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Teks -- Psalms 13:1-6 (NET)

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Konteks
Psalm 13
13:1 For the music director; a psalm of David. How long, Lord, will you continue to ignore me? How long will you pay no attention to me? 13:2 How long must I worry, and suffer in broad daylight? How long will my enemy gloat over me? 13:3 Look at me! Answer me, O Lord my God! Revive me, or else I will die! 13:4 Then my enemy will say, “I have defeated him!” Then my foes will rejoice because I am upended. 13:5 But I trust in your faithfulness. May I rejoice because of your deliverance! 13:6 I will sing praises to the Lord when he vindicates me.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel


Topik/Tema Kamus: David | SEPTUAGINT, 2 | Afflictions and Adversities | ENLIGHTEN | Faith | Psalms | Thankfulness | Joy | WEAN | FORGET; FORGETFUL | HEART | LIGHT | DANIEL, BOOK OF | FACE | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 13:2 - How long Shall I be in such perplexities, not knowing what course to take?

Shall I be in such perplexities, not knowing what course to take?

Wesley: Psa 13:3 - Lighten Revive and comfort, and deliver me from the darkness of death, which is ready to come upon me.

Revive and comfort, and deliver me from the darkness of death, which is ready to come upon me.

Wesley: Psa 13:6 - I will sing It is a common thing for David and other prophets to speak of future deliverances as if they were already come, that so they may signify both the infa...

It is a common thing for David and other prophets to speak of future deliverances as if they were already come, that so they may signify both the infallible certainty of the thing, and their firm assurance thereof.

JFB: Psa 13:1 - -- On title, see Introduction. The Psalmist, mourning God's absence and the triumph of his enemies, prays for relief before he is totally destroyed, and ...

On title, see Introduction. The Psalmist, mourning God's absence and the triumph of his enemies, prays for relief before he is totally destroyed, and is encouraged to hope his trust will not be in vain. (Psa 13:1-6)

The forms of expression and figure here used are frequent (compare Psa 9:12, Psa 9:18; Psa 10:11-12).

JFB: Psa 13:1 - How long . . . for ever Shall it be for ever?

Shall it be for ever?

JFB: Psa 13:2 - -- The counsels or devices of his heart afford no relief.

The counsels or devices of his heart afford no relief.

JFB: Psa 13:3 - lighten mine eyes Dim with weakness, denoting approaching death (compare 1Sa 14:27-29; Psa 6:7; Psa 38:10).

Dim with weakness, denoting approaching death (compare 1Sa 14:27-29; Psa 6:7; Psa 38:10).

JFB: Psa 13:4 - rejoice Literally, "shout as in triumph."

Literally, "shout as in triumph."

JFB: Psa 13:4 - I am moved Cast down from a firm position (Psa 10:6).

Cast down from a firm position (Psa 10:6).

JFB: Psa 13:5-6 - -- Trust is followed by rejoicing in the deliverance which God effects, and, instead of his enemy, he can lift the song of triumph.

Trust is followed by rejoicing in the deliverance which God effects, and, instead of his enemy, he can lift the song of triumph.

Clarke: Psa 13:1 - How long wilt thou forget me How long wilt thou forget me - The words עד אנה ad anah , to what length, to what time, translated here how long? are four times repeated in t...

How long wilt thou forget me - The words עד אנה ad anah , to what length, to what time, translated here how long? are four times repeated in the two first verses, and point out at once great dejection and extreme earnestness of soul

Clarke: Psa 13:1 - Hide thy face from me? Hide thy face from me? - How long shall I be destitute of a clear sense of thy approbation?

Hide thy face from me? - How long shall I be destitute of a clear sense of thy approbation?

Clarke: Psa 13:2 - Take counsel in my soul Take counsel in my soul - I am continually framing ways and means of deliverance; but they all come to naught, because thou comest not to my deliver...

Take counsel in my soul - I am continually framing ways and means of deliverance; but they all come to naught, because thou comest not to my deliverance. When a soul feels the burden and guilt of sin, it tries innumerable schemes of self-recovery; but they are all useless. None but God can speak peace to a guilty conscience

Clarke: Psa 13:2 - Mine enemy be exalted Mine enemy be exalted - Satan appears to triumph while the soul lies under the curse of a broken law.

Mine enemy be exalted - Satan appears to triumph while the soul lies under the curse of a broken law.

Clarke: Psa 13:3 - Consider and hear me Consider and hear me - Rather, answer me. I have prayed; I am seeking thy face I am lost without thee; I am in darkness; my life draws nigh to destr...

Consider and hear me - Rather, answer me. I have prayed; I am seeking thy face I am lost without thee; I am in darkness; my life draws nigh to destruction; if I die unforgiven, I die eternally. O Lord my God, consider this; hear and answer, for thy name’ s sake.

Clarke: Psa 13:4 - Let mine enemy say Let mine enemy say - Satan’ s ordinary method in temptation is to excite strongly to sin, to blind the understanding and inflame the passions; ...

Let mine enemy say - Satan’ s ordinary method in temptation is to excite strongly to sin, to blind the understanding and inflame the passions; and when he succeeds, he triumphs by insults and reproaches. None so ready then to tell the poor soul how deeply, disgracefully, and ungratefully it has sinned! Reader, take heed

Clarke: Psa 13:4 - When I am moved When I am moved - When moved from my steadfastness and overcome by sin. O what desolation is made by the fall of a righteous soul! Itself covered wi...

When I am moved - When moved from my steadfastness and overcome by sin. O what desolation is made by the fall of a righteous soul! Itself covered with darkness and desolation, infidels filled with scoffing, the Church clad in mourning, the Spirit of God grieved, and Jesus crucified afresh, and put to an open shame! O God, save the pious reader from such wreck and ruin!

