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Teks -- Job 25:1-6 (NET)

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Konteks
Bildad’s Third Speech
25:1 Then Bildad the Shuhite answered: 25:2 “Dominion and awesome might belong to God; he establishes peace in his heights. 25:3 Can his armies be numbered? On whom does his light not rise? 25:4 How then can a human being be righteous before God? How can one born of a woman be pure? 25:5 If even the moon is not bright, and the stars are not pure as far as he is concerned, 25:6 how much less a mortal man, who is but a maggot– a son of man, who is only a worm!”
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Bildad the Shuhite man who was a friend of Job
 · Shuhite a resident of the town of Shuah


Topik/Tema Kamus: Bildad | JOB, BOOK OF | ZOPHAR | Job | REGENERATION | Depravity of Mankind | God | Mankind | Humility | Shuhite | Worm | Son of man | Moon | ANTHROPOLOGY | CLEAN | Angel | SHINE | WORM; SCARLET-WORM | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Job 25:1 - Answered Not to that which Job spake last, but to that which seemed most reprovable in all his discourses; his censure of God's proceedings with him, and his d...

Not to that which Job spake last, but to that which seemed most reprovable in all his discourses; his censure of God's proceedings with him, and his desire of disputing the matter with him. Perhaps Bildad and the rest now perceived that Job and they did not differ so much as they thought. They owned that the wicked might prosper for a while. And Job owned, they would be destroyed at the last.

Wesley: Job 25:2 - Dominion Sovereign power over all persons and things.

Sovereign power over all persons and things.

Wesley: Job 25:2 - Fear Terror, that which justly makes him dreadful to all men, and especially to all that undertake to dispute with him.

Terror, that which justly makes him dreadful to all men, and especially to all that undertake to dispute with him.

Wesley: Job 25:2 - He This clause, as well as the following verse, seems to be added to prove God's dominion and dreadfulness: he keepeth and ruleth all persons and things ...

This clause, as well as the following verse, seems to be added to prove God's dominion and dreadfulness: he keepeth and ruleth all persons and things in heaven, in peace and harmony. The angels, though they be very numerous, all own his sovereignty, and acquiesce in his pleasure. The stars, tho' vast in their bulk, and various in their motions: exactly keep the order which God hath appointed them: and therefore it is great folly for thee to quarrel with the methods of God's dealings with thee.

Wesley: Job 25:3 - Armies Of the angels, and stars, and other creatures, all which are his hosts.

Of the angels, and stars, and other creatures, all which are his hosts.

Wesley: Job 25:3 - Light The light of the sun is communicated to all parts of the world. This is a faint resemblance, of the cognisance and care which God takes of the whole c...

The light of the sun is communicated to all parts of the world. This is a faint resemblance, of the cognisance and care which God takes of the whole creation. All are under the light of his knowledge: all partake of the light of his goodness: his pleasure is to shew mercy: all the creatures live upon his bounty.

Wesley: Job 25:4 - Man The word signifies man that is miserable, which supposes him to be sinful; and shall such a creature quarrel with that dominion of God, to which the s...

The word signifies man that is miserable, which supposes him to be sinful; and shall such a creature quarrel with that dominion of God, to which the sinless, and happy, and glorious angels submit? God - Before God's tribunal, to which thou dost so boldly appeal.

Wesley: Job 25:5 - Moon The moon, tho' bright and glorious, if compared with the Divine Majesty, is without any lustre or glory. By naming the moon, and thence proceeding to ...

The moon, tho' bright and glorious, if compared with the Divine Majesty, is without any lustre or glory. By naming the moon, and thence proceeding to the stars, the sun is also included.

Wesley: Job 25:6 - Worm Mean, and vile, and impotent; proceeding from corruption, and returning to it.

Mean, and vile, and impotent; proceeding from corruption, and returning to it.

Wesley: Job 25:6 - The son For miserable man in the last branch he here puts the son of any man, to shew that this is true even of the greatest and best of men. Let us then wond...

For miserable man in the last branch he here puts the son of any man, to shew that this is true even of the greatest and best of men. Let us then wonder at the condescension of God, in taking such worms into covenant and communion with himself!

