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Teks -- Psalms 32:1-11 (NET)

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Konteks
Psalm 32
32:1 By David; a well-written song. How blessed is the one whose rebellious acts are forgiven, whose sin is pardoned! 32:2 How blessed is the one whose wrongdoing the Lord does not punish, in whose spirit there is no deceit. 32:3 When I refused to confess my sin, my whole body wasted away, while I groaned in pain all day long. 32:4 For day and night you tormented me; you tried to destroy me in the intense heat of summer. (Selah) 32:5 Then I confessed my sin; I no longer covered up my wrongdoing. I said, “I will confess my rebellious acts to the Lord.” And then you forgave my sins. (Selah) 32:6 For this reason every one of your faithful followers should pray to you while there is a window of opportunity. Certainly when the surging water rises, it will not reach them. 32:7 You are my hiding place; you protect me from distress. You surround me with shouts of joy from those celebrating deliverance. (Selah) 32:8 I will instruct and teach you about how you should live. I will advise you as I look you in the eye. 32:9 Do not be like an unintelligent horse or mule, which will not obey you unless they are controlled by a bridle and bit. 32:10 An evil person suffers much pain, but the Lord’s faithfulness overwhelms the one who trusts in him. 32:11 Rejoice in the Lord and be happy, you who are godly! Shout for joy, all you who are morally upright!
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel
 · Maskil a literary or musical term
 · Selah a musical notation for crescendo or emphasis by action (IBD)


Topik/Tema Kamus: Music | David | PSALMS, BOOK OF | Conscience | God | Righteous | HORSE | CONFESSION | FORGIVENESS | Afflictions and Adversities | Joy | Prayer | Sin | Bit | Repentant Ones | Quotations and Allusions | IMPUTATION | Faith | Summer | Drought | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 32:2 - Imputeth Whom God doth not charge with the guilt of his sins, but graciously pardons and accepts him in Christ.

Whom God doth not charge with the guilt of his sins, but graciously pardons and accepts him in Christ.

Wesley: Psa 32:2 - No guile Who freely confesses all his sins, and turns from sin to God with all his heart.

Who freely confesses all his sins, and turns from sin to God with all his heart.

Wesley: Psa 32:3 - Silence From a full and open confession of my sins.

From a full and open confession of my sins.

Wesley: Psa 32:3 - Old My spirit failed, and the strength of my body decayed.

My spirit failed, and the strength of my body decayed.

Wesley: Psa 32:3 - Roaring Because of the continual horrors of my conscience, and sense of God's wrath.

Because of the continual horrors of my conscience, and sense of God's wrath.

Wesley: Psa 32:4 - Hand Thy afflicting hand.

Thy afflicting hand.

Wesley: Psa 32:4 - My moisture Was dried up.

Was dried up.

Wesley: Psa 32:5 - The iniquity The guilt of my sin.

The guilt of my sin.

Wesley: Psa 32:6 - For this Upon the encouragement of my example.

Upon the encouragement of my example.

Wesley: Psa 32:6 - Found In an acceptable and seasonable time, while God continues to offer grace and mercy.

In an acceptable and seasonable time, while God continues to offer grace and mercy.

Wesley: Psa 32:6 - Waters In the time of great calamities.

In the time of great calamities.

Wesley: Psa 32:6 - Not come So as to overwhelm him.

So as to overwhelm him.

Wesley: Psa 32:8 - I will This and the next verse seems to be the words of God, whom David brings in as returning this answer to his prayers.

This and the next verse seems to be the words of God, whom David brings in as returning this answer to his prayers.

Wesley: Psa 32:8 - Mine eye So Christ did St. Peter, when he turned and looked upon him.

So Christ did St. Peter, when he turned and looked upon him.

Wesley: Psa 32:9 - Will not Unless they be forced to it by a bit or bridle. And so all the ancient translators understand it.

Unless they be forced to it by a bit or bridle. And so all the ancient translators understand it.

Wesley: Psa 32:10 - Sorrows This is an argument to enforce the foregoing admonition.

This is an argument to enforce the foregoing admonition.

JFB: Psa 32:1-2 - -- Maschil--literally, "giving instruction." The Psalmist describes the blessings of His forgiveness, succeeding the pains of conviction, and deduces fro...

Maschil--literally, "giving instruction." The Psalmist describes the blessings of His forgiveness, succeeding the pains of conviction, and deduces from his own experience instruction and exhortation to others. (Psa 32:1-11)

(Compare Rom 4:6).

JFB: Psa 32:1-2 - forgiven Literally, "taken away," opposed to retain (Joh 20:23).

Literally, "taken away," opposed to retain (Joh 20:23).

JFB: Psa 32:1-2 - covered So that God no longer regards the sin (Psa 85:3).

So that God no longer regards the sin (Psa 85:3).

JFB: Psa 32:2 - imputeth Charge to him, and treat him accordingly.

Charge to him, and treat him accordingly.

JFB: Psa 32:2 - no guile Or, deceit, no false estimate of himself, nor insincerity before God (compare Rom 8:1).

Or, deceit, no false estimate of himself, nor insincerity before God (compare Rom 8:1).

JFB: Psa 32:3-4 - -- A vivid description of felt, but unacknowledged, sin.

A vivid description of felt, but unacknowledged, sin.

JFB: Psa 32:3-4 - When Literally, "for," as in Psa 32:4.

Literally, "for," as in Psa 32:4.

JFB: Psa 32:4 - thy hand Of God, or power in distressing him (Psa 38:2).

Of God, or power in distressing him (Psa 38:2).

JFB: Psa 32:4 - moisture Vital juices of the body, the parching heat of which expresses the anguish of the soul. On the other figures, compare Psa 6:2, Psa 6:7; Psa 31:9-11. I...

Vital juices of the body, the parching heat of which expresses the anguish of the soul. On the other figures, compare Psa 6:2, Psa 6:7; Psa 31:9-11. If composed on the occasion of the fifty-first Psalm, this distress may have been protracted for several months.

JFB: Psa 32:5 - -- A prompt fulfilment of the purposed confession is followed by a prompt forgiveness.

A prompt fulfilment of the purposed confession is followed by a prompt forgiveness.

JFB: Psa 32:6 - For this That is, my happy experience.

That is, my happy experience.

JFB: Psa 32:6 - godly Pious in the sense of Psa 4:3.

Pious in the sense of Psa 4:3.

JFB: Psa 32:6 - a time (Isa 55:6); when God's Spirit inclines us to seek pardon, He is ready to forgive.

(Isa 55:6); when God's Spirit inclines us to seek pardon, He is ready to forgive.

JFB: Psa 32:6 - floods, &c. Denotes great danger (Psa 18:17; Psa 66:12).

Denotes great danger (Psa 18:17; Psa 66:12).

JFB: Psa 32:7 - -- His experience illustrates the statement of Psa 32:6.

His experience illustrates the statement of Psa 32:6.

JFB: Psa 32:8 - -- Whether, as most likely, the language of David (compare Psa 51:13), or that of God, this is a promise of divine guidance.

Whether, as most likely, the language of David (compare Psa 51:13), or that of God, this is a promise of divine guidance.

JFB: Psa 32:8 - I will . . . mine eye Or, My eye shall be on thee, watching and directing thy way.

Or, My eye shall be on thee, watching and directing thy way.

JFB: Psa 32:9 - -- The latter clause, more literally, "in that they come not near thee"; that is, because they will not come, &c., unless forced by bit and bridle.

The latter clause, more literally, "in that they come not near thee"; that is, because they will not come, &c., unless forced by bit and bridle.

JFB: Psa 32:10 - -- The sorrows of the impenitent contrasted with the peace and safety secured by God's mercy.

The sorrows of the impenitent contrasted with the peace and safety secured by God's mercy.

JFB: Psa 32:11 - -- The righteous and upright, or those conforming to the divine teaching for securing the divine blessing, may well rejoice with shouting.

The righteous and upright, or those conforming to the divine teaching for securing the divine blessing, may well rejoice with shouting.

Clarke: Psa 32:1 - Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven - In this and the following verse four evils are mentioned 1.    Transgression, פשע...

Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven - In this and the following verse four evils are mentioned

1.    Transgression, פשע peshwa

2.    Sin, חטאה chataah

3.    Iniquity, עון avon

4.    Guile, רמיה remiyah

The first signifies the passing over a boundary, doing what is prohibited. The second signifies the missing of a mark, not doing what was commanded; but is often taken to express sinfulness, or sin in the future, producing transgression in the life. The third signifies what is turned out of its proper course or situation; any thing morally distorted or perverted. Iniquity, what is contrary to equity or justice. The fourth signifies fraud, deceit, guile, etc. To remove these evils, three acts are mentioned: forgiving, covering, and not imputing

1.    Transgression, פשע pesha , must be forgiven, נשוי nesui , borne away, i.e., by a vicarious sacrifice; for bearing sin, or bearing away sin, always implies this

2.    Sin, חטאה chataah , must be covered, כסוי kesui , hidden from the sight. It is odious and abominable, and must be put out of sight

3.    Iniquity, עון anon , which is perverse or distorted, must not be imputed, לא יחשב lo yachshob , must not be reckoned to his account

4.    Guile, רמיה remiyah , must be annihilated from the soul: In whose spirit there is no Guile. The man whose transgression is forgiven; whose sin is hidden, God having cast it as a millstone into the depths of the sea; whose iniquity and perversion is not reckoned to his account; and whose guile, the deceitful and desperately wicked heart, is annihilated, being emptied of sin and filled with righteousness, is necessarily a happy man

The old Psalter translates these two verses thus: Blissid qwas wikednes es for gyven, and qwas synnes is hyled (covered). Blisful man til qwam Lord retted (reckoneth) noght Syn: ne na treson es in his gast (spirit). In vain does any man look for or expect happiness while the power of sin remains, its guilt unpardoned, and its impurity not purged away. To the person who has got such blessings, we may say as the psalmist said, אשרי ashrey , O the blessedness of that man, whose transgression is forgiven! etc

St. Paul quotes this passage, Rom 4:6-7 (note), to illustrate the doctrine of justification by faith; where see the notes.

Clarke: Psa 32:3 - When I kept silence When I kept silence - Before I humbled myself, and confessed my sin, my soul was under the deepest horror. "I roared all the day long;"and felt the ...

When I kept silence - Before I humbled myself, and confessed my sin, my soul was under the deepest horror. "I roared all the day long;"and felt the hand of God heavy upon my soul.

Clarke: Psa 32:5 - I acknowledged my sin I acknowledged my sin - When this confession was made thoroughly and sincerely, and I ceased to cover and extenuate my offense, then thou didst forg...

I acknowledged my sin - When this confession was made thoroughly and sincerely, and I ceased to cover and extenuate my offense, then thou didst forgive the iniquity of my sin. I felt the hardness of heart: I felt the deep distress of soul; I felt power to confess and abhor my sin; I felt confidence in the mercy of the Lord; and I felt the forgiveness of the iniquity of my sin

Clarke: Psa 32:5 - Selah Selah - This is all true; I know it; I felt it; I feel it.

