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Teks -- Psalms 28:1-9 (NET)

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Konteks
Psalm 28
28:1 By David. To you, O Lord, I cry out! My protector, do not ignore me! If you do not respond to me, I will join those who are descending into the grave. 28:2 Hear my plea for mercy when I cry out to you for help, when I lift my hands toward your holy temple! 28:3 Do not drag me away with evil men, with those who behave wickedly, who talk so friendly to their neighbors, while they plan to harm them! 28:4 Pay them back for their evil deeds! Pay them back for what they do! Punish them! 28:5 For they do not understand the Lord’s actions, or the way he carries out justice. The Lord will permanently demolish them. 28:6 The Lord deserves praise, for he has heard my plea for mercy! 28:7 The Lord strengthens and protects me; I trust in him with all my heart. I am rescued and my heart is full of joy; I will sing to him in gratitude. 28:8 The Lord strengthens his people; he protects and delivers his chosen king. 28:9 Deliver your people! Empower the nation that belongs to you! Care for them like a shepherd and carry them in your arms at all times!
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel
 · Pit the place of the dead
 · pit the place of the dead


Topik/Tema Kamus: Poetry | David | BIBLE, THE, IV CANONICITY | Prayer | Testimony | Praise | Oracle | Blessing | Church | OPERATION | Wicked | Holy of Holies | Intercession | Righteous | Thankfulness | Godlessness | Heart | Joy | Messiah | Lies and Deceits | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 28:2 - Towards Towards the holy of holies, because there the ark was; from whence God gave oracular answers to his people.

Towards the holy of holies, because there the ark was; from whence God gave oracular answers to his people.

Wesley: Psa 28:3 - Draw not Do not drag me; as thou dost these, to execution and destruction.

Do not drag me; as thou dost these, to execution and destruction.

Wesley: Psa 28:5 - Regard not The providential works of God towards his people.

The providential works of God towards his people.

Wesley: Psa 28:7 - I am helped He speaks of it as past, because God assured him by his spirit, that he had heard and accepted his prayers.

He speaks of it as past, because God assured him by his spirit, that he had heard and accepted his prayers.

JFB: Psa 28:1 - -- An earnest cry for divine aid against his enemies, as being also those of God, is followed by the Psalmist's praise in assurance of a favorable answer...

An earnest cry for divine aid against his enemies, as being also those of God, is followed by the Psalmist's praise in assurance of a favorable answer, and a prayer for all God's people. (Psa 28:1-9)

JFB: Psa 28:1 - my rock (Psa 18:2, Psa 18:31).

JFB: Psa 28:1 - be not silent to me Literally, "from me," deaf or inattentive.

Literally, "from me," deaf or inattentive.

JFB: Psa 28:1 - become like them, &c. Share their fate.

Share their fate.

JFB: Psa 28:1 - go down into the pit Or, "grave" (Psa 30:3).

Or, "grave" (Psa 30:3).

JFB: Psa 28:2 - lift up my hands A gesture of prayer (Psa 63:4; Psa 141:2).

A gesture of prayer (Psa 63:4; Psa 141:2).

JFB: Psa 28:2 - oracle Place of speaking (Exo 25:22; Num 7:89), where God answered His people (compare Psa 5:7).

Place of speaking (Exo 25:22; Num 7:89), where God answered His people (compare Psa 5:7).

JFB: Psa 28:3 - Draw me not away Implies punishment as well as death (compare Psa 26:9). Hypocrisy is the special wickedness mentioned.

Implies punishment as well as death (compare Psa 26:9). Hypocrisy is the special wickedness mentioned.

JFB: Psa 28:4 - -- The imprecation is justified in Psa 28:5. The force of the passage is greatly enhanced by the accumulation of terms describing their sin.

The imprecation is justified in Psa 28:5. The force of the passage is greatly enhanced by the accumulation of terms describing their sin.

JFB: Psa 28:4 - endeavours Points out their deliberate sinfulness.

Points out their deliberate sinfulness.

JFB: Psa 28:5 - -- Disregard of God's judgments brings a righteous punishment.

Disregard of God's judgments brings a righteous punishment.

JFB: Psa 28:5 - destroy . . . build . . . up The positive strengthened by the negative form.

The positive strengthened by the negative form.

JFB: Psa 28:6 - supplications Or, "cries for mercy."

Or, "cries for mercy."

JFB: Psa 28:7 - -- The repetition of "heart" denotes his sincerity.

The repetition of "heart" denotes his sincerity.

JFB: Psa 28:8 - -- The distinction made between the people.

The distinction made between the people.

JFB: Psa 28:8 - their strength And the anointed--may indicate Absalom's rebellion as the occasion.

And the anointed--may indicate Absalom's rebellion as the occasion.

JFB: Psa 28:9 - -- The special prayer for the people sustains this view.

The special prayer for the people sustains this view.

JFB: Psa 28:9 - feed them As a shepherd (Psa 23:1, &c.).

As a shepherd (Psa 23:1, &c.).

Clarke: Psa 28:1 - O Lord my rock O Lord my rock - צורי tsuri not only means my rock, but my fountain, and the origin of all the good I possess

O Lord my rock - צורי tsuri not only means my rock, but my fountain, and the origin of all the good I possess

Clarke: Psa 28:1 - If thou be silent If thou be silent - If thou do not answer in such a way as to leave no doubt that thou hast heard me, I shall be as a dead man. It is a modern refin...

If thou be silent - If thou do not answer in such a way as to leave no doubt that thou hast heard me, I shall be as a dead man. It is a modern refinement in theology which teaches that no man can know when God hears and answers his prayers, but by an induction of particulars, and by an inference from his promises. And, on this ground, how can any man fairly presume that he is heard or answered at all? May not his inductions be no other than the common occurrences of providence? And may not providence be no more than the necessary occurrence of events? And is it not possible, on this skeptic ground, that there is no God to hear or answer? True religion knows nothing of these abominations; it teaches its votaries to pray to God, to expect an answer from him, and to look for the Holy Spirit to bear witness with their spirits that they are the sons and daughters of God.

Clarke: Psa 28:2 - Toward thy holy oracle Toward thy holy oracle - דביר קדשך debir kodshecha ; debir properly means that place in the holy of holies from which God gave oracular ...

Toward thy holy oracle - דביר קדשך debir kodshecha ; debir properly means that place in the holy of holies from which God gave oracular answers to the high priest. This is a presumptive proof that there was a temple now standing; and the custom of stretching out the hands in prayer towards the temple, when the Jews were at a distance from it, is here referred to.

Clarke: Psa 28:3 - Draw file not away Draw file not away - Let me not be involved in the punishment of the wicked.

Draw file not away - Let me not be involved in the punishment of the wicked.

Clarke: Psa 28:4 - Give them Give them - Is the same as thou wilt give them; a prophetic declaration of what their lot will be.

Give them - Is the same as thou wilt give them; a prophetic declaration of what their lot will be.

Clarke: Psa 28:5 - They regard not the works of the Lord They regard not the works of the Lord - They have no knowledge of the true God, either as to his nature, or as to his works

They regard not the works of the Lord - They have no knowledge of the true God, either as to his nature, or as to his works

Clarke: Psa 28:5 - He shall destroy them, and not build them up He shall destroy them, and not build them up - This is a remarkable prophecy, and was literally fulfilled: the Babylonian empire was destroyed by Cy...

