven days - God spoke these words probably on the seventh or Sabbath day, and the days of the ensuing week were employed in entering the ar...

For yet seven days - God spoke these words probably on the seventh or Sabbath day, and the days of the ensuing week were employed in entering the ark, in embarking the mighty troop, for whose reception ample provision had been already made

Clarke: Gen 7:4 - Forty days Forty days - This period became afterwards sacred, and was considered a proper space for humiliation. Moses fasted forty days, Deu 9:9, Deu 9:11; so...

Forty days - This period became afterwards sacred, and was considered a proper space for humiliation. Moses fasted forty days, Deu 9:9, Deu 9:11; so did Elijah, 1Ki 19:8; so did our Lord, Mat 4:2. Forty days’ respite were given to the Ninevites that they might repent, Jon 3:4; and thrice forty (one hundred and twenty) years were given to the old world for the same gracious purpose, Gen 6:3. The forty days of Lent, in commemoration of our Lord’ s fasting, have a reference to the same thing; as each of these seems to be deduced from this primitive judgment.

Clarke: Gen 7:11 - In the six hundredth year, etc. In the six hundredth year, etc. - This must have been in the beginning of the six hundredth year of his life; for he was a year in the ark, Gen 8:13...

In the six hundredth year, etc. - This must have been in the beginning of the six hundredth year of his life; for he was a year in the ark, Gen 8:13; and lived three hundred and fifty years after the flood, and died nine hundred and fifty years old, Gen 9:29; so it is evident that, when the flood commenced, he had just entered on his six hundredth year

Clarke: Gen 7:11 - Second month Second month - The first month was Tisri, which answers to the latter half of September, and first half of October; and the second was Marcheshvan, ...

Second month - The first month was Tisri, which answers to the latter half of September, and first half of October; and the second was Marcheshvan, which answers to part of October and part of November. After the deliverance from Egypt, the beginning of the year was changed from Marcheshvan to Nisan, which answers to a part of our March and April. But it is not likely that this reckoning obtained before the flood. Dr. Lightfoot very probably conjectures that Methuselah was alive in the first month of this year. And it appears, says he, how clearly the Spirit of prophecy foretold of things to come, when it directed his father Enoch almost a thousand years before to name him Methuselah, which signifies they die by a dart; or, he dieth, and then is the dart; or, he dieth, end then it is sent. And thus Adam and Methuselah had measured the whole time between the creation and the flood, and lived above two hundred and forty years together. See Genesis 5 at the end, Gen 5:32 (note)

Clarke: Gen 7:11 - Were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened Were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened - It appears that an immense quantity of waters occupied t...

Were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened - It appears that an immense quantity of waters occupied the center of the antediluvian earth; and as these burst forth, by the order of God, the circumambient strata must sink, in order to fill up the vacuum occasioned by the elevated waters. This is probably what is meant by breaking up the fountains of the great deep. These waters, with the seas on the earth’ s surface, might be deemed sufficient to drown the whole globe, as the waters now on its surface are nearly three-fourths of the whole, as has been accurately ascertained by Dr. Long. See the note on Gen 1:10

By the opening of the windows of heaven is probably meant the precipitating all the aqueous vapours which were suspended in the whole atmosphere, so that, as Moses expresses it, Gen 1:7, the waters that were above the firmament were again united to the waters which were below the firmament, from which on the second day of creation they had been separated. A multitude of facts have proved that water itself is composed of two airs, oxygen and hydrogen; and that 85 parts of the first and 15 of the last, making 100 in the whole, will produce exactly 100 parts of water. And thus it is found that these two airs form the constituent parts of water in the above proportions. The electric spark, which is the same as lightning, passing through these airs, decomposes them and converts them to water. And to this cause we may probably attribute the rain which immediately follows the flash of lightning and peal of thunder. God therefore, by the means of lightning, might have converted the whole atmosphere into water, for the purpose of drowning the globe, had there not been a sufficiency of merely aqueous vapours suspended in the atmosphere on the second day of creation. And if the electric fluid were used on this occasion for the production of water, the incessant glare of lightning, and the continual peals of thunder, must have added indescribable horrors to the scene. See the note on Gen 8:1. These two causes concurring were amply sufficient, not only to overflow the earth, but probably to dissolve the whole terrene fabric, as some judicious naturalists have supposed: indeed, this seems determined by the word מבול mabbul , translated flood, which is derived from בל bal בלל or balal , to mix, mingle, confound, confuse, because the aqueous and terrene parts of the globe were then mixed and confounded together; and when the supernatural cause that produced this mighty change suspended its operations, the different particles of matter would settle according to their specific gravities, and thus form the various strata or beds of which the earth appears to be internally constructed. Some naturalists have controverted this sentiment, because in some cases the internal structure of the earth does not appear to justify the opinion that the various portions of matter had settled according to their specific gravities; but these anomalies may easily be accounted for, from the great changes that have taken place in different parts of the earth since the flood, by volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, etc. Some very eminent philosophers are of the opinion "that, by the breaking up of the fountains of the great deep, we are to understand an eruption of waters from the Southern Ocean."Mr. Kirwan supposes "that this is pretty evident from such animals as the elephant and rhinoceros being found in great masses in Siberia, mixed with different marine substances; whereas no animals or other substances belonging to the northern regions have been ever found in southern climates. Had these animals died natural deaths in their proper climate, their bodies would not have been found in such masses. But that they were carried no farther northward than Siberia, is evident from there being no remains of any animals besides those of whales found in the mountains of Greenland. That this great rush of waters was from the south or south-east is farther evident, he thinks, from the south and south-east sides of almost all great mountains being much steeper than their north or north-west sides, as they necessarily would be if the force of a great body of water fell upon them in that direction."On a subject like this men may innocently differ. Many think the first opinion accords best with the Hebrew text and with the phenomena of nature, for mountains do not always present the above appearance.

Clarke: Gen 7:12 - The rain was upon the earth The rain was upon the earth - Dr. Lightfoot supposes that the rain began on the 18th day of the second month, or Marcheshvan, and that it ceased on ...

The rain was upon the earth - Dr. Lightfoot supposes that the rain began on the 18th day of the second month, or Marcheshvan, and that it ceased on the 28th of the third month, Cisleu.

Clarke: Gen 7:15 - And they went in, etc. And they went in, etc. - It was physically impossible for Noah to have collected such a vast number of tame and ferocious animals, nor could they ha...

And they went in, etc. - It was physically impossible for Noah to have collected such a vast number of tame and ferocious animals, nor could they have been retained in their wards by mere natural means. How then were they brought from various distances to the ark and preserved there? Only by the power of God. He who first miraculously brought them to Adam that he might give them their names, now brings them to Noah that he may preserve their lives. And now we may reasonably suppose that their natural enmity was so far removed or suspended that the lion might dwell with the lamb, and the wolf lie down with the kid, though each might still require his peculiar aliment. This can be no difficulty to the power of God, without the immediate interposition of which neither the deluge nor the concomitant circumstances could have taken place.

Clarke: Gen 7:16 - The Lord shut him in The Lord shut him in - This seems to imply that God took him under his especial protection, and as he shut Him in, so he shut the Others out. God ha...

The Lord shut him in - This seems to imply that God took him under his especial protection, and as he shut Him in, so he shut the Others out. God had waited one hundred and twenty years upon that generation; they did not repent; they filled up the measure of their iniquities, and then wrath came upon them to the uttermost.

Clarke: Gen 7:20 - Fifteen cubits upward Fifteen cubits upward - Should any person object to the universality of the deluge because he may imagine there is not water sufficient to drown the...

Fifteen cubits upward - Should any person object to the universality of the deluge because he may imagine there is not water sufficient to drown the whole globe in the manner here related, he may find a most satisfactory answer to all the objections he can raise on this ground in Mr. Ray’ s Physico-theological Discourses, 2d edit., 8vo., 1693.

Clarke: Gen 7:22 - Of all that was in the dry land Of all that was in the dry land - From this we may conclude that such animals only as could not live in the water were preserved in the ark.

Of all that was in the dry land - From this we may conclude that such animals only as could not live in the water were preserved in the ark.

Clarke: Gen 7:24 - And the waters prevailed upon the earth a hundred and fifty days And the waters prevailed upon the earth a hundred and fifty days - The breaking up of the fountains of the great deep, and the raining forty days an...

And the waters prevailed upon the earth a hundred and fifty days - The breaking up of the fountains of the great deep, and the raining forty days and nights, had raised the waters fifteen cubits above the highest mountains; after which forty days it appears to have continued at this height for one hundred and fifty days more. "So,"says Dr. Lightfoot, "these two sums are to be reckoned distinct, and not the forty days included in the one hundred and fifty; so that when the one hundred and fifty days were ended, there were six months and ten days of the flood past."For an improvement of this awful judgment, see the conclusion of the following chapter, Gen 8:22 (note).

Calvin: Gen 7:1 - And the Lord said unto Noah 1.And the Lord said unto Noah. I have no doubt that Noah was confirmed, as he certainly needed to be, by oracles frequently repeated. He had already ...

1.And the Lord said unto Noah. I have no doubt that Noah was confirmed, as he certainly needed to be, by oracles frequently repeated. He had already sustained, during one hundred years, the greatest and most furious assaults; and the invincible combatant had achieved memorable victories; but the most severe contest of all was, to bid farewell to the world, to renounce society and to bury himself in the ark. The face of the earth was, at that time, lovely; and Moses intimates that it was the season in which the herbs shoot forth and the trees begin to flourish. Winter, which binds the joy of sky and earth in sharp and rugged frost, has now passed away; and the Lord has chosen the moment for destroying the world, in the very season of spring. For Moses states that the commencement of the deluge was in the second month. I know, however, that different opinions prevail on this subject; for there are three who begin the year from the autumnal equinox; but that mode of reckoning the year is more approved, which makes it commence in the month of March. However this might be, it was no light trial for Noah to leave of his own accord, the life to which he had been accustomed during six hundred years, and to seek a new mode of life in the abyss of death. He is commanded to forsake the world, that he may live in a sepulcher which he had been labouriously digging for himself through more than a hundred years. Why was this? Because, in a little while, the earth was to be submerged in a deluge of waters. Yet nothing of the kind is apparent: all indulge in feasts, celebrate nuptials, build sumptuous houses; in short, everywhere, daintiness and luxury prevail; as Christ himself testifies, that that age was intoxicated with its own pleasures, (Luk 17:26.) Wherefore, it was not without reason, that the Lord encouraged and fortified the mind of his servant afresh, by the renewal of the promise, lest he should faint; as if he would says ‘Hitherto thou hast labored with fortitude amid so many causes of offense; but now the case especially demands that thou shouldst take courage, in order to reap the fruit of thy labor: do not, however, wait till the waters burst forth on every side from the opened veins of the earth, and till the higher waters of heaven, with opposing violence, rush from their opened cataracts; but while everything is yet tranquil, enter into the ark, and there remain till the seventh day, then suddenly shall the deluge arise.’ And although oracles are not now brought down from heaven, let us know that continual meditation on the word is not ineffectual; for as new difficulties perpetually arise before us, so God, by one and another promise, establishes our faith, so that our strength being renewed, we may at length arrive at the goal. Our duty, indeed, is, attentively to hear God speaking to us; and neither through depraved fastidiousness, to reject those exercises, by which He cherishes, or excites, or confirms our faith, according as he knows it to be still tender, or languishing, or weak; nor yet to reject them as superfluous. For thee have I seen righteous. When the Lord assigns as his reason for preserving Noah, that he knew him to be righteous, he seems to attribute the praise of salvation to the merit of works; for if Noah was saved because he was righteous, it follows, that we shall deserve life by good works. But here it behaves us cautiously to weigh the design of God; which was to place one man in contrast with the whole world, in order that, in his person, he might condemn the unrighteousness of all men. For he again testifies, that the punishment which he was about to inflict on the world was just, seeing that only one man was left who then cultivated righteousness, for whose sake he was propitious to his whole family. Should any one object, that from this passage, God is proved to have respect to works in saving men, the solution is ready; that this is not repugnant to gratuitous acceptance, since God accepts those gifts which he himself has conferred upon his servants. We must observe, in the first place, that he loves men freely, inasmuch as he finds nothing in them but what is worthy of hatred, since all men are born the children of wrath, and heirs of eternal malediction. In this respect he adopts them to himself in Christ, and justifies them by his mere mercy. After he has, in this manner, reconciled them unto himself, he also regenerates them, by his Spirit, to new life and righteousness. Hence flow good works, which must of necessity be pleasing to God himself. Thus he not only loves the faithful but also their works. We must again observe, that since some fault always adheres to our works, it is not possible that they can be approved, except as a matter of indulgence. The grace, therefore, of Christ, and not their own dignity or merit, is that which gives worth to our works. Nevertheless, we do not deny that they come into the account before God: as he here acknowledges and accepts the righteousness of Noah which had proceeded from his own grace; and in this manner (as Augustine speaks) he will crown his own gifts. We nay further notice the expression, “I have seen thee righteous before me;” by which words, he not only annihilates all that hypocritical righteousness which is destitute of interior sanctity of heart, but vindicates his own authority; as if he would declare, that he alone is a competent judge to estimate righteousness. The clause, in this generation, is added, as I have said, for the sake of amplification; for so desperate was the depravity of that age, that it was regarded as a prodigy, that Noah should be free from the common infection.