Selah - This is all true; I know it; I felt it; I feel it.

Clarke: Psa 32:6 - For this shall every one that is godly For this shall every one that is godly - Because thou art merciful; because thou hast shown mercy to all who have truly turned to thee, and believed...

For this shall every one that is godly - Because thou art merciful; because thou hast shown mercy to all who have truly turned to thee, and believed in thee; every one who fears thee, and hears of this, shall pray unto thee in an acceptable time, when thou mayest be found; in the time of finding. When the heart is softened and the conscience alarmed, that is a time of finding. God is ever ready; men are not so. Who can pray with a hard heart and a dark mind? While you feel relentings, pray

Clarke: Psa 32:6 - Surely in the floods Surely in the floods - In violent trials, afflictions, and temptations; when the rains descend, the winds blow, and the floods beat against that god...

Surely in the floods - In violent trials, afflictions, and temptations; when the rains descend, the winds blow, and the floods beat against that godly man who prays and trusts in God; "they shall not come nigh him,"so as to weaken his confidence or destroy his soul. His house is founded on a rock.

Clarke: Psa 32:7 - Thou art my hiding place Thou art my hiding place - An allusion, probably, to the city of refuge: "Thou shalt preserve me from trouble."The avenger of blood shall not be abl...

Thou art my hiding place - An allusion, probably, to the city of refuge: "Thou shalt preserve me from trouble."The avenger of blood shall not be able to overtake me. And being encompassed with an impregnable wall, I shall feel myself encompassed with songs of deliverance - I shall know that I am safe.

Clarke: Psa 32:8 - I will instruct thee I will instruct thee - These are probably the Lord’ s words to David. Seeing thou art now sensible of the mercy thou hast received from me, and...

I will instruct thee - These are probably the Lord’ s words to David. Seeing thou art now sensible of the mercy thou hast received from me, and art purposing to live to my glory, I will give thee all the assistance requisite. I will become thy Instructor, "and will teach thee,"in all occurrences, "the way thou shouldst go."I will keep mine eyes upon thee, and thou shalt keep thine upon me: as I go, thou must follow me; and I will continually watch for thy good.

Clarke: Psa 32:9 - Be ye not as the horse or as the mule Be ye not as the horse or as the mule - They will only act by force and constraint; be not like them; give a willing service to your Maker. "They ha...

Be ye not as the horse or as the mule - They will only act by force and constraint; be not like them; give a willing service to your Maker. "They have no understanding;"you have a rational soul, made to be guided and influenced by reason. The service of your God is a reasonable service; act, therefore, as a rational being. The horse and the mule are turned with difficulty; they must be constrained with bit and bridle. Do not be like them; do not oblige your Maker to have continual recourse to afflictions, trials, and severe dispensations of providence, to keep you in the way, or to recover you after you have gone out of it.

Clarke: Psa 32:10 - Many sorrows shall be to the wicked Many sorrows shall be to the wicked - Every wicked man is a miserable man. God has wedded sin and misery as strongly as he has holiness and happines...

Many sorrows shall be to the wicked - Every wicked man is a miserable man. God has wedded sin and misery as strongly as he has holiness and happiness. God hath joined them together; none can put them asunder

Clarke: Psa 32:10 - But he that trusteth in the Lord But he that trusteth in the Lord - Such a person is both safe and happy.

But he that trusteth in the Lord - Such a person is both safe and happy.

Clarke: Psa 32:11 - Be glad - and rejoice Be glad - and rejoice - Let every righteous soul rejoice and glory, but let it be in the Lord. Man was made for happiness, but his happiness must be...

Be glad - and rejoice - Let every righteous soul rejoice and glory, but let it be in the Lord. Man was made for happiness, but his happiness must be founded on holiness: and holiness, as it comes from God, must be retained by continual union with him. Probably this verse belongs to the next Psalm, and was originally its first verse

Calvin: Psa 32:1 - Blessed are they whose iniquity is forgiven 1.Blessed are they whose iniquity is forgiven This exclamation springs from the fervent affection of the Psalmist’s heart as well as from serious c...

1.Blessed are they whose iniquity is forgiven This exclamation springs from the fervent affection of the Psalmist’s heart as well as from serious consideration. Since almost the whole world turning away their thoughts from God’s judgment, bring upon themselves a fatal forgetfulness, and intoxicate themselves with deceitful pleasures; David, as if he had been stricken with the fear of God’s wrath, that he might betake himself to Divine mercy, awakens others also to the same exercise, by declaring distinctly and loudly that those only are blessed to whom God is reconciled, so as to acknowledge those for his children whom he might justly treat as his enemies. Some are so blinded with hypocrisy and pride, and some with such gross contempt of God, that they are not at all anxious in seeking forgiveness, but all acknowledge that they need forgiveness; nor is there a man in existence whose conscience does not accuse him at God’s judgment-seat, and gall him with many stings. This confession, accordingly, that all need forgiveness, because no man is perfect, and that then only is it well with us when God pardons our sins, nature herself extorts even from wicked men. But in the meantime, hypocrisy shuts the eyes of multitudes, while others are so deluded by a perverse carnal security, that they are touched either with no feelings of Divine wrath, or with only a frigid feeling of it.

From this proceeds a twofold error: first, that such men make light of their sins, and reflect not on the hundredth part of their danger from God’s indignation; and, secondly, that they invent frivolous expiations to free themselves from guilt and to purchase the favor of God. Thus in all ages it has been everywhere a prevailing opinion, that although all men are infected with sin, they are at the same time adorned with merits which are calculated to procure for them the favor of God, and that although they provoke his wrath by their crimes, they have expiations and satisfactions in readiness to obtain their absolution. This delusion of Satan is equally common among Papists, Turks, Jews, and other nations. Every man, therefore, who is not carried away by the furious madness of Popery, will admit the truth of this statement, that men are in a wretched state unless God deal mercifully with them by not laying their sins to their charge. But David goes farther, declaring that the whole life of man is subjected to God’s wrath and curse, except in so far as he vouchsafes of his own free grace to receive them into his favor; of which the Spirit who spake by David is an assured interpreter and witness to us by the mouth of Paul, (Rom 4:6.) Had Paul not used this testimony, never would his readers have penetrated the real meaning of the prophet; for we see that the Papists, although they chant in their temples, “Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven,” etc., yet pass over it as if it were some common saying and of little importance. But with Paul, this is the full definition of the righteousness of faith; as if the prophet had said, Men are then only blessed when they are freely reconciled to God, and counted as righteous by him. The blessedness, accordingly, that David celebrates utterly destroys the righteousness of works. The device of a partial righteousness with which Papists and others delude themselves is mere folly; and even among those who are destitute of the light of heavenly doctrine, no one will be found so mad as to arrogate a perfect righteousness to himself, as appears from the expiations, washings, and other means of appeasing God, which have always been in use among all nations. But yet they do not hesitate to obtrude their virtues upon God, just as if by them they had acquired of themselves a great part of their blessedness.

David, however, prescribes a very different order, namely, that in seeking happiness, all should begin with the principle, that God cannot be reconciled to those who are worthy of eternal destruction in any other way than by freely pardoning them, and bestowing upon them his favor. And justly does he declare that if mercy is withheld from them, all men must be utterly wretched and accursed; for if all men are naturally prone only to evil, until they are regenerated, their whole previous life, it is obvious, must be hateful and loathsome in the sight of God. Besides, as even after regeneration, no work which men perform can please God unless he pardons the sin which mingles with it, they must be excluded from the hope of salvation. Certainly nothing will remain for them but cause for the greatest terror. That the works of the saints are unworthy of reward because they are spotted with stains, seems a hard saying to the Papists. But, in this they betray their gross ignorance in estimating, according to their own conceptions, the judgment of God, in whose eyes the very brightness of the stars is but darkness. Let this therefore remain an established doctrine, that as we are only accounted righteous before God by the free remission of sins, this is the gate of eternal salvation; and, accordingly, that they only are blessed who rely upon God’s mercy. We must bear in mind the contrast which I have already mentioned between believers who, embracing the remission of sins, rely upon the grace of God alone, and all others who neglect to betake themselves to the sanctuary of Divine grace.

Moreover, when David thrice repeats the same thing, this is no vain repetition. It is indeed sufficiently evident of itself that the man must be blessed whose iniquity is forgiven; but experience teaches us how difficult it is to become persuaded of this in such a manner as to have it thoroughly fixed in our hearts. The great majority, as I have already shown you, entangled by devices of their own, put away from them, as far as they can, the terrors of conscience and all fear of Divine wrath. They have, no doubt, a desire to be reconciled to God; and yet they shun the sight of him, rather than seek his grace sincerely and with all their hearts. Those, on the other hand, whom God has truly awakened so as to be affected with a lively sense of their misery, are so constantly agitated and disquieted that it is difficult to restore peace to their minds. They taste indeed God’s mercy, and endeavor to lay hold of it, and yet they are frequently abashed or made to stagger under the manifold assaults which are made upon them. The two reasons for which the Psalmist insists so much on the subject of the forgiveness of sins are these, - that he may, on the one hand, raise up those who are fallen asleep, inspire the careless with thoughtfulness, and quicken the dull; and that he may, on the other hand, tranquillise fearful and anxious minds with an assured and steady confidence. To the former, the doctrine may be applied in this manner: ”What mean ye, O ye unhappy men! that one or two stings of conscience do not disturb you? Suppose that a certain limited knowledge of your sins is not sufficient to strike you with terror, yet how preposterous is it to continue securely asleep, while you are overwhelmed with an immense load of sins?” And this repetition furnishes not a little comfort and confirmation to the feeble and fearful. As doubts are often coming upon them, one after another, it is not sufficient that they are victorious in one conflict only. That despair, therefore, may not overwhelm them amidst the various perplexing thoughts with which they are agitated, the Holy Spirit confirms and ratifies the remission of sins with many declarations.