He shall destroy them, and not build them up - This is a remarkable prophecy, and was literally fulfilled: the Babylonian empire was destroyed by Cyrus, and never built up again; for he founded the Persian empire on its ruins. haven the place where Babylon stood is now no longer known.

Clarke: Psa 28:7 - The Lord is my strength The Lord is my strength - I have the fullest persuasion that he hears, will answer, and will save me.

The Lord is my strength - I have the fullest persuasion that he hears, will answer, and will save me.

Clarke: Psa 28:8 - The Lord is their strength The Lord is their strength - Instead of למו lamo , to them, eight MSS. of Kennicott and De Rossi have לעמו leammo to his people; and this...

The Lord is their strength - Instead of למו lamo , to them, eight MSS. of Kennicott and De Rossi have לעמו leammo to his people; and this reading is confirmed by the Septuagint, Syriac, Vulgate, Ethiopic, Arabic, and Anglo-Saxon. This makes the passage more precise and intelligible; and of the truth of the reading there can be no reasonable doubt. "The Lord is the strength of his People, and the saving strength of his anointed."Both king and people are protected, upheld, and saved by him.

Clarke: Psa 28:9 - Save thy people Save thy people - Continue to preserve them from all their enemies; from idolatry, and from sin of every kind

Save thy people - Continue to preserve them from all their enemies; from idolatry, and from sin of every kind

Clarke: Psa 28:9 - Bless thine inheritance Bless thine inheritance - They have taken thee for their God; thou hast taken them for thy people

Bless thine inheritance - They have taken thee for their God; thou hast taken them for thy people

Clarke: Psa 28:9 - Feed them Feed them - רעה raah signifies both to feed and to govern. Feed them, as a shepherd does his flock; rule them, as a father does his children

Feed them - רעה raah signifies both to feed and to govern. Feed them, as a shepherd does his flock; rule them, as a father does his children

Clarke: Psa 28:9 - Lift them up for ever Lift them up for ever - Maintain thy true Church; let no enemy prevail against it. Preserve and magnify them for ever. Lift them up: as hell is the ...

Lift them up for ever - Maintain thy true Church; let no enemy prevail against it. Preserve and magnify them for ever. Lift them up: as hell is the bottomless pit in which damned spirits sink down for ever; or, as Chaucer says downe all downe; so heaven is an endless height of glory, in which there is an eternal rising or exaltation. Down, all down; up, all up; for ever and ever

Calvin: Psa 28:1 - Unto thee, O Jehovah! will I cry 1.Unto thee, O Jehovah! will I cry The Psalmist begins by declaring that he would betake himself to the help of God alone, which shows both his faith...

1.Unto thee, O Jehovah! will I cry The Psalmist begins by declaring that he would betake himself to the help of God alone, which shows both his faith and his sincerity. Although men labor every where under a multitude of troubles, yet scarcely one in a hundred ever has recourse to God. Almost all having their consciences burdened with guilt, and having never experienced the power of divine grace which might lead them to betake themselves to it, either proudly gnaw the bit or fill the air with unavailing complaints, or, giving way to desperation, faint under their afflictions. By calling God his strength, David more fully shows that he confided in God’s assistance, not only when he was in the shade and in peace, but also when he was exposed to the severest temptations. In comparing himself to the dead, too, he intimates how great his straits were, although his object was not merely to point out the magnitude of his danger, but also to show that when he needed succor, he looked not here and there for it, but relied on God alone, without whose favor there remained no hope for him. It is, therefore, as if he had said, I am nothing if thou leavest me; if thou succourest me not, I perish. It is not enough for one who is in such a state of affliction to be sensible of his misery, unless, convinced of his inability to help himself, and renouncing all help from the world, he betake himself to God alone. And as the Scriptures inform us that God answers true believers when he shows by his operations that he regards their supplications, so the word silent is set in opposition to the sensible and present experience of his aid, when he appears, as it were, not to hear their prayers.

Calvin: Psa 28:2 - Hear the voice of my prayers when I cry to thee 2.Hear the voice of my prayers when I cry to thee This repetition is a sign of a heart in anguish. David’s ardor and vehemence in prayer are also i...

2.Hear the voice of my prayers when I cry to thee This repetition is a sign of a heart in anguish. David’s ardor and vehemence in prayer are also intimated by the noun signifying voice, and the verb signifying to cry. He means that he was so stricken with anxiety and fear, that he prayed not coldly, but with burning, vehement desire, like those who, under the pressure of grief, vehemently cry out. In the second clause of the verse, by synecdoche, the thing signified is indicated by the sign. It has been a common practice in all ages for men to lift up their hands in prayer. Nature has extorted this gesture even from heathen idolaters, to show by a visible sign that their minds were directed to God alone. The greater part, it is true, contented with this ceremony, busy themselves to no effect with their own inventions; but the very lifting up of the hands, when there is no hypocrisy and deceit, is a help to devout and zealous prayer. David, however, does not say here that he lifted his hands to heaven, but to the sanctuary, that, aided by its help, he might ascend the more easily to heaven. He was not so gross, or so superstitiously tied to the outward sanctuary, as not to know that God must be sought spiritually, and that men then only approach to him when, leaving the world, they penetrate by faith to celestial glory. But remembering that he was a man, he would not neglect this aid afforded to his infirmity. As the sanctuary was the pledge or token of the covenant of God, David beheld the presence of God’s promised grace there, as if it had been represented in a mirror; just as the faithful now, if they wish to have a sense of God’s nearness to them, should immediately direct their faith to Christ, who came down to us in his incarnation, that he might lift us up to the Father. Let us understand, then, that David clung to the sanctuary with no other view than that by the help of God’s promise he might rise above the elements of the world, which he used, however, according to the appointment of the Law. The Hebrew word דביר , debir, which we have rendered sanctuary, 594 signifies the inner-room of the tabernacle or temple, or the most holy place, where the ark of the covenant was contained, and it is so called from the answers or oracles which God gave forth from thence, to testify to his people the presence of his favor among them.

Calvin: Psa 28:3 - Draw me not away with wicked men 3.Draw me not away with wicked men The meaning is, that in circumstances so dissimilar, God should not mingle the righteous with the wicked in the sa...

3.Draw me not away with wicked men The meaning is, that in circumstances so dissimilar, God should not mingle the righteous with the wicked in the same indiscriminate destruction. 595 Undoubtedly, too, in speaking of his enemies, he indirectly asserts his own integrity. But he did not pray in this manner, because he thought that God was indiscriminately and unreasonably angry with men; he reasons rather from the nature of God, that he ought to cherish good hope, because it was God’s prerogative to distinguish between the righteous and the wicked, and to give every one his due reward. By the workers of iniquity, he means man wholly addicted to wickedness. The children of God sometimes fall, commit errors, and act amiss in one way or other, but they take no pleasure in their evil doings; the fear of God, on the contrary, stirs them up to repentance. David afterwards defines and enlarges upon the wickedness of those whom he describes; for, under pretense of friendship they perfidiously deceived good men, professing one thing with their tongue, while they entertained a very different thing in their hearts. Open depravity is easier to be borne with than this craftiness of the fox, when persons put on fair appearances in order to find opportunity of doing mischief. 596 This truth, accordingly, admonishes us that those are most detestable in God’s sight, who attack the simple and unwary with fair speeches as with poison.

Calvin: Psa 28:4 - Give them according to their works 4.Give them according to their works Having thus requested God to have a regard to his innocence, the Psalmist thunders forth a curse against his ene...