Clarke: Psa 13:5 - But I have trusted in thy mercy But I have trusted in thy mercy - Thou wilt not suffer me to fall; or if I have fallen, wilt thou not, for his sake who died for sinners, once more ...

But I have trusted in thy mercy - Thou wilt not suffer me to fall; or if I have fallen, wilt thou not, for his sake who died for sinners, once more lift up the light of thy countenance upon me? Wilt thou not cover my sin

Clarke: Psa 13:5 - My heart shall rejoice in thy salvation My heart shall rejoice in thy salvation - There is no true joy but of the heart; and the heart cannot rejoice till all guilt is taken away from the ...

My heart shall rejoice in thy salvation - There is no true joy but of the heart; and the heart cannot rejoice till all guilt is taken away from the conscience.

Clarke: Psa 13:6 - I will sing unto the Lord I will sing unto the Lord - That heart is turned to God’ s praise which has a clear sense of God’ s favor

I will sing unto the Lord - That heart is turned to God’ s praise which has a clear sense of God’ s favor

Clarke: Psa 13:6 - Because he hath dealt bountifully with me Because he hath dealt bountifully with me - כי גמל עלי ki gamel alai , because he hath recompensed me. My sorrows were deep, long continued...

Because he hath dealt bountifully with me - כי גמל עלי ki gamel alai , because he hath recompensed me. My sorrows were deep, long continued, and oppressive, but in thy favor is life. A moment of this spiritual joy is worth a year of sorrow! O, to what blessedness has this godly sorrow led! He has given me the oil of joy for the spirit of heaviness, and the garments of praise for mourning

The old MS. Psalter, which I have so frequen,tly mentioned and quoted, was written at least four hundred years ago, and written probably in Scotland, as it is in the Scottish dialect. That the writer was not merely a commentator, but a truly religious man, who was well acquainted with the travail of the soul, and that faith in the Lord Jesus Christ which brings peace to the troubled heart, is manifested from various portions of his comment. To prove this I shall, I think I may say, favor the reader with another extract from this Psalm on the words, "How long wilt thou forget me,"etc., Psa 13:1. I have only to observe that with this commentator a true penitent, one who is deeply in earnest for his salvation, is called a "perfyte man"; i.e., one wholly given up to God

How lang lord for getes thu me in the endyng? How lang o way turnes thou thi face fro me? The voice of haly men that covaytes and yernes the comyng of Iehu Crist, that thai might lyf with hym in ioy; and pleynaund tham of delaying. And sais, Lord how lang for getes the me in the endyng? That I covayte to haf and hald. That es how lang delayes thu me fra the syght of Iehu Crist, that es ryght endyng of myn entent. And how lang turnes thu thi face fra me? that es, qwen wil thu gif me perfyte Knawing of the? This wordes may nane say sothly, bot a perfyte man or woman, that has gedyrd to gydir al the desyres of thair Saule, and with the nayle of luf fested tham in Iehu Crist. Sa tham thynk one hour of the day war our lang to dwel fra hym; for tham langes ay til hym; bot tha that lufs noght so, has no langyng that he come: for thair conscience sais thaim, that thai haf noght lufed hym als that suld have done.

The language of true Christian experience has been the same in all times and nations. "But he that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love;"and to such this is strange language

Calvin: Psa 13:1 - How long, O Jehovah 1.How long, O Jehovah It is very true that David was so greatly hated by the generality of people, on account of the calumnies and false reports whic...

1.How long, O Jehovah It is very true that David was so greatly hated by the generality of people, on account of the calumnies and false reports which had been circulated against him, that almost all men judged that God was not less hostile to him than Saul 270 and his other enemies were. But here he speaks not so much according to the opinion of others, as according to the feeling of his own mind, when he complains of being neglected by God. Not that the persuasion of the truth of God’s promises was extinguished in his heart, or that he did not repose himself on his grace; but when we are for a long time weighed down by calamities, and when we do not perceive any sign of divine aid, this thought unavoidably forces itself upon us, that God has forgotten us. To acknowledge in the midst of our afflictions that God has really a care about us, is not the usual way with men, or what the feelings of nature would prompt; but by faith we apprehend his invisible providence. Thus, it seemed to David, so far as could be judged from beholding the actual state of his affairs, that he was forsaken of God. At the same time, however, the eyes of his mind, guided by the light of faith, penetrated even to the grace of God, although it was hidden in darkness. When he saw not a single ray of good hope to whatever quarter he turned, so far as human reason could judge, constrained by grief, he cries out that God did not regard him; and yet by this very complaint he gives evidence that faith enabled him to rise higher, and to conclude, contrary to the judgment of the flesh, that his welfare was secure in the hand of God. Had it been otherwise, how could he direct his groanings and prayers to him? Following this example, we must so wrestle against temptations as to be assured by faith, even in the very midst of the conflict, that the calamities which urge us to despair must be overcome; just as we see that the infirmity of the flesh could not hinder David from seeking God, and having recourse to him: and thus he has united in his exercise, very beautifully, affections which are apparently contrary to each other. The words, How long, for ever? are a defective form of expression; but they are much more emphatic than if he had put the question according to the usual mode of speaking, Why for so long a time? By speaking thus, he gives us to understand, that for the purpose of cherishing his hope, and encouraging himself in the exercise of patience, he extended his view to a distance, and that, therefore, he does not complain of a calamity of a few days’ duration, as the effeminate and the cowardly are accustomed to do, who see only what is before their feet, and immediately succumb at the first assault. He teaches us, therefore, by his example, to stretch our view as far as possible into the future, that our present grief may not entirely deprive us of hope.