It is now proper to weigh the particular force of the expressions here employed. Certainly the remission which is here treated of does not agree with satisfactions. God, in lifting off or taking away sins, and likewise in covering and not imputing them, freely pardons them. On this account the Papists, by thrusting in their satisfactions and works of supererogation as they call them, bereave themselves of this blessedness. Besides, David applies these words to complete forgiveness. The distinction, therefore, which the Papists here make between the remission of the punishment and of the fault, by which they make only half a pardon, is not at all to the purpose. Now, it is necessary to consider to whom this happiness belongs, which may be easily gathered from the circumstance of the time. When David was taught that he was blessed through the mercy of God alone, he was not an alien from the church of God; on the contrary, he had profited above many in the fear and service of God, and in holiness of life, and had exercised himself in all the duties of godliness. And even after making these advances in religion, God so exercised him, that he placed the alpha and omega of his salvation in his gratuitous reconciliation to God. Nor is it without reason that Zacharias, in his song, represents “the knowledge of salvation” as consisting in knowing “the remission of sins,” (Luk 1:77.) The more eminently that any one excels in holiness, the farther he feels himself from perfect righteousness, and the more clearly he perceives that he can trust in nothing but the mercy of God alone. Hence it appears, that those are grossly mistaken who conceive that the pardon of sin is necessary only to the beginning of righteousness. As believers are every day involved in many faults, it will profit them nothing that they have once entered the way of righteousness, unless the same grace which brought them into it accompany them to the last step of their life. Does any one object, that they are elsewhere said to be blessed “who fear the Lord,” “who walk in his ways,” “who are upright in heart,” etc., the answer is easy, namely, that as the perfect fear of the Lord, the perfect observance of his law, and perfect uprightness of heart, are nowhere to be found, all that the Scripture anywhere says, concerning blessedness, is founded upon the free favor of God, by which he reconciles us to himself.

Calvin: Psa 32:2 - In whose spirit there is no guile 2.In whose spirit there is no guile In this clause the Psalmist distinguishes believers both from hypocrites and from senseless despisers of God, nei...

2.In whose spirit there is no guile In this clause the Psalmist distinguishes believers both from hypocrites and from senseless despisers of God, neither of whom care for this happiness, nor can they attain to the enjoyment of it. The wicked are, indeed, conscious to themselves of their guilt, but still they delight in their wickedness; harden themselves in their impudence, and laugh at threatenings; or, at least, they indulge themselves in deceitful flatteries, that they may not be constrained to come into the presence of God. Yea, though they are rendered unhappy by a sense of their misery, and harassed with secret torments, yet with perverse forgetfulness they stifle all fear of God. As for hypocrites, if their conscience as any time stings them, they soothe their pain with ineffectual remedies: so that if God at any time cite them to his tribunal, they place before them I know not what phantoms for their defense; and they are never without coverings whereby they may keep the light out of their hearts. Both these classes of men are hindered by inward guile from seeking their happiness in the fatherly love of God. Nay more, many of them rush frowardly into the presence of God, or puff themselves up with proud presumption, dreaming that they are happy, although God is against them. David, therefore, means that no man can taste what the forgiveness of sins is until his heart is first cleansed from guile. What he means, then, by this term, guile, may be understood from what I have said. Whoever examines not himself, as in the presence of God, but, on the contrary, shunning his judgment, either shrouds himself in darkness, or covers himself with leaves, deals deceitfully both with himself and with God. It is no wonder, therefore, that he who feels not his disease refuses the remedy. The two kinds of this guile which I have mentioned are to be particularly attended to. Few may be so hardened as not to be touched with the fear of God, and with some desire of his grace, and yet they are moved but coldly to seek forgiveness. Hence it comes to pass, that they do not yet perceive what an unspeakable happiness it is to possess God’s favor. Such was David’s case for a time, when a treacherous security stole upon him, darkened his mind, and prevented him from zealously applying himself to pursue after this happiness. Often do the saints labor under the same disease. If, therefore, we would enjoy the happiness which David here proposes to us, we must take the greatest heed lest Satan, filling our hearts with guile, deprive us of all sense of our wretchedness, in which every one who has recourse to subterfuges must necessarily pine away.

Calvin: Psa 32:3 - When I kept silence, my bones wasted away 3.When I kept silence, my bones wasted away Here David confirms, by his own experience, the doctrine which he had laid down; namely, that when humble...

3.When I kept silence, my bones wasted away Here David confirms, by his own experience, the doctrine which he had laid down; namely, that when humbled under the hand of God, he felt that nothing was so miserable as to be deprived of his favor: by which he intimates, that this truth cannot be rightly understood until God has tried us with a feeling of his anger. Nor does he speak of a mere ordinary trial, but declares that he was entirely subdued with the extremest rigour. And certainly, the sluggishness of our flesh, in this matter, is no less wonderful than its hardihood. If we are not drawn by forcible means, we will never hasten to seek reconciliation to God so earnestly as we ought. In fine, the inspired writer teaches us by his own example, that we never perceive how great a happiness it is to enjoy the favor of God, until we have thoroughly felt from grievous conflicts with inward temptations, how terrible the anger of God is. He adds, that whether he was silent, or whether he attempted to heighten his grief by his crying and roaring, 661 his bones waxed old; in other words, his whole strength withered away. From this it follows, that whithersoever the sinner may turn himself, or however he may be mentally affected, his malady is in no degree lightened, nor his welfare in any degree promoted, until he is restored to the favor of God. It often happens that those are tortured with the sharpest grief who gnaw the bit, and inwardly devour their sorrow, and keep it enclosed and shut up within, without discovering it, although afterwards they are seized as with sudden madness, and the force of their grief bursts forth with the greater impetus the longer it has been restrained. By the term silence, David means neither insensibility nor stupidity, but that feeling which lies between patience and obstinacy, and which is as much allied to the vice as to the virtue. For his bones were not consumed with age, but with the dreadful torments of his mind. His silence, however, was not the silence of hope or obedience, for it brought no alleviation of his misery.

Calvin: Psa 32:4 - For day and night thy hand was heavy upon me 4.For day and night thy hand was heavy upon me In this verse he explains more fully whence such heavy grief arose; namely, because he felt the hand o...

4.For day and night thy hand was heavy upon me In this verse he explains more fully whence such heavy grief arose; namely, because he felt the hand of God to be sore against him. The greatest of all afflictions is to be so heavily pressed with the hand of God, that the sinner feels he has to do with a Judge whose indignation and severity involve in them many deaths, besides eternal death. David, accordingly, complains that his moisture was dried up, not merely from simply meditating on his sore afflictions, but because he had discovered their cause and spring. The whole strength of men fails when God appears as a Judge and humbles and lays them prostrate by exhibiting the signs of his displeasure. Then is fulfilled the saying of Isaiah,

“The grass withereth, the flower fadeth, because the Spirit of the Lord bloweth upon it.” (Isa 40:7)

The Psalmist, moreover, tells us, that it was no common chastisement by which he had been taught truly to fear the divine wrath; for the hand of the Lord ceased not to be heavy upon him both day and night. From a child, indeed, he had been inspired with the fear of God, by the secret influence of the Holy Spirit, and had been taught in true religion and godliness by sound doctrine and instruction. And yet so insufficient was this instruction for his attainment of this wisdom, that he had to be taught again like a new beginner in the very midst of his course. Yea, although he had now been long accustomed to mourn over his sins, he was every day anew reduced to this exercise, which teaches us, how long it is ere men recover themselves when once they have fallen; and also how slow they are to obey until God, from time to time, redouble their stripes, and increase them from day to day. Should any one ask concerning David, whether he had become callous under the stripes which he well knew were inflicted on him by the hand of God, the context furnishes the answer; namely, that he was kept down and fettered by perplexing griefs, and distracted with lingering torments, until he was well subdued and made meek, which is the first sign of seeking a remedy. And this again teaches us, that it is not without cause that the chastisements by which God seems to deal cruelly with us are repeated, and his hand made heavy against us, until our fierce pride, which we know to be un-tameable, unless subdued with the heaviest stripes, is humbled.

Calvin: Psa 32:5 - I have acknowledged my sin unto thee // And thou didst remit the guilt of my sin 5.I have acknowledged my sin unto thee The prophet now describes the issue of his misery, in order to show to all the ready way of obtaining the happ...

5.I have acknowledged my sin unto thee The prophet now describes the issue of his misery, in order to show to all the ready way of obtaining the happiness of which he makes mention. When his feeling of divine wrath sorely vexed and tormented him, his only relief was unfeignedly to condemn himself before God, and humbly to flee to him to crave his forgiveness. He does not say, however, that his sins merely came to his remembrance, for so also did the sins of Cain and Judas, although to no profit; because, when the consciences of the wicked are troubled with their sins, they cease not to torment themselves, and to fret against God: yea, although he forces them unwillingly to his bar, they still eagerly desire to hide themselves. But here there is described a very different method of acknowledging sin; namely, when the sinner willingly betakes himself to God, building his hope of salvation not on stubbornness or hypocrisy, but on supplication for pardon. This voluntary confession is always conjoined with faith; for otherwise the sinner will continually seek lurking-places where he may hide himself from God. David’s words clearly show that he came unfeignedly and cordially into the presence of God, that he might conceal nothing. When he tells us that he acknowledged his sin, and did not hide it, the latter clause is added, according to the Hebrew idiom, for the sake of amplification. There is no doubt, therefore, that David, when he appeared before God, poured out all his heart. Hypocrites, we know, that they may extenuate their evil doings, either disguise or misrepresent them; in short, they never make an honest confession of them, with an ingenuous and open mouth. But David denies that he was chargeable with this baseness. Without any dissimulation he made known to God whatever grieved him; and this he confirms by the words, I have said While the wicked are dragged by force, just as a judge compels offenders to come to trial, he assures us that he came deliberately and with full purpose of mind; for the term, said, just signifies that he deliberated with himself. It therefore follows, that he promised and assured himself of pardon through the mercy of God, in order that terror might not prevent him from making a free and an ingenuous confession of his sins.

The phrase, upon myself, or against myself, intimates that David put away from him all the excuses and pretences by which men are accustomed to unburden themselves, transferring their fault, or tracing it to other people. David, therefore, determined to submit himself entirely to God’s judgment, and to make known his own guilt, that being self-condemned, he might as a suppliant obtain pardon.

And thou didst remit the guilt of my sin This clause is set in opposition to the grievous and direful agitations by which he says he was harassed before he approached by faith the grace of God. But the words also teach, that as often as the sinner presents himself at the throne of mercy, with ingenuous confession, he will find reconciliation with God awaiting him. In other words, the Psalmist means that God was not only willing to pardon him, but that his example afforded a general lesson that those in distress should not doubt of God’s favor towards them, so soon as they should betake themselves to him with a sincere and willing mind. Should any one infer from this, that repentance and confession are the cause of obtaining grace, the answer is easy; namely, that David is not speaking here of the cause but of the manner in which the sinner becomes reconciled to God. Confession, no doubt, intervenes, but we must go beyond this, and consider that it is faith which, by opening our hearts and tongues, really obtains our pardon. It is not admitted that every thing which is necessarily connected with pardon is to be reckoned amongst its causes. Or, to speak more simply, David obtained pardon by his confession, not because he merited it by the mere act of confessing, but because, under the guidance of faith, he humbly implored it from his judge. Moreover, as the same method of confession ought to be in use among us at this day, which was formerly employed by the fathers under the law, this sufficiently refutes that tyrannical decree of the Pope, by which he turns us away from God, and sends us to his priests to obtain pardon.

Calvin: Psa 32:6 - Therefore shall every one that is meek pray unto thee // In the flood of many waters 6.Therefore shall every one that is meek pray unto thee Here the Psalmist expressly states that whatever he has hitherto set forth in his own person ...