4.Give them according to their works Having thus requested God to have a regard to his innocence, the Psalmist thunders forth a curse against his enemies. And the accumulation of words shows that he had groaned long and grievously under the burden before he broke forth to desire such vengeance. He intimates that the wicked of whom he speaks had transgressed not once, nor for a short time, nor in one way, but that they had proceeded so far in their constant evil doings, that their audacity was no longer to be endured. We know how troublesome and grievous a temptation it is to see the ungodly proceeding without measure or end, as if God connived at their wickedness. David, therefore, wearied as it were with continual forbearing, and fainting under the burden, implores God, at length, to restrain the wantonness of his enemies, who of late ceased not to heap wickedness upon wickedness. Thus we perceive that there is nothing superfluous in this verse, when to works he adds the wickedness of their doings, and the work of their hands, and thrice petitions that they may receive the reward which they have deserved. Add to this, that he at the same time bears testimony to his own faith, to which boasting hypocrites often compel the children of God, while by their deceit and cavils, they impose upon the judgments of the world. We see how men who are distinguished for wickedness, not content with impunity themselves, cannot abstain from oppressing the innocent by false accusations, just as the wolf, desirous of making a prey 597 of the lambs, according to the common proverb, accused them of troubling the water. David is therefore compelled by this exigency to call upon God for protection. Here again occurs the difficult question about praying for vengeance, which, however, I shall despatch in few words, as I have discussed it elsewhere. In the first place, then, it is unquestionable, that if the flesh move us to seek revenge, the desire is wicked in the Sight of God. He not only forbids us to imprecate evil upon our enemies in revenge for private injuries, but it cannot be otherwise than that all those desires which spring from hatred must be disordered. David’s example, therefore, must not be alleged by those who are driven by their own intemperate passion to seek vengeance. The holy prophet is not inflamed here by his own private sorrow to devote his enemies to destruction; but laying aside the desire of the flesh, he gives judgment concerning the matter itself. Before a man can, therefore, denounce vengeance against the wicked, he must first shake himself free from all improper feelings in his own mind. In the second place, prudence must be exercised, that the heinousness of the evils which offend us drive us not to intemperate zeal, which happened even to Christ’s disciples, when they desired that fire might be brought from heaven to consume those who refused to entertain their Master, (Luk 9:54.) They pretended, it is true, to act according to the example of Elias; but Christ severely rebuked them, and told them that they knew not by what spirit they were actuated. In particular, we must observe this general rule, that we cordially desire and labor for the welfare of the whole human race. Thus it will come to pass, that we shall not only give way to the exercise of God’s mercy, but shall also wish the conversion of those who seem obstinately to rush upon their own destruction. In short, David, being free from every evil passion, and likewise endued with the spirit of discretion and judgment, pleads here not so much his own cause as the cause of God. And by this prayer, he farther reminds both himself and the faithful, that although the wicked may give themselves loose reins in the commission of every species of vice with impunity for a time, they must at length stand before the judgment-seat of God.

Calvin: Psa 28:5 - Because they regard not the doings of Jehovah // Let him destroy them, and not build them up 5.Because they regard not the doings of Jehovah In this verse he lays open the root of impiety, declaring that the ungodly are so bold to do mischief...

5.Because they regard not the doings of Jehovah In this verse he lays open the root of impiety, declaring that the ungodly are so bold to do mischief, because, while they are thus indulging their hatred, and perpetrating every species of wickedness, they think that they have nothing to do with God. And when conscience stings them, they soothe themselves with false hopes, and at last stubbornly harden themselves into insensibility. First, being intoxicated with prosperity, they flatter themselves that God is their friend, while he has no regard for those good men who are overwhelmed with so many afflictions; and, next, they persuade themselves that the world is governed by chance, thus blinding themselves in the midst of the clear light of day. In this manner, David’s adversaries, willingly ignorant that God had appointed him to be king, emboldened themselves to persecute him. He therefore complains of their gross ignorance of this, just as Isaiah (Isa 5:20) brings the same complaint, in general terms, against all the ungodly of his days. This doctrine, then, has a twofold use. First, it is no small consolation to the children of God to be persuaded, while they are unrighteously vexed, that by the providence of God they are thus profitably exercised to patience; and that while the affairs of this world are all in a state of disturbance and confusion, God nevertheless sits supreme in heaven conducting and governing all things. 598 In the second place, this is a very proper curb to subdue the passions of our flesh, that we may not, like the Andabates, 599 contend in the dark, and with shut eyes, as if God saw not and cared not about what is done here below. Let us, therefore, learn carefully to consider that the judgments which God executes are just so many proofs of his righteousness in governing mankind, and that although all things should be huddled together in confusion, the eye of faith should be directed to heaven, to consider God’s secret judgments. And as God never ceases, even in the midst of the greatest darkness, to give some tokens of his providence, it is inexcusable indolence not to attend to them. This perverseness the prophet aggravates, by repeating again, the works of God’s hands He thus intimates, that the ungodly, by recklessly pursuing their course, trample under foot whatever of God’s works they may meet with to check their madness.

Let him destroy them, and not build them up Some are of opinion that the first part of this verse is the nominative in the room of a substantive to the verbs in the last clause; as if David had said, This brutal madness shall destroy them; but the name of God should rather be supplied, and then the context will run excellently. As the verbs, however, in the Hebrew are in the future tense 600 the sentence may be explained as meaning that David now assures himself of the destruction of the reprobates for which he had lately prayed. I do not reject this interpretation; but, in my opinion, the words are just a continuance of his petitions. In this way, he prays that the wicked may be overthrown, so as not to rise again, or recover their former state. The expression, Let him destroy them, and not build them up, is a common figure of speech among the Hebrews, according to what Malachi says concerning Edom, “Thus saith the Lord of Hosts, They shall build, but I shall throw down,” (Mal 1:4.) Lest we should be struck, therefore, with an incurable plague, let us learn to awake our minds to the consideration of God’s works, that we may be taught to fear him, to persevere in patience, and to advance in godliness.

Calvin: Psa 28:6 - Blessed be Jehovah, who hath heard 6.Blessed be Jehovah, who hath heard This is the second part of the psalm in which the prophet begins to give thanks to God. We have already seen how...

6.Blessed be Jehovah, who hath heard This is the second part of the psalm in which the prophet begins to give thanks to God. We have already seen how he employed himself in prayer in the midst of his dangers; and now by this thanksgiving he teaches us that his prayers were not in vain. Thus he confirms by his own example, that God is ready to bring help to his people whenever they seek him in truth and sincerity. He declares the same truth more fully in the next verse, calling God his strength and his shield; for he was persuaded that God had heard him from this, that he had been wonderfully preserved. He adds, that he had been helped in respect of his confidence and hope; for it often comes to pass, that those who call upon God, notwithstanding come short of his grace through their own unbelief. Thirdly, he says that he will add to his joy a testimony of his gratitude. Wicked men and hypocrites flee to God when they are overwhelmed with difficulties, but as soon as they escape from them, forgetting their deliverer, they rejoice with frantic mirth. In short, David trusted not in vain, since he truly found by experience that God possesses ever present power to preserve his servants; and that this was matter of true and solid joy to him, that he found God ever favorable to him. On this account, likewise, he promises that he would be mindful of God, and grateful to him. And undoubtedly, when God spreads cheerfulness through our hearts, it is to open our mouths to sing his praises.