Calvin: Psa 13:2 - How long shall I take counsel in my soul? 2.How long shall I take counsel in my soul? We know that men in adversity give way to discontent, and look around them, first to one quarter, and the...

2.How long shall I take counsel in my soul? We know that men in adversity give way to discontent, and look around them, first to one quarter, and then to another, in search of remedies. Especially, upon seeing that they are destitute of all resources, they torment themselves greatly, and are distracted by a multitude of thoughts; and in great dangers, anxiety and fear compel them to change their purposes from time to time, when they do not find any plan upon which they can fix with certainty. David, therefore, complains, that while thinking of different methods of obtaining relief, and deliberating with himself now in one way, and now in another, he is exhausted to no purpose with the multitude of suggestions which pass through his mind; and by joining to this complaint the sorrow which he felt daily, he points out the source of this disquietude. As in severe sickness the diseased would desire to change their place every moment, and the more acute the pains which afflict them are, the more fitful and eager are they in shifting and changing; so, when sorrow seizes upon the hearts of men, its miserable victims are violently agitated within, and they find it more tolerable to torment themselves without obtaining relief, than to endure their afflictions with composed and tranquil minds. The Lord, indeed, promises to give to the faithful “the spirit of counsels” (Isa 11:2) but he does not always give it to them at the very beginning of any matter in which they are interested, but suffers them for a time to be embarrassed by long deliberation without coming to a determinate decision, 271 or to be perplexed, as if they were entangled among thorns, not knowing whither to turn, 272 or what course to take. Some explain the Hebrew word יומם , yomam, as meaning all the day long. But it seems to me, that by it is rather meant another kind of continuance, namely, that his sorrow returned, and was renewed every day. In the end of the verse he deplores another evil, that his adversaries triumph over him the more boldly, when they see him wholly enfeebled, and as it were wasted by continual languor. Now this is an argument of great weight in our prayers; for there is nothing which is more displeasing to God, and which he will less bear with, than the cruel insolence which our enemies display, when they not only feast themselves by beholding us in misery, but also rise up the higher against us, and treat us the more disdainfully, the more they see us oppressed and afflicted.

Calvin: Psa 13:3 - Look upon me, answer me 3.Look upon me, answer me As when God does not promptly afford assistance to his servants, it seems to the eye of sense that he does not behold their...

3.Look upon me, answer me As when God does not promptly afford assistance to his servants, it seems to the eye of sense that he does not behold their necessities, David, for this reason, asks God, in the first place, to look upon him, and, in the second place, to succor him. Neither of these things, it is true, is prior or posterior in respect of God; but it has been already stated in a preceding psalm, and we will have occasion afterwards frequently to repeat the statement, that the Holy Spirit purposely accommodates to our understanding the models of prayer recorded in Scripture. If David had not been persuaded that God had his eyes upon him, it would have availed him nothing to cry to God; but this persuasion was the effect of faith. In the meantime, until God actually puts forth his hand to give relief, carnal reason suggests to us that he shuts his eyes, and does not behold us. The manner of expression here employed amounts to the same thing as if he had put the mercy of God in the first place, and then added to it his assistance, because God then hears us, when, having compassion upon us, he is moved and induced to succor us. To enlighten the eyes signifies the same thing in the Hebrew language as to give the breath of life, for the rigour of life appears chiefly in the eyes. In this sense Solomon says,

“The poor and the deceitful man meet together; the Lord lighteneth both their eyes.” (Pro 29:13)

And when Jonathan fainted for hunger, the sacred history relates that his eyes were overcast with dimness; and again, that when he had tasted of the honeycomb, his eyes were enlightened, (1Sa 14:27.) The word sleep, as it is used in this passage, is a metaphor of a similar kind, being put for death. In short, David confesses, that unless God cause the light of life to shine upon him, he will be immediately overwhelmed with the darkness of death, and that he is already as a man without life, unless God breathe into him new vigor. And certainly our confidence of life depends on this, that although the world may threaten us with a thousand deaths, yet God is possessed of numberless means of restoring us to life. 273

Calvin: Psa 13:4 - Lest my enemy 4.Lest my enemy David again repeats what he had a little before said concerning the pride of his enemies, namely, how it would be a thing ill becomin...

4.Lest my enemy David again repeats what he had a little before said concerning the pride of his enemies, namely, how it would be a thing ill becoming the character of God were he to abandon his servant to the mockery of the ungodly. David’s enemies lay, as it were, in ambush watching the hour of his ruin, that they might deride him when they saw him fall. And as it is the peculiar office of God to repress the audacity and insolence of the wicked, as often as they glory in their wickedness, David beseeches God to deprive them of the opportunity of indulging in such boasting. It is, however, to be observed, that he had in his conscience a sufficient testimony to his own integrity, and that he trusted also in the goodness of his cause, so that it would have been unbecoming and unreasonable had he been left without succor in danger, and had he been overwhelmed by his enemies. We can, therefore, with confidence pray for ourselves, in the manner in which David here does for himself, only when we fight under the standard of God, and are obedient to his orders, so that our enemies cannot obtain the victory over us without wickedly triumphing over God himself.

Calvin: Psa 13:5 - NO PHRASE The Psalmist does not as yet feel how much he has profited by praying; but depending upon the hope of deliverance, which the faithful promise of God ...