JFB: Job 25:2 - peace in his high places Implying that His power is such on high as to quell all opposition, not merely there, but on earth also. The Holy Ghost here shadowed forth Gospel tru...

Implying that His power is such on high as to quell all opposition, not merely there, but on earth also. The Holy Ghost here shadowed forth Gospel truths (Col 1:20; Eph 1:10).

JFB: Job 25:3 - armies Angels and stars (Isa 40:26; Jer 33:22; Gen 15:5; "countless," Dan 7:10).

Angels and stars (Isa 40:26; Jer 33:22; Gen 15:5; "countless," Dan 7:10).

JFB: Job 25:3 - his light (Jam 1:17).

JFB: Job 25:4 - -- (Job 4:17-18; Job 14:4; Job 15:14).

JFB: Job 25:5 - -- "Look up even unto the moon" (Job 15:15). "Stars" here answer to "saints" (angels) there; "the moon" here to "the heavens" there. Even the "stars," th...

"Look up even unto the moon" (Job 15:15). "Stars" here answer to "saints" (angels) there; "the moon" here to "the heavens" there. Even the "stars," the most dazzling object to man's eye, and the angels, of which the stars are emblems (Job 4:18; Rev 9:1), are imperfect in His sight. Theirs is the light and purity but of creatures; His of the Creator.

JFB: Job 25:6 - -- (Job 4:19-21; Job 15:16).

JFB: Job 25:6 - worm . . . worm Two distinct Hebrew words. The first, a worm bred in putridity; alluding to man's corruption. The second a crawling worm; implying that man is weak an...

Two distinct Hebrew words. The first, a worm bred in putridity; alluding to man's corruption. The second a crawling worm; implying that man is weak and grovelling.

Clarke: Job 25:1 - Bildad the Shuhite Bildad the Shuhite - This is the last attack on Job; the others felt themselves foiled, though they had not humility enough to acknowledge it, but w...

Bildad the Shuhite - This is the last attack on Job; the others felt themselves foiled, though they had not humility enough to acknowledge it, but would not again return to the attack. Bildad has little to say, and that little is very little to the point. He makes a few assertions, particularly in reference to what Job had said in the commencement of the preceding chapter, of his desire to appear before God, and have his case tried by him, as he had the utmost confidence that his innocence should be fully proved. For this Bildad reprehends Job with arguments which had been brought forth often in this controversy, and as repeatedly confuted, Job 4:18; Job 15:14-16.

Clarke: Job 25:2 - Dominion and fear are with him Dominion and fear are with him - God is an absolute sovereign; his fear is on all the hosts of heaven; and by his sovereignty he establishes and pre...

Dominion and fear are with him - God is an absolute sovereign; his fear is on all the hosts of heaven; and by his sovereignty he establishes and preserves order in the heavens, and among all the inhabitants of the eternal world: how canst thou, therefore, dare to appeal to him, or desire to appear before him?

Clarke: Job 25:3 - Is there any number of his armies? Is there any number of his armies? - He has troops innumerable; he can serve himself of all his creatures; every thing may be a means of help or des...

Is there any number of his armies? - He has troops innumerable; he can serve himself of all his creatures; every thing may be a means of help or destruction, according to his Divine will. When he purposes to save, none can destroy; and when he is determined to destroy, none can save. It is vain to trust in his creatures against himself

Clarke: Job 25:3 - Upon whom doth not his light arise? Upon whom doth not his light arise? - That is, his providence rules over all; he is universal Lord; he causes his sun to arise on the evil and the g...

Upon whom doth not his light arise? - That is, his providence rules over all; he is universal Lord; he causes his sun to arise on the evil and the good, and sends his rain on the just and unjust.

Clarke: Job 25:4 - How then can man be justified? How then can man be justified? - Or, ונה umah , With what, shall a man be justified with God? Though this is no conclusion from Bildad’ s p...