Calvin: Psa 28:8 - Jehovah is their strength 8.Jehovah is their strength By way of explanation, he repeats what he had said before, that God had been his strength; namely, because he had blessed...

8.Jehovah is their strength By way of explanation, he repeats what he had said before, that God had been his strength; namely, because he had blessed his armies. David had indeed employed the hand and labor of men, but to God alone he ascribes the victory. As he knew that whatever help he had obtained from men proceeded from God, and that his prosperous success flowed likewise from his gratuitous favor, he discerned his hand in these means, as palpably as if it had been stretched forth from heaven. And surely it is passing shameful, that human means, which are only the instruments of God’s power, should obscure his glory; although there is no sin more common. It is a manner of speaking which has great weight, when, speaking of his soldiers, he uses only the pronoun their, as if he pointed to them with the finger. The second clause assigns the reason of the other. He declares that himself and his whole army were endued with victorious valor from heaven, because he fought under the standard of God. This is the meaning of the word anointed; for, had not God appointed him king, and freely adopted him, he would not have favored him any more than he did Saul. By this means, in extolling solely the power of God which advanced him to the kingdom, he attributes nothing to his own policy or power. In the meantime, we may learn, that when one is satisfied of the lawfulness of his calling, this doctrine encourages him to entertain good hope with respect to the prosperous issue of his affairs. In particular, it is to be observed, as we have briefly noticed in another place, that the fountain whence all the blessings God bestows upon us flows is, that he hath chosen us in Christ. David employs salvations or deliverances in the plural number, because he had been often and in various ways preserved. The meaning, therefore, is, that from the time when God had anointed him by the hand of Samuel, he never ceased to help him, but delivered him in innumerable ways, until he had accomplished the work of his grace in him.

Calvin: Psa 28:9 - NO PHRASE In this verse he shows that it was not so much his own welfare as the welfare of the whole Church which was the object of his concern, and that he ne...

In this verse he shows that it was not so much his own welfare as the welfare of the whole Church which was the object of his concern, and that he neither lived nor reigned for himself, but for the common good of the people. He well knew that he was appointed king for no other end. In this he declares himself to be a type of the Son of God, of whom, when Zechariah (Zec 9:9) predicts that he would come “having salvation,” there is no doubt that he promises nothing to him apart from his members, but that the effects of this salvation would diffuse themselves throughout his whole body. By this example, accordingly, he prescribes a rule to earthly kings, that, devoting themselves to the public good, they should only desire to be preserved for the sake of their people. 601 How very far otherwise it is, it is needless to say. Blinded with pride and presumption they despise the rest of the world, just as if their pomp and dignity raised them altogether above the common state of man. Nor is it to be wondered at, that mankind are so haughtily and contumeliously trampled under foot of kings, since the greatest part cast off and disdain to bear the cross of Christ. 602 Let us therefore remember that David is like a mirror, in which God sets before us the continual course of his grace. Only we must be careful, that the obedience of our faith may correspond to his fatherly love, that he may acknowledge us for his people and inheritance. The Scriptures often designate David by the name of a shepherd; but he himself assigns that office to God, thus confessing that he is altogether unfit for it, 603 save only in as far as he is God’s minister.

Defender: Psa 28:8 - his anointed "Anointed" is the Hebrew word Messiah ."

"Anointed" is the Hebrew word Messiah ."

TSK: Psa 28:1 - Unto // O // be // to // I become Unto : Psa 3:4, Psa 5:2, Psa 22:2, Psa 77:1, Psa 142:1 O : Psa 18:2, Psa 42:9; Isa 26:4 *marg. be : Psa 35:22, Psa 83:1 to : Heb. from I become : Psa ...

TSK: Psa 28:2 - when // thy holy oracle when : Psa 63:4, Psa 125:5, Psa 134:2, Psa 141:2, Psa 143:6; 2Ch 6:13; 1Ti 2:8 thy holy oracle : or, the oracle of thy sanctuary, Psa 5:7, Psa 138:2; ...

TSK: Psa 28:3 - Draw // speak // mischief Draw : Psa 26:9; Num 16:26; Mat 25:41, Mat 25:46 speak : Psa 12:2, Psa 55:21, Psa 62:4; Jer 9:8, Jer 9:9; Mic 3:5; Mat 22:15-18 mischief : Psa 7:14, P...

TSK: Psa 28:4 - Give // and // the work // render Give : Psa 5:10, Psa 59:12, Psa 59:13, Psa 69:22-24; Jer 18:21-23; 2Ti 4:14; Rev 18:6 and : Psa 2:1-5, Psa 21:10; Eze 38:10 the work : Psa 62:12, Psa ...

TSK: Psa 28:5 - Because // operation // not build Because : Psa 10:5, Psa 92:4-6, Psa 104:24, Psa 111:2-4; Job 34:26, Job 34:27; Isa 5:12, Isa 22:11; Isa 26:9-11; Hos 14:9; Joh 12:37; Rom 1:20, Rom 1:...

TSK: Psa 28:6 - -- Psa 31:21, Psa 31:22, Psa 66:19, Psa 66:20, Psa 69:33, Psa 69:34, Psa 107:19-22, Psa 116:1, Psa 116:2, Psa 118:5

TSK: Psa 28:7 - strength // shield // heart // therefore // with strength : Psa 28:8, Psa 18:1, Psa 18:2, Psa 19:14, Psa 46:1; Isa 12:2, Isa 45:24; Eph 6:10 shield : Psa 84:11, Psa 91:4; Gen 15:1 heart : Psa 13:5, P...

TSK: Psa 28:8 - their // saving strength // his their : or, his saving strength : Heb. strength of salvations his : Psa 2:2, Psa 20:6; 1Sa 16:13; Isa 61:1

their : or, his

saving strength : Heb. strength of salvations

his : Psa 2:2, Psa 20:6; 1Sa 16:13; Isa 61:1

TSK: Psa 28:9 - Save // bless // feed // lift Save : Psa 14:7, Psa 25:22, Psa 80:14-19; Jer 31:7 bless : Deu 9:29; 2Sa 21:3; 1Ki 8:51, 1Ki 8:53; Jer 10:16; Eph 1:18 feed : or, rule, Psa 78:71; 2Sa...

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Poole: Psa 28:2 - -- i.e. Towards the holy of holies, which is so called, 1Ki 6:23 , compared with 2Ch 3:10 : compare also 1Ki 6:5 8:6 , because there the ark was; from ...

i.e. Towards the holy of holies, which is so called, 1Ki 6:23 , compared with 2Ch 3:10 : compare also 1Ki 6:5 8:6 , because there the ark was; from whence God gave oracular answers to his people; and to which they accordingly directed their prayers, not only when they drew near to it, but when they were at a distance from it, as Dan 6:10 .

Poole: Psa 28:3 - Draw me not away with the wicked // Mischief is in their heart Draw me not away with the wicked: the sense is, either, 1. Do not suffer me to be drawn away by their counsel or example to imitate their evil cours...

Draw me not away with the wicked: the sense is, either,

1. Do not suffer me to be drawn away by their counsel or example to imitate their evil courses. For God is oft said to do that which he doth not effect, but only permit and order, as 2Sa 12:12 . Or,

2. Do not draw me into the same snares and mischief with them; do not drag me, as thou dost or wilt do all these malefactors, to execution and destruction. Let me not die the death of the wicked. Compare Psa 26:9 . Thus drawing is used for drawing to death, Job 21:33 Eze 32:20 . This seems best to suit with the following context, wherein he imprecateth and foretelleth that destruction upon his enemies which he deprecated for himself.