6.Therefore shall every one that is meek pray unto thee Here the Psalmist expressly states that whatever he has hitherto set forth in his own person belongs in common to all the children of God. And this is to be carefully observed, because, from our native unbelief, the greater part of us are slow and reluctant to appropriate the grace of God. We may also learn from this, that David obtained forgiveness, not by the mere act of confession, as some speak, but by faith and prayer. Here he directs believers to the same means of obtaining it, bidding them betake themselves to prayer, which is the true sacrifice of faith. Farther, we are taught, that in David God gave an example of his mercy, which may not only extend to us all, but may also show us how reconciliation is to be sought. The words, every one, serve for the confirmation of every godly person; but the Psalmist at the same time shows, that no one can obtain the hope of salvation but by prostrating himself as a suppliant before God, because all without exception stand in need of his mercy.

The expression, The time of finding, which immediately follows, some think, refers to the ordinary and accustomed hours of prayer; but others more accurately, in my opinion, compare it 664 with that place in Isaiah, (Isa 55:6,) where it is said, “Seek ye the Lord while he may be found, call ye upon him while he is near.” It is never out of season, indeed, to seek God, for every moment we need his grace, and he is always willing to meet us. But as slothfulness or dullness hinders us from seeking him, David here particularly intimates the critical seasons when believers are stimulated by a sense of their own need to have recourse to God. The Papists have abused this place to warrant their doctrine, that we ought to have advocates in heaven to pray for us; 665 but the attempt to found an argument in support of such a doctrine from this passage is so grossly absurd that it is unworthy of refutation. We may see from it, however, either how wickedly they have corrupted the whole Scripture, or with what gross ignorance they blunder in the plainest matters.

In the flood of many waters This expression agrees with that prophecy of Joel,

“Whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord, shall be delivered.” (Joe 2:32)

The meaning is, that although the deep whirlpools of death may compass us round on every side, we ought not to fear that they shall swallow us up; but rather believe that we shall be safe and unhurt, if we only betake ourselves to the mercy of God. We are thus emphatically taught that the godly shall have certain salvation even in death, provided they betake themselves to the sanctuary of God’s grace. Under the term flood are denoted all those dangers from which there appears no means of escape.

Calvin: Psa 32:7 - NO PHRASE At last the Psalmist gives himself to thanksgiving, and although he uses but few words to celebrate the divine favor, there is, notwithstanding, much...

At last the Psalmist gives himself to thanksgiving, and although he uses but few words to celebrate the divine favor, there is, notwithstanding, much force in his brevity. In the first place, he denies that there is any other haven of safety but in God himself. Secondly, he assures himself that God will be his faithful keeper hereafter; for I willingly retain the future tense of the verb, though some, without any reason, translate it into the past. He is not, however, to be understood as meaning that he conceived himself safe from future tribulations, but he sets God’s guardianship over against them. Lastly, whatever adversity may befall him, he is persuaded that God will be his deliverer. By the word compass, he means manifold and various kinds of deliverance; as if he had said, that he should be under obligation to God in innumerable ways, and that he should, on every side, have most abundant matter for praising him. We may observe in the meantime, how he offers his service of gratitude to God, according to his usual method, putting songs of deliverance instead of help.

Calvin: Psa 32:8 - I will instruct thee, and teach thee 8.I will instruct thee, and teach thee That his exhortation may have the greater force, the divine speaker directs his discourse to every man individ...

8.I will instruct thee, and teach thee That his exhortation may have the greater force, the divine speaker directs his discourse to every man individually; for the doctrine which is spoken penetrates the mind more readily, when every man applies it particularly to himself. When the way of salvation is here shown to the children of God, the greatest care must be taken that no man depart from it in the slightest degree. We may also learn from this place, that we are reconciled to God upon condition that every man endeavor to make his brethren partakers of the same benefit. David, the more strongly to mark his care about them, describes it by the sight of the eye. 668 By the way it should be observed, that those who are solicitous about our welfare are appointed by the Lord as guides of our way, from which it appears how great is the paternal solicitude which he has about us.

Calvin: Psa 32:9 - Be not like the horse or mule 9.Be not like the horse or mule David now briefly explains the amount of the counsel which he formerly said he would give. He exhorts all to learn wi...

9.Be not like the horse or mule David now briefly explains the amount of the counsel which he formerly said he would give. He exhorts all to learn with quietness, to lay aside stubbornness, and to put on the spirit of meekness. There is much wisdom, too, in the advice which he gives to the godly to correct their hardihood; for if we were as attentive to God’s corrections as we ought, every one would eagerly hasten to seek his favor. Whence is so much slowness to be found in all, but that we are either stupid or refractory? By likening the refractory, therefore, to brute beasts, David puts them to shame, and at the same time declares that it will avail them nothing to “kick against the pricks.” Men, says he, know how to tame the fierceness of horses by bridles and bits; what then do they think God will do when he finds them intractable?

Calvin: Psa 32:10 - Many sorrows shall be to the wicked 10.Many sorrows shall be to the wicked Without a figure he here declares what will be the condition of the rebellious and stiff-necked. 669 He mentio...

10.Many sorrows shall be to the wicked Without a figure he here declares what will be the condition of the rebellious and stiff-necked. 669 He mentioned before that God wanted not bridles and bits with which to restrain their frowardness; and now he adds, that there would be no end or measure of their miseries until they were utterly consumed. Although God, therefore, may spare us for a time, yet let this denunciation fill us with fear, and preserve us from hardening ourselves, because we are as yet unpunished; nor let our prosperity, which is cursed by God, so deceive us as to close our minds against reflecting on those unseen sorrows which he threatens against all the wicked. And as the Psalmist has told us, on the one hand, that God is armed with innumerable plagues against the wicked, so he adds, on the other hand, that he is furnished with infinite goodness, with which he can succor all who are his. The sum is, that there is no other remedy for our afflictions but to humble ourselves under God’s hand, and to found our salvation on his mercy alone; and that those who rely on God shall be blessed in all respects, because, on whatever side Satan may assault them, there will the Lord oppose him, and shield them with his protecting power.

Calvin: Psa 32:11 - Be glad in Jehovah 11.Be glad in Jehovah After teaching how ready and accessible true happiness is to all the godly, David, with much reason, exhorts them to gladness. ...

11.Be glad in Jehovah After teaching how ready and accessible true happiness is to all the godly, David, with much reason, exhorts them to gladness. He commands them to rejoice in the Lord, as if he had said, There is nothing to prevent them from assuring themselves of God’s favor, seeing he so liberally and so kindly offers to be reconciled to them. In the meantime, we may observe that this is the incomparable fruit of faith which Paul likewise commends, namely, when the consciences of the godly being quiet and cheerful, enjoy peace and spiritual joy. Wherever faith is lively, this holy rejoicing will follow. But since the world’s own impiety prevents it from participating in this joy, David, therefore, addresses the righteous alone, whom he denominates the upright in heart, to teach us that the external appearance of righteousness which pleases men is of no avail in the sight of God. But how does he call those righteous, whose whole happiness consists in the free mercy of God not imputing their sins to them? I answer, that none others are received into favor but those who are dissatisfied with themselves for their sins, and repent with their whole heart; not that this repentance merits pardon, but because faith can never be separated from the spirit of regeneration. When they have begun to devote themselves to God, he accepts the upright disposition of their hearts equally as if it were pure and perfect; for faith not only reconciles a man to God, but also sanctifies whatever is imperfect in him, so that by the free grace of God, he becomes righteous who could never have obtained so great a blessing by any merit of his own.

Defender: Psa 32:1 - sin is covered Psa 32:1, Psa 32:2 is quoted by Paul in Rom 4:7, Rom 4:8. Psa 32:1-11 is evidently David's song of joy after his repentance and restoration, following...

Psa 32:1, Psa 32:2 is quoted by Paul in Rom 4:7, Rom 4:8. Psa 32:1-11 is evidently David's song of joy after his repentance and restoration, following his sin of adultery and murder, in the matter of Bathsheba and Uriah (2 Samuel 11, 12; Psalm 51)."

Defender: Psa 32:3 - my roaring David was outwardly silent about his sin but inwardly "roaring." Note the use of the same word in connection with the sufferings of Christ on the cros...

David was outwardly silent about his sin but inwardly "roaring." Note the use of the same word in connection with the sufferings of Christ on the cross (Psa 22:1)."

Defender: Psa 32:5 - acknowledged my sin This procedure (confession to the Lord followed by His forgiveness) is reflected in the New Testament (1Jo 1:9)."

This procedure (confession to the Lord followed by His forgiveness) is reflected in the New Testament (1Jo 1:9)."

TSK: Psa 32:1 - Blessed // transgression // covered Blessed : Psa 1:1, Psa 1:2, Psa 40:4, Psa 84:12, Psa 89:15, Psa 106:3, Psa 119:1, Psa 119:2, Psa 128:1; Jer 17:7, Jer 17:8; Mat 5:3-12, Mat 16:17; Luk...

TSK: Psa 32:2 - The Lord // whose The Lord : Lev 17:4; Rom 5:13; 2Co 5:19-21 whose : Joh 1:47; 2Co 1:12; 1Pe 2:1, 1Pe 2:2; Rev 14:5

TSK: Psa 32:3 - When // bones // roaring When : Gen 3:8-19; 1Sa 31:13; 2Sa 11:27, 2Sa 12:1-12, 2Sa 21:12-14; Pro 28:13; Isa 57:17; Jer 31:18, Jer 31:19; Luk 15:15, Luk 15:16 bones : Psa 6:2, ...

TSK: Psa 32:4 - hand // moisture hand : Psa 38:2-8, Psa 39:10, Psa 39:11; 1Sa 5:6, 1Sa 5:7, 1Sa 5:9, 1Sa 5:11, 1Sa 6:9; Job 16:21, Job 33:7 moisture : Psa 22:15, Psa 90:6, Psa 90:7, P...

TSK: Psa 32:5 - acknowledged // have // I said // forgavest // iniquity acknowledged : Psa 38:18, Psa 51:3-5; Lev 26:39, Lev 26:40; Jos 7:19; 2Sa 12:13, 2Sa 24:10; Job 33:27; Pro 28:13; Jer 3:13; 1Jo 1:8-10 have : Job 31:3...

TSK: Psa 32:6 - For this // godly // pray // a time // in the floods For this : Psa 34:2-5, Psa 40:3, Psa 51:12, Psa 51:13; 2Co 1:4; 1Ti 1:16 godly : Psa 4:3; 2Co 7:9, 2Co 7:10; Tit 2:12 pray : Pro 1:28; Isa 49:8, Isa 5...

TSK: Psa 32:7 - my // compass // songs my : Psa 9:9, Psa 27:5, Psa 31:20, Psa 119:114, Psa 143:9; Jer 36:26; Col 3:3 compass : Psa 32:10, Psa 5:12, Psa 18:5 songs : Psa 40:3, Psa 98:1; Exo ...