The Psalmist does not as yet feel how much he has profited by praying; but depending upon the hope of deliverance, which the faithful promise of God enabled him to entertain, he makes use of this hope as a shield to repel those temptations with the terror of which he might be greatly distressed. Although, therefore, he is severely afflicted, and a multiplicity of cares urge him to despair, he, notwithstanding, declares it to be his resolution to continue firm in his reliance upon the grace of God, and in the hope of salvation. With the very same confidence ought all the godly to be furnished and sustained, that they may duly persevere in prayer. Whence, also, we gather what I have formerly adverted to, that it is by faith we apprehend the grace of God, which is hidden from and unknown to the understanding of the flesh. As the verbs which the Psalmist uses are not put in the same tense, different meanings may be drawn from the different tenses; but David, I have no doubt, here wishes to testify that he continued firm in the hope of the deliverance promised to him, and would continue so even to the end, however heavy the burden of temptations which might press upon him. Accordingly, the word exult is put in the future tense, to denote the continued exercise of the affection spoken of, and that no affliction shall ever shake out of his heart the joy of faith. It is to be observed, that he places the goodness of God first in order, as being the cause of his deliverance, — I will sing unto the Lord I translate this into the future tense. David, it is true, had not yet obtained what he earnestly desired, but being fully convinced that God was already at hand to grant him deliverance, he pledges himself to give thanks to him for it. And surely it becomes us to engage in prayer in such a frame of mind as at the same time to be ready to sing the praises of God; a thing which is impossible, unless we are fully persuaded that our prayers will not be ineffectual. We may not be wholly free from sorrow, but it is nevertheless necessary that this cheerfulness of faith rise above it, and put into our mouth a song on account of the joy which is reserved for us in the future although not as yet experienced by us; 275 just as we see David here preparing himself to celebrate in songs the grace of God, before he perceives the issue of his troubles. The word גמל , gamal, 276 which others render to reward, signifies nothing else here than to bestow a benefit from pure grace, and this is its meaning in many other passages of Scripture. What kind of thanksgiving, I pray you to consider, would that be, to say that God rewarded and rendered to his servant due recompense? This is sufficient to refute the absurd and trifling sophism of those who wrest this passage to prove the merit of works. In short, the only thing which remains to be observed is, that David, in hastening with promptitude of soul to sing of God’s benefits before he had received them, places the deliverance, which was then apparently at a distance, immediately before his eyes.

TSK: Psa 13:1 - How // forget // wilt thou hide am 3464, bc 540 (Title), chief. or, overseer. How : Psa 6:3, Psa 35:17, Psa 74:1, Psa 80:4, Psa 85:5, Psa 89:46, Psa 90:14, Psa 94:3, Psa 94:4 forget...

am 3464, bc 540 (Title), chief. or, overseer.

How : Psa 6:3, Psa 35:17, Psa 74:1, Psa 80:4, Psa 85:5, Psa 89:46, Psa 90:14, Psa 94:3, Psa 94:4

forget : Psa 10:12; Lam 5:20

wilt thou hide : Psa 22:1, Psa 22:2; Deu 31:17; Job 13:24; Isa 59:2

TSK: Psa 13:2 - take // sorrow // enemy // exalted take : Psa 77:2-12, Psa 94:18, Psa 94:19, Psa 142:4-7; Job 7:12-15, Job 9:19-21, Job 9:27, Job 9:28, Job 10:15; Job 23:8-10; Jer 15:18 sorrow : Psa 38...

TSK: Psa 13:3 - Consider // lighten // lest Consider : Psa 9:13, Psa 25:19, Psa 31:7, Psa 119:153; Lam 5:1 lighten : Psa 18:28; 1Sa 14:27, 1Sa 14:29; Ezr 9:8; Luk 2:32; Rev 21:23 lest : Jer 51:3...

TSK: Psa 13:4 - Lest // I have // when Lest : Psa 10:11, Psa 25:2, Psa 35:19, Psa 35:25, Psa 38:16; Jos 7:9; Eze 35:12-15 I have : Psa 9:19; Jer 1:19; Lam 1:16 when : Psa 55:22, Psa 62:2, P...

TSK: Psa 13:5 - But // my heart But : Psa 32:10, Psa 33:18, Psa 33:21, Psa 33:22, Psa 36:7, Psa 52:8, Psa 147:11; Isa 12:2; Jud 1:21 my heart : Psa 9:14, Psa 43:4, Psa 43:5, Psa 51:1...

TSK: Psa 13:6 - I // he I : Psa 21:13 he : Psa 116:7, Psa 119:7

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Poole: Psa 13:1 - How long wilt thou forget // how long wilt thou The occasion of this Psalm was David’ s deep and long-continued distresses, from which he prays for deliverance. David complaineth to God of hi...

The occasion of this Psalm was David’ s deep and long-continued distresses, from which he prays for deliverance.

David complaineth to God of his delay to help, Psa 13:1 , and the enemies’ triumph, Psa 13:2 . He, praying for preventing grace, Psa 13:3,4 professeth his trust in God, Psa 13:5 , and boasteth of Divine mercy, Psa 13:6 .

How long wilt thou forget i.e. neglect or disregard, me ? for ever I

how long wilt thou withdraw thy favour and assistance?

Poole: Psa 13:2 - -- How long shall I be in such perplexities and anxieties of mind, not knowing what course to take, nor how to get out of my troubles?

How long shall I be in such perplexities and anxieties of mind, not knowing what course to take, nor how to get out of my troubles?

Poole: Psa 13:3 - Lighten mine eyes // Lest I sleep the sleep of death Lighten mine eyes either, 1. Because I find my counsel insufficient, Psa 13:2 , do thou enlighten my mind, and guide me by thy counsel and Spirit in...

Lighten mine eyes either,

1. Because I find my counsel insufficient, Psa 13:2 , do thou enlighten my mind, and guide me by thy counsel and Spirit into the right way of obtaining thy mercy and help. So this phrase is used Psa 19:8 Eph 1:18 . Or,

2. Do thou revive, and comfort, and deliver me from the darkness of death, which is ready to come upon me and to close mine eyes. Nothing is more common than to express great dangers and calamities by darkness, and great comforts and deliverances by light , as Job 15:22 17:13 30:26 , and by an enlightening of the eyes, as Ezr 9:8 . Compare Pro 15:30 29:13 .