Mischief is in their heart which are hypocritical and perfidious persons, whilst I, through thy grace, am upright and sincere. Seeing then I am so unlike them in disposition and practice, let me not be made like them in their ruin.

Poole: Psa 28:4 - -- David useth these imprecations, partly, to vindicate himself from the slanders of his enemies, who reported him to be as wicked as they were, only m...

David useth these imprecations, partly, to vindicate himself from the slanders of his enemies, who reported him to be as wicked as they were, only more close and cunning therein; which, if he had been, he had bitterly cursed himself; which it could not reasonably be presumed that he would do; partly, from his great and long experience of their implacable and incorrigible malignity, not only against him, but against God, and his declared will, and against all truly good men, and that covered with pretences of piety to God, and of peaceableness towards their neighbours, Psa 28:3 , which made their wickedness more inexcusable and detestable; partly, by the instinct and direction of God’ s Spirit, by whose inspiration he uttered this as well as the rest of the Psalm; and partly, that hereby he might provoke them to repentance; for this curse belongs only to those who shall obstinately persist in their wicked courses. Add to all this, that as verbs of the imperative mood are oft used by the Hebrews for futures, so these may not be proper imprecations, but predictions of their destruction.

Poole: Psa 28:5 - The works of the Lord, nor the operation of his hands // He shall destroy them, and not build them up The works of the Lord, nor the operation of his hands i.e. the providential works of God, both for and towards his church and people in general; the ...

The works of the Lord, nor the operation of his hands i.e. the providential works of God, both for and towards his church and people in general; the serious observation whereof would have made them afraid of opposing them, and desirous to join themselves with them; and for and towards me in particular, concerning whose succession to the kingdom God hath so expressly declared his mind and will, and to whom he hath given so many and such wonderful preservations, that they who will not acknowledge it, but continue to oppose it, may well be presumed to be guilty of rebellion against God’ s will, and of the contempt of his providence.

He shall destroy them, and not build them up i.e. destroy them utterly and irrecoverably, because they wilfully shut their eyes against the light of God’ s word and works.

Poole: Psa 28:6 - -- He speaks of it as past, either because God had in part heard and answered him already, or because God assured him by his Spirit that he had heard a...

He speaks of it as past, either because God had in part heard and answered him already, or because God assured him by his Spirit that he had heard and accepted his prayers, and would assuredly answer him in due time.

Poole: Psa 28:8 - Their strength // The saving strength // Of his anointed Their strength i.e. the strength of his people, mentioned in the next verse; the relative being put before the antecedent, which is left to be gather...

Their strength i.e. the strength of his people, mentioned in the next verse; the relative being put before the antecedent, which is left to be gathered out of the following matter, as it is Num 24:17 Psa 87:1 . Or, his strength ; for the Hebrew affix mo , which commonly is plural, is sometimes taken singularly; of which see my Latin Synopsis here, and on Isa 53:8 . And his , i.e. of his anointed, as the next clause explains it. Or the words may be thus rendered, Strength is or belongs to thee Lord . Heb. The Lord, strength is his , or to him . It is a Hebrew pleonasm.

The saving strength Heb. the strength of the preservations, or deliverances, or victories, or salvations , i.e. he by whose strength alone he hath got these victories, &c.

Of his anointed i.e. of me, whom he hath anointed to be king, whom therefore he will defend; he speaks of himself in the third person, which is usual in the Hebrew tongue.

Poole: Psa 28:9 - Thine inheritance // Lift them up Thine inheritance Israel, for whom I pray; partly because thou hast in some sort committed them to my charge, and partly because Saul did not take du...

Thine inheritance Israel, for whom I pray; partly because thou hast in some sort committed them to my charge, and partly because Saul did not take due care of them.

Lift them up raise them out of their low and afflicted condition, in which they are, by reason of Saul’ s weakness and neglect, and by the prevailing power of the Philistines, and advance them to a state of safety and honour, and that not for a season, but with constancy and perpetuity, as it follows.

Haydock: Psa 28:1 - Prepareth // Glory An invitation to glorify God, with a commemoration of his mighty works. Prepareth. Hebrew, "delivereth," as a midwife (St. Jerome, 5 Edition, Aquil...

An invitation to glorify God, with a commemoration of his mighty works.

Prepareth. Hebrew, "delivereth," as a midwife (St. Jerome, 5 Edition, Aquila) "maketh the hinds to calve;" (Protestants; Haydock) or "to leap, (from eul; Berthier) or frighteneth." Hinds are supposed to bring forth with great difficulty. But the reverse seems to be the case. (St. Chrysostom in Job xxxix. 3.) (Calmet) ---

They are very swift, and trample serpents under their feet, nature having given them this power. (St. Jerome) (Pliny, [Natural History?] vii. 32.) The text may be understood of the last sacrament, which prepares us for our passage; (Berthier) or of matrimony, by means of which the world is peopled with rational beings, whose duty it is to glorify God in his temple. (Haydock) ---

This is also the effect of grace, and of the preaching of the gospel, (Berthier) which inspires people with a desire of running on in the way of perfection. Christ explains to them hidden mysteries in his Church, to which he bring multitudes, like the waters, ruling over them, and enabling them to overcome all temptations, till he crown his elect with eternal peace. (Worthington) ---

Glory. Running thither through fear, or to thank God for rain after a drought.

Haydock: Psa 28:1 - Finishing // God Finishing. Septuagint, Greek: exodiou or exodou, may also signify "the going out;" (Haydock) as if the sacred ministers exhorted their successor...

Finishing. Septuagint, Greek: exodiou or exodou, may also signify "the going out;" (Haydock) as if the sacred ministers exhorted their successors to perform their duty in the ensuing week, or on the last day of the feast of tabernacles, Leviticus xxiii. 36. (Calmet) ---

Hebrew has only "A canticle of David," (Haydock) and the rest was not in the Hexapla in the time of Theodoret, so that many pay no attention to it. The author seems to have supposed that the psalm was composed when David had finished the tabernacle, on Sion. (Calmet) (2 Kings vi., and 1 Paralipomenon xvi.) ---

But the psalmist had in view things of far greater importance, the propagation of Christianity among many great potentates. (Worthington) ---

The Fathers explain it in this sense, though it may literally allude (Calmet) to the storm procured by the prayer of Elias, 3 Kings xviii. 1, 41. (Haydock) ---

It might be composed in a thunderstorm, and used on similar occasions, (Muis) when a person had to go from home. (Haydock) ---

The seven voices may allude to the seven sacraments, or trumpets, Apocalypse x. 3. (Berthier) ---

God. Septuagint seem to have read Aleim, or they have taken elim in the same sense, as it signifies "the mighty" as well as "rams." On account of this ambiguity, a double translation is given either by the Septuagint, or rather by some later writer, who may have inserted the explanation, O ye children of God, bring ye to the Lord; (Haydock) which has crept from the margin into the text. (Amama) ---

It is marked as superfluous by Grabe, (Haydock) not being found in the best Greek copies; or at least have an obel, (Eusebius) to insinuate that it was not in Hebrew, in which state it appears in the Gal. Psalter, published in St. Jerome's works. (Calmet) ---

It is not contrary to the original, though more explicit, (Berthier) as the address is made to all the faithful, (Menochius) or to the priests and nobility. (Haydock) ---

The apostles are styled rams, because they beat down error with the two Testaments; whence bishops' mitres have two horns. (Lombard; Amama) ---

"Give praise to the Lord, ye troops of angels; render to the Lord glory and strength." (Chaldean) (Calmet) ---

Be grateful for the favours which are here recounted. (Worthington) ---

Most people now translate, "sons of the mighty." Yet St. Jerome and Houbigant have, "offspring of rams;" filios arietum. Bring lambs to the Lord, as the original may certainly mean; though many who are attached to the Hebrew allow also sons of God. (Berthier) ---

Montfaucon says that Origen marked with a lemniscus, what he judged "a better reading," and thus obelized the first of these versions, and added the second with an asterisk. This liberty has been attended both with good and bad consequences. (Kennicott)

Haydock: Psa 28:2 - Honour // Holy court Honour. Hebrew, "strength," which we must acknowledge. (Haydock) --- The first design of sacrifice is to adore God in spirit. (Worthington) --- ...