How then can man be justified? - Or, ונה umah , With what, shall a man be justified with God? Though this is no conclusion from Bildad’ s premises, yet the question is of the highest importance to man. Neither Bildad nor any of his fellows could answer it; the doctrine of redemption through the blood of the cross was then known only through types and shadows. We who live in the Gospel dispensation, can readily answer the question, With what shall miserable man ( אנוש enosh ) be justified with God? - Ans. By bringing forward, by faith, to the throne of the Divine justice, the sacrificial offering of the Lord Jesus Christ; and confiding absolutely in it, as being a full, sufficient, and complete atonement and sacrifice for his sins, and for the salvation of a lost world. How, or with what ( ומה umah ) shall he be clean that is born of a woman? - Ans. By receiving that grace or heavenly influence communicated by the power and energy of the eternal Spirit applying to the heart the efficacy of that blood which cleanses from all unrighteousness. This, and this only, is the way in which a sinner, when truly penitent, can be justified before God: and in which a believer, convinced of indwelling sin, can be sanctified and cleansed from all unrighteousness. This is the only means of justification and sanctification, without which there can be no glorification. And these two great works, which constitute the whole of salvation, have been procured for a lost world by the incarnation, passion, death, and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ, who was delivered for our offenses, and rose again for our justification; to whom be glory and dominion now and for evermore, Amen!

Clarke: Job 25:5 - Behold even to the moon, and it shineth not Behold even to the moon, and it shineth not - It is continually changing its appearance. It never appears twice in its whole revolution with the sam...

Behold even to the moon, and it shineth not - It is continually changing its appearance. It never appears twice in its whole revolution with the same face: it is ever waxing or waning; and its face is variegated with opaque spots. Its changeableness can never be compared with the unchangeable nature of God

Clarke: Job 25:5 - Yea, the stars are not pure in his sight Yea, the stars are not pure in his sight - Whatever their excellence may be as stars, it is nothing in comparison with him from whom they have deriv...

Yea, the stars are not pure in his sight - Whatever their excellence may be as stars, it is nothing in comparison with him from whom they have derived their being and splendor. See the notes on Job 4:18; Job 15:14-16. The Targum reads: "Behold, the moon is as yet spotted in her eastern part; the sun shines not; and the stars are not pure in his sight."Some think that by stars are meant those angels who kept not their first estate: this may be so, but I cannot see it in the text. It may, however, mean the heavenly host, as it is supposed to do, Job 28:7; but I still must hesitate on the propriety of such applications. It is probable this speech of Bildad was delivered in the night-season, when clouds interrupted the bright shining of the moon. The third verse seems to refer immediately to the stars, which to the naked eye are innumerable. The sun is not mentioned, because of his absence. This speech of Bildad is both confused and inconclusive. His reasoning is absurd, and he draws false conclusions from his premises. In the third verse, he says, "Is there any number of his armies? and upon whom does not his light arise?"But how absurd is the conclusion which he draws from his questions: - "How then can a man be justified with God, or he be clean who is born of a woman?"This has no relation to the premises; still to us the question is not difficult, and has already been answered in the notes: "A man can be justified with God,"through the blood of Christ; and "he can be clean who is born of a woman."through the sanctification of the Spirit.

Clarke: Job 25:6 - How much less man, that is a worm? How much less man, that is a worm? - Or as the Targum - "How much more man, who in his life is a reptile; and the son of man, who in his death is a ...

How much less man, that is a worm? - Or as the Targum - "How much more man, who in his life is a reptile; and the son of man, who in his death is a worm."Almost all the versions read, "Truly man is corruption, and the son of man a worm."The original is degradingly expressive: "Even because אנוש enosh , miserable man, is רמה rimmah , a crawling worm; and the son of Adam, who is תולעה toleah , a worm, or rather maggot, from its eating into and dividing certain substances."- Parkhurst. Thus endeth Bildad the Shuhite, who endeavored to speak on a subject which he did not understand; and, having got on bad ground, was soon confounded in his own mind, spoke incoherently, argued inconclusively, and came abruptly and suddenly to an end. Thus, his three friends being confounded, Job was left to pursue his own way; they trouble him no more; and he proceeds in triumph to the end of the thirty-first chapter.

Defender: Job 25:4 - justified with God This is essentially the same argument (Job 25:4-6) conveyed to Eliphaz by the deceiving spirit (Job 4:17-19), and then made to Job by Eliphaz (Job 15:...

This is essentially the same argument (Job 25:4-6) conveyed to Eliphaz by the deceiving spirit (Job 4:17-19), and then made to Job by Eliphaz (Job 15:14-16). Bildad here repeats it."