TSK: Psa 32:8 - instruct // I will guide instruct : Psa 34:11; Pro 3:1, Pro 4:1-13, Pro 8:10, Pro 8:11; Mat 11:29 I will guide : etc. Heb. I will counsel thee, mine eye shall be upon thee, Ps...

instruct : Psa 34:11; Pro 3:1, Pro 4:1-13, Pro 8:10, Pro 8:11; Mat 11:29

I will guide : etc. Heb. I will counsel thee, mine eye shall be upon thee, Psa 25:9, Psa 25:10, Psa 33:18; Pro 3:5, Pro 3:6; Isa 49:10

TSK: Psa 32:9 - Be ye // no Be ye : Pro 26:3; Jer 31:18; Jam 3:3, Jam 4:7-10 no : Job 35:11; Jer 4:22, Jer 8:6, Jer 8:7

TSK: Psa 32:10 - Many // but Many : Psa 16:4, Psa 34:19-21, Psa 140:11; Pro 13:21; Ecc 8:12; Isa 3:11, Isa 57:21; Rom 2:8, Rom 2:9; 1Ti 6:10 but : Psa 2:12, Psa 5:12, Psa 34:8, Ps...

TSK: Psa 32:11 - Be glad // shout // upright Be glad : Psa 33:1, Psa 64:10, Psa 68:3, Psa 97:12; Deu 12:12; 1Sa 2:1; Rom 5:11; Phi 3:1, Phi 3:3, Phi 4:4 shout : Psa 5:11, Psa 97:1, Psa 98:4; Ezr ...

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Poole: Psa 32:1 - not walk in the counsel of the ungodly Maschil; or, an instructor. This Psalm is most fitly so called, because it was composed for the information of the church, in that most important doc...

Maschil; or, an instructor. This Psalm is most fitly so called, because it was composed for the information of the church, in that most important doctrine, concerning the way to true blessedness.

They are blessed whose sins are forgiven, Psa 32:1,2 . Confession of sins giveth ease to the conscience, Psa 32:3-7 . God’ s promise to them that trust in him, Psa 32:8-11 .

I did indeed say that they, and they only, were blessed, that did

not walk in the counsel of the ungodly & c., but did delight in and meditate on God’ s law , Psa 1:1,2 . And it is true, this is the only way to blessedness. But if inquiry be made into the cause of man’ s blessedness, we must seek that elsewhere. All men having sinned and made themselves guilty before God, and fallen short of the glory of God, and of that happiness which was conferred upon their first parents, now there is no way to recover this lost felicity, but by seeking and obtaining the favour of God, and the pardon of our sins; which is the very doctrine of the gospel; to the confirmation whereof this text is justly alleged, Rom 4:6,7 . Our sins are debts, and they need forgiving; they are filthy and abominable in God’ s sight, and need covering.

Poole: Psa 32:2 - In whose spirit there is no guile Whom God doth not charge with the guilt of his sins, as he might justly do, but graciously accepts and pardons him in Christ, and deals with him as ...

Whom God doth not charge with the guilt of his sins, as he might justly do, but graciously accepts and pardons him in Christ, and deals with him as if he had not sinned.

In whose spirit there is no guile who freely confesseth all his sins without dissembling and concealing of them; which may seem to be the main thing here intended, by comparing this with the following verses; and who is sincere in his professions of repentance, turning from sin to God with all his heart, and not feignedly.

Poole: Psa 32:3 - When I kept silence // My bones waxed old // Through my roaring all the day long When I kept silence to wit, from a full and open confession of my sins, as appears from Psa 32:5 , and from pouring out my soul to God in serious and...

When I kept silence to wit, from a full and open confession of my sins, as appears from Psa 32:5 , and from pouring out my soul to God in serious and fervent prayers for pardon and peace. Whilst I concealed my sins, or smothered my fears, and, stifled the workings of my own conscience.

My bones waxed old my spirits failed, and the strength of my body decayed:

Through my roaring all the day long because of the continual horrors of my conscience, and sense of God’ s wrath, wherewith I was as yet rather oppressed and overwhelmed, than brought to thorough repentance.

Poole: Psa 32:4 - Thy hand Thy hand thy afflicting hand bringing my sins to remembrance, and filling me with thy terrors for them. My very radical moisture was in a manner drie...

Thy hand thy afflicting hand bringing my sins to remembrance, and filling me with thy terrors for them. My very radical moisture was in a manner dried up, and wasted through excessive fears and sorrows.

Poole: Psa 32:5 - The iniquity of my sin At last I took up a full resolution, that I would no longer daily nor deal deceitfully with God, nor vainly seek to hide my sins from the all-seeing...

At last I took up a full resolution, that I would no longer daily nor deal deceitfully with God, nor vainly seek to hide my sins from the all-seeing God, but that I would openly and candidly confess and bewail all my sins with all their aggravations, and humbly implore the pardon of them.

The iniquity of my sin i.e. the guilt of my sin. Or, Thou didst take away the punishment (as this Hebrew word oft signifies) of my sin ; or, my exceeding sinful sin ; two words signifying the same thing, being here put together by way of aggravation, according to the manner of the Hebrews.

Poole: Psa 32:6 - For this // In a time when thou mayest be found For this i.e. upon the encouragement of my example, and thy great mercy vouchsafed to me, in answer to my humble confession and supplication. In a t...

For this i.e. upon the encouragement of my example, and thy great mercy vouchsafed to me, in answer to my humble confession and supplication.

In a time when thou mayest be found Heb. in the time of finding thee ; the pronoun thee being easily and fitly repeated out of the next foregoing clause, i.e. while he may be found , as it is expressed, Isa 55:6 , or while he is near, Psa 69:13 , in an acceptable and seasonable time, while God continues to offer grace and mercy to sinners, before the decree bring forth , Zep 2:2 , and sentence be passed or executed upon them. By which clause he seems to intimate the difference between the godly, who pray and cry earnestly to God for mercy in its season; and the wicked, who will do so when it is too late, and the season is lost. In the floods of great. waters, i.e. in the time of great calamities, which are frequently compared to great waters. They shall not come nigh unto him, to wit, so as to overwhelm or hurt him. Or God will set him in a high and safe place, out of the reach of them, as he provided an ark for Noah when the deluge came; to which peradventure he alludes in this place.

Poole: Psa 32:7 - -- i.e. With such great deliverances on all sides, as will give just occasion to sing forth thy praises.

i.e. With such great deliverances on all sides, as will give just occasion to sing forth thy praises.

Poole: Psa 32:8 - Thee // In the way which thou shalt go // I will guide thee with mine eye This and the next verse are the words, either, 1. Of God; whom David brings in as returning this answer to his prayers, and the profession of his t...

This and the next verse are the words, either,

1. Of God; whom David brings in as returning this answer to his prayers, and the profession of his trust in God. Or rather,

2. Of David himself; who having received singular favours from God, and having declared what the godly would do upon that occasion, Psa 32:6 , he now undertakes to instruct the wicked what they should do; which he doth, partly to express his thankfulness to God for delivering himself, and his, zeal to advance the honour and service of God in the world; partly, as an act of justice, that he might make some amends to those whom he had injured, and provoke them to repentance, whom by his sins he had scandalized, and either drawn to sin, or encouraged and hardened in sin, which he was obliged and did promise to do upon this or the like occasion, Psa 51:13 ; and partly, for the discharge of his office and duty, as he was both a king and a prophet, and a good man; in all which capacities he was obliged to endeavour the conversion and salvation of sinners.

Thee thee, O sinner, whosoever thou art, who hast no understanding, but art a wicked man, as the two following verses explain it. He speaks this to the generality of impenitent sinners, as the next verse shows, which begins in the plural number, Be not ye , &c.; only he expresseth it here singularly, as appealing and applying himself particularly to the conscience of every individual person, which he thought the most effectual way of proceeding, as he had found in himself, when Nathan applied his indefinite discourse to him, saying, Thou art the man .

In the way which thou shalt go i.e. in which thou oughtest to walk; the future tense oft noting a man’ s duty, as Gen 20:9 Mal 1:6 .

I will guide thee with mine eye I will lend thee the eyes of my mind. Or, I will be to thee instead of eyes , as the phrase is, Num 10:31 , to advise, and direct, and caution thee; which I am able to do, not only by those gifts and graces which God hath given me, but also from my own experience. I will guide thee as the rider doth his horse, to which the person to be guided is compared, Psa 32:9 ; or as a master doth his scholar; or as a guide doth him who knoweth not the right way. Or the words may be thus rendered, I will give thee counsel, mine eye shall be upon thee , as it is more fully expressed, Gen 44:21 Jer 24:6 40:4 , i.e. I will watch over thee, and instruct or admonish thee, as I have occasion.

Poole: Psa 32:9 - Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule be not such brutish and sottish creatures as I have been, not having reason or grace to govern yourselves, nor...

Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule be not such brutish and sottish creatures as I have been, not having reason or grace to govern yourselves, nor hearkening to the counsels and admonitions of others. Lest they come near unto thee ; lest they should come too near to thee, so as to bite or kick thee. But neither is this the common practice of horses or mules, of which he seems to speak; nor is this the proper use of a bit or bridle, to keep them from so doing; but rather to bring them nearer to the rider for his use, and to keep them under his conduct and power, from whom they are otherwise apt to run away. The words therefore are and may be otherwise rendered, because they do not or will not come near unto thee , to wit, for thy service, unless they be forced to it by a bit or bridle. And so all the ancient translators understand it.

Poole: Psa 32:10 - Many sorrows shall be to the wicked // He that trusteth in the Lord Many sorrows shall be to the wicked: this is an argument to enforce the foregoing admonition; if any men will be refractory and unruly, God hath many...

Many sorrows shall be to the wicked: this is an argument to enforce the foregoing admonition; if any men will be refractory and unruly, God hath many ways to curb and chastise them, and bring them to his will.

He that trusteth in the Lord who relies upon his providence and promise for his preservation and deliverance, and commits himself to God’ s care and conduct, waiting upon him in his way, and not turning aside to crooked or sinful paths for safety or satisfaction.

PBC: Psa 32:3 - -- 3. "And though they may, through the temptation of Satan and of the world, the prevalence of corruption remaining in them, and the neglect of the mean...

3. "And though they may, through the temptation of Satan and of the world, the prevalence of corruption remaining in them, and the neglect of the means of their preservation, fall into grievous Mt 26:70,72,74 sins, and for a time continue therein, whereby they incur Isa 64:5,9; Eph 4:30 God’s displeasure, and grieve His Holy Spirit, come to have their graces and Ps 51:10,12 comforts impaired, have their hearts hardened and their consciences wounded, Ps 32:3-4 hurt and scandalize others, and bring temporal judgments 2Sa 12:14 upon themselves, yet they shall renew their Lu 22:32,61-62 repentance and be preserved, through faith in Christ Jesus, to the end." (From London Confession of 1689)

See PBtop: PERSEVERANCE AND PRESERVATION

Haydock: Psa 32:1 - -- An exhortation to praise God, and to trust in him.