Lest I sleep the sleep of death i.e. lest I sink under my burden and die; for death is oft called a sleep in Scripture, as Job 3:13 14:12 Psa 76:5 Joh 11:11 .

Poole: Psa 13:4 - I have prevailed against him // When I am moved I have prevailed against him to wit, by my art or strength; which will reflect dishonour upon thee, as if thou wept either unfaithful and unmindful o...

I have prevailed against him to wit, by my art or strength; which will reflect dishonour upon thee, as if thou wept either unfaithful and unmindful of thy promises, or unable to make them good. Therefore repress this their arrogancy and blasphemy, and maintain thine own honour.

When I am moved or, stumble , or fall , to wit, into mischief.

Poole: Psa 13:5 - -- Neither their threats and brags, nor my own dangers, shall shake my confidence in thy mercy promised to me.

Neither their threats and brags, nor my own dangers, shall shake my confidence in thy mercy promised to me.

Poole: Psa 13:6 - dealt bountifully with me Either, 1. In giving me that support and assurance of his favour which for the present I enjoy. Or, 2. In giving me that mercy which he hath freel...

Either,

1. In giving me that support and assurance of his favour which for the present I enjoy. Or,

2. In giving me that mercy which he hath freely promised me; it being a common thing for David and other prophets to speak of future deliverances as if they were already come, that so they may signify both the infallible certainty of the thing, and their firm assurance thereof. But the words may be rendered, when he shall have

dealt bountifully with me This verb properly signifies to requite , or reward , (as it may be taken here, for there is a reward of grace as well as of debt , Rom 4:4 ) but here it signifies a free and bountiful giving, as it doth also Psa 119:17 142:7 .

Haydock: Psa 13:1 - Sion // Salvation The general corruption of men, before our redemption by Christ. Sion; which God has chosen for his sanctuary. (Haydock) --- Salvation, or the Sav...

The general corruption of men, before our redemption by Christ.

Sion; which God has chosen for his sanctuary. (Haydock) ---

Salvation, or the Saviour, whom Jacob expected, Genesis lxix. (Berthier) ---

This Redeemer would fill all, both Jews and Gentiles, with joy, who should embrace his faith. (St. Augustine, &c.) ---

The prophet seems to foretell the restoration of the ten tribes to the kingdom of Judea, as it took place after the captivity. (Calmet, Diss.) ---

But he sighed for, and designated more particularly, (Haydock) the Saviour of the world; who would redeem man from the tyranny of the devil, to the great joy of those who strive to supplant every vice, and to contemplate God, (Worthington) as some interpret the names of Jacob and Israel. (Haydock) ---

The Gentiles will then be ingrafted into the stock of Abraham, (Menochius) into the true olive-tree, Romans xi. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 13:1 - Fool // Heart // No God // No, not one Fool: the man of the most depraved morals, the atheist and deist. There have always been (Berthier) such pests of society. (Haydock) --- David ha...

Fool: the man of the most depraved morals, the atheist and deist. There have always been (Berthier) such pests of society. (Haydock) ---

David has refuted them again, Psalm lii. (Berthier) ---

Some have imagined that this psalm was composed in consequence of the blasphemies of Rabsaces, (4 Kings xviii. 32.; Theodoret, &c.) or of the Babylonians. (Calmet) ---

The Fathers explain it of Jesus Christ, denied by the Jews, &c. ---

Heart. This must be strangely corrupted, before the mouth can utter such impiety. (Haydock) ---

No God. Chaldean, "no power of God on earth." Elohim denotes particularly "judges." There have been a few philosophers who have denied the existence of God; and more who have called in question his Providence: though this amounts to the same thing. But the number of those who confess God with the mouth, and deny him by their works, is immense. (Haydock) ---

These live as if there were no judge. (Calmet) ---

By sin they come at last to think there is none to govern the world. (Worthington) ---

Plato (Leg. 10.) acknowledged that three sorts of people offend God; those who deny him; who say that He does not mind human affairs; or those who think that presents may prevail on him to connive at their wickedness. It is doubtful whether the mind can ever be so darkened as to believe that there is no God. (Berthier) ---

The heart may wish there were none to punish its impiety. (Haydock) ---

Libertinage or pride gives birth to so many infidels. They have begun by reducing conscience to silence. Their arguments only tend to destroy. ---

No, not one, is not in Hebrew, Septuagint, &c., except in ver. 3. (Calmet) ---

Yet it occurs in the Vatican Septuagint, which is the best. (Berthier) (Calmet) ---

"They are become abominable, with earnestness there is none who doth good." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) ---

Or they sin designedly and with affectation. (Calmet) ---

All are unable to do good without the Redeemer. (Worthington) ---

Some explain this of mankind in general, as all are born in sin. David refers also to actual and habitual sinners. (Berthier) ---

St. Paul (Romans iii.) proves from this text, and Isaias lix. 7, that all stand in need of grace and faith, and cannot be saved either by the law of nature or of Moses. But it does not follow that faith alone will save, or that the most just are still wicked, as Calvin and Beza falsely expound the Scriptures. For the prophets speak of those who were not yet justified, teaching that all mankind were once in sin, and could not be justified but by Christ. At the same time, they assert that, when they are justified, they must serve justice to bear fruit, and obtain happiness, Romans vi. These points are well explained by St. Augustine: (de Sp. et lit. i. 9.) "The just are justified freely by his grace," not by the law or will; though this is not effected without the will, &c. The same holy doctor (c. 27) observes, that the just do not live free from all venial sins, and yet remain in the state of salvation; while the wicked continue in the state of damnation, though they do some good works. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 13:2 - God God. Those only who seek God, understand their real interests. (Haydock) --- The pagans, and particularly those of Babylon, lived in the greatest ...