TSK: Job 25:2 - Dominion // he maketh Dominion : Job 9:2-10, Job 26:5-14, Job 40:9-14; 1Ch 29:11, 1Ch 29:12; Psa 99:1-3; Jer 10:6, Jer 10:7; Dan 4:34-37; Mat 6:13, Mat 28:18; Eph 1:20, Eph...

TSK: Job 25:3 - there // upon whom there : Psa 103:20, Psa 103:21, Psa 148:2-4; Isa 40:26; Dan 7:10; Mat 26:53; Rev 5:11 upon whom : Job 38:12, Job 38:13; Gen 1:3-5, Gen 1:14-16; Psa 19...

TSK: Job 25:4 - How then // how can How then : Job 4:17-19, Job 9:2, Job 15:14-16; Psa 130:3, Psa 143:2; Rom 3:19, Rom 3:20, Rom 5:1 how can : Job 14:3, Job 14:4; Psa 51:5; Zec 13:1; Eph...

TSK: Job 25:5 - -- Isa 24:23, Isa 60:19, Isa 60:20; 2Co 3:10

TSK: Job 25:6 - How much less How much less : etc. The original is degradingly expressive: ""How much less enosh , miserable man, who is a worm; and the son of Adam, who is tole...

How much less : etc. The original is degradingly expressive: ""How much less enosh , miserable man, who is a worm; and the son of Adam, who is toleah , a maggot.""Job 4:19; Gen 18:27; Psa 22:6; Isa 41:14

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Poole: Job 25:1 - Bildad answered Bildad answered not to that which Job spoke last, but to that which stuck most in Bildad’ s mind, and which seemed most reprovable in all his d...

Bildad answered not to that which Job spoke last, but to that which stuck most in Bildad’ s mind, and which seemed most reprovable in all his discourses, to wit, his bold censure of God’ s proceedings with him, and his avowed and oft-repeated desire of disputing the matter with him.

Poole: Job 25:2 - Dominion // Fear // Are with him // He maketh peace in his high places Dominion i.e. absolute and sovereign power over all persons and things, with whom to contend is both rebellion and madness. Fear actively understoo...

Dominion i.e. absolute and sovereign power over all persons and things, with whom to contend is both rebellion and madness.

Fear actively understood, or terror , i.e. that which justly makes him dreadful to all men, and especially to all that shall undertake to dispute with him; awful majesty, infinite knowledge, whereby he knows men’ s hearts and ways far better than they know themselves, and sees much sin in them which themselves do not discover, and exact purity and justice, which renders him formidable to sinners.

Are with him emphatically spoken; with him whom thou challengest; with him who is not lightly and irreverently to be named, much less to be contended with. And therefore it is thy duty to humble thyself for thy presumptuous words and carriages towards him, and quietly and modestly to submit thyself and thy cause to his pleasure.

He maketh peace in his high places This clause, as well as the following verse, seems to be added to prove what he last said of God’ s dominion and dreadfulness; he keepeth and ruleth all persons and things in heaven in peace and harmony; and the order which he hath established among them. The angels, though they be very numerous, and differing in orders and ministries, do all own his sovereignty, and acquiesce in his pleasure, without any disputing and murmuring. The stars and heavenly bodies, though vast in their bulk, and various in their motions, yet exactly keep their courses and the order which God hath appointed them; and therefore it is great folly and impudence to exempt thyself from God’ s jurisdiction, or to quarrel with the methods of God’ s dealings with thee.

Poole: Job 25:3 - Of his armies // Upon whom doth no his light arise? Of his armies of the angels, and stars, and other creatures, all which are his hosts, wholly submitting themselves to his will, to be and do what God...

Of his armies of the angels, and stars, and other creatures, all which are his hosts, wholly submitting themselves to his will, to be and do what God would have them; and therefore how insolent and unreasonable a thing is it for thee to quarrel with him! He spoke before of God’ s making peace, and here he mentions the armies by which he keeps it.