An exhortation to praise God, and to trust in him.

Haydock: Psa 32:1 - David // Upright David. There is no title in Hebrew; and the Greek copies vary. This psalm may be considered as a continuation of the former, with the last verse of...

David. There is no title in Hebrew; and the Greek copies vary. This psalm may be considered as a continuation of the former, with the last verse of which it may be well connected. (Calmet) ---

Some suppose that David composed it after he had been rescued from the giant Jesbibenob, ver. 16., and 1 Paralipomenon xx. 4. (Ferrand.) ---

It is not certain that he is the author; but as other psalms without a title are ascribed to him, we have no reason to deny that he wrote this. (Berthier) ---

Many explain it as a thanksgiving of Ezechias. (Theodoret, &c.) ---

But we need not refer it to any particular event. (Calmet) ---

Upright. But it is not seemly in the mouth of a sinner, Ecclesiasticus xv. 9., (Worthington) and Psalm lxix. 16. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 32:2 - Psaltery Psaltery. Hebrew nebel, (Haydock) which does not resemble the modern psaltery. (Calmet) --- We must carefully observe mortification, and the dec...

Psaltery. Hebrew nebel, (Haydock) which does not resemble the modern psaltery. (Calmet) ---

We must carefully observe mortification, and the decalogue. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 32:3 - New // Noise New. Interesting, like the canticle of the lamb, or of redemption, Apocalypse. [chap. v.?] Public worship and music are very useful, when performed...

New. Interesting, like the canticle of the lamb, or of redemption, Apocalypse. [chap. v.?] Public worship and music are very useful, when performed with attention. (Berthier) ---

The prophet invites all to praise God for the blessings granted by Christ in the new law. (Worthington) ---

Noise, proceeding from the heart, the cry of which alone penetrates heaven. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 32:4 - Faithfulness Faithfulness. He always fulfils his promises, and his laws are just; (Worthington) therefore he deserves our praise. (Calmet) (Psalm cxliv. 13.)

Faithfulness. He always fulfils his promises, and his laws are just; (Worthington) therefore he deserves our praise. (Calmet) (Psalm cxliv. 13.)

Haydock: Psa 32:5 - Judgment Judgment. God joins these virtues together, (Worthington) as we ought to do. (Haydock) (Luke vi. 36., and Matthew v. 48.) --- He punishes the wick...

Judgment. God joins these virtues together, (Worthington) as we ought to do. (Haydock) (Luke vi. 36., and Matthew v. 48.) ---

He punishes the wicked, and rewards the good. But his mercy displays itself on the earth, as there is no misery in heaven. (St. Augustine) ---

Its effects appear more since the coming of our Saviour. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 32:6 - Mouth Mouth, by his command. (Euthymius) (Genesis i. 6.) --- The Fathers here find the blessed Trinity expressed; (Calmet; Menochius) and the Council of...

Mouth, by his command. (Euthymius) (Genesis i. 6.) ---

The Fathers here find the blessed Trinity expressed; (Calmet; Menochius) and the Council of Trent admonishes us to follow their unanimous interpretation, which is here adopted by Baumbgarte, a Protestant, 1719. St. John [i. 1.] informs us that all was made by the Word, from whom the Father and the Holy Spirit cannot be separated. (Berthier) ---

Seneca (consol. 8.) seems to have had some idea of this mystery. Quisquis formator universi fuit, sive ille Deus est potens omnium; sive incorporalis Ratio, ingentium operum artifex; sive divinus Spiritus, per omnia maxima et minima æquali intentione diffusus. The power of them may designate the stars and angels, which the Hebrew styles "the army" of heaven, Isaias xxiv. 21., and Matthew xxvi. 53. (Calmet) ---

The word of God is omnipotent, (Worthington) "the Creator....both of visible and invisible things." (Nicene Creed) (Haydock) ---

Calvin rejects this proof of the Trinity as weak, (Amama) as he did not like the word Trinity, nor perhaps the mystery itself. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 32:7 - As in As in. This is agreeable to St. Augustine, and some ancient psalters; though the Septuagint have "like a bottle" made of leather, Greek: osei askon...

As in. This is agreeable to St. Augustine, and some ancient psalters; though the Septuagint have "like a bottle" made of leather, Greek: osei askon. Moderns would translate, "like a heap." But Symmachus and St. Jerome agree with us, (see Psalm lxxvii. 13.; Calmet) as well as the Chaldean and Houbigant. God has made the bed of the sea capable of containing such quantities of water, some of which evaporate and descend again from the clouds, to make the earth fruitful. Yet many take no notice of this admirable economy. (Berthier) ---

Theodoret and St. Athanasius understand the clouds to be meant by this vessel; but the former sentiment seems better. These waters, as well as hail, &c., are instruments of God's vengeance, Deuteronomy xxxii. 34. The depths have the same import. God calls them forth at pleasure, (Amos v. 8., and Genesis vii. 11.) and confines them within bounds, Job xxxviii. 11.

Haydock: Psa 32:9 - Created Created. Hebrew, "on foot," to express God's absolute dominion. (Calmet) --- This passage shews that bra means properly created out of nothing, ...

Created. Hebrew, "on foot," to express God's absolute dominion. (Calmet) ---

This passage shews that bra means properly created out of nothing, Genesis i. Matter did not exist before God spoke. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 32:10 - And....princes And....princes. This seems to be lost in Hebrew, as all the Greeks have recognised it. (Berthier) --- God prepares the causes and means when he fo...

And....princes. This seems to be lost in Hebrew, as all the Greeks have recognised it. (Berthier) ---

God prepares the causes and means when he forms his decrees, which are wholly independent. He is not forced to wait for a favourable opportunity. (Calmet) ---

He confounded the tongues at Babel, and his absolute decrees are always executed. (Worthington)

Gill: Psa 32:1 - Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven // whose sin is covered Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven,.... Or "lifted up" m; bore and carried away: sin is a transgression of the law; the guilt of it charg...

Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven,.... Or "lifted up" m; bore and carried away: sin is a transgression of the law; the guilt of it charged upon the conscience of a sinner is a heavy burden, too heavy for him to bear, and the punishment of it is intolerable: forgiveness is a removal of sin, guilt, and punishment. Sin was first taken off, and transferred from the sinner to Christ, the surety; and who laid upon him really and judicially, as the sins of the people of Israel were put upon the scapegoat typically; and was bore by him, both guilt and punishment, and taken away, finished, and made an end of; and by the application of his blood and sacrifice it is taken away from the sinner's conscience; it is caused to pass from him, and is removed afar off, as far as the east is from the west; it is so lifted off from him as to give him ease and peace, and so as never to return to the destruction of him; wherefore such a man is a happy man; he has much peace, comfort, calmness, and serenity of mind now can appear before God with intrepidity, and serve him without fear; no bill of indictment can hereafter be found against him; no charge will be exhibited, and so no condemnation to him. The same is expressed, though in different words, in the next clause;

whose sin is covered; not by himself, by any works of righteousness done by him; for these are a covering too narrow; nor by excuses and extenuations; for prosperity and happiness do not attend such a conduct, Pro 28:13; but by Christ; he is the mercy seat, the covering of the law; who is the covert of his people from the curses of it, and from the storm of divine wrath and vengeance, due to the transgressions of it; his blood is the purple covering of the chariot, under which the saints ride safe to heaven; the lines of his blood are drawn over crimson and scarlet sins, by which they are blotted out, and are not legible; and being clothed with the robe of Christ's righteousness, all their sins are covered from the eye of divine Justice; not from the eye of God's omniscience, which sees the sins of all men, and beholds those of his own people; and which he takes notice of, and corrects for, in a fatherly way; but from vindictive justice, they are so hid as not to be imputed and charged, nor the saints to be condemned for them; such are unblamable and unreproveable in the sight of God, and are all fair in the eyes of Christ; and their sins are caused to pass away from themselves, and they have no more sight and conscience of them; and though sought for at the last day, they will not be found and brought to light, nor be seen by men or angels. There is something unseemly, impure, nauseous, abominable, and provoking in sin; which will not bear to be seen by the Lord, and therefore must be covered, or the sinner can never stand in his presence and be happy.

Gill: Psa 32:2 - Blessed is the man to whom the Lord imputeth not iniquity // and in whose spirit there is no guile Blessed is the man to whom the Lord imputeth not iniquity,.... Or "does not think of it" n; with respect unto men, at least to the harm of them; his ...

Blessed is the man to whom the Lord imputeth not iniquity,.... Or "does not think of it" n; with respect unto men, at least to the harm of them; his thoughts are thoughts of peace, and not of evil; their sins and iniquities he remembers no more; he does not charge them with them, he does not reckon them, or place them to their account, having imputed them to his Son; see 2Co 5:19. The Apostle Paul interprets this as inclusive of the imputation of righteousness without works; even of the righteousness of Christ, in which the blessedness of a man lies, Rom 4:6; for such an one is accepted with God, is justified in his sight, and is secure from condemnation and wrath; it is well with him at all times, in life, at death, and at judgment; he is an heir of eternal life, will enter into it, and be for ever glorified;

and in whose spirit there is no guile: for being thoroughly convinced of sin, he is sincere in his repentance for it, without deceit and hypocrisy in his confession of it; as David, the Apostle Paul, and the publican were, when they acknowledged themselves sinners; his faith, in looking to Christ for pardon and righteousness, is from the heart, and is unfeigned, and so is his profession of it before God, angels, and men; and whatever hypocrisy and guile are remaining in the old man, there is none in the new spirit put into him; in the new man, which is created in him, and which sinneth not: as the other phrases are expressive of pardon and justification, this points at internal sanctification, and which serves to complete the description of the happy man; such an one as David himself was; and this happiness he illustrates from his own experience in the following verses.

Gill: Psa 32:3 - When I kept silence // my bones waxed old; through my roaring all the day long When I kept silence,.... Was unthoughtful of sin, unconcerned about it, and made no acknowledgment and confession of it to God, being quite senseless ...

When I kept silence,.... Was unthoughtful of sin, unconcerned about it, and made no acknowledgment and confession of it to God, being quite senseless and stupid; the Targum adds, "from the words of the law"; which seems to point at sin as the cause of what follows;

my bones waxed old; through my roaring all the day long; not under a sense of sin, but under some severe affliction, and through impatience in it; not considering that sin lay at the bottom, and was the occasion of it; and such was the violence of the disorder, and his uneasiness under it, that his strength was dried up by it, and his bones stuck out as they do in aged persons, whose flesh is wasted away from them; see Psa 102:3.

Gill: Psa 32:4 - For day and night thy hand was heavy upon me // my moisture is turned into the drought of summer // Selah For day and night thy hand was heavy upon me,.... Meaning the afflicting hand of God, which is not joyous, but grievous, and heavy to be borne; especi...