Honour. Hebrew, "strength," which we must acknowledge. (Haydock) ---

The first design of sacrifice is to adore God in spirit. (Worthington) ---

Holy court. Hebrew, "in the holy beauty," 1 Paralipomenon xvi. 29. Even the priests were obliged to remain in the court, where they adored God, as sitting upon the Cherubim, in the most holy place (Calmet) in the Catholic Church. (Worthington) ---

External worship must be observed. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 28:3 - Voice Voice. Separating the waters from the earth at the beginning, as the six other voices may denote the other works of the creation; or all these voice...

Voice. Separating the waters from the earth at the beginning, as the six other voices may denote the other works of the creation; or all these voices may signify the various effects of thunder, or may allude to the terrors preceding the last judgment, (Apocalypse x. 3.) or attending the establishment and liberation of the Jewish and Christian Churches. The first voice was heard when Jesus was baptized, (Matthew iii. 17.) as the rest may intimate the instruction and efficacy of the other sacraments. It is evident that something posterior to the reign of David is prefigured; (Berthier) and the Fathers have generally understood the psalm of the propagation of the gospel by the apostles, two of whom are styled sons of thunder, Mark iii. 17. (Calmet) ---

The psalmist speaks of greater things than attended the translation of the ark. He represents our Saviour preaching with great power and majesty, (Matthew vii. 29.) and subjecting the most powerful monarchs to his dominion. (Worthington) ---

Thunder is often styled the voice of God, and is occasioned by the collision of the clouds, (Haydock) which Moses calls the waters above. (St. Basil) (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 28:4 - Power Power and magnificence. The sacraments of confirmation and the blessed Eucharist, or the wonderful propagation of the Church, amid violent persecu...

Power and magnificence. The sacraments of confirmation and the blessed Eucharist, or the wonderful propagation of the Church, amid violent persecutions. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 28:5 - Libanus Libanus. Which were the most famous. (Haydock) --- Storms often tear up trees by the roots. (Calmet) --- The effects of the gospel and of penanc...

Libanus. Which were the most famous. (Haydock) ---

Storms often tear up trees by the roots. (Calmet) ---

The effects of the gospel and of penance, may be described, or the terrors of the last day, when Jesus Christ will destroy the proud. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 28:6 - Shall reduce them to pieces // Calf // And as Shall reduce them to pieces, &c. In Hebrew, shall make them to skip like a calf. The psalmist here describes the effects of thunder, (which he ca...

Shall reduce them to pieces, &c. In Hebrew, shall make them to skip like a calf. The psalmist here describes the effects of thunder, (which he calls the voice of the Lord) which sometimes breaks down the tallest and strongest trees; and makes their broken branches skip, &c. All this is to be understood mystically, of the powerful voice of God's word in his Church; which has broke the pride of the great ones of this world, and brought many of them meekly and joyfully to submit their necks to the sweet yoke of Christ. (Challoner) ---

Calf, or "branch," as the Greek word also implies. But Hebrew seems more naturally to signify "a calf; Libanus and Sirion, (or Sarion.; Deuteronomy iii. 9.) as the son of the unicorn." These two mountains are represented jolting together. (Calmet) ---

The violence of an earthquake has sometimes produced such effects. (Pliny, [Natural History?] ii. 83.) See Psalm cxiii. 4., Judges v. 5., and Habacuc iii. 10. (Calmet) ---

And as. The construction & dilectus, seems rather to make this only nominative, "the Lord shall, &c., and the beloved, (Haydock) the Messias, like the son of the unicorn," shall perform the like wonders. It seems probable that the Septuagint have read Jeshurun for Shirion, (Berthier) or vissron, instead of ussriun; as i would onlybe a little transposed. (Haydock) ---

Jeshurun is a title of Israel, (Deuteronomy xxxii. 15., and xxxiii. 5, 26.) who was a figure of the Messias, the beloved of God. (Berthier) ---

"And he will scatter them as a calf would do; Libanus and Sarion, are in motion, like the son of the rhinoceros." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) The most powerful submit to Christ, who works these wonders. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 28:7 - Fire // Shaketh Fire. Lightning, which deals destruction around. (Calmet) --- The Holy Ghost appeared in the form of parted tongues of fire, to enable the apostle...

Fire. Lightning, which deals destruction around. (Calmet) ---

The Holy Ghost appeared in the form of parted tongues of fire, to enable the apostles to convert the desert of the Gentile world, and the Jews, represented by the desert of Cades, (Worthington) which was near their country, (Haydock) on the frontiers of Idumea, Numbers xiii. 27. (Calmet) ---

Holy orders were instituted by Christ, to confer grace to the sacred ministers, according to their different stations or exigencies; (Berthier) or extreme unction, which prepares the sol for her separation from the body, may be here meant, if we follow the usual disposition of the sacraments; as the following sentence may allude to holy orders, which shakes or causes the desert to fructify, (Haydock) unless these words be rather applied to matrimony. (Berthier) ---

Shaketh and shakes. St. Jerome has parturire faciens, making the desert bring forth." Chaldean, "frightens the serpents." All nature is alarmed at the sound of thunder. (Haydock) ---

The deserts then appear most terrible. (Calmet)

Gill: Psa 28:1 - Unto thee will I cry // O Lord my rock // be not silent to me // lest, if thou be silent to me, I become like them that go down into the pit Unto thee will I cry,.... This denotes the distress the psalmist was in, fervency and ardour in prayer, resolution to continue in it, and singularity ...

Unto thee will I cry,.... This denotes the distress the psalmist was in, fervency and ardour in prayer, resolution to continue in it, and singularity with respect to the object of it; determining to cry to the Lord only; to which he was encouraged by what follows;

O Lord my rock; he being a strong tower and place of defence to him, in whom were all his safety, and his trust and confidence, and in whom he had an interest;

be not silent to me; or "deaf" q; persons that do not hear are silent, and make no answer; as the Lord seems to be, when he returns no answer to the cries of his people; when he does not arise and help them; when he seems not to take any notice of his and their enemies, but stands at a distance from them, and as if he had forsaken them; see Psa 39:12; the words may be considered, as they are by some, as an address to Christ his rock, his advocate and intercessor; that he would not be silent, but speak for him, and present his supplications to God, with the much incense of his mediation; see 1Sa 7:8;

lest, if thou be silent to me, I become like them that go down into the pit; either like such that fall into a ditch, and cannot help themselves out, and they cry, and there is none to take them out from thence; or like such that die in battle, and are cast into a pit, and there buried in common with others; which David might fear would be his case, through Saul's violent pursuit after him; or lest he should be like the dead, who are not regarded, and are remembered no more; or lest he should really die by the hands of his enemies, and so be laid in the grave, the pit of corruption; or be in such distress and despair as even the damned in hell be, the pit out of which there is no deliverance.