Upon whom doth no his light arise? either,

1. Properly, his sun, which riseth upon all, Mat 5:45 . Or rather,

2. Metaphorically, all that is in men, which is or may be called light ; the light of life, by which men subsist, and are kept out of the state of the dead, called a land of darkness , Job 10:22 ; the light of reason and understanding, called. God’ s candle , Pro 20:27 , by which thou, O Job, art capable of arguing with God and with us; and all that peace, and prosperity, and comfort which thou ever didst enjoy, which oft comes under the name of light, as Est 8:15,16 Ps 97:11 Psa 112:4 ; which being here called light , is, to continue the metaphor, most fitly said to arise upon men: all this is from God, and therefore is wholly at his disposal; he freely gave it all, and he may justly take it away, as thou thyself didst truly observe and confess, Job 1:21 , and consequently thou hast no reason to reproach God for disposing of his own as he pleaseth. Thou hast lost nothing which was thine own, and having no propriety, there is no foundation for any judicial contest with God.

Poole: Job 25:4 - Man // With God // That is born of a woman Man: the word signifies man that is miserable, which supposeth him to be sinful; and that such a creature should quarrel with that dominion of God, t...

Man: the word signifies man that is miserable, which supposeth him to be sinful; and that such a creature should quarrel with that dominion of God, to which the sinless, and happy, and glorious angels willingly submit, is most absurd and impious.

With God i.e. before God’ s tribunal, to which thou dost so boldly appeal. Thou mayst plead thy cause with thy fellow worms, as we are, and expect to be justified; but woe to thee if the great God undertake to plead his cause against thee! how severely and certainly wouldst thou then be condemned!

That is born of a woman to wit, after the ordinary course; for otherwise Christ was born of a woman, but in a singular manner. This birth is alleged as an evidence of man’ s filthiness, Job 14:4 15:14 Psa 51:5 , and of his liableness to God’ s curse and wrath, Gen 3:16 Eph 2:2 , and consequently of his condemnation, opposite to the justification here mentioned, and confidently expected by Job in this contest.

Poole: Job 25:5 - moon // The stars are not pure in his sight The moon, though a bright and glorious creature, Job 31:26 Son 6:10 , if compared with the splendour of the Divine majesty, is but as a dark and ear...

The moon, though a bright and glorious creature, Job 31:26 Son 6:10 , if compared with the splendour of the Divine majesty, is but as a dark and earthy lump, without any lustre or glory. He names the

moon and the

stars rather than the sun , because they many times are eclipsed or disappear even to our eyes, which is a plain evidence of their utter obscurity in respect of God’ s light; whereas the sun, though that also he obscure, if compared with God, yet it casts a constant and most clear light. Or by naming the moon , and thence proceeding to the stars, the sun is included between them.

The stars are not pure in his sight he can discern many spots and blemishes in them which we cannot see; and in like manner he can discover those corruptions or sins in us which are unknown to our own conscience, which should make thee, O Job, tremble to appear before his tribunal.

Poole: Job 25:6 - A worm A worm to wit, mean, and vile, and impotent; proceeding from corruption, and returning to it; and withal filthy and loathsome, and so every way a ver...

A worm to wit, mean, and vile, and impotent; proceeding from corruption, and returning to it; and withal filthy and loathsome, and so every way a very unfit person to appear before the high and holy God, and much more to contend with him. The same thing is repeated in other words; only for miserable man in the last branch he here puts the son of any man , of what degree or quality soever, to show that this is true even of the greatest and best of men.

Haydock: Job 25:1 - Answered Answered. He directs his attack against Job's desiring to plead before God, and gives a wrong statement of his request, which he also attempts to re...

Answered. He directs his attack against Job's desiring to plead before God, and gives a wrong statement of his request, which he also attempts to refute, by urging the same inconclusive arguments as before. (Calmet) ---

Blind and obstinate disputers still repeat the same objections; (Worthington) as Protestants do against the Catholic doctrines, which have been so often and so ably defended. (Haydock)

Haydock: Job 25:2 - Places Places. Directing all the heavenly bodies with perfect harmony. (Calmet)

Places. Directing all the heavenly bodies with perfect harmony. (Calmet)

Haydock: Job 25:3 - Soldiers Soldiers. The works of the whole creation, particularly the stars and angels. (Menochius)

Soldiers. The works of the whole creation, particularly the stars and angels. (Menochius)

Haydock: Job 25:4 - Clean Clean. Job had used a similar expression, as well as Eliphaz, chap. iv. 17., and xiv. 4., and xv. 15. The holy man did not assert that he was free ...