For day and night thy hand was heavy upon me,.... Meaning the afflicting hand of God, which is not joyous, but grievous, and heavy to be borne; especially without his gracious presence, and the discoveries of his love: this continued night and day, without any intermission; and may design some violent distemper; perhaps a fever; since it follows,

my moisture is turned into the drought of summer. That is, the radical moisture in him was almost dried up, as brooks in the summer season; his body was parched, as it were, with the burning heat of the disease; or with an apprehension of the wrath of God under it, or both: and so he continued until be was brought to a true sense of sin, and an acknowledgment of it, when he had the discoveries of pardoning love, as is expressed in Psa 32:5. The Septuagint and Vulgate Latin versions read, "I am turned into distress, through a thorn being fixed"; and so Apollinarius paraphrases the words,

"I am become miserable, because thorns are fixed in my skin;''

reading קוץ for קיץ; and which Suidas o interprets "sin", that being like the thorn, unfruitful and pricking; see 2Co 12:7.

Selah; on this word; see Gill on Psa 3:2.

Gill: Psa 32:5 - I acknowledged my sin unto thee // and mine iniquity have I not hid // I said, I will confess my transgressions unto the Lord // and thou forgavest the iniquity of my sin // Selah I acknowledged my sin unto thee,.... The sin of Adam, in which he was concerned; original sin, the corruption of his nature, the sin that dwelt in him...

I acknowledged my sin unto thee,.... The sin of Adam, in which he was concerned; original sin, the corruption of his nature, the sin that dwelt in him, his private and secret sins, which none knew but God and himself; even all his sins, which were many, with all their aggravated circumstances; wherefore he uses various words to express them by, in this and the following clauses; as "sin", "iniquity", and "transgressions"; the same that are used in the doctrine of pardon in the preceding verses; his confession being of the same extent with pardon, and all these he calls his own; as nothing is more a man's own than his sins are; and these the psalmist acknowledged to the Lord; or "made", or "will make known" p to him: not that any sin is unknown to God, even the most secret ones; but they may be said to be made known to God, when a sinner makes a sincere and hearty acknowledgment of them before him, and expresses his own sense of them; how that they are with him, and ever before him, what knowledge rather he has of them, how much he is affected with them, and concerned for the commission of them; and such an acknowledgment the Lord expects and requires of his people, Jer 3:12;

and mine iniquity have I not hid; by retaining it as a sweet morsel under his tongue; for he not only acknowledged it, but forsook it; or by not confessing it, as Achan; for not confessing sin is the of hiding it; or by denying it, as Gehazi, Ananias and Sapphira; or by palliating and extenuating it; or by casting the blame on others, as did Adam and his wife; see Job 31:33; or by covering it with a guise of sanctify and religion;

I said, I will confess my transgressions unto the Lord; not unto men, though in some cases confession of sin is to be made to men; a confession of it in general is to be made to the churches, and administrators of ordinances, in order to admission into a church state, and to the ordinances of Christ, Mat 3:6; and in case of private offences, faults are to be confessed one to another, and forgiveness granted; and in case of public offences, a confession should be made to a church publicly; partly for the satisfaction of the church, and partly for the glory of divine grace; but confession is not to be made to a priest, or to a person in a ministerial character, in order for absolution; but to the Lord only, against whom sin is committed, and who only can pardon it: and this the psalmist saith in his heart he would do, and did do it; he not only confessed facts, but the fault of them, with their evil circumstances, and that he justly deserved punishment for them; and this he did from his heart, with abhorrence of the sins committed by him, and in faith, with a view to the pardoning mercy of God in Christ;

and thou forgavest the iniquity of my sin. That is, either the guilt of his sin, which he took away from him; or the punishment of it, which he delivered him from: moreover, this phrase may denote the exceeding sinfulness of sin, and so may both express the sense which the psalmist had of it, and exalt the grace of God in the forgiveness of it; by which must be meant a fresh manifestation and application of pardon to his soul: now, when confession of sin, and remission of it, are thus put together, the sense is not that confession of sin is the cause of pardon; it is not the moving cause of it, that is the grace and mercy of God; nor the procuring and meritorious cause of it, that is the blood of Christ: it is not for the sake of a sinner's confession of sin, but for Christ's sake, that sin is forgiven; but this is the way in which it is enjoyed; and such as truly repent of sin, and sincerely confess it, are the persons to whom the Lord manifests his forgiving love; such may expect it, Pro 28:13.

Selah; on this word; see Gill on Psa 3:2.

Gill: Psa 32:6 - For this shall everyone that is godly pray unto thee // in a time when thou mayest be found // surely in the floods of great waters they shall not come nigh unto him For this shall everyone that is godly pray unto thee,.... Meaning either that the success he had met with, in acknowledging his sin, would encourage o...

For this shall everyone that is godly pray unto thee,.... Meaning either that the success he had met with, in acknowledging his sin, would encourage others also to take a like step, and make their supplications to the Lord also; or that every godly person should pray to God for the same blessing of pardoning grace likewise. Pardon of sin is to be prayed for; not only Moses, David, Daniel, and other Old Testament saints, prayed for it; but Christ has directed his disciples and followers, under the Gospel dispensation, to do the same, Luk 11:4; and which must be understood of praying for the manifestation of it to their consciences; for God has by one eternal act forgiven all trespasses at once, for Christ's sake; nor can any new act of pardon arise in the mind of God, or a fresh one pass in the court of heaven, nor the blood of Christ be shed again for the remission of it. Moreover, godly men will, in this sense, pray for it, as they have daily occasion to do: a godly man is a man that is created after the image of God, is born of him, and is possessed of internal powerful godliness, and has all things pertaining to it; and particularly has a godly sorrow for sin, and the fear of God in his heart, and before his eyes: and such a man is a praying one; having the spirit of grace, he has the spirit of supplication, and prays with the Spirit and with the understanding; and his praying for the pardon of sin shows that he is not without it, but daily commits it, and so needs fresh discoveries of forgiving love: and which he prays for

in a time when thou mayest be found; which is to be understood, not of any particular stated times of prayer, as morning, noon, and night; for the throne of grace is always open, and God is to be found, and grace and mercy with him at all times; and much less does this respect a day of grace for particular persons, which, if improved, and the opportunity taken, they may have pardon; but if neglected till it is over, then there is no pardon for them; for there is no such day of grace: the whole Gospel dispensation is a day of grace; and that will not be over until all the elect of God are gathered in; and until then it is, and will be; now is the accepted time, now is the day of salvation; but it designs a time of need, of soul distress, in which, when persons call upon God in truth, and seek him with their whole heart, he is found by them, and they find grace and mercy with him to relieve them in their distress; the Targum is,

"in an acceptable time;''

surely in the floods of great waters they shall not come nigh unto him; that is, unto the godly man; not but that afflictions, which are comparable to great floods of waters, do reach godly persons; but not so as to overwhelm them and destroy them; they are delivered out of them. The phrase seems to denote safety in the greatest calamities; that though even a deluge of vengeance and awful judgments should come upon the world, yet the godly man is safe; his place is the munition of rocks; he is in the hands of Christ, and is enclosed in the arms of everlasting love, from whence he can never be taken by men or devils: the Targum interprets these "waters of many people"; and adds, so as "to do any evil", or "hurt".

Gill: Psa 32:7 - Thou art my hiding place // thou shalt compass me about with songs of deliverance // Selah Thou art my hiding place,.... In time of trouble; see Psa 27:5; so Christ is said to be, Isa 32:2. "Thou shall preserve me from trouble"; not from ha...

Thou art my hiding place,.... In time of trouble; see Psa 27:5; so Christ is said to be, Isa 32:2. "Thou shall preserve me from trouble"; not from having it; for in this world the saints must have tribulation, and through it enter the kingdom, but from being swallowed up with it; the Lord will bring them safe out of it, and of them it shall be said, "these are they that came out of great tribulation", Rev 7:14;

thou shalt compass me about with songs of deliverance; or gird with gladness, as in Psa 30:11; the meaning is, that God would give him abundant reason for praise and thankfulness; and an opportunity of attending him with songs of praise for deliverance out of the hands of his enemies, and from trouble; and that both in his house below, where the saints, his loving people and faithful subjects, would join with him, in the midst of whom he should stand encompassed with their songs of praise; or in heaven above, where he should sing the song of Moses, and of the Lamb, and be surrounded with the hallelujahs of angels and glorified saints; Aben Ebra interprets these songs of the voices of angels.

Selah; on this word; see Gill on Psa 3:2.

Gill: Psa 32:8 - I will instruct thee // and teach thee in the way which shall go // I will guide thee with mine eye I will instruct thee,.... Or "cause thee to understand" q. These are by many thought to be the words of the Lord, who gives to a man an understanding ...

I will instruct thee,.... Or "cause thee to understand" q. These are by many thought to be the words of the Lord, who gives to a man an understanding of spiritual things; he instructs by his providence, and even by afflictive dispensations of providence; and by his word, which is written for the learning of men, and is profitable for doctrine and instruction in righteousness, and by the ministers of it, who are therefore called instructors in Christ; and by his Spirit, when he instructs effectually and to purpose; by him he instructs men in the knowledge of themselves, and of himself in Christ, and of peace, pardon, righteousness, and salvation by Christ; and leads into all truth as it is in Jesus; and opens the understanding to understand the Scriptures, and the doctrines contained in them;

and teach thee in the way which shall go; the path of duty, from whence men are apt to wander; when the Lord hedges up the way they would go with thorny providences, and by his ministers, word, and Spirit, directs them in the right way; saying, this is the way, walk in it; and the way of truth, which is clearly pointed to in the Scriptures of truth, and by the Spirit of truth; and also the way of life and salvation by Christ, revealed in the Gospel and which the preachers of it show to the sons of men;

I will guide thee with mine eye; as a master guides his scholar; or as "mine eye" r: with as much care and tenderness as if thou wert the apple of mine eye; see Deu 32:10; or the words may be rendered, "I will counsel", or "give counsel"; as he does, who is wonderful in counsel, and that by his Son, who is the wonderful Counsellor; and by his word and testimonies, which are the delight of his people, and the men of their counsel: "mine eye is upon thee" s; as the eye of the Lord is upon the righteous, to watch over them for good, to provide for them, guide and direct them. These words may very well be considered as the words of David, in which he determines to act a part, agreeable to the title of the psalm, "Maschil"; which signifies instructing, or causing to understand; and as he thought himself bound in duty to do, under the influence of the grace and mercy he had received from the Lord, in the forgiveness of his sins; and which he elsewhere resolved to do in a like case, and which is an instance parallel to this, Psa 51:13; he here promises to "instruct" men in the way of attaining to the blessedness he had been speaking of, by directing them to take the steps he did; namely, to go to the, Lord, and acknowledge and confess their sins before him, when they might expect to find pardoning mercy and grace, as he did; and to "teach" them the way of their duty upon this, to fear the Lord and his goodness, and to serve him in righteousness and holiness all the days of their lives; and to "guide them with his eye"; by declaring to them the gracious experiences he had been favoured with, by telling them what he himself had seen and known.