Gill: Psa 28:2 - Hear the voice of my supplications // when I cry unto thee // when I lift up my hands toward thy holy oracle Hear the voice of my supplications,.... Which proceed from the Spirit of grace and of supplication, and are put up in an humble manner, under a sense ...

Hear the voice of my supplications,.... Which proceed from the Spirit of grace and of supplication, and are put up in an humble manner, under a sense of wants and unworthiness, and on the foot of grace and mercy, and not merit;

when I cry unto thee; as he now did, and determined he would, and continue so doing, until he was heard;

when I lift up my hands toward thy holy oracle: the holy of holies, in the tabernacle and in the temple, which was sometimes so called, 1Ki 6:23; compared with 2Ch 3:10; where were the ark, the mercy seat, and cherubim, between which the Lord dwelt, and gave responses to his people; or heaven itself, which the holy of holies was a figure of; where is the throne of God, and from whence he hears the prayers of his people directed to him; or else Christ himself, who is the most Holy, and the "Debir", or Oracle, who speaks to the Lord for his people; and by whom the Lord speaks to them again, and communes with them. The oracle had its name, "debir", from speaking. Lifting up of the hands is a prayer gesture, and here designs the performance of that duty to God in heaven, through Christ; see Lam 3:41; it was frequently used, even by the Heathens, as a prayer gesture r; see Psa 141:2.

Gill: Psa 28:3 - Draw me not away with the wicked // and with the workers of iniquity // which speak peace to their neighbours, but mischief is in their hearts Draw me not away with the wicked,.... That is, with those who are notoriously wicked; who are inwardly and outwardly wicked; whose inward part is very...

Draw me not away with the wicked,.... That is, with those who are notoriously wicked; who are inwardly and outwardly wicked; whose inward part is very wickedness, and who sell themselves and give up themselves to work wickedness: the sense is, that God would not suffer him to be drawn away, or drawn aside by wicked men, but that he would deliver him from temptation; or that he would not give him up into their hands, to be at their mercy; who he knew would not spare him, if they had him in their power; or that he might not die the death of the wicked, and perish with them; see Psa 26:9;

and with the workers of iniquity; who make it the trade and business of their lives to commit sin; and which may be applied, not only to profane sinners, but to professors of religion, Mat 7:23; since it follows,

which speak peace to their neighbours, but mischief is in their hearts; hypocrites, double minded men, who have a form of godliness, but deny the power of it; pretend to religion, and have none; and speak fair to the face, but design mischief and ruin; as Saul and his servants did to David, 1Sa 18:17.

Gill: Psa 28:4 - Give them according to their deeds // and according to the wickedness of their endeavours // give them after the work of their hands // render to them their desert Give them according to their deeds,.... According to the demerit of them, which is death, even death eternal; and according to the wickedness of th...

Give them according to their deeds,.... According to the demerit of them, which is death, even death eternal;

and according to the wickedness of their endeavours; for though wicked men do not always succeed; yet their want of success does not excuse their wickedness;

give them after the work of their hands; see 2Ti 4:14;

render to them their desert; what their iniquities, in thought, word, and deed, deserve: such petitions are not contrary to that Christian charity which the Gospel recommends; nor do they savour of a spirit of revenge, which is condemned by the word of God; for it should be observed, that these things are said with respect to men given up to a reprobate mind; and that the psalmist does not seek to avenge himself, nor to gratify his own mind; but he sought the glory of God, and moreover spoke by a prophetic spirit, knowing what was the will of God in this case; see Psa 28:5; and therefore these petitions of his are not to be drawn into an example in common and ordinary cases.

Gill: Psa 28:5 - Because they regard not the works of the Lord // nor the operation of his hands // he shall destroy them, and not build them up Because they regard not the works of the Lord,.... Neither the work of creation, as if there was no first cause of all things; nor the work of Provide...

Because they regard not the works of the Lord,.... Neither the work of creation, as if there was no first cause of all things; nor the work of Providence, taking no notice either of the judgments or of the mercies of God; as though they believed that God had forsaken the earth, and would do neither good nor evil; and still less the work of redemption, which in covenant, promise, and prophecy, was appointed for the Messiah to work out; and as for the work of the Spirit of God upon the soul, they had no notion of that, of the nature and necessity of it; the things of the Spirit of God being foolishness to them, and undiscernible by them; see Isa 5:12. Perhaps the psalmist may have some regard to his being anointed by Samuel, according to the will of God, and to the victory which he obtained over Goliath, and over others, which justly gained him great esteem among some, and created envy in others; and also the wonderful protection of him from time to time; the Chaldee paraphrase is, "because they do not understand the law of the Lord". It follows,

nor the operation of his hands; in which his hand was so very apparent, that nothing less could be said than that this was the finger of God; wherefore,

he shall destroy them, and not build them up; that is, they shall be irrecoverably lost; they shall be punished with everlasting destruction; there will be no help or remedy for them: some s understand this as a prayer, that God would destroy them in such a manner, and render it, "let him destroy them", &c. t.

Gill: Psa 28:6 - Blessed be the Lord // because he hath heard the voice of my supplications Blessed be the Lord,.... Which must be understood, not as invoking nor as conferring a blessing on him, neither of which can be done by a creature; n...

Blessed be the Lord,.... Which must be understood, not as invoking nor as conferring a blessing on him, neither of which can be done by a creature; nor does he stand in need of any, he being Elshaddai, God all sufficient, God over all, blessed for ever; but as ascribing all blessedness to him, congratulating his greatness and happiness, and giving him praise and glory for mercies received; and particularly for the following:

because he hath heard the voice of my supplications; what he had prayed for, Psa 28:2; an answer was quickly returned, even while he was speaking, Isa 65:24; though this may be an expression of faith, being fully persuaded and assured that he was heard, and would be answered, and may be said by a prophetic spirit; knowing that what he had humbly asked for would be granted; so Aben Ezra and Kimchi understand it in a way of prophecy.

Gill: Psa 28:7 - The Lord is my strength // and my shield // my heart trusted in him // and I am helped // therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth // and with my song will I praise him The Lord is my strength,.... That is, the author both of natural and spiritual strength; that gave him strength of body, and fortitude of mind, to be...

The Lord is my strength,.... That is, the author both of natural and spiritual strength; that gave him strength of body, and fortitude of mind, to bear up under all the exercises he was tried with; the strength of his life, spiritual and temporal, and of his salvation; the strength of his heart under present distresses, and who he knew would be so in the hour of death, when his heart and strength would fail;

and my shield; to protect and defend him; as were the love, power, and faithfulness of God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, his power and fulness, his blood, righteousness, and salvation;

my heart trusted in him; in the Lord as his strength and shield; not in any creature, nor in his own strength and righteousness; but in the Lord God, in whom are righteousness and strength: and it is plain he did not trust in his own heart, since his heart trusted in the Lord; and which shows that his trust was an hearty one, his faith was a faith unfeigned, he believed with the heart unto righteousness;

and I am helped: this was the fruit of his trust, even a gracious experience of divine assistance: saints are helpless in themselves, and are also as to the help of man; God is the only helper of them; he helps them out of all their troubles; in whatsoever he calls them unto, and to what they want; and the help he affords is sometimes quick, and always seasonable; and sometimes by means, and sometimes without them;

therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth; that is, in the Lord, the ground of which was the help he had from him; and this joy was very great, a joy unspeakable, and full of glory; it was not carnal, but spiritual, a heart joy, joy in the Holy Ghost;

and with my song will I praise him; praise is due to God, what glorifies him, and is acceptable to him; it becomes the saints, is comely for them, and it is pleasant work to them, when grace is in exercise; see Psa 69:30; this may be understood of one of his songs, and one of the best of them, and of one better than this, as a Jewish writer u observes.