Clean. Job had used a similar expression, as well as Eliphaz, chap. iv. 17., and xiv. 4., and xv. 15. The holy man did not assert that he was free from sin, but only that God did not punish him (Calmet) so dreadfully (Haydock) on that account, and that he has just reasons for afflicting his servants, if it were only to manifest his own power and glory. (Calmet)

Haydock: Job 25:5 - Sight Sight, compared with him. The most beautiful things in nature are nothing; and of course, the most just are all imperfection, when left to themselve...

Sight, compared with him. The most beautiful things in nature are nothing; and of course, the most just are all imperfection, when left to themselves. (Calmet)

Gill: Job 25:1 - Then answered Bildad the Shuhite // and said Then answered Bildad the Shuhite,.... Not to what Job had just now delivered, in order to disprove that, that men, guilty of the grossest crimes, ofte...

Then answered Bildad the Shuhite,.... Not to what Job had just now delivered, in order to disprove that, that men, guilty of the grossest crimes, often go unpunished in this life, and prosper and succeed, and die in peace and quietness, as other men; either because he was convinced of the truth of what he had said, or else because he thought he was an obstinate man, and that it was best to let him alone, and say no more to him, since there was no likelihood of working any conviction on him; wherefore he only tries to possess his mind of the greatness and majesty of God, in order to deter him from applying to God in a judicial way, and expecting redress and relief from him;

and said; as follows.

Gill: Job 25:2 - Dominion and fear are with him // he maketh peace in his high places Dominion and fear are with him,.... Not with man, as Sephorno interprets it, as that with him is power to rule over the imagination (the evil figment...

Dominion and fear are with him,.... Not with man, as Sephorno interprets it, as that with him is power to rule over the imagination (the evil figment of his heart) to choose the good, and refuse the evil; and with him is fear of punishment, and also the fear of God to restrain him from evil; but with God, as may easily be perceived from the whole context, though his name is not expressed in this clause, and not till Job 25:4; this dominion he is possessed of is universal; his kingdom rules over all, over all the angels, good and bad; over all men, over all the nations of the world, and the great men in it, the kings and princes of it; and over all, of every age, sex, and condition; and it is absolute and uncontrollable; he governs according to his will, and is not to be controlled in his ways; nor is he accountable to any for what he does, and his kingdom is an everlasting one, and his dominion for ever and ever: and by the fear that is with him is not meant actively, with which he fears; for he is afraid of none, be they ever so great and mighty, Job 22:4; but passively, with which he is feared; for holy and reverend is his name, and so his nature, and all that belong to him; he is feared by the angels in heaven, who cover their faces before him, and cast their crowns at his feet; and by the saints on earth, in whose assemblies he is served with reverence and godly fear; and should be stood in awe of by all the inhabitants of the world, because of the glory of his nature, the greatness of his works, and the goodness of his providence:

he maketh peace in his high places; in the high places of his earth, and among the great men of it, creating and commanding peace, and causing war among them to cease, whenever it is his pleasure; and in the regions of the air, where, though there are often thunder and lightning, storms and tempests of wind, hail, and rain, yet, when he says, Peace, be still, all is serene and quiet; and in the orbs of the heaven, the sun, moon, and stars, which know their appointed times and seasons, and keep their place or course, and do their work and office in the most easy and cheerful manner; and among the angels in the highest heaven, which are properly his high places, who, though their numbers are so great, and they themselves thrones, dominions, principalities, and powers, and have various offices and different work assigned them, readily do his will, and are in the utmost harmony and concord among themselves, show no reluctance to him, nor any discord to each other: now Bildad would have Job consider whether he could think himself so significant, that cognizance would be taken of him and his cause by so great, glorious, and majestic a thing; or that he would suffer his high places, where peace reigned, to be disturbed by his noise and brawl.

Gill: Job 25:3 - Is there any number of his armies // and upon whom doth not his light arise Is there any number of his armies?.... His armies in heaven, the heavenly host of angels, which are innumerable; there are more than twelve legions of...