Calvin: Gen 7:2 - Of every clean beast 2.Of every clean beast. He again repeats what he had before said concerning animals, and not without occasion. For there was no little difficulty in ...

2.Of every clean beast. He again repeats what he had before said concerning animals, and not without occasion. For there was no little difficulty in collecting from woods, mountains, and caves, so great a multitude of wild beasts, many species of which were perhaps altogether unknown; and there was, in most of them, the same ferocity which we now perceive. Wherefore, God encourages the holy man, lest being alarmed with that difficulty, and having cast aside all hope of success, he should fail. Here, however, at first sight, appears some kind of contradiction, because whereas he before had spoken of pairs of animals, he now speaks of sevens. But the solution is at hand; because, previously, Moses does not state the number, but only says that females were added as companions to the males; as if he had said, Noah himself was commanded not to gather the animals promiscuously together, but to select pairs out of them for the propagation of offspring. Now, however, the discourse is concerning the actual number. Moreover, the expression, by sevens, is to be understood not of seven pairs of each kind, but of three pairs, to which one animal is added for the sake of sacrifice. 276 Besides, the Lord would have a threefold greater number of clean animals than of others preserved, because there would be a greater necessity of them for the use of man. In which appointment, we must consider the paternal goodness of God towards us, by which he is inclined to have regard to us in all things.

Calvin: Gen 7:3 - To keep seed alive upon the face of all the earth 3.To keep seed alive upon the face of all the earth. That is, that hence offspring might be born. But this is referred to Noah; for although, properl...

3.To keep seed alive upon the face of all the earth. That is, that hence offspring might be born. But this is referred to Noah; for although, properly speaking, God alone gives life, yet God here refers to those duties which he had enjoined upon his servant: and it is with respect to his appointed office, that God commands him to collect animals that he may keep seed alive. Nor is this extraordinary, seeing that the ministers of the gospel are said, in a sense, to confer spiritual life. In the clause which next follows, upon the face of all the earth, there is a twofold consolation: that the waters, after they had covered the earth for a time, would again cease, so that the dry surface of the earth should appear; and then, that not only should Noah himself survive, but, by the blessing of God, the number of animals should be so increased, as to spread far and wide through the whole world. Thus, in the midst of ruin, future restoration is promised to him. Moses is very earnest in showing that God took care, by every means, to retain Noah in obedience to his word, and that the holy man entirely acquiesced. This doctrine is very useful, especially when God either promises or threatens anything incredible, since men do not willingly receive what seems to them improbable. For nothing was less accordant with the judgment of the flesh, than that the world should be destroyed by its Creator; because this was to subvert the whole order of nature which he had established. Wherefore, unless Noah had been well admonished of this terrible judgment of God, he never would have ventured to believe it; lest he should conceive of God as acting in contradiction to himself. The word היקום ( hayekom,) which Moses here uses has its origin from a word signifying to stand; but it properly means whatever lives and flourishes.

Calvin: Gen 7:5 - And Noah did according to all that the Lord commanded 5.And Noah did according to all that the Lord commanded. This is not a bare repetition of the former sentence; but Moses commends Noah’s uniform te...

5.And Noah did according to all that the Lord commanded. This is not a bare repetition of the former sentence; but Moses commends Noah’s uniform tenor of obedience in keeping all God’s commandments; as if he would say, that in whatever particular it pleased God to try his obedience, he always remained constant. And, certainly, it is not becoming to obey one or another commandment of God only, so that when we have performed a defective obedience, we should feel at liberty to withdraw; for we must keep in memory the declaration of James,

‘He who forbade thee to kill, forbade thee also to steal, and to commit adultery,’ (Jas 2:11.)

Calvin: Gen 7:6 - And Noah was six hundred years old 6.And Noah was six hundred years old. It is not without reason that he again mentions the age of Noah. For old age has this among other evils, that i...

6.And Noah was six hundred years old. It is not without reason that he again mentions the age of Noah. For old age has this among other evils, that it renders men more indolent and morose; whence the faith of Noah was the more conspicuous, because it did not fail him in that advanced period of life. And as it was a great excellence, not to languish through successive centuries, so big promptitude deserves no little commendation; because, being commanded to enter the ark, he immediately obeyed. When Moses shortly afterwards subjoins, that he had entered on account of the waters of the deluge, the words ought not to be expounded, as if he were compelled, by the rushing of the waters, to flee into the ark; but that he, being moved with fear by the word, perceived by faith the approach of that deluge which all others ridiculed. Wherefore, his faith is again commended in this place, because, indeed, he raised his eyes above heaven and earth.

Calvin: Gen 7:8 - Of clean beasts 8.Of clean beasts. Moses now explains, — what had before been doubtful, — in which manner the animals were gathered together into the ark, and sa...

8.Of clean beasts. Moses now explains, — what had before been doubtful, — in which manner the animals were gathered together into the ark, and says that they came of their own accord. If this should seem to any one absurd, let him recall to mind what was said before, that in the beginning every kind of animals presented themselves to Adam, that he might give them names. And, truly, we dread the sight of wild beasts from no other cause than this, that seeing we have shaken off the yoke of God, we have lost that authority over them with which Adam was endued. Now, it was a kind of restoration of the former state of things when God brought to Noah those animals which he intended should be preserved through Noah’s labor and service. For Noah retained the untamed animals in his ark, in the very same way in which hens and geese are preserved in a coop. And it is not superfluously added, that the animals themselves came, as God had instructed Noah; for it shows that the blessing of God rested on the obedience of Noah, so that his labor should not be in vain. It was impossible, humanly speaking, that in a moment such an assemblage of all animals should take place; but because Noah, simply trusting the event with God, executed what was enjoined upon him; God, in return, gave power to his own precept, that it might not be without effect. Properly speaking, this was a promise of God annexed to his commands. And, therefore, we must conclude, that the faith of Noah availed more, than all snares and nets, for the capture of animals; and that, by the very same gate, lions, and wolves, and tigers, meekly entered, with oxen, and with lambs, into the ark. And this is the only method by which we may overcome all difficulties; while, — being persuaded, that what is impossible to us is easy to God, — we derive alacrity from hope. It has before been stated that the animals entered in by pairs. We have also related the different opinions of interpreters respecting the month in which the deluge took place. For since the Hebrews begin their year in sacred things from March, but in earthly affairs from September; or, — which is the same thing, — since the two equinoxes form with them a double commencement of the year, some think that the sacred year, and some the political, is here intended. But because the former method of reckoning the years was Divinely appointed, and is also more agreeable to nature, it seems probable that the deluge began about the time of spring.

Calvin: Gen 7:11 - The same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up 11.The same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up. Moses recalls the period of the first creation to our memory; for the earth was o...

11.The same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up. Moses recalls the period of the first creation to our memory; for the earth was originally covered with water; and by the singular kindness of God, they were made to recede, that some space should be left clear for living creatures. And this, philosophers are compelled to acknowledge, that it is contrary to the course of nature for the waters to subside, so that some portion of the earth might rise above them. And Scripture records this among the miracles of God, that he restrains the force of the sea, as with barriers, lest it should overwhelm that part of the earth which is granted for a habitation to men. Moses also says, in the first chapter, that some waters were suspended above in the heaven; and David, in like manner, declares, that they are held enclosed as in a bottle. Lastly, God raised for men a theater in the habitable region of the earth; and caused, by his secret power, that the subterraneous waters should not break forth to overwhelm us, and the celestial waters should not conspire with them for that purpose. Now, however, Moses states, that when God resolved to destroy the earth by a deluge, those barriers were torn up. And here we must consider the wonderful counsel of God; for he might have deposited, in certain channels or veins of the earth, as much water as would have sufficed for all the purposes of human life; but he has designedly placed us between two graves, lest, in fancied security, we should despise that kindness on which our life depends. For the element of water, which philosophers deem one of the principles of life, threatens us with death from above and from beneath, except so far as it is restrained by the hand of God. In saying that the fountains were broken up, and the cataracts opened, his language is metaphorical, and means, that neither did the waters flow in their accustomed manner, nor did the rain distil from heaven; but that the distinctions which we see had been established by God, being now removed, there were no longer any bars to restrain the violent irruption.

Calvin: Gen 7:12 - And the rain was upon the earth 12.And the rain was upon the earth. Although the Lord burst open the floodgates of the waters, yet he does not allow them to break forth in a moment,...

12.And the rain was upon the earth. Although the Lord burst open the floodgates of the waters, yet he does not allow them to break forth in a moment, so as immediately to overwhelm the earth, but causes the rain to continue forty days; partly, that Noah, by long meditation, might more deeply fix in his memory what he had previously learned, by instruction, through the word; partly, that the wicked, even before their death, might feel that those warnings which they had held in derision, were not empty threats. For they who had so long scorned the patience of God, deserved to feel that they were gradually perishing under that righteous judgment of his, which, during a hundred years, they had treated as a fable. And the Lord frequently so tempers his judgments, that men may have leisure to consider with more advantage those judgments which, by their sudden eruption, might overcome them with astonishment. But the wonderful depravity of our nature shows itself in this, that if the anger of God is suddenly poured forth, we become stupefied and senseless; but if it advances with measured pace, we become so accustomed to it as to despise it; because we do not willingly acknowledge the hand of God without miracles; and because we are easily hardened, by a kind of superinduced insensibility, at the sight of God’s works.

Calvin: Gen 7:13 - In the self-same day entered Noah, and Shem, etc 13.In the self-same day entered Noah, and Shem, etc. A repetition follows, sufficiently particular, considering the brevity with which Moses runs thr...

13.In the self-same day entered Noah, and Shem, etc. A repetition follows, sufficiently particular, considering the brevity with which Moses runs through the history of the deluge, yet by no means superfluous. For it was the design of the Spirit to retain our minds in the consideration of a vengeance too terrible to be adequately described by the utmost severity of language. Besides, nothing is here related but what is difficult to be believed; wherefore Moses the more frequently inculcates these things, that however remote they may be from our apprehension, they may still obtain credit with us. Thus the narration respecting the animals refers to this point; that by the faith of holy Noah they were drawn from their woods and caverns and were collected in one place from their wandering courses, as if they had been led by the hand of God. We see, therefore, that Moses does not insist upon this point without an object; but he does it to teach us that each species of animals was preserved, not by chance, nor by human industry, but because the Lord reached out and offered to Noah himself, from hand to hand, (as they say,) whatever animal he intended to keep alive.

Calvin: Gen 7:16 - And the Lord shut him in 16.And the Lord shut him in. This is not added in vain, nor ought it to be lightly passed over. That door must have been large, which could admit an ...

16.And the Lord shut him in. This is not added in vain, nor ought it to be lightly passed over. That door must have been large, which could admit an elephant. And truly, no pitch would be sufficiently firm and tenacious, and no joining sufficiently solid, to prevent the immense force of the water from penetrating through its many seams, especially in an irruption so violent, and in a shock so severe. Therefore, Moses, to cut off occasion for the vain speculations which our own curiosity would suggest, declares in one word, that the ark was made secure from the deluge, not by human artifice, but by divine miracle. It is, indeed, not to be doubted that Noah had been endued with new ability and sagacity, that nothing might be defective in the structure of the ark. But lest even this favor should be without success, it was necessary for something greater to be added. Wherefore, that we might not measure the mode of preserving the ark by the capacity of our own judgment, Moses teaches use that the waters were not restrained from breaking in upon the ark, by pitch or bitumen only, but rather by the secret power of God, and by the interposition of his hand.

Calvin: Gen 7:17 - And the flood was forty days, etc 17.And the flood was forty days, etc. Moses copiously insists upon this fact, in order to show that the whole world was immersed in the waters. Moreo...