God. Those only who seek God, understand their real interests. (Haydock) ---

The pagans, and particularly those of Babylon, lived in the greatest dissolution, so as to call loudly for vengeance, ver. 5. (Calmet) ---

Both the understanding and the will were gone astray. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 13:3 - Unprofitable // Not one // Their // Sepulchre Unprofitable. Without faith in Christ, none have meritorious works. (Worthington) --- Not one. Such was the condition of the world before Christ...

Unprofitable. Without faith in Christ, none have meritorious works. (Worthington) ---

Not one. Such was the condition of the world before Christ, as all were born in sin. "No one," says St. Augustine, "can do good, except he shew the method." All were immersed in ruin, "except the holy Virgin, concerning whom, for the honour of the Lord, I would have no question at all, in treating of sins." (St. Augustine, de Nat. et Grat. contra Pelag. xxxvii. 44.) (Calmet) ---

The Council of Trent approves of this reserve, when speaking of original sin. Our Saviour is the source of this privilege, and much more out of the question. He could not be guilty of any sort of transgression. He was in all things like to us, excepting sin. (Haydock) ---

Their, &c. What follows to shall not, (ver. 4.) occurs in St. Paul; (Romans iii. 11, 12, 13.) whence St. Jerome supposes that it has been inserted here, though the apostle took the quotations from different parts of scripture. (Praef. in xvi. Isaias.) He informs us, that all the Greek commentators marked it as not found in Hebrew or the Septuagint, "except in the Vulgate or Greek: koine, which varied in different parts of the world." There seems to be no reason why it should have been omitted designedly, whereas some might insert it, through the false notion that St. Paul had taken it from this psalm. (Calmet) ---

The Hebrew is not therefore mutilated, but the Vulgate redundant. (Amama) ---

Yet this is not absolutely clear. We find the quotation in the Roman Septuagint which is the most correct; (Berthier) though some prefer the Alexandrian manuscripts. (Haydock) ---

It is also in the Arabic and Ethiopic versions; so that it might have been in St. Paul's copy. Our Saviour read a passage from Isaias, which is not extant, Luke iv. 19. (Berthier) ---

St. Justin Martyr, St. Augustine, &c., agree with the Vulgate; and Lindan mentions a Hebrew copy which had these verses, though the learned have reason to think that this Hebrew was of a modern date. (Calmet) ---

Protestants, 1577, inserted these three verses, (Worthington) which they now omit. ---

Sepulchre. They are never satisfied with destruction, (Haydock) and with vexing others. (Worthington) ---

We bear in ourselves the seed of corruption, which can be prevented from growing up only by the grace of Jesus Christ. (Berthier) ---

Perdition is from thyself, O Israel. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 13:4 - Know // My people Know my just providence, though they would fain keep it out of sight, (ver. 1.) that they may indulge their passions. (Haydock) --- My people. Th...

Know my just providence, though they would fain keep it out of sight, (ver. 1.) that they may indulge their passions. (Haydock) ---

My people. These we may conclude, were just; (Berthier) at least in comparison with their cruel oppressors, (Haydock) who made it their daily practice to injure them, (St. Augustine) as they could do it with facility, Numbers xix. 9., Proverbs xxx. 14., and Micheas iii. 2. (Calmet) ---

The prophet, in God's name, complains of their eagerness to hurt the good. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 13:5 - Where Where. This expression refers to there, which is in Hebrew, though this last part of the verse is wanting. (Capel) --- It is in Psalm lii. 6, a...

Where. This expression refers to there, which is in Hebrew, though this last part of the verse is wanting. (Capel) ---

It is in Psalm lii. 6, and this renders the former omission (ver. 3.) more credible. (Berthier) ---

When Cyrus approached to besiege Babylon, Nabonides, the king, met him, and gave him battle; but losing the victory, he, in a panic, retreated to Borsippe, and abandoned the defence of his capital. (Berosus cited by Josephus, contra Apion i.) The citizens were in the utmost consternation, Isaias xiii., and xxi., &c. (Calmet) ---

But the wicked tremble at the prospect of temporal losses, (Menochius) and at shadows, while they boldly affront the Deity. Unbelievers find difficulties in the Catholic doctrines, which are frequently attributed to their own mistakes. (Haydock) ---

The pagans would not believe in God, but trembled before idols; which cannot hurt the faithful. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 13:6 - Man Man, who wished sincerely to practise his religion, like Daniel, &c. Such you have persecuted, and hence God has filled you with alarms, and will p...

Man, who wished sincerely to practise his religion, like Daniel, &c. Such you have persecuted, and hence God has filled you with alarms, and will punish you. (Calmet) ---

Some persevere in justice, amid the general contagion and insults of men. (Worthington)

Gill: Psa 13:1 - How long wilt thou forget me, O Lord? for ever // how long wilt thou hide thy face from me How long wilt thou forget me, O Lord? for ever?.... When God does not immediately deliver his people from their enemies, or help them out of an afflic...

How long wilt thou forget me, O Lord? for ever?.... When God does not immediately deliver his people from their enemies, or help them out of an affliction; when he does not discover his love, communicate his grace, apply the blessings and promises of his covenant as usual; and when he does not visit them in his usual manner, and so frequently as he has formerly done, they are ready to conclude he has forgotten them; and sometimes this continues long, and then they fear they are forgotten for ever; and this they cannot bear, and therefore expostulate with God in a querulous manner, as the psalmist does here; but this is to be understood not in reality, but in their own apprehension, and in the opinion of their enemies; God never does nor can forget his people; oblivion does not fall upon him with respect to common persons and things; and much less with respect to his own dear children, for whom a special book of remembrance is written; See Gill on Psa 9:18;

how long wilt thou hide thy face from me? his love, and the manifestation of it, from his person; his gracious presence, the light of his smiling countenance, which sometimes God hides or withdraws from his people by way of resentment of their unbecoming carriage to him; and which is very distressing to them, for they are apt to imagine it is in wrath and hot displeasure, when he still loves them, and will with everlasting kindness have mercy on them; see Isa 8:17. The Targum renders it, "the glory of thy face".