Is there any number of his armies?.... His armies in heaven, the heavenly host of angels, which are innumerable; there are more than twelve legions of them, thousand and ten thousand times ten thousand, employed in a military way, for the safety and preservation of the saints; see Gen 32:1; and the sun, moon, and stars, often called the host of heaven, the latter of which cannot be numbered, and which fought in their courses against Sisera, Jdg 5:20; and his armies on earth, all the inhabitants of it; yea, every creature, even the smallest insect in it, which are without number: thus, frogs, lice, flies, and locusts, were the armies of God, with which he fought against Pharaoh and the Egyptians, see Joe 2:11;

and upon whom doth not his light arise? either natural light, that grand luminary the sun, which rises on all, the evil and the good, nor is anything hid from the light and heat of it; or moral light, the light of nature, with which everyone that comes into the world is enlightened by him; or the light of providential goodness, which is unto all, and over all his creatures; the whole earth is full of it, and all the inhabitants have a share in it; nor is anything hid from his all piercing, all penetrating, all seeing eye, who is light itself, and dwells in light inaccessible, and from which light nothing can be hid.

Gill: Job 25:4 - How then can man be justified with God? // or how can he be clean that is born of a woman How then can man be justified with God? Since he sees all his ways and works, his secret as well as open sins; either be more just than he, as Eliphaz...

How then can man be justified with God? Since he sees all his ways and works, his secret as well as open sins; either be more just than he, as Eliphaz expresses it, Job 4:17; which no man in his senses will say; or just as he is, and upon a level with him, or in comparison of him, or before him, and in his sight: and this is what Job himself denies, Job 9:2; for however righteous a man may be in his own sight, or in the sight of others, he cannot of himself be justified in the sight of God; nor can any be justified with him by his own righteousness, because the best righteousness of man is imperfect; and, if Bildad thought this was the sentiment of Job, he mistook him; for, what he meant by coming to the seat of God, and ordering his cause before him, Job 23:2; to which Bildad seems to refer, and being judged by him, when he doubted not but he should be acquitted, was no other than the justification of his cause, and not of his person before God; or that he should be cleared of the imputation of hypocrisy, and of being the sinner and wicked man, and guilty of very bad things, though secret and private, for which he was afflicted; for otherwise Job knew full well that he could not be justified with God by his own personal righteousness, for he knew himself to be a sinner, and owns it; nor did he think himself perfect, and his righteousness a complete one; and therefore he expected not to be justified by it; he knew his living Redeemer, and believed in him for righteousness, and expected the justification of his person, and his acceptance with God, only by him; and in this way there are many that are justified with God secretly, "in foro Dei", in the court of God, and in his sight, who always beholds his people as righteous in Christ, and openly, "in foro conscientiae", in the court of conscience, when they believe in him; and who will be publicly justified, and declared righteous, at the day of judgment:

or how can he be clean that is born of a woman? which suggests a doctrine that Job as firmly believed as Bildad did, that all men are unclean by natural generation, or as they are born into the world; their ancestors being such, the more immediate, and the more remote, which may be traced back to the first man and woman, Job 14:4; so that as no man is clean and pure as God is, or in comparison of him, or in his sight; they can neither be naturally clean, nor so of themselves, by any means or methods they can make use of; but then they may be, as many are, clean by the blood of Christ, and grace of God, through which his people are cleansed from all their sins, and all their iniquities, and are without spot before the throne and in the sight of God.

Gill: Job 25:5 - Behold, even to the moon // and it // shineth not // yea, the stars are not pure in his sight Behold, even to the moon,.... If all things that are glorious and illustrious in the lower world, and which are between that and the region of the moo...