17.And the flood was forty days, etc. Moses copiously insists upon this fact, in order to show that the whole world was immersed in the waters. Moreover, it is to be regarded as the special design of this narrations that we should not ascribe to fortune, the flood by which the world perished; how ever customary it may be for men to cast some veil over the works of God, which may obscure either his goodness or his judgments manifested in them. But seeing it is plainly declared, that whatever was flourishing on the earth was destroyed, we hence infer, that it was an indisputable and signal judgment of God; especially since Noah alone remained secure, because he had embraced, by faith, the word in which salvation was contained. He then recalls to memory what we before have said; namely how desperate had been the impiety, and how enormous the crimes of men, by which God was induced to destroy the whole world; whereas, on account of his great clemency, he would have spared his own workmanship, had he seen that any milder remedy could have been effectually applied. These two things, directly opposed to each other, he connects together; that the whole human race was destroyed, but that Noah and his family safely escaped. Hence we learn how profitable it was for Noah, disregarding the world, to obey God alone: which Moses states not so much for the sake of praising the man, as for that of inviting us to imitate his example. Moreover, lest the multitude of sinners should draw us away from God; we must patiently bear that the ungodly should hold us up to ridicule, and should triumph over us, until the Lord shall show by the final issue, that our obedience has been approved by him. In this sense, Peter teaches that Noah’s deliverance from the universal deluge was a figure of baptism, (1Pe 3:21;) as if he had said, the method of the salvation, which we receive through baptism, degrees with this deliverance of Noah. Since at this time also the world is full of unbelievers as it was then; therefore it is necessary for us to separate ourselves from the greater multitude, that the Lord may snatch us from destruction. In the same manner, the Church is fitly, and justly, compared to the ark. But we must keep in mind the similitude by which they mutually correspond with each other; for that is derived from the word of God alone; because as Noah believing the promise of God, gathered himself his wife and his children together, in order that under a certain appearance of death, he might emerge out of death; so it is fitting that we should renounce the world and die, in order that the Lord may quicken us by his word. For nowhere else is there any security of salvation. The Papists, however, act ridiculously who fabricate for us an ark without the word.

Defender: Gen 7:2 - by sevens The "clean" kinds of beasts and birds were those suitable for domestication and a form of fellowship with man, as well as for sacrificial offerings. A...

The "clean" kinds of beasts and birds were those suitable for domestication and a form of fellowship with man, as well as for sacrificial offerings. Apparently three pairs of each of these were preserved in order to allow for wider variation in breeding after the Flood. The seventh was offered by Noah in sacrifice when they left the ark (Gen 8:20)."

Defender: Gen 7:3 - keep seed alive God's purpose for the ark was to "keep seed alive" in the earth, a statement meaningful only in the context of a universal flood. The ark was far too ...

God's purpose for the ark was to "keep seed alive" in the earth, a statement meaningful only in the context of a universal flood. The ark was far too large to accommodate merely a local or regional fauna. In fact, if the Flood were only local, the ark would not have been needed at all. Noah's family, as well as the birds and beasts, could far more easily have simply migrated away from the region to be flooded."

Defender: Gen 7:4 - seven days This seven-day period of final warning and preparation marks the first of many references to seven-day intervals during the Flood year. This fact make...

This seven-day period of final warning and preparation marks the first of many references to seven-day intervals during the Flood year. This fact makes it obvious that the practice of measuring time in seven-day weeks had been in effect throughout the period between the creation week and the Flood.

Defender: Gen 7:4 - forty days A worldwide rain lasting forty days would be impossible under present meteorologic conditions. The condensation of the antediluvian vapor canopy, the ...

A worldwide rain lasting forty days would be impossible under present meteorologic conditions. The condensation of the antediluvian vapor canopy, the "waters above the firmament," (Gen 1:6-8) is the only adequate explanation.

Defender: Gen 7:4 - every living substance "Every living substance" includes the plant life on the land. All the lush vegetation of the pre-Flood world was to be uprooted, transported and burie...

"Every living substance" includes the plant life on the land. All the lush vegetation of the pre-Flood world was to be uprooted, transported and buried in great sedimentary beds, many of which would eventually become the world's coal beds."

Defender: Gen 7:11 - seventeenth day The exact date of the Flood's onset must have been noted for some reason. The ark landed on the mountains of Ararat exactly 150 days or five months la...

The exact date of the Flood's onset must have been noted for some reason. The ark landed on the mountains of Ararat exactly 150 days or five months later (Gen 8:3, Gen 8:4). The implication is that the primeval year contained twelve months of thirty days each (Rev 11:2, Rev 11:3).

Defender: Gen 7:11 - fountains of the great deep The physical cause of the Flood is clearly identified as the eruption of the waters in the "great deep" and the opening of the "windows of heaven." Th...

The physical cause of the Flood is clearly identified as the eruption of the waters in the "great deep" and the opening of the "windows of heaven." These are quite sufficient in themselves to explain all the phenomena of the Flood. The antediluvian hydrologic cycle was apparently controlled by a system of subterranean pressurized reservoirs and conduits, but these fountains were all cleaved open in one day, releasing tremendous quantities of water and magma to the earth's surface and dust and gas into the atmosphere. The resulting combination of atmospheric turbulence and dust nuclei of condensation was probably the immediate cause of the precipitation of the vapor canopy. The cataclysmic restoration of the primeval deep which resulted left the antediluvian world completely devastated."

Defender: Gen 7:15 - two of all flesh Two of every kind of land animal entered the ark, including those animals (for example, dinosaurs) that have become extinct in the millennia following...

Two of every kind of land animal entered the ark, including those animals (for example, dinosaurs) that have become extinct in the millennia following the Flood. The animals were all young animals, since they would have to spend the year in the ark without reproducing and then emerge to repopulate the earth after the Flood. The animals entering the ark possessed genes for the remarkable physiologic abilities of migration and hibernation. These were not needed in the equable climates of the primeval world, but would be vital for survival in the post-Flood world. After being installed in their respective "rooms" in the ark, and after a good meal, most of them probably spent most of the Flood year in a state of hibernation."

Defender: Gen 7:17 - bare up the ark The ark was thirty cubits high and, when loaded, probably had a draft of almost fifteen cubits. As soon as the water rose to a level of fifteen cubits...

The ark was thirty cubits high and, when loaded, probably had a draft of almost fifteen cubits. As soon as the water rose to a level of fifteen cubits above the platform on which it had been constructed, it would begin to float."

Defender: Gen 7:18 - prevailed The word "prevailed" in the original Hebrew conveys the meaning, "were overwhelmingly mighty." Not only would all land animals eventually drown, but t...

The word "prevailed" in the original Hebrew conveys the meaning, "were overwhelmingly mighty." Not only would all land animals eventually drown, but the plant covering would be uprooted and rafted away, the soils eroded and finally even the mountains and hills washed away. In the sea depths, the eruption of the fountains of the great deep would also profoundly affect marine life. Great quantities of magma, metals and other materials were extruded from the earth's mantle. The sediments from the lands were transported down to be deposited in the encroaching sea basins. Complex hydrodynamic phenomena - tsunamis, vortices, turbidity flows, cyclic erosion and deposition, and a variety of geomorphologic activity - took place throughout the year. Earth movements of great magnitude and tremendous volcanic explosions shook the earth again and again, until finally, "the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished" (2Pe 3:6).

Defender: Gen 7:18 - face of the waters The occupants of the ark, unaware of the convulsions in the depths below, rode safely and in comparative comfort, steered by God's unseen hand away fr...

The occupants of the ark, unaware of the convulsions in the depths below, rode safely and in comparative comfort, steered by God's unseen hand away from the zones of hydrodynamic violence."

Defender: Gen 7:19 - all the high hills The double superlative precludes the use of "all" in a relative sense here. The obvious intent of the writer was to describe a universal inundation."

The double superlative precludes the use of "all" in a relative sense here. The obvious intent of the writer was to describe a universal inundation."

Defender: Gen 7:20 - mountains The words "high hills" and "mountains" are the same in the original Hebrew. The waters were 15 cubits (22.5 feet) above the highest mountains, patentl...

The words "high hills" and "mountains" are the same in the original Hebrew. The waters were 15 cubits (22.5 feet) above the highest mountains, patently including Mount Ararat, which is now 17,000 feet high. In the "local-flood" theory, Mt. Ararat would have had the same elevation before and after the flood, but it is obvious that a 17,000 foot flood is not a local flood."

Defender: Gen 7:21 - moved upon the earth "All flesh" died that moved on land. In a local flood, at least most of the animals (certainly all the birds) would escape to higher ground."

"All flesh" died that moved on land. In a local flood, at least most of the animals (certainly all the birds) would escape to higher ground."

Defender: Gen 7:22 - breath of life The "breath (Hebrew neshamah) of life" is clearly stated here to be a component of animal life as well as human life. Thus animals possess "spirit," b...

The "breath (Hebrew neshamah) of life" is clearly stated here to be a component of animal life as well as human life. Thus animals possess "spirit," but not the "image of God.""

Defender: Gen 7:23 - every living substance The rocks of the earth's crust now contain the fossil remains of unnumbered billions of plants and animals, buried in water-transported sediments whic...

The rocks of the earth's crust now contain the fossil remains of unnumbered billions of plants and animals, buried in water-transported sediments which quickly became lithified. This "geologic column" has been grossly distorted by evolutionists into the record of an imagined 3-billion-year history of evolution during the geological ages. Actually, it represents the deposits of the cataclysmic Flood with the fossil order primarily depicting the relative elevations of the habitats - and therefore the usual order of sedimentary burial in the Flood - of the organisms of the pre-Flood world. Many modern geologists are again admitting the necessity of catastrophic formation and burial to explain the fossiliferous rocks in the geologic column. The reason why very few fossil men (also few fossilized flying birds) are found in the rocks is their high mobility and ability to escape burial in sediments. When eventually drowned, their bodies would remain on the surface until they decayed."

Defender: Gen 7:24 - prevailed This is the third emphasis on the waters "prevailing" (Gen 7:18, Gen 7:19, Gen 7:24). This highest intensity of flood action continued for five months...

This is the third emphasis on the waters "prevailing" (Gen 7:18, Gen 7:19, Gen 7:24). This highest intensity of flood action continued for five months."

TSK: Gen 7:1 - Come // thee am 1656, bc 2348 Come : Gen 7:7, Gen 7:13; Job 5:19-24; Psa 91:1-10; Pro 14:26, Pro 18:10; Isa 26:20, Isa 26:21; Eze 9:4-6; Zep 2:3; Mat 24:37-39; Luk...

TSK: Gen 7:2 - every clean // sevens // not every clean : Gen 7:8, Gen 6:19-21, Gen 8:20; Lev. 11:1-47; Deut. 14:1-21; Act 10:11-15 sevens : Heb. seven, seven not : Lev 10:10; Eze 44:23

every clean : Gen 7:8, Gen 6:19-21, Gen 8:20; Lev. 11:1-47; Deut. 14:1-21; Act 10:11-15

sevens : Heb. seven, seven

not : Lev 10:10; Eze 44:23

TSK: Gen 7:4 - For // forty days // and every // destroy For : Gen 7:10, Gen 2:5, Gen 6:3, Gen 8:10, Gen 8:12, Gen 29:27, Gen 29:28; Job 28:25, Job 36:27-32, Job 37:11, Job 37:12; Amo 4:7 forty days : Gen 7:...

TSK: Gen 7:5 - all that all that : Gen 6:22; Exo 39:32, Exo 39:42, Exo 39:43, Exo 40:16; Psa 119:6; Mat 3:15; Luk 8:21; Joh 2:5; Joh 8:28, Joh 8:29, Joh 13:17; Phi 2:8; Heb 5...