Gill: Psa 13:2 - How long shall I take counsel in my soul // having sorrow in my heart daily // how long shall mine enemy be exalted over me How long shall I take counsel in my soul,.... Or "put it" s; to take counsel of good men and faithful friends, in matters of moment and difficulty, is...

How long shall I take counsel in my soul,.... Or "put it" s; to take counsel of good men and faithful friends, in matters of moment and difficulty, is safe and right; and it is best of all to take counsel of God, who is wonderful in it, and guides his people with it; but nothing is worse than for a man to take counsel of his own heart, or only to consult himself; for such counsel often casts a man down, and he is ashamed of it sooner or later: but this seems not to be the sense here; the phrase denotes the distressing circumstances and anxiety of mind the psalmist was in; he was at his wits' end, and cast about in his mind, and had various devises and counsels formed there; and yet knew not what way to take, what course to steer;

having sorrow in my heart daily; by reason of God's hiding his face from him; on account of sin that dwelt in him, or was committed by him; because of his distance from the house of God, and the worship and ordinances of it; and by reason of his many enemies that surrounded him on every side: this sorrow was an heart sorrow, and what continually attended him day by day; or was in the daytime, when men are generally amused with business or diversions, as well as in the night, as Kimchi observes;

how long shall mine enemy be exalted over me? even the vilest of men, Psa 12:8; this may be understood either of temporal enemies, and was true of David when he was obliged not only to leave his own house and family, but the land of Judea, and flee to the Philistines; and when he fled from Absalom his son, lest he should be taken and slain by him; or of spiritual enemies, and is true of saints when sin prevails and leads captive, and when the temptations of Satan succeed; as when he prevailed upon David to number the people, Peter to deny his master, &c. The Jewish writers t observe that here are four "how longs", answerable to the four monarchies, Babylonian, Persian, Grecian, and Roman, and their captivities under them.

Gill: Psa 13:3 - Consider and hear me, O Lord my God // lighten mine eyes // lest I sleep the sleep of death Consider and hear me, O Lord my God,.... The psalmist amidst all his distresses rightly applies to God by prayer, claims his interest in him as his c...

Consider and hear me, O Lord my God,.... The psalmist amidst all his distresses rightly applies to God by prayer, claims his interest in him as his covenant God, which still continued notwithstanding all his darkness, desertions, and afflictions; and entreats him to "consider" his affliction and trouble, and deliver him out of it; to consider his enemies, how many and mighty they were; and his own weakness his frame, that he was but dust, and unable to stand against them: or to "look" u upon his affliction, and upon him under it, with an eye of pity and compassion; to have respect to him and to his prayers, and to turn unto him, and lift up the light of his countenance upon him: and so this petition is opposed to the complaint in Psa 13:1; and he further requests that he would "hear" him; that is, so as to answer him, and that immediately, and thereby show that he had not forgotten him, but was mindful of him, of his love to him, and covenant with him;

lighten mine eyes: meaning either the eyes of his body, which might be dim and dull through a failure of the animal spirits, by reason of inward grief, outward afflictions, or for want of bodily food; which when obtained refreshes nature, cheers the animal spirits, enlightens or gives a briskness to the eyes; see 1Sa 14:27; or else the eyes of his understanding, Eph 1:18; that he might behold wondrous things in the law of God, know the things which were freely given to him of God, see more clearly his interest in him, and in the covenant of his grace, and have his soul refreshed and comforted with the light of God's countenance; and he be better able to discern his enemies, and guard against them; and be directed to take the best method to be delivered and secured from them. The people of God are sometimes in the dark, and see no light; especially when benighted, and in sleepy frames; and it is God's work to enlighten and quicken them;

lest I sleep the sleep of death; a natural death w, which is comparable to sleep, and often expressed by it; and which sense agrees with lightening the eyes of his body, as before explained; or rather the sense is, lift up the light of thy countenance, revive thy work in the midst of the years; let me see thy goodness in the land of the living, that I may not faint and sink and die away. Or it may be an eternal death is designed; for though true believers shall never die this death, yet they may be in such circumstances, as through unbelief to fear they shall. The Targum paraphrases the word thus;

"enlighten mine eyes in thy law, lest I sin, and sleep with those who are guilty of death.''

Gill: Psa 13:4 - Lest mine enemy say, I have prevailed against him // and those that trouble me rejoice when I am moved Lest mine enemy say, I have prevailed against him,.... Which is an argument God takes notice of; and for which reason he does not give up his people i...

Lest mine enemy say, I have prevailed against him,.... Which is an argument God takes notice of; and for which reason he does not give up his people into the hands of their enemies; see Deu 32:27. The Chaldee paraphrase interprets this of the evil imagination or corruption of nature, and represents it as a person, as the Apostle Paul does in Rom 7:15; and which may be said to prevail, when it pushes on to sin, and hinders doing good, and carries captive; and it may be applied to Satan, the great enemy of God's people, who triumphs over them, when he succeeds in his temptations;

and those that trouble me rejoice when I am moved; meaning from his house and family, from his country and kingdom, from a prosperous state and condition to a distressed one; at which the troublers of David's peace would rejoice. They that trouble the saints are sin, Satan, and the world; and the two last rejoice when they are in an uncomfortable and afflicted condition; and especially Satan rejoices when he gains his point, if it is but to move them from any degree of steadfastness, of faith and hope, or from the ways of God in any respect: the Targum adds, "from thy ways"; for to be moved so as to perish eternally they cannot, being built upon the Rock of ages, and surrounded by the power and grace of God.