Gill: Psa 28:8 - The Lord is their strength // and he is the saving strength of his anointed The Lord is their strength,.... The strength of his people, mentioned in Psa 28:9; not only the strength of David in particular, but of all his peopl...

The Lord is their strength,.... The strength of his people, mentioned in Psa 28:9; not only the strength of David in particular, but of all his people in general; see Psa 37:39;

and he is the saving strength of his anointed; meaning either himself, as before, who was anointed by Samuel king of Israel, and therefore had not invaded and thrust himself into an office he had no call and right unto; or the Messiah, the Lord's Anointed, whom he heard, helped, and strengthened in the day of salvation, and delivered him from the power of death and the grave, and raised him from thence, and gave him glory; see Psa 20:6.

Gill: Psa 28:9 - Save thy people // and bless thine inheritance // feed them also // and lift them up for ever Save thy people,.... The psalmist begins the psalm with petitions for himself, and closes it with prayers for the people of God; whom God has chosen f...

Save thy people,.... The psalmist begins the psalm with petitions for himself, and closes it with prayers for the people of God; whom God has chosen for his people, taken into covenant to be his people, and given them to his son as such; these he has resolved to save, and has appointed Christ, and sent him into the world, to be the Saviour of them; and to them he makes known and applies the great salvation by his Spirit: so that this prayer was a prayer of faith, as are also the following petitions;

and bless thine inheritance; the people whom the Lord has chosen for his inheritance, and has given to Christ as his portion, and are his peculiar possession; and these he blesses with all spiritual blessings, with grace here, and glory hereafter, as is requested;

feed them also; as the shepherd does his flock, by leading them into green pastures, by giving them the bread of life, by nourishing them with the word and ordinances, by the means or his ministering servants, who are under-shepherds appointed to feed the saints with knowledge and understanding;

and lift them up for ever; above their enemies, and out of the reach of them; bear and carry them now, as the shepherd does his lambs, in his arms and bosom; and raise them out of their graves, and give them the dominion in the morning of the resurrection, and cause them to reign as kings and priests with Christ, as they ever will.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 28:1 Heb “the pit.” The noun בּוֹר (bor, “pit, cistern”) is sometimes used of the grave and/or the re...

NET Notes: Psa 28:2 The Hebrew term דְּבִיר (dÿvir, “temple”) actually refers to the most holy place within the...

NET Notes: Psa 28:3 Heb “and evil [is] in their heart[s].”

NET Notes: Psa 28:4 Heb “Give to them according to their work, and according to the evil of their deeds. According to the work of their hands give to them. Return t...

NET Notes: Psa 28:5 Heb “will tear them down and not rebuild them.” The ungodly are compared to a structure that is permanently demolished.

NET Notes: Psa 28:6 He has heard my plea for mercy. The psalmist’s mood abruptly changes at this point, because the Lord responded positively to his petition and as...

NET Notes: Psa 28:7 Heb “and from my song I will thank him.” As pointed in the Hebrew text, מִשִּׁירִ...

NET Notes: Psa 28:8 Heb “he [is] a refuge of help for his anointed one.” The noun מָשִׁיחַ (mashiakh, “a...

NET Notes: Psa 28:9 Or “forever.”

Geneva Bible: Psa 28:2 Hear the voice of my supplications, when I cry unto thee, when I lift up my hands toward thy ( b ) holy oracle. ( b ) He counts himself as a dead man...

Geneva Bible: Psa 28:3 ( c ) Draw me not away with the wicked, and with the workers of iniquity, which speak peace to their neighbours, but mischief [is] in their hearts. (...

Geneva Bible: Psa 28:4 ( d ) Give them according to their deeds, and according to the wickedness of their endeavours: give them after the work of their hands; render to them...

Geneva Bible: Psa 28:5 Because they regard not the works of the LORD, nor the operation of his hands, he shall ( e ) destroy them, and not build them up. ( e ) Let them be ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 28:6 ( f ) Blessed [be] the LORD, because he hath heard the voice of my supplications. ( f ) Because he felt the assurance of God's help in his heart, his...

Geneva Bible: Psa 28:8 The LORD [is] ( g ) their strength, and he [is] the saving strength of his anointed. ( g ) Meaning his soldiers who were means by which God declared ...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 28:1-5 - --David is very earnest in prayer. Observe his faith in prayer; God is my rock, on whom I build my hope. Believers should not rest till they have receiv...

MHCC: Psa 28:6-9 - --Has God heard our supplications? Let us then bless his name. The Lord is my strength, to support me, and carry me on through all my services and suffe...

Matthew Henry: Psa 28:1-5 - -- In these verses David is very earnest in prayer. I. He prays that God would graciously hear and answer him, now that, in his distress, he called upo...

Matthew Henry: Psa 28:6-9 - -- In these verses, I. David gives God thanks for the audience of his prayers as affectionately as a few verses before he had begged it: Blessed be th...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 28:1-5 - -- This first half of the Psalm (Psa 28:1) is supplicatory. The preposition מן in connection with the verbs חרשׁ , to be deaf, dumb, and חשׁ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 28:6-9 - -- The first half of the Psalm prayed for deliverance and for judgment; this second half gives thanks for both. If the poet wrote the Psalm at one sitt...

Constable: Psa 28:1-9 - --Psalm 28 This psalm is similar to Psalm 26 except in this one David's distress was imminent. He believed...

Constable: Psa 28:1-4 - --1. Urgent petition for deliverance 28:1-4 28:1 David cried out in prayer for the Lord's deliverance from his enemies so he would not die. The "pit" re...

Constable: Psa 28:5-8 - --2. Confident praise for deliverance 28:5-8 28:5 David was sure the wicked would fail in their purposes since they did not acknowledge the Lord's works...

Constable: Psa 28:9 - --3. Final request for deliverance 28:9 Having expressed his confidence in the Lord's salvation Da...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 28:4-5 It is a fearful thing for sinners to be given exactly what they deserve.

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 28 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 28:1, David prays earnestly against his enemies; Psa 28:6, and for the people.

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

Poole: Psalms 28 (Pendahuluan Pasal) THE ARGUMENT This Psalm seems to be made upon the same occasion with the former, and is mixed, as many others of his Psalms are, of hopes and fears...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 28 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 28:1-5) A prayer in distress. (Psa 28:6-9) Thanksgiving for deliverance.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 28 (Pendahuluan Pasal) The former part of this psalm is the prayer of a saint militan and now in distress (Psa 28:1-3), to which is added the doom of God's implacable ene...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 28 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 28 A Psalm of David. This psalm, Aben Ezra says, David either composed himself, or one of the singers for him; the former see...

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