TSK: Gen 7:6 - -- Gen 5:32, Gen 8:13

TSK: Gen 7:7 - -- Gen 7:1, Gen 7:13-15, Gen 6:18; Pro 22:3; Mat 24:38; Luk 17:27; Heb 6:18, Heb 11:7; 1Pe 3:20; 2Pe 2:5

TSK: Gen 7:9 - -- Gen 7:16, Gen 2:19; Isa 11:6-9, Isa 65:25; Jer 8:7; Act 10:11, Act 10:12; Gal 3:28; Col 3:11

TSK: Gen 7:10 - after seven days // waters after seven days : or, on the seventh day, Gen 7:4 waters : Gen 7:4, Gen 7:17-20, Gen 6:17; Job 22:16; Mat 24:38, Mat 24:39; Luk 17:27

after seven days : or, on the seventh day, Gen 7:4

waters : Gen 7:4, Gen 7:17-20, Gen 6:17; Job 22:16; Mat 24:38, Mat 24:39; Luk 17:27

TSK: Gen 7:11 - second month // all // windows second month : The first month was Tisri, which answers to the latter end of September and first half of October; the second was Marchesvan, which ans...

second month : The first month was Tisri, which answers to the latter end of September and first half of October; the second was Marchesvan, which answers to part of October and part of November.

all : Gen 1:7, Gen 6:17, Gen 8:2; Job 28:4, Job 38:8-11; Psa 33:7, Psa 74:15; Pro 8:28, Pro 8:29; Isa 24:19; Jer 5:22, Jer 51:16; Eze 26:19; Amo 9:5, Amo 9:6; Mat 24:38; 1Th 5:3

windows : or, flood-gates, Gen 1:7, Gen 8:2; 2Ki 7:2, 2Ki 7:19; Psa 78:23, Psa 78:24; Mal 3:10

TSK: Gen 7:12 - forty forty : Gen 7:4, Gen 7:17; Exo 24:18; Deu 9:9, Deu 9:18, Deu 10:10; 1Ki 19:8; Mat 4:2

TSK: Gen 7:13 - day // and Shem day : Gen 7:1, Gen 7:7-9, Gen 6:18; Heb 11:7; 1Pe 3:20; 2Pe 2:5 and Shem : Gen 5:32, Gen 6:10, Gen 9:18, Gen 9:19, Gen 10:1, Gen 10:2, Gen 10:6, Gen 1...

TSK: Gen 7:14 - They // sort They : Gen 7:2, Gen 7:3, Gen 7:8, Gen 7:9 sort : Heb. wing

They : Gen 7:2, Gen 7:3, Gen 7:8, Gen 7:9

sort : Heb. wing

TSK: Gen 7:15 - -- Gen 6:20; Isa 11:6

TSK: Gen 7:16 - as // the as : Gen 7:2, Gen 7:3 the : 2Ki 4:4, 2Ki 4:5; Deu 33:27; Psa 46:2, Psa 91:1-10; Pro 3:23; Mat 25:10; Luk 13:25; Joh 10:27-30; 1Pe 1:5

TSK: Gen 7:17 - -- Gen 7:4, Gen 7:12

TSK: Gen 7:18 - waters prevailed // ark waters prevailed : Exo 14:28; Job 22:16; Psa 69:15 ark : Psa 104:26

waters prevailed : Exo 14:28; Job 22:16; Psa 69:15

ark : Psa 104:26

TSK: Gen 7:19 - and all the high hills and all the high hills : At the present day every mountain where search has been made, conspire in one uniform, universal proof that they all had the ...

and all the high hills : At the present day every mountain where search has been made, conspire in one uniform, universal proof that they all had the sea spread over their highest summits; shells, skeletons of fish, etc., having been found there. Job 12:15; Psa 46:2, Psa 46:3, Psa 104:6-9; Jer 3:23; 2Pe 3:6

TSK: Gen 7:20 - and the mountains and the mountains : Psa 104:6; Jer 3:23

and the mountains : Psa 104:6; Jer 3:23

TSK: Gen 7:21 - -- Gen 7:4, Gen 6:6, Gen 6:7, Gen 6:13, Gen 6:17; Job 22:15-17; Isa 24:6, Isa 24:19; Jer 4:22-27, Jer 12:3, Jer 12:4; Hos 4:3; Joe 1:17-20, Joe 2:3; Zep ...

TSK: Gen 7:22 - breath of life breath of life : Heb. breath of the spirit of life, Gen 2:7, Gen 6:17

breath of life : Heb. breath of the spirit of life, Gen 2:7, Gen 6:17

TSK: Gen 7:23 - every living substance // and Noah every living substance : The most incontestable evidence has been afforded of the universality of this fact. caps1 tcaps0 he moose deer, a native of ...

every living substance : The most incontestable evidence has been afforded of the universality of this fact. caps1 tcaps0 he moose deer, a native of America, has been found buried in Ireland; elephants, native of Asia and Africa, in the midst of England; crocodiles, natives of the Nile, in the heart of Germany; and shell fish, never known in any but the American seas, with the entire skeletons of whales, in the most inland counties of England. Gen 7:21, Gen 7:22; Job 22:15-17; Isa 24:1-8; Mat 24:37-39; Luk 17:26, Luk 17:27; 1Pe 3:20; 2Pe 2:5

and Noah : Exo 14:28-30; Job 5:19; Psa 91:1, Psa 91:9, Psa 91:10; Pro 11:4; Eze 14:14-20; Mal 3:17, Mal 3:18; Mat 25:46; Heb 11:7; 1Pe 3:20; 2Pe 2:5, 2Pe 2:9, 2Pe 3:6

TSK: Gen 7:24 - -- Gen 8:3, Gen 8:4, compare with Gen 7:11 of this chapter, The breaking up of the fountains of the great deep, and the raining forty days and nights, ha...

Gen 8:3, Gen 8:4, compare with Gen 7:11 of this chapter, The breaking up of the fountains of the great deep, and the raining forty days and nights, had raised the waters fifteen cubits, or twenty-two feet and a half, above the highest mountain; after which forty days, it appears to have continued at this height one hundred and fifty days more.

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Gen 7:1 - thou and all thy // For thee have I seen righteous said unto Noah, Come i.e. prepare to enter, thou and all thy family; which consisted only of eight persons, 1Pe 3:20 , to wit, Noah and his three s...

said unto Noah, Come i.e. prepare to enter,

thou and all thy family; which consisted only of eight persons, 1Pe 3:20 , to wit, Noah and his three sons, and their four wives, Gen 6:18 . Whereby it appears that each had but one wife, and consequently it is more than probable that polygamy, as it began in the posterity of wicked Cain, Gen 4:19 , so it was confined to them, and had not as yet got footing amongst the sons of God. For if ever polygamy had been allowable, it must have been now, for the repeopling of the perishing world.

For thee have I seen righteous with the righteousness of faith, as it is explained, Heb 11:7 , evidenced by all the fruits of righteousness and true holiness, not only before men, and seemingly, but really, and to my all-seeing eye, in this generation of which expression, See Poole on "Gen 6:9" .

Poole: Gen 7:2 - Obj // Answ // By sevens // by sevens // the male and his female Obj The distinction of clean and unclean beasts was not before the law. Answ Some legal things were prescribed and used before the law, as abstinen...

Obj The distinction of clean and unclean beasts was not before the law.

Answ Some legal things were prescribed and used before the law, as abstinence from the eating of blood, Gen 9:4 , and, among other things, sacrifices, as learned men have sufficiently proved; and consequently the distinction of beasts to be sacrificed was then, in some measure, understood, which afterwards was expressed, Lev 1:1-17 , &c. Nor is this a good argument, This was not written before, therefore it was not commanded and practised before, especially concerning a time when no commands of God were written, but only delivered by tradition.

By sevens either,

1. Seven single, as most think. Or rather,

2. Seven couples, as may be gathered,

1. From the duplication of the word in Hebrew. If it be said seven seven signifies only seven of every kind, then it would have been said concerning the unclean beasts two two, i.e. two of each sort: whereas now there is an apparent difference; there it is said only by two, but here,

by sevens or seven seven, which difference of the phrase suggest a difference in the things. 2. By the following words,

the male and his female which being indifferently applied to the clean and unclean, plainly shows that none of them entered into the ark single, and therefore there was no odd seventh among them, but all went in by couples, which was most convenient in all for the propagation of their kind, and in the clean for other uses also; as for sacrifices to God, if not for the sustentation of men in the ark, and after they came out of it. Which gives us the reason why God would have more of the clean than of the unclean put into the ark, because they were more serviceable both to God and men.

Poole: Gen 7:3 - by sevens // to keep seed alive Of clean fowls, which he leaves to be understood out of the foregoing verse, by sevens and of the unclean, by two; as before of the beasts, to ke...

Of clean fowls, which he leaves to be understood out of the foregoing verse,

by sevens and of the unclean, by two; as before of the beasts,

to keep seed alive i.e. the issue or breed of them.

Poole: Gen 7:4 - Yet seven days // And every living substance Yet seven days or, after seven days, the Hebrew Lamed being put for after, as it is Exo 16:1 Psa 19:3 Jer 41:4 . Or, within seven days, wh...

Yet seven days or, after seven days, the Hebrew Lamed being put for after, as it is Exo 16:1 Psa 19:3 Jer 41:4 . Or, within seven days, which time God allowed to the world as a further space of repentance, whereof therefore it is probable Noah gave them notice; and it is not unlikely that many of them who slighted the threatening when it was at one hundred and twenty years distance, now hearing a second threatening, and considering the nearness of their danger, might be more affected and brought to true repentance; who though destroyed in their bodies by the flood for their former and long impenitency, which God would not so far pardon, yet might be saved in their spirits. See 1Pe 4:6 . And as some preserved in the ark were damned, so others drowned in the deluge might be eternally saved.

And every living substance all that hath in it the breath of life, as was said Gen 6:17 .

Poole: Gen 7:5 - -- Which was said Gen 6:22 , and is here repeated, because this was an eminent instance of his faith and obedience.

Which was said Gen 6:22 , and is here repeated, because this was an eminent instance of his faith and obedience.

Poole: Gen 7:7 - -- Or, for fear of; for fear is ascribed to and commended in Noah, Heb 11:7 . Or, from the face of.

Or, for fear of; for fear is ascribed to and commended in Noah, Heb 11:7 . Or, from the face of.

Poole: Gen 7:9 - two and two They went by the secret impulse of their great Creator and Governor, see Gen 2:19 6:20 two and two of which see above, Gen 4:20 .

They went by the secret impulse of their great Creator and Governor, see Gen 2:19 6:20

two and two of which see above, Gen 4:20 .

Poole: Gen 7:11 - In the six hundredth year // In the second month // The fountains of the great deep // deep // The windows of heaven were opened In the six hundredth year either complete, or rather current or begun; otherwise he had lived three hundred and fifty one years after the flood, not ...

In the six hundredth year either complete, or rather current or begun; otherwise he had lived three hundred and fifty one years after the flood, not three hundred and fifty only, as it is written, Gen 9:29 .

In the second month either,

1. Of that year of Noah’ s life; or,

2. Of the year. Now as the year among the Hebrews was twofold; the one sacred, for the celebration of feasts, beginning in March, of which see Exo 12:2 ; the other civil, for the better ordering of men’ s political or civil affairs, which began in September. Accordingly this second month is thought, by some, to be part of April and part of May, the most pleasant part of the year, when the flood was least expected or feared; by others, part of October and part of November, a little after Noah had gathered the fruits of the earth, and laid them up in the ark. So the flood came in with the winter, and was by degrees dried up by the heat of the following summer. And this opinion seems the more probable, because the most ancient and first beginning of the year was in September; and the other beginning of the year in March was but a later institution among the Jews, with respect to their feasts and sacred affairs only, which are not at all concerned here.

The fountains of the great deep i.e. of the sea, called the deep, Job 38:16,30 41:31 Psa 106:9 ; and also of that great abyss, or sea of waters, which is contained in the bowels of the earth. For that there are vast quantities of waters there, is implied both here and in other scriptures, as Psa 33:7 2Pe 3:5 ; and is affirmed by Plato in his Phaedrus, and by Seneca in his Natural Questions, 3.19, and is evident from springs and rivers which have their rise from thence; and some of them have no other place into which they issue themselves, as appears from the Caspian Sea, into which divers rivers do empty themselves, and especially that great river Volga, in such abundance, that it would certainly drown all those parts of the earth, if there were not a vent for them under ground; for other vent above ground out of that great lake or sea they have none. Out of this

deep therefore, and out of the sea together, it was very easy for God to bring such a quantity of waters, as might overwhelm the earth without any production of new waters, which yet he with one word could have created. So vain are the cavils of atheistical antiscripturists in this.

The fountains are said to be broken up here, also Psa 74:15 , by a metonymy, because the earth and other obstructions were broken up, and so a passage opened for the fountains; as bread is said to be bruised, Isa 28:28 , and meal to be ground, Isa 47:2 , because the corn, of which the meal and bread were made, was bruised and ground.