Gill: Psa 13:5 - But I have trusted in thy mercy // my heart shall rejoice in thy salvation But I have trusted in thy mercy,.... The faith, hope, and comfort of the psalmist grew and increased by prayer; from complaining he goes to praying, f...

But I have trusted in thy mercy,.... The faith, hope, and comfort of the psalmist grew and increased by prayer; from complaining he goes to praying, from praying to believing; he trusted not in himself, not in his own heart, nor in his own righteousness and merits, but in the mercy of God; and not in the bare absolute mercy of God, but in the grace and goodness of God, as the word x here used signifies, as it is displayed in the plenteous redemption which is by Christ; which is a sufficient ground of faith and hope; see Psa 130:7;

my heart shall rejoice in thy salvation; which God is the contriver, author, and giver of, and in which the glory of his perfections is so greatly displayed: and a true believer rejoices more on account that God is glorified by it than because of his own interest in it; and this joy is an inward one, it is joy in the heart, and is real and unfeigned, and is what continues, and will be felt and expressed both here and hereafter.

Gill: Psa 13:6 - I will sing unto the Lord // because he hath dealt bountifully with me I will sing unto the Lord,.... In prayer faith is encouraged, through believing the heart is filled with joy; and this joy is expressed by the lips, i...

I will sing unto the Lord,.... In prayer faith is encouraged, through believing the heart is filled with joy; and this joy is expressed by the lips, in songs of praise to the Lord, ascribing the glory of salvation to him, and giving him thanks for every mercy and blessing of life;

because he hath dealt bountifully with me; both in a way of providence and grace, granting life and preserving it, and supporting with the comforts of it; blessing with spiritual blessings, and crowning with loving kindness and tender mercies; all which is generous and bountiful dealing, and affords a just occasion of praise and thanksgiving; see Psa 116:7.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 13:1 Heb “will you hide your face from me.”

NET Notes: Psa 13:2 Heb “be exalted over me.” Perhaps one could translate, “How long will my enemy defeat me?”

NET Notes: Psa 13:3 Heb “or else I will sleep [in?] the death.” Perhaps the statement is elliptical, “I will sleep [the sleep] of death,” or ̶...

NET Notes: Psa 13:4 Heb “or else.”

NET Notes: Psa 13:5 Heb “may my heart rejoice in your deliverance.” The verb form is jussive. Having expressed his trust in God’s faithful character and...

NET Notes: Psa 13:6 Or “for he will have vindicated me.” The verb form indicates a future perfect here. The idiom גָמַל ע&...

Geneva Bible: Psa 13:1 "To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David." How long wilt thou forget me, O LORD? ( a ) for ever? how long wilt thou hide thy face from me? ( a ) He d...

Geneva Bible: Psa 13:2 How long shall I take ( b ) counsel in my soul, [having] sorrow in my heart daily? how long shall mine enemy be exalted over me? ( b ) Changing my pu...

Geneva Bible: Psa 13:4 Lest mine enemy say, I have ( c ) prevailed against him; [and] those that trouble me rejoice when I am moved. ( c ) Which might turn to God's dishono...

Geneva Bible: Psa 13:5 But I have trusted in thy ( d ) mercy; my heart shall rejoice in thy salvation. ( d ) The mercy of God is the cause of our salvation.

Geneva Bible: Psa 13:6 I will sing unto the LORD, because he hath ( e ) dealt bountifully with me. ( e ) Both by the benefits past and by others to come.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 13:1-6 - --God sometimes hides his face, and leaves his own children in the dark concerning their interest in him: and this they lay to heart more than any outwa...

Matthew Henry: Psa 13:1-6 - -- David, in affliction, is here pouring out his soul before God; his address is short, but the method is very observable, and of use for direction and...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 13:1-2 - -- (Heb.: 13:2-3) The complicated question: till when, how long...for ever (as in Psa 74:10; Psa 79:5; Psa 89:47), is the expression of a complicated ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 13:3-4 - -- (Heb.: 13:4-5) In contrast to God's seeming to have forgotten him and to wish neither to see nor know anything of his need, he prays: הבּיטה ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 13:5-6 - -- (Heb.: 13:6) Three lines of joyous anticipation now follow the five of lament and four of prayer. By יאני he sets himself in opposition to his...

Constable: Psa 13:1-6 - --Psalm 13 Like several of the preceding psalms this one is also a prayer that the psalmist offered in the...

Constable: Psa 13:1 - --1. Lament over prolonged suffering 13:1-2 Rhetorical questions expressed David's frustration and...

Constable: Psa 13:2-3 - --2. Petition for an answer 13:3-4 David needed information and wisdom in view of his need. If he ...

Constable: Psa 13:4-5 - --3. Trust in eventual deliverance 13:5-6 In spite of God's lack of response, David continued to t...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 13 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 13:1, David complains of delay; Psa 13:3, He prays for preventing grace; Psa 13:5, He boasts of divine mercy.

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 13 (Pendahuluan Pasal) The psalmist complains that God had long withdrawn. He earnestly prays for comfort. He assures himself of an answer of peace.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 13 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This psalm is the deserted soul's case and cure. Whether it was penned upon any particular occasion does not appear, but in general, I. David sadl...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 13 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 13 To the chief Musician, a Psalm of David. According to Theodoret this psalm was written by David, not when he fled from Sau...

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