Gill: Psa 32:9 - Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding // whose mouth must be held in with bit and bridle, lest they come near unto thee Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding,.... The design of this exhortation is to direct men how to behave under the ins...

Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding,.... The design of this exhortation is to direct men how to behave under the instructions given; not as brutes, which have no rational faculties, but as men; that they should not show themselves thoughtless, stupid, and unteachable, as these animals, or worse than they; nor stubborn and obstinate, refractory and untractable, resolving not to be taught, stopping the ear, and pulling away the shoulder; nor ill natured and mischievous; not only hating instruction, casting away the law of the Lord, but kicking and spurning at, and persecuting such who undertake to instruct them; as these creatures sometimes attempt to throw their riders, and, when down, kick at them;

whose mouth must be held in with bit and bridle, lest they come near unto thee; to do mischief, bite or kick; or "because they do not come near to thee" t; and that they may come near, and be brought into subjection, and become obedient; therefore such methods are used; see Jam 3:3; there is in the words a tacit intimation, that men are commonly, and for the most part, like these creatures, stupid, stubborn, and mischievous; and therefore severe methods are used by the Lord, sore chastenings, to humble and instruct them; see Jer 31:18; the mule, more especially, is remarkable for its stupidity u; and though the horse is docile, yet he is sometimes stubborn and refractory.

Gill: Psa 32:10 - Many sorrows shall be to the wicked // but he that trusteth in the Lord // mercy shall compass him about Many sorrows shall be to the wicked,.... Who will not be instructed and reformed, but are like the horse and mule, without understanding; many outwar...

Many sorrows shall be to the wicked,.... Who will not be instructed and reformed, but are like the horse and mule, without understanding; many outward sorrows or afflictions attend them; loathsome and consuming diseases come upon their bodies by intemperance and debauchery; and they and their families are brought to a piece of bread, through their vicious courses; and inward sorrows, horror and terror of mind, seize them when their consciences are at any time awakened, and are open to conviction; when a load of guilt lies on them, what remorse of conscience they feel! and what severe reflections do they make! and how are they pierced through with many sorrows! And though indeed, for the most part, wicked men have their good things in this life, and are in prosperous circumstances, and are not in trouble, as other men; yet what they have is with a curse; and they have no true peace, pleasure, and satisfaction in what they enjoy; and the curses of a righteous law; and everlasting destruction is prepared for them in the other world, when they will have many sorrows indeed; their worm will not die, and the fire of divine fury will not be quenched; there will be for ever indignation and wrath, tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that does evil;

but he that trusteth in the Lord; not in his wealth and riches, in his wisdom and strength, in himself, and his own righteousness; for such are wicked persons; but in the Lord; in his righteousness to justify him, in his blood to pardon him, in his strength to support him, and in his grace to supply him with everything necessary for him;

mercy shall compass him about; not only follow him and overtake him, but surround him; he shall be crowned with lovingkindness and tender mercies: the phrase denotes the abundance of mercies that shall be bestowed upon him here and hereafter, as both grace and glory.

Gill: Psa 32:11 - Be glad in the Lord // and rejoice, ye righteous // and shout for joy all ye that are upright in heart Be glad in the Lord,.... The Targum renders it, "in the Word of the Lord"; in Christ the essential Word; in him as the Lord their righteousness, and b...

Be glad in the Lord,.... The Targum renders it, "in the Word of the Lord"; in Christ the essential Word; in him as the Lord their righteousness, and because of his righteousness imputed to them, by which they become righteous; and in him as their Saviour and Redeemer, and because of the salvation which he has wrought out for them; see Isa 61:10;

and rejoice, ye righteous; in the Lord, as before; for this is not a carnal, but spiritual joy, which is here exhorted to, the same as in Phi 4:4; and "righteous" ones, who are excited to it, are such who are not righteous in appearance only, or in their own conceit, or by the deeds of the law, or in and of themselves; for there is none righteous this way: but who are made righteous by the obedience of Christ, and are righteousness itself in him; under a sense of which grace they live soberly, righteously, and godly; and these have great reason to rejoice and be glad;

and shout for joy all ye that are upright in heart: who have the truth of grace, and the root of the matter in them, oil in the vessels of their hearts, with their lamps; whose faith is unfeigned, whose hope is without hypocrisy, and whose love is without dissimulation; and who worship the Lord in spirit and in truth, and draw nigh to him with true hearts, and call upon him in the simplicity of them; these ought to rejoice, and even shout for joy, because of the grace that is wrought in them, and bestowed upon them, and the glory they shall be partakers of; for both grace and glory are given to these, and no good thing is withheld from them; the end of these upright souls is peace; and when they have done their work, they shall lie down and rest in their beds, and each one shall walk in his uprightness, Psa 84:11.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 32:1 Heb “covered over.”

NET Notes: Psa 32:2 In whose spirit there is no deceit. The point is not that the individual is sinless and pure. In this context, which focuses on confession and forgive...

NET Notes: Psa 32:3 Heb “my bones became brittle.” The psalmist pictures himself as aging and growing physically weak. Trying to cover up his sin brought seve...

NET Notes: Psa 32:4 Summer. Perhaps the psalmist suffered during the hot season and perceived the very weather as being an instrument of divine judgment. Another option i...

NET Notes: Psa 32:5 Heb “the wrongdoing of my sin.” By joining synonyms for “sin” in this way, the psalmist may be emphasizing the degree of his w...

NET Notes: Psa 32:6 Heb “him.” The translation uses the plural “them” to agree with the plural “every one of your faithful followers” ...

NET Notes: Psa 32:7 Heb “[with] shouts of joy of deliverance you surround me.”

NET Notes: Psa 32:8 Heb “I will advise, upon you my eye,” that is, “I will offer advice [with] my eye upon you.” In 2 Chr 20:12 the statement R...

NET Notes: Psa 32:9 Heb “with a bridle and bit, its [?] to hold, not to come near to you.” The meaning of the Hebrew noun עֲדִי ...

NET Notes: Psa 32:10 Heb “but the one who trusts in the Lord, faithfulness surrounds him.”

NET Notes: Psa 32:11 Heb “all [you] pure of heart.” The “heart” is here viewed as the seat of one’s moral character and motives. The “p...

Geneva Bible: Psa 32:1 "[A Psalm] of David, ( a ) Maschil." Blessed [is he whose] transgression [is] ( b ) forgiven, [whose] sin [is] covered. ( a ) Concerning the free rem...

Geneva Bible: Psa 32:3 When I kept ( c ) silence, my bones waxed old through my ( d ) roaring all the day long. ( c ) Between hope and despair. ( d ) Was not eased by sile...

Geneva Bible: Psa 32:5 I ( e ) acknowledged my sin unto thee, and mine iniquity have I not hid. I said, I will confess my transgressions unto the LORD; and thou forgavest th...

Geneva Bible: Psa 32:6 For this shall every one that is godly pray unto thee in a ( f ) time when thou mayest be found: surely in the floods of great waters ( g ) they shall...

Geneva Bible: Psa 32:8 I will ( h ) instruct thee and teach thee in the way which thou shalt go: I will guide thee with mine eye. ( h ) David promises to make the rest of G...

Geneva Bible: Psa 32:9 Be ye not as the horse, [or] as the mule, [which] have no understanding: whose ( i ) mouth must be held in with bit and bridle, lest they come near un...

Geneva Bible: Psa 32:11 Be glad in the LORD, and ( k ) rejoice, ye righteous: and shout for joy, all [ye that are] upright in heart. ( k ) He shows that peace and joy of con...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Psa 32:1-2 - A Libation To Jehovah A Threefold Thought Of Sin And Forgiveness Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. 2. Blessed is the man unto whom the L...

MHCC: Psa 32:1-2 - --Sin is the cause of our misery; but the true believer's transgressions of the Divine law are all forgiven, being covered with the atonement. Christ ba...

MHCC: Psa 32:3-7 - --It is very difficult to bring sinful man humbly to accept free mercy, with a full confession of his sins and self-condemnation. But the true and only ...

MHCC: Psa 32:8-11 - --God teaches by his word, and guides with the secret intimations of his will. David gives a word of caution to sinners. The reason for this caution is,...

Matthew Henry: Psa 32:1-6 - -- This psalm is entitled Maschil, which some take to be only the name of the tune to which it was set and was to be sung. But others think it is sig...

Matthew Henry: Psa 32:7-11 - -- David is here improving the experience he had had of the comfort of pardoning mercy. I. He speaks to God, and professes his confidence in him and ex...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 32:1-2 - -- The Psalm begins with the celebration of the happiness of the man who experiences God's justifying grace, when he gives himself up unreservedly to H...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 32:3-5 - -- For, as his own experience has taught the poet, he who does not in confession pour out all his corruption before God, only tortures himself until he...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 32:6-7 - -- For this mercy, which is provided for every sinner who repents and confesses his sin, let then, every חסיד , who longs for חסד , turn in pr...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 32:8-10 - -- It is not Jahve, who here speaks in answer to the words that have been thus far addressed to Him. In this case the person addressed must be the poet...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 32:11 - -- After the doctrine of the Psalm has been unfolded in three unequal groups of verses, there follows, corresponding to the brief introduction, a still...

Constable: Psa 32:1-11 - --Psalm 32 In this psalm David urged those who sin against the Lord to seek His pardon with the encouragem...

Constable: Psa 32:1-2 - --1. The blessing of forgiveness 32:1-2 This psalm begins like Psalm 1. "Blessed" means having rec...

Constable: Psa 32:3-5 - --2. The chastening of the unrepentant 32:3-5 32:3-4 David's failure to confess his sin immediately resulted in internal grief and external weakness for...

Constable: Psa 32:6-11 - --3. The counsel of the forgiven 32:6-11 32:6 Initially David advised the godly to confess their sins quickly so God would not remove Himself from them ...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 32:1-2 Transgression is violation of the Law. Sin is falling short of the Law’s standard. Iniquity is lawlessness.

Evidence: Psa 32:5 Contrition does not save us. Its outworking can be seen in these verses: we acknowledge our sin to God rather than justifying ourselves. No longer do ...

Evidence: Psa 32:9 Differences between men and animals . The Bible tells us that animals are created " without understanding." Human beings are different from animals. ...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 32 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 32:1, Blessedness consists in remission of sins; Psa 32:3, Confession of sins gives ease to the conscience; Psa 32:8, God’s promise...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 32 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 32:1, Psa 32:2) The happiness of a pardoned sinner. (Psa 32:3-7) The misery that went before, and the comfort that followed the confession of si...

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 32 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This psalm, though it speaks not of Christ, as many of the psalms we have hitherto met with have done, has yet a great deal of gospel in it. The ap...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 32 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 32 A Psalm, of David, Maschil. This is the first of the psalms that bears this title: some think it is the name of a musical ...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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