The windows of heaven were opened which some understand of the waters, which, from Gen 1:7 , they suppose were placed by God above the visible heavens, and reserved and kept, as it were, in prison for this very purpose; and now the prison-doors were opened, and they let loose and sent down for the destruction of the world. But others more fitly understand it of the clouds, which are called the windows of heaven, Mal 3:10 ; so 2Ki 7:2,19 Ps 78:23 Isa 24:18 , which then grew thicker and bigger with waters; nor is there any inconvenience in it, if we say that God created a great quantity of waters for this end, which afterwards he annihilated.

Poole: Gen 7:12 - -- God by this gradual proceeding both awakened to repentance, and gave them space for it.

God by this gradual proceeding both awakened to repentance, and gave them space for it.

Poole: Gen 7:13 - In the selfsame day In the selfsame day on which the flood began by that terrible shower. Heb. In the body, or essence, or strength of the day, as Gen 17:26 Lev...

In the selfsame day on which the flood began by that terrible shower. Heb. In the body, or essence, or strength of the day, as Gen 17:26 Lev 23:14 Jos 10:27 : q. d. Not in the dark or twilight, like one ashamed of his action, or afraid of the people, but when it was clear day, or about noon-tide, in the public view of the world.

Poole: Gen 7:14 - Every bird // Of every sort Every bird The first word signifies the greater, the second the less sort of birds, as appears from Gen 15:9,10 Le 14:4 Psa 104:17 . Of every sort ...

Every bird The first word signifies the greater, the second the less sort of birds, as appears from Gen 15:9,10 Le 14:4 Psa 104:17 .

Of every sort Heb. Of every kind of wing, whether feathered, as it is in most birds, or skinny and gristly, as in bats.

Poole: Gen 7:15 - See Poole on "Gen 7:9" See Poole on "Gen 7:9" . i.e. All living creatures forementioned, Gen 7:14 .

See Poole on "Gen 7:9" . i.e. All living creatures forementioned, Gen 7:14 .

Poole: Gen 7:16 - -- Or, shut the door after him, or upon him, or for him, i.e. his good and safety, against the fury either of the waters or of the people. T...

Or, shut the door after him, or upon him, or for him, i.e. his good and safety, against the fury either of the waters or of the people. This God did in some extraordinary manner.

Poole: Gen 7:17 - The flood // The waters increased The flood or, that flood of waters which was poured down in that shower mentioned Gen 7:12 ; otherwise the flood was one hundred and fifty days upo...

The flood or, that flood of waters which was poured down in that shower mentioned Gen 7:12 ; otherwise the flood was one hundred and fifty days upon the earth, Gen 7:24 .

The waters increased by the accession of more waters from above and beneath.

Poole: Gen 7:18 - The waters were increased greatly upon the earth The waters were increased greatly upon the earth overthrowing men, and houses, and trees, where possibly they did or thought to secure themselves.

The waters were increased greatly upon the earth overthrowing men, and houses, and trees, where possibly they did or thought to secure themselves.

Poole: Gen 7:19 - -- Profane wits pretend this to be impossible, because of the vast height of divers mountains. But, 1. This cannot be thought impossible by any man th...

Profane wits pretend this to be impossible, because of the vast height of divers mountains. But,

1. This cannot be thought impossible by any man that believeth a God; to whom it was as easy to bring forth a sufficiency of water, for this end, as to speak a word. And if we acknowledge a miracle of the Divine power and providence here, it is no more than even heathens have confessed in other cases.

2. Peradventure this flood might not be simply universal over the whole earth, but only over all the habitable world, where either men or beasts lived; which was as much as either the meritorious cause of the flood, men’ s sins, or the end of it, the destruction of all men and beasts, required. And the or that whole heaven may be understood of that which was over all the habitable parts of it. And whereas our modern heathens, that miscall themselves Christians, laugh at the history of this flood upon this and the like occasions, as if it were an idle romance; they may please to note, that their predecessors, the ancient and wiser heathens, have divers of them acknowledged the truth of it, though they also mixed it with their fables, which was neither strange nor unusual for them to do. Lactantius appeals to the heathens of his age concerning it. Nay, there is not only mention of the flood in general, but also of the dove sent out of the ark, in Plutarch, and Berosus, and Abydenus. And the memory of this general flood is preserved to this day among the poor ignorant Indians, who asked the Christians who invaded their land, whether they ever heard of such a thing, and whether another flood was to be expected? And the Chinese writers relate, that but one person, whom they call Puoncuus, with his family, were saved in the flood, and all the rest perished.

Poole: Gen 7:20 - Fifteen cubits Fifteen cubits were sufficient for the destruction of the highest men, or other creatures, though placed upon the highest mountains.

Fifteen cubits were sufficient for the destruction of the highest men, or other creatures, though placed upon the highest mountains.

Poole: Gen 7:21 - All flesh that moved All flesh that moved i.e. lived; for motion is a sign of life.

All flesh that moved i.e. lived; for motion is a sign of life.

Poole: Gen 7:22 - -- Whether men or beasts, &c., all that breathed the same air with man, all that lived in the same element which man by his sins had infected; whereby ...

Whether men or beasts, &c., all that breathed the same air with man, all that lived in the same element which man by his sins had infected; whereby the fishes are excepted, as living in another element. See Poole on "Gen 2:7" .

Poole: Gen 7:23 - -- This is so often repeated, that it may be more deeply ingrafted into the dull minds and hard hearts of men, to teach men that they ought again and a...

This is so often repeated, that it may be more deeply ingrafted into the dull minds and hard hearts of men, to teach men that they ought again and again to consider this dreadful instance of God’ s justice against sin and incorrigible sinners.

Poole: Gen 7:24 - The waters prevailed // An hundred and fifty days The waters prevailed i.e. either grew higher and higher, or rather continued to prevail, and did not decrease. An hundred and fifty days in all, wh...

The waters prevailed i.e. either grew higher and higher, or rather continued to prevail, and did not decrease.

An hundred and fifty days in all, whereof one part was the forty days mentioned Gen 7:17 , as appears from Gen 8:4 .

Haydock: Gen 7:2 - Of all clean // Clean // And seven Of all clean. The distinction of clean and unclean beasts, appears to have been made before the law of Moses, which was not promulgated till the yea...

Of all clean. The distinction of clean and unclean beasts, appears to have been made before the law of Moses, which was not promulgated till the year of the world 2514. (Challoner). ---

Clean: not according to the law of Moses, which was not yet given, but such as tradition had described ---

fit for sacrifice; (Menochius) though they might be of the same species as were deemed clean in the law, which ratified the ancient institution. ---

And seven: (Hebrew) simply seven, three couple and an odd female, for sacrifice after the deluge: one couple was to breed, the other two perhaps for food. (Haydock) ---

Some imagine, that there were fourteen unclean and four clean animals, of every species, in the ark, because the Samaritan, Septuagint, and Vulgate read, "seven and seven." (Origen, &c.) ---

But our Saviour, sending the Disciples to preach two and two, did not appoint a company of four to go together, but only of two, as is generally allowed, Mark vi. 7. (Calmet)

Haydock: Gen 7:11 - Seventeenth day // Fountains and flood-gates Seventeenth day. On the tenth, God had given the last warning to the wretched and obstinate sinners, to whom Noe had been preaching, both by word an...

Seventeenth day. On the tenth, God had given the last warning to the wretched and obstinate sinners, to whom Noe had been preaching, both by word and by building the ark, for 120 years; all in vain. This second month is, by some, supposed to be the month of May; by others, that of November. Usher makes Noe enter the ark on the 18th December 1656. The waters decreased May 17, mountains appear July 31, he sends out the raven September 8, and leaves the ark December 29, after having remained in it a year and ten days, according to the antediluvian computation, or a full year of 365 days. The systems of those pretended philosophers, who would represent this flood as only partial, affecting the countries which were then inhabited, are all refuted by the plain narration of Moses. What part of the world could have been secure, when the waters prevailed fifteen cubits above the highest mountains? To give a natural cause only for this miraculous effect, would be nugatory: but as waters covered the earth at first, so they surely might again, by the power of God. (Haydock) ---

Fountains and flood-gates. These are the two natural causes which Moses assigns for the deluge, the waters below, and those above in the sky or firmament. Heaven is said to be shut when it does not rain, (Luke iv. 25.) so it is here opened, and flood-gates, or torrents of rain, pour down incessantly. But God attributes not the deluge to these causes alone; he sufficiently intimates that it would be miraculous, (ver. 4, I will rain, ) and still more emphatically, chap. vi. 17, Behold I . Hebrew, "I, even I myself, do bring on a flood of waters." The idea which Moses give of the flood, corresponds with that which he before gave of chaos, when earth and water were undistinguished in one confusing mass, chap. i. 6. The Hebrews look upon it as a continual miracle, that the earth is not always deluged, being founded, as they represent it, on the waters, Jeremias v. 22. Calmet and others have proved, both from Scripture and from philosophical arguments, the universality of the deluge, against Isaac Vossius, &c. (Haydock)

Haydock: Gen 7:16 - The Lord shut him in The Lord shut him in, by an angel besmearing the door with pitch, to prevent the waters from penetrating, while Noe did the like in the inside. (Cal...

The Lord shut him in, by an angel besmearing the door with pitch, to prevent the waters from penetrating, while Noe did the like in the inside. (Calmet) ---

Thus God supplies our wants when we are not able to provide for ourselves, and though he could do all by himself, yet he requires us to co-operate with him, and often makes use of secondary causes. (Worthington)

Haydock: Gen 7:24 - Days Days: counting from the end of the forty days, when the deluge was at its height. (Calmet) --- In all the histories of past ages, there is nothing ...

Days: counting from the end of the forty days, when the deluge was at its height. (Calmet) ---

In all the histories of past ages, there is nothing so terrible as this event. What became of all those myriads of human beings who perished on this occasion? We know not. Some have charitably supposed, that, although the far greater part perished everlastingly, a few who had been incredulous while Noe preached, opened their eyes at last, when it was too late to save their bodies, and by sincere repentance rescued their souls from the flames, and were consigned to do penance, for a time, in the other world. These heard the preaching of Jesus Christ, or believed in his redemption, while they were yet living, and so deserved to partake of his mercies, and joyfully beheld his sacred person when he came to visit them in their prison of purgatory. 1 Peter iii. 19, He came and preached to those spirits that were in prison: which had been sometime incredulous, when they waited for the patience of God in the days of Noe, when the ark was a building: wherein a few, that is eight souls, were saved from drowning by water. Whereunto baptism, being of the like form, now saves you also, &c. See F. S. Bellarmine, &c. In these last words of St. Peter, we may also notice, that the ark was a figure of baptism, which is so necessary, that without its reception, or desire of it at least, no man can be saved. It is also a figure of the cross, and of the one true Church, as the Fathers remark, with St. Augustine, City of God xv. i; Menochius &c.; St. Gregory, hom. 12 in Ezech. &c. ---

This is so striking that it deserves to be seriously considered. It was only one, though God could have ordered many smaller vessels to be made ready, perhaps with less inconvenience to Noe, that we might reflect, out of the Church the obstinate will surely perish. St. Jerome, ep. ad Dam.: In this ark all that were truly holy, and some imperfect, like Cham, were contained, clean beasts and unclean dwelt together, that we need not wonder if some Catholics be a disgrace to their name. The ark had different partitions, to remind us of the various orders of Clergy and Laity in the Church, with one chief governor, the Pope, like Noe in the ark. It was strong, visible, &c., and pitched all over with the durable cement, bitumen, and riding triumphant amid the storms, the envy of all who were out of it, till at last it settled upon a rock. So the Church is built on a rock, against which the gates of hell shall not prevail: she is not less obvious to the sincere seeker, than a city built on the top of the highest mountain, &c. We might here take a retrospective view of the chief occurrences and personages of the former world; we should observe the same order of the things from the beginning, ---

the conflict of virtue and vice, the preservation of the true faith and worship of God among a few chosen souls, who preferred to be persecuted by worldlings, rather than to offend God. They contended earnestly for the fiath once delivered to the Saints, to Adam and Eve, once innocent, and afterwards penitent. We behold original sin, and the promised remedy for mankind; while the rebel angels are abandoned, without redress. There was kept up a communion of saints: sacrifice to the one God was performed generally by the heads of families, who were priests in the law of nature. Even Cain, though a bad man, through hypocrisy, chose to offer sacrifice before he had quite broken off from the society of the faithful, and resolved to become the father of all excommunicated persons, and of all seceders. (chap. iv. 16.) He was admonished by God that he had free will, and might merit a reward by a different conduct. His sentence, as well as that pronounced upon Adam, and upon all mankind, before the flood, reminds us of the particular and general judgment; as the translation of Henoch sets before us the happy state of the blessed, and the immortality, of which it was an earnest. See Douay Bible, where the chief mysteries of faith are pointed out as the creed of the Antediluvians. Even the Blessed Trinity was insinuated, or shewn to them, at a distance, in various texts: the unity and indissolubility of marriage were clearly expressed; the true Church continued in Noe, while the chain of schismatics and heretics was broken, and Cain's progeny destroyed. In this period of time, we may discover what the ancients so often describe respecting the four ages: ---

the golden age is most perfectly found in Paradise; but only for a few days, or perhaps only a few hours, during which our first parents preserved their innocence. The silver age may have lasted rather longer, till the murder of Abel, or 128 years, when Cain began to disturb the peace of the world. From that time, till the giants make their appearance, we may reckon the age of brass. But that of iron had continued for may years before the flood. The like deterioration of morals we may discover after the deluge, and again after the renovation of the world, by the preaching of the gospel. For some time after these two great events, things bore a pleasing aspect; Noe was busy in offering sacrifice to God, Christians wee all one heart and one soul, enjoying all things in common, and God gave a blessing to the earth, and confirmed his covenant with men. Then Cham, Nemrod, and Babel appear, heresies in the new law break forth, and disturb the lovely harmony of mankind: but still a sufficient number preserve their integrity, till about the days of Abraham and Arius, in their respective periods, and may be said to have lived in the silver age, when compared with the brazen insolence of the great majority of those who came after. The iron age of these two periods, may be dated from the persecution of Epiphanes against the Jews, when so may apostatized from the faith, and from that much more terrible persecution which will be raised against Christians by Antichrist, the man of sin, (of which the former was a type) when the charity of many shall grow cold, and Christ will hardly find faith upon the earth. To that age may just be applied, those strong expressions of disapprobation which God made use of before the flood, chap. vi. 3, 6, 12. He will punish the crimes of that age with a deluge of fire, and say, The end of all flesh is come before me, &c., ver. 13. Time shall be no longer, Apocalypse x. 6. (Haydock)

Gill: Gen 7:1 - And the Lord said unto Noah // Come thou and all thy house into the ark // for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation And the Lord said unto Noah,.... After Noah had built the ark, and got all things ready as were commanded him; and when it was but seven days ere the ...

And the Lord said unto Noah,.... After Noah had built the ark, and got all things ready as were commanded him; and when it was but seven days ere the flood would begin:

Come thou and all thy house into the ark; that is, he and his wife, his three sons and their wives:

for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation: this was a great character of Noah; that he was a "righteous" person, not by his own righteousness, but by the righteousness of faith he was both heir and preacher of; and this he was "before" God, in his sight, seen, known, and acknowledged by him as righteous; and therefore must be really so: and this shows that he was not so by the works of the law, but by the righteousness of Christ; because by them no flesh living is justified in the sight of God: and Noah was a rare instance of this character; there was none besides him in that wicked generation, so that he was very conspicuous and remarkable; and it was wonderful grace to him, that he should have this blessing to be righteous in an age so sadly corrupt, which was the cause of his being saved; for whoever are justified shall be saved eternally, Rom 8:30 as well as they are often saved from temporal calamities, see Isa 3:10.

Gill: Gen 7:2 - Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens // the male and his female // and of beasts that are not clean by two Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens,.... From hence it appears, that the distinction of clean and unclean beasts, at least for sacr...

Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens,.... From hence it appears, that the distinction of clean and unclean beasts, at least for sacrifice, if not for food, was known before the flood, and so before the law of Moses; though some think this is said by anticipation, and as providing a large stock of such creatures for the propagation of their species; because they would be most serviceable to men both for food and sacrifice: but as it is certain that sacrifices were offered ever since the fall of man; by the same way, namely, by divine revelation, that men were taught to sacrifice creatures as typical of the sacrifice of Christ, they were directed what sort of creatures to offer, as were most suitable figures of him; those beasts that were clean, and used under the law, and so no doubt, at this time, were oxen, sheep, and goats: and these were to be taken into the ark by "sevens", or "seven seven" p; either only three pairs, male and female, for procreation, and the seventh a male for sacrifice, when the flood was over; or rather fourteen, seven couple, an equal number of male and female, as Aben Ezra and Ben Gersom, that there might be enough for propagation; since a large number of them would be consumed, both for food and sacrifice:

the male and his female, or "the man and his wife" q; which confirms the sense given, that there were seven pairs, or otherwise, if there had been an odd seventh, there would not have been a male and his female:

and of beasts that are not clean by two, or only two:

the male and his female, or "the man and his wife"; which was a number sufficient for the propagation of creatures neither used for food nor sacrifice; and many of which are harmful to mankind, as lions, wolves, tigers, bears, &c.

Gill: Gen 7:3 - Of fowls also of the air by sevens, the male and his female // to keep seed alive upon the face of all the earth Of fowls also of the air by sevens, the male and his female,.... That is, of such as were clean; seven couple of these were to be brought into the ark...

Of fowls also of the air by sevens, the male and his female,.... That is, of such as were clean; seven couple of these were to be brought into the ark, for the like use as of the clean beasts, and those under the law; and so at this time, and here meant were turtledoves, and young pigeons that were for sacrifice; and the rest were for food: and the design of bringing both into the ark was:

to keep seed alive upon the face of all the earth; that the species of creatures might be continued, both of beasts and birds, clean and unclean.

Gill: Gen 7:4 - For yet seven days // and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights // and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth For yet seven days,.... Or one week more, after the above orders were given, which, the Jews say, were for the mourning at Methuselah's death; others,...

For yet seven days,.... Or one week more, after the above orders were given, which, the Jews say, were for the mourning at Methuselah's death; others, that they were an additional space to the one hundred and twenty given to the old world for repentance; in which time some might truly repent, finding that the destruction of the world was very near, and who might be saved from everlasting damnation, though not from perishing in the flood: but it rather was a space of time proper for Noah to have, to settle himself and family, and all the creatures in the ark, and dispose of everything there, in the best manner, for their sustenance and safety:

and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights: this was not an ordinary but an extraordinary rain, in which the power and providence of God were eminently concerned, both with respect to the continuance of it, and the quantity of water that fell:

and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth: not every substance that has a vegetative life, as plants, herbs, and trees, which were not destroyed, see Gen 8:11 but every substance that has animal life, as fowls, cattle, creeping things, and men.

Gill: Gen 7:5 - And Noah did according to all that the Lord commanded him And Noah did according to all that the Lord commanded him,.... He prepared for his entrance into the ark, and all the creatures with him; got everythi...

And Noah did according to all that the Lord commanded him,.... He prepared for his entrance into the ark, and all the creatures with him; got everything ready for them, the rooms for their habitation, and food for their sustenance.

Gill: Gen 7:6 - And Noah was six hundred years old when the flood of waters was upon the earth And Noah was six hundred years old when the flood of waters was upon the earth,.... When it began, for he was in his six hundred and first year when i...

And Noah was six hundred years old when the flood of waters was upon the earth,.... When it began, for he was in his six hundred and first year when it ended, Gen 8:13 his eldest son was now an hundred years old, since when Noah was five hundred years old he begat children, Gen 5:32.

Gill: Gen 7:7 - And Noah went in, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons' wives with him, into the ark // because of the waters of the flood And Noah went in, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons' wives with him, into the ark,.... Within the space of the seven days, between the command ...

And Noah went in, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons' wives with him, into the ark,.... Within the space of the seven days, between the command of God to go into it, and the coming of the flood; or rather on the seventh day, on which it began to rain; when he saw it was coming on, see Gen 7:11.

because of the waters of the flood; for fear of them, lest, before he entered into the ark with his family, he and they should be carried away with them; or "from the face of the waters" r, which now began to appear and spread; or rather, "before the waters" s, before they came to any height.

Gill: Gen 7:8 - Of clean beasts, and of beasts that are not clean // and of fowls // and of everything that creepeth upon the earth Of clean beasts, and of beasts that are not clean,.... Seven couple of the one, and a couple of the other: and of fowls, clean and unclean, also a ...

Of clean beasts, and of beasts that are not clean,.... Seven couple of the one, and a couple of the other:

and of fowls, clean and unclean, also a like number:

and of everything that creepeth upon the earth; and upon that only, not in the water, for these had no need of the ark, they could live in the waters.

Gill: Gen 7:9 - There went in two and two unto Noah into the ark // the male and the female // as God commanded Noah There went in two and two unto Noah into the ark,.... Of themselves, as Jarchi and Aben Ezra, being impressed with an instinct from God so to do; or b...

There went in two and two unto Noah into the ark,.... Of themselves, as Jarchi and Aben Ezra, being impressed with an instinct from God so to do; or by the ministry of angels, as observed See Gill on Gen 6:20 there were two of a sort, and some think four:

the male and the female; and of some seven, or seven pairs, as before observed:

as God commanded Noah; which respects his own and his family's entrance and the creatures; both were commanded by God, and attended to by Noah, who was obedient in all things.

Gill: Gen 7:10 - And it came to pass after seven days // that the waters of the flood were upon the earth And it came to pass after seven days,.... Were ended, or on the seventh day, after God had given the orders to Noah, to prepare for his going into the...

And it came to pass after seven days,.... Were ended, or on the seventh day, after God had given the orders to Noah, to prepare for his going into the ark, with his family, and all the creatures:

that the waters of the flood were upon the earth: that is, they began to be upon the earth; for it continued to rain from hence forty days and forty nights; and still the waters continued to increase, and it was an hundred and fifty days before they began to ebb.

Gill: Gen 7:11 - In the six hundredth year of Noah's life // in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month // the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened In the six hundredth year of Noah's life,.... Not complete, but current, for otherwise Noah would have lived after the flood three hundred and fifty o...

In the six hundredth year of Noah's life,.... Not complete, but current, for otherwise Noah would have lived after the flood three hundred and fifty one years, whereas he lived but three hundred and fifty; Gen 9:28.

in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month: as the Jews had two ways of beginning their year, one at the spring, and the other at autumn; the one on ecclesiastical accounts, which began at Nisan, and which answers to March and April; and then the second month must be Ijar, which answers to part of April and part of May: and the other on civil accounts, which began at Tisri, and answers to part of September and part of October; and then the second month must be Marchesvan, which answers to part of October and part of November; so they are divided about this month in which the flood was: one says it was Marchesvan; another that it was Ijar t; a third in particular says u it was on the tenth of Marchesvan that all the creatures came together into the ark, and on the seventeenth the waters of the flood descended on the earth; and this is most likely, since this was the most ancient way of beginning the year; for it was not until after the Jews came out of Egypt that they began their year in Nisan on sacred accounts; and besides the autumn was a proper time for Noah's gathering in the fruits of the earth, to lay up in the ark, as well as for the falling of the rains; though others think it was in the spring, in the most pleasant time of the year, and when the flood was least expected: the Arabic writers w, contrary to both, and to the Scripture, say, that Noah, with his sons, and their wives, and whomsoever the Lord bid him take into the ark, entered on a Friday, the twenty seventh day of the month Adar or Agar: according to the Chaldean account by Berosus x, it was predicted that mankind would be destroyed by a flood on the fifteenth of the month Daesius, the second month from the vernal equinox: it is very remarkable what Plutarch y relates, that Osiris went into the ark the seventeenth of Athyr, which month is the second after the autumnal equinox, and entirely agrees with the account of Moses concerning Noah: according to Bishop Usher, it was on the seventh of December, on the first day of the week; others the sixth of November; with Mr. Whiston the twenty eighth:

the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened; and by both these the flood of waters was brought upon the earth, which drowned it, and all the creatures in it: by the former are meant the vast quantities of subterraneous waters, which are more or greater than we know; and might be greater still at the time of the deluge:"there are large lakes, (as Seneca observes z,) which we see not, much of the sea that lies hidden, and many rivers that slide in secret:''so that those vast quantities of water in the bowels of the earth being pressed upwards, by the falling down of the earth, or by some other cause unknown to us, as Bishop Patrick observes, gushed out violently in several parts of the earth, where holes and gaps were made, and where they either found or made a vent, which, with the forty days' rain, might well make such a flood as here described: it is observed a, there are seas which have so many rivers running into them, which must be emptied in an unknown manner, by some subterraneous passages, as the Euxine sea; and particularly it is remarked of the Caspian sea, reckoned in length to be above one hundred and twenty German leagues, and in breadth from east to west about ninety, that it has no visible way for the water to run out, and yet it receives into its bosom near one hundred rivers, and particularly the great river Volga, which is of itself like a sea for largeness, and is supposed to empty so much water into it in a year's time, as might suffice to cover the whole earth, and yet it is never increased nor diminished, nor is it observed to ebb or flow: so that if, says my author, the fountains of the great deep, or these subterraneous passages, were continued to be let loose, without any reflux into them, as Moses supposes, during the time of the rain of forty days and forty nights; and the waters ascended but a quarter of a mile in an hour; yet in forty days it would drain all the waters for two hundred and forty miles deep; which would, no doubt, be sufficient to cover the earth above four miles high: and by the former, "the windows" or flood gates of heaven, or the "cataracts", as the Septuagint version, may be meant the clouds, as Sir Walter Raleigh b interprets them; Moses using the word, he says, to express the violence of the rains, and pouring down of waters; for whosoever, adds he, hath seen those fallings of water which sometimes happen in the Indies, which are called "the spouts", where clouds do not break into drops, but fall with a resistless violence in one body, may properly use that manner of speech which Moses did, that the windows or flood gates of heaven were opened, or that the waters fell contrary to custom, and that order which we call natural; God then loosened the power retentive in the uppermost air, and the waters fell in abundance: and another writer upon this observes c, that thick air is easily turned into water; and that round the earth there is a thicker air, which we call the "atmosphere"; which, the further it is distant from the earth, the thinner it is, and so it grows thinner in proportion, until it loseth all its watery quality: how far this may extend cannot be determined; it may reach as far as the orb of the moon, for aught we know to the contrary; now when this retentive quality of waters was withdrawn, Moses tells us, that "the rain was upon the earth forty days" and "forty nights": and therefore some of it might come so far as to be forty days in falling; and if we allow the rain a little more than ten miles in an hour, or two hundred and fifty miles in a day, then all the watery particles, which were 10,000 miles high, might descend upon the earth; and this alone might be more than sufficient to cover the highest mountains. (We now know that the earth's atmosphere does not extent more than a few miles above the earth's surface, before thinning out rapidly. If all the water vapour in our present atmosphere fell as rain, the ground would be covered to an average depth of less than two inches d. Even if there was a vapour canopy, this would not be a major source or water. Most of the water came from subterranean sources or volcanic activity. We know that volcanic eruptions spew much steam and water vapour into the atmosphere. This would later fall as rain. For a complete discussion of this see the book in footnote e. Ed.)

Gill: Gen 7:12 - And the rain was upon the earth forty days and forty nights And the rain was upon the earth forty days and forty nights,.... So long it was falling upon it, after the windows of heaven were opened. Aben Ezra wo...

And the rain was upon the earth forty days and forty nights,.... So long it was falling upon it, after the windows of heaven were opened. Aben Ezra would have it, that all things were in such confusion, during the flood, that there was no difference between day and night, since, it is said, "day and night shall not cease any more"; and that after the waters ceased, then Noah knew that forty days and nights had passed, for God had revealed this secret to him; but the text seems more to make against him than for him.

Gill: Gen 7:13 - In the selfsame day entered Noah, and Shem, and Ham, and Japheth, the sons of Noah // and Noah's wife, and the three wives of his sons, into the ark In the selfsame day entered Noah, and Shem, and Ham, and Japheth, the sons of Noah,.... That is, on the seventeenth day of the second month; See Gill ...

In the selfsame day entered Noah, and Shem, and Ham, and Japheth, the sons of Noah,.... That is, on the seventeenth day of the second month; See Gill on Gen 7:11 the names of Noah and his three sons are expressed, but not the names of his wife, and of the wives of his sons; they are only described by their relation as follows:

and Noah's wife, and the three wives of his sons, into the ark: but other writers pretend to give us their names; Berosus c calls the wife of Noah "Tytea", the great, and Aretia, plainly from "Tit", clay, and "Aerets", the earth; and his sons' wives Pandora, Noela, and Noegla: according to Sanchoniatho d, the name of Noah was "Epigeus", a man of the earth, see Gen 9:20 and afterwards "Ouranus", heaven; and he had a sister whom he married, called "Ge", earth; and with this agrees the account that the Allantes give of their deities; the first of which was Uranus, and his wife's name was Titaea; who, after her death, was deified, and called "Ge" e: so the Jewish writers say f, the wife of Noah was called Titzia, and others say Aritzia, from the word "Eretz", earth g; though others will have it, that she was Naamah, the daughter of Lamech: the Arabic writers h tell us, that the name of Noah's wife was Hancel, the daughter of Namusa, the son of Enoch; that the name of Shem's wife was Zalbeth, or, as other copies, Zalith or Salit; that the name of Ham's Nahalath; and of Japheth's Aresisia; who were all three the daughters of Methuselah; and they also relate i, that when Noah entered the ark, he took the body of Adam with him, and placed it in the middle of the ark.

Gill: Gen 7:14 - They, and every beast after his kind, and all the cattle after their kind // and every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind // every fowl after his kind // every bird of every sort They, and every beast after his kind, and all the cattle after their kind,.... They, Noah and his family, went into the ark; as did all sorts of beast...

They, and every beast after his kind, and all the cattle after their kind,.... They, Noah and his family, went into the ark; as did all sorts of beasts and cattle, reckoned one hundred and thirty sorts, by some one hundred and fifty, including serpents:

and every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind; supposed to be scarce thirty sorts; not one sort of creature was left out, though ever so small, and despicable:

every fowl after his kind; Bishop Wilkins has divided them into nine sorts, and reckons them up to be one hundred and ninety five in the whole:

every bird of every sort, or "bird of every wing" k, let their wings be what they will; some, as Ainsworth observes, are winged with feathers, others with skin, as bats.

Gill: Gen 7:15 - And they went in unto Noah into the ark // two and two of all flesh, wherein is the breath of life And they went in unto Noah into the ark,.... Noah went in first, and the creatures of themselves came to him, or were conducted by the ministry of ang...

And they went in unto Noah into the ark,.... Noah went in first, and the creatures of themselves came to him, or were conducted by the ministry of angels; and they were delivered into his hands, and he placed them in the ark as was most convenient for them: it is very likely he went in and out as occasion required, for the better management and disposition of things; for he seems to be the last of all that went in, see Gen 7:16,

two and two of all flesh, wherein is the breath of life; they that went by sevens, yet being seven couples, as has been observed, as those which were only two or four, went by pairs: this is true of them all.

Gill: Gen 7:16 - And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh // as God had commanded him // and the Lord shut him in And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh,.... These pairs were not two males or two females, but one male and one female; so they w...

And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh,.... These pairs were not two males or two females, but one male and one female; so they were coupled for the propagation of their species, which was the end of their entering into the ark, and being preserved:

as God had commanded him: Noah, who took care, as they entered, that there were so many of a sort as was enjoined, and these were male and female:

and the Lord shut him in; or shut the door after him l, he being the last that entered; and which he could not so well shut himself, at least so close, as was done by the Lord, or by the angels; and this was done to keep out the waters, and all within in safety; and to shut out others, and preserve Noah from the rage of wicked men, as well as the violence of the waters: some m have thought that not so much the door of the ark is meant, as the way to it, the pensile bridge which was necessary for the creatures to enter the ark; which being carried away by the force of the waters near the ark, that not being joined to it, precluded all access of the scoffers, whose scoffs were soon turned to lamentation and howling.

Gill: Gen 7:17 - And the flood was forty days upon the earth // the waters increased, and bare up the ark, and it was lift up above the earth And the flood was forty days upon the earth,.... This is said with respect to what follows, and the meaning is, that when and after the flood had been...

And the flood was forty days upon the earth,.... This is said with respect to what follows, and the meaning is, that when and after the flood had been upon the earth so long, then

the waters increased, and bare up the ark, and it was lift up above the earth; after this they were so many and so strong that they lifted up the ark from the place where it stood, and bore it up, that it touched not the earth; and Aben Ezra from hence infers, that the ark did not remove from its place after the flood began, until forty days.

Gill: Gen 7:18 - And the waters prevailed, and were increased greatly upon the earth // and the ark went upon the face of the waters And the waters prevailed, and were increased greatly upon the earth,.... Still they became greater and more powerful, as to bear up the ark, so to cas...

And the waters prevailed, and were increased greatly upon the earth,.... Still they became greater and more powerful, as to bear up the ark, so to cast down houses, trees, &c. by the continual rains that fell, though perhaps they were not so violent as before, and by the constant eruptions of water out of the earth:

and the ark went upon the face of the waters; it floated about upon them, in an easy gentle manner; for there were no storms of wind or tempests raised, which might endanger it. (If much of the water came from volcanic activity, and if earthquakes accompanied the breaking forth of the fountains of the deep, many tidal waves would result. This would completely destroy and remains of the old civilisation and as well give the ark a rough sea to drift in. The ark's dimensions would give make it almost impossible to upset. Ed.)

Gill: Gen 7:19 - And the waters prevailed exceedingly on the earth // and all the high hills that were under the whole heaven were covered And the waters prevailed exceedingly on the earth,.... Yet more and more, so that the people without the ark were obliged to remove, not only from the...

And the waters prevailed exceedingly on the earth,.... Yet more and more, so that the people without the ark were obliged to remove, not only from the lower to the higher rooms in their houses, and to the tops of them, but to the highest trees; and when these were bore down, to the highest hills and mountains; and to those it was in vain to fly, by what follows:

and all the high hills that were under the whole heaven were covered: whence it appears there were hills before the flood, and that these were not caused by it, and that the deluge was universal, since there was not a hill under the whole heaven but what was covered with it. In Deucalion's flood all men are said to perish, except a few who fled to the high mountains n; which story seems to be hammered out of this account.

Gill: Gen 7:20 - Fifteen cubits upwards did the waters prevail // and the mountains were covered Fifteen cubits upwards did the waters prevail,.... Either to such an height above the earth, upwards from that, or from the high hills; for though the...

Fifteen cubits upwards did the waters prevail,.... Either to such an height above the earth, upwards from that, or from the high hills; for though the words do not necessarily imply that, yet it may be allowed, since there was water enough to cover the highest of them; and fifteen cubits of water were enough to drown the tallest man, or largest beast that should be upon the top of any of them:

and the mountains were covered, with water, even it may be allowed fifteen cubits high; nor will this furnish out so considerable an objection to the history of the flood as may be thought at first sight, since the highest mountains are not near so high as they are by some calculated. Sir Walter Raleigh allows thirty miles for the height of the mountains, yet the highest in the world will not be found to be above six direct miles in height. Olympus, whose height is so extolled by the poets, does not exceed a mile and a half perpendicular, and about seventy paces. Mount Athos, said to cast its shade into the isle of Lemnos (according to, Pliny eighty seven miles) is not above two miles in height, nor Caucasus much more; nay, the Peak of Teneriff, reputed the highest mountain in the world, may be ascended in three days (according to the proportion of eight furlongs to a day's journey), which makes about the height of a German mile perpendicular; and the Spaniards affirm, that the Andes, those lofty mountains of Peru, in comparison of which they say the Alps are but cottages, may be ascended in four days' compass o.

Gill: Gen 7:21 - And all flesh died that moved upon the earth // both of fowl, and of cattle, and of beast, and of every creeping thing that creepeth on the earth // and every man And all flesh died that moved upon the earth,.... That had animal life in them, of which motion was a sign: both of fowl, and of cattle, and of bea...

And all flesh died that moved upon the earth,.... That had animal life in them, of which motion was a sign:

both of fowl, and of cattle, and of beast, and of every creeping thing that creepeth on the earth; excepting those that were in the ark. This general destruction of the creatures, as it was for the sins of men, whose they were, and by whom they were abused, and is expressive of God's hatred of sin, and of his holiness and justice in the punishment of it; so, on the other hand, it is a display both of the wisdom of God, in causing a decrease of the creatures, in proportion to the decrease of men, who now would not need so many; and of the goodness of God to those that were spared, that so the beasts of the field, especially the wilder sort, might not multiply against them, and prevail over them, see Exo 23:29.

and every man: except those in the ark; and the number of them is supposed to be as great, if not greater, than of the present inhabitants of the earth, by those who are skilful in the calculation of the increase of men. It is thought it may be easily allowed, that their number amounted to eleven billion; and some have made their number to be eighty billion p. The Apostle Peter calls them, the world of the ungodly, 2Pe 2:5.

Gill: Gen 7:22 - All in whose nostrils was the breath of life // of all that was in the dry land, died All in whose nostrils was the breath of life,.... Whether of fowls, beast, cattle, or creeping things: of all that was in the dry land, died; by w...

All in whose nostrils was the breath of life,.... Whether of fowls, beast, cattle, or creeping things:

of all that was in the dry land, died; by which description fishes were excepted, since they breathe not, having no lungs, and are not on the dry land, where they cannot live, but in the waters. Some pretend it to be the opinion of some Jewish writers, that the fishes did die, the waters being made hot, and scalded them; but this fable I have not met with.

Gill: Gen 7:23 - And every living substance was destroyed which was upon the face of the ground // both men and cattle, and the creeping things, and the fowl of the heaven, and they were destroyed from the earth // and Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the ark And every living substance was destroyed which was upon the face of the ground,.... Not everything, particularly trees; for after the flood was abated...

And every living substance was destroyed which was upon the face of the ground,.... Not everything, particularly trees; for after the flood was abated there was an olive tree, a leaf of which was brought to Noah by the dove, Gen 8:11 but all animals:

both men and cattle, and the creeping things, and the fowl of the heaven, and they were destroyed from the earth; this is repeated, partly for explanation of the preceding clause, and partly for confirmation of this general destruction, which might seem almost incredible; there never was such a destruction of creatures before, or since, nor never will be till the general conflagration; and is a proof of the sovereignty of God, his almighty power, the purity and holiness of his nature, and the strictness and severity of his justice, and shows what a fearful thing it is to fail into his hands:

and Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the ark; besides those, of the millions of mankind that were upon the earth, not one was left, the flood came and destroyed them all, Luk 17:27 the fable some Jewish writers relate of Og being found alive, and which they gather from Deu 3:11 by sitting upon a piece of wood of one of the ladders of the ark, to whom Noah reached out food every day, and so he remained alive q, deserves no regard; though perhaps from hence arose the Grecian fable of the flood of Ogyges, which seems to be the same with this of Noah.

Gill: Gen 7:24 - And the waters prevailed upon the earth one hundred and fifty days. And the waters prevailed upon the earth one hundred and fifty days. Which is to be reckoned not from the end of the forty days' rain, but from the beg...

And the waters prevailed upon the earth one hundred and fifty days. Which is to be reckoned not from the end of the forty days' rain, but from the beginning of the flood; for from the seventeenth day of the second month, when the fountains of the deep were broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened, unto the seventeenth day of the seventh month, when the ark rested on the mountains of Ararat, and the waters decreased, were just five months, or one hundred and fifty days; until which time the waters increased yet more and more, even after the forty days' rain; so that it seems there was a continual rain afterwards, as Aben Ezra observes, though not so vehement; or otherwise it is not so easy to account for the increase of the waters.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Gen 7:1 Heb “for you I see [as] godly before me in this generation.” The direct object (“you”) is placed first in the clause to give i...

NET Notes: Gen 7:2 Heb “a male and his female” (also a second time at the end of this verse). The terms used here for male and female animals (אִ...

NET Notes: Gen 7:3 Heb “to keep alive offspring.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:4 The Hiphil participle מַמְטִיר (mamtir, “cause to rain”) here expresses the certainty of t...

NET Notes: Gen 7:5 Heb “according to all.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:6 Heb “and the flood was water upon.” The disjunctive clause (conjunction + subject + verb) is circumstantial/temporal in relation to the pr...

NET Notes: Gen 7:7 The preposition מִן (min) is causal here, explaining why Noah and his family entered the ark.

NET Notes: Gen 7:8 Heb “two two” meaning “in twos.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:9 Heb “Noah”; the pronoun has been used in the translation for stylistic reasons.

NET Notes: Gen 7:10 Heb “came upon.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:11 On the prescientific view of the sky reflected here, see L. I. J. Stadelmann, The Hebrew Conception of the World (AnBib), 46.

NET Notes: Gen 7:12 Heb “was.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:13 Heb “On that very day Noah entered, and Shem and Ham and Japheth, the sons of Noah, and the wife of Noah, and the three wives of his sons with h...

NET Notes: Gen 7:14 Heb “every bird, every wing.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:15 Heb “flesh.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:16 Heb “Those that went in, male and female from all flesh they went in.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:18 Heb “went.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:19 Heb “and.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:20 Heb “the waters prevailed fifteen cubits upward and they covered the mountains.” Obviously, a flood of twenty feet did not cover the mount...

NET Notes: Gen 7:21 Heb “flesh.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:22 Heb “everything which [has] the breath of the spirit of life in its nostrils from all which is in the dry land.”

NET Notes: Gen 7:23 The Hebrew verb שָׁאָר (sha’ar) means “to be left over; to survive” in the Niphal verb stem. It ...

NET Notes: Gen 7:24 The Hebrew verb translated “prevailed over” suggests that the waters were stronger than the earth. The earth and everything in it were no ...

Geneva Bible: Gen 7:1 And the LORD said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark; for thee have I seen ( a ) righteous before me in this generation. ( a ) In re...

Geneva Bible: Gen 7:2 Of every ( b ) clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens, the male and his female: and of beasts that [are] not clean by two, the male and his fem...

Geneva Bible: Gen 7:9 There ( c ) went in two and two unto Noah into the ark, the male and the female, as God had commanded Noah. ( c ) God compelled them to present thems...

Geneva Bible: Gen 7:11 In the six hundredth year of Noah's life, in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month, the same day were all the ( e ) fountains of the grea...

Geneva Bible: Gen 7:15 And they went in unto Noah into the ark, two and two ( f ) of all flesh, wherein [is] the breath of life. ( f ) Every living thing that God would hav...

Geneva Bible: Gen 7:16 And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh, as God had commanded him: and the LORD ( g ) shut him in. ( g ) So that God's secret pow...

Geneva Bible: Gen 7:23 And every living substance was destroyed ( h ) which was upon the face of the ground, both man, and cattle, and the creeping things, and the fowl of t...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Gen 7:1-12 - --The call to Noah is very kind, like that of a tender father to his children to come in-doors when he sees night or a storm coming. Noah did not go int...

MHCC: Gen 7:13-16 - --The ravenous creatures were made mild and manageable; yet, when this occasion was over, they were of the same kind as before; for the ark did not alte...

MHCC: Gen 7:17-20 - --The flood was increasing forty days. The waters rose so high, that the tops of the highest mountains were overflowed more than twenty feet. There is n...

MHCC: Gen 7:21-24 - --All the men, women, and children, that were in the world, excepting those in the ark, died. We may easily imagine what terror seized them. Our Saviour...

Matthew Henry: Gen 7:1-4 - -- Here is, I. A gracious invitation of Noah and his family into a place of safety, now that the flood of waters was coming, Gen 7:1. 1. The call itsel...

Matthew Henry: Gen 7:5-10 - -- Here is Noah's ready obedience to the commands that God gave him. Observe, 1. He went into the ark, upon notice that the flood would come after seve...

Matthew Henry: Gen 7:11-12 - -- Here is, I. The date of this great event; this is carefully recorded, for the greater certainty of the story. 1. It was in the 600th year of Noah's ...

Matthew Henry: Gen 7:13-16 - -- Here is repeated what was related before of Noah's entrance into the ark, with his family and creatures that were marked for preservation. Now, I. I...

Matthew Henry: Gen 7:17-20 - -- We are here told, I. How long the flood was increasing - forty days, Gen 7:17. The profane world, who believed not that it would come, probably wh...

Matthew Henry: Gen 7:21-24 - -- Here is, I. The general destruction of all flesh by the waters of the flood. Come, and see the desolations which God makes in the earth (Psa 46:8)...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 7:1-16 - -- Gen 7:1-12 When the ark was built, and the period of grace (Gen 6:3) had passed, Noah received instructions from Jehovah to enter the ark with his...

Keil-Delitzsch: Gen 7:17-24 - -- Gen 7:17-24 contain a description of the flood: how the water increased more and more, till it was 15 cubits above all the lofty mountains of the ea...

Constable: Gen 1:1--11:27 - --I. PRIMEVAL EVENTS 1:1--11:26 Chapters 1-11 provide an introduction to the Book of Genesis, the Pentateuch, and ...

Constable: Gen 6:9--10:1 - --D. What became of Noah 6:9-9:29 The Lord destroyed the corrupt, violent human race and deluged its world...

Constable: Gen 6:9--9:1 - --1. The Flood 6:9-8:22 The chiastic (palistrophic) structure of this section shows that Moses int...

Constable: Gen 6:9--7:11 - --Conditions and events before the Flood 6:9-7:10 6:9-12 "The same explanation for Enoch's rescue from death (he walked with God') is made the basis for...

Constable: Gen 7:11-24 - --The Flood proper 7:11-24 There are two views among evangelicals as to the extent of the ...

Guzik: Gen 7:1-24 - God Destroys the World with a Flood Genesis 7 - God Destroys the World with a Flood A. Final preparations for the flood. 1. (1) God invites Noah into the ark. Then the LORD said to N...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Bible Query: Gen 7:1 Q: In Gen 6:13 and 7:1, how did Noah know God was speaking to him, since He never saw God? A: Many times, people who have many years of relationship...

Bible Query: Gen 7:1 Q: In Gen 7:1, did the other people have "no chance" to repent as atheists have claimed? A: No. As they saw the ark being built, they could listen t...

Bible Query: Gen 7:2 Q: In Gen 7:2, how could Noah know how to take the clean animals, since there was no Old Testament law yet? A: Noah did not have the Old Testament s...

Bible Query: Gen 7:4--8:12 Q: In Gen 7:4 - 8:12, what is unusual about the literary structure here? A: This is called a chiasm, which is common in Hebrew literature, not Greek...

Bible Query: Gen 7:12 Q: In Gen 7:12,24, did the flood last 40 days, or 150? A: Genesis 7:12 says it rained from the sky for 40 days, but the waters flooded the earth for...

Bible Query: Gen 7:24 Q: In Gen 7:12,24, did the flood last 40 days, or 150? A: Genesis 7:12 says it rained from the sky for 40 days, but the waters flooded the earth for...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) GENESIS, the book of the origin or production of all things, consists of two parts: the first, comprehended in the first through eleventh chapters, gi...

JFB: Genesis (Garis Besar) THE CREATION OF HEAVEN AND EARTH. (Gen 1:1-2) THE FIRST DAY. (Gen 1:3-5) SECOND DAY. (Gen 1:6-8) THIRD DAY. (Gen 1:9-13) FOURTH DAY. (Gen 1:14-19) FI...

TSK: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Book of Genesis is the most ancient record in the world; including the History of two grand and stupendous subjects, Creation and Providence; of e...

TSK: Genesis 7 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Gen 7:1, Noah, with his family, and the living creatures, enter the ark, and the flood begins; Gen 7:17, The increase and continuance of ...

Poole: Genesis 7 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 7 God commands Noah to enter into the ark; the reason of it, Gen 7:1 . Directs him as to the manner and time, Gen 7:2-4 . Noah’ s obed...

MHCC: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) Genesis is a name taken from the Greek, and signifies " the book of generation or production;" it is properly so called, as containing an account of ...

MHCC: Genesis 7 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Gen 7:1-12) Noah, and his family and the living creatures, enter the ark, and the flood begins. (Gen 7:13-16) Noah shut in the ark. (Gen 7:17-20) T...

Matthew Henry: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The First Book of Moses, Called Genesis We have now before us the holy Bible, or book, for so bible ...

Matthew Henry: Genesis 7 (Pendahuluan Pasal) In this chapter we have the performance of what was foretold in the foregoing chapter, both concerning the destruction of the old world and the sal...

Constable: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title Each book of the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Old Testam...

Constable: Genesis (Garis Besar) Outline The structure of Genesis is very clear. The phrase "the generations of" (toledot in Hebrew, from yalad m...

Constable: Genesis Bibliography Aalders, Gerhard Charles. Genesis. The Bible Student's Commentary series. 2 vols. Translated by William Hey...

Haydock: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF GENESIS. INTRODUCTION. The Hebrews now entitle all the Five Books of Moses, from the initial words, which originally were written li...

Gill: Genesis (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO GENESIS This book, in the Hebrew copies of the Bible, and by the Jewish writers, is generally called Bereshith, which signifies "in...

Gill: Genesis 7 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO GENESIS 7 This chapter begins with an order to Noah to come with his family and all the creatures into the ark, that they might be ...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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