Behold, even to the moon,.... If all things that are glorious and illustrious in the lower world, and which are between that and the region of the moon, are beheld; or all from the seat of the Divine Majesty, down to that glorious luminary, are viewed, they lose all their lustre and brightness, when compared with the Divine Being;

and it, even that itself

shineth not; it is darkened, confounded, and ashamed; it hides its beautiful face, and draws in its borrowed and useful light, at the approach of him, who is light itself, and in whom is no darkness at all: or it tabernacles not n; has no tabernacle to abide in, as is said of the sun, Psa 19:4; or does not expand and spread its light, as a tent o or tabernacle is spread; it does not diffuse, but contracts it. No mention is made of the sun, not because that shines in its own light, which the moon does not; but perhaps because the controversy between Job and his friends was held in the night, when the moon and the stars were only seen, and therefore only mentioned; otherwise, what is here observed equally holds good of the sun as of the moon; see Isa 24:23;

yea, the stars are not pure in his sight; as there are spots in the sun and in the moon, seen by the eye of man, aided and assisted, so such may be seen by God in the stars also, and in these, both in a natural and in a mystical sense; as by them may be meant the angels of heaven, even those are not pure in the sight of God, and in comparison of him, the most perfectly pure and holy Being; see Job 4:18.

Gill: Job 25:6 - How much less man, that is a worm // and the son of man, which is a worm How much less man, that is a worm?.... Whose original is of the earth, dwells in it, and is supported by it, and creeps into it again; who is impure ...

How much less man, that is a worm?.... Whose original is of the earth, dwells in it, and is supported by it, and creeps into it again; who is impure by nature and by practice, weak and impotent to do anything that is spiritually good, or to defend himself from his spiritual enemies; and is mean and despicable, as even the best of men are, in their own eyes, and in the eyes of the world: and, if the best of men are comparable to such creatures, and our Lord himself, in human nature, was content to be called a worm, and no man; what must the worst of men be, or man be in and of himself, without the grace of God and righteousness of Christ, by which he can be only clean and righteous? see Isa 41:14; and, if the celestial bodies above mentioned are eclipsed of all their brightness and glory, in the presence of God; what a contemptible figure must man make in the court of heaven, who, in comparison of them, is but a worm, and much more so, as appearing before God?

and the son of man, which is a worm; which is repeated with a little variation for the confirmation of it; or it may signify, that even the first man was no other than of the earth, earthy, and so are all his sons. The Targum is,

"how much more man, who in his life is a reptile, and the son of man, who in his death is a worm?''

to which may be added, that he is in his grave a companion for the worms; and indeed it appears by the observations made through microscopes, that man, in his first state of generation, is really a worm p; so that, as Pliny says q, one that is a judge of things may pity and be ashamed of the sorry original of the proudest of animals. By this short reply of Bildad, and which contains little more than what had been before said, it is plain that he was tired of the controversy, and glad to give out.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Job 25:1 The third speech of Bildad takes up Job 25, a short section of six verses. It is followed by two speeches from Job; and Zophar does not return with hi...

NET Notes: Job 25:2 The line says that God “makes peace in his heights.” The “heights” are usually interpreted to mean the highest heaven. There m...

NET Notes: Job 25:3 In place of “light” here the LXX has “his ambush,” perhaps reading אֹרְבוֹ (’o...

NET Notes: Job 25:4 Bildad here does not come up with new expressions; rather, he simply uses what Eliphaz had said (see Job 4:17-19 and 15:14-16).

NET Notes: Job 25:5 Heb “not pure in his eyes.”

NET Notes: Job 25:6 The text just has “maggot” and in the second half “worm.” Something has to be added to make it a bit clearer. The terms “...

Geneva Bible: Job 25:2 ( a ) Dominion and fear [are] with him, he maketh peace in his high places. ( a ) His purpose is to prove that although God may try and afflict the j...

Geneva Bible: Job 25:3 Is there any number of his armies? ( b ) and upon whom doth not his light arise? ( b ) Who can hide him from his presence?

Geneva Bible: Job 25:4 How then can man ( c ) be justified with God? or how can he be clean [that is] born of a woman? ( c ) That is, be just in respect to God?

Geneva Bible: Job 25:5 Behold even to the moon, and it shineth not; yea, ( d ) the stars are not pure in his sight. ( d ) If God shows his power, the moon and stars cannot ...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Job 25:1-6 - --Bildad drops the question concerning the prosperity of wicked men; but shows the infinite distance there is between God and man. He represents to Job ...

Matthew Henry: Job 25:1-6 - -- Bildad is to be commended here for two things: - 1. For speaking no more on the subject about which Job and he differed. Perhaps he began to think J...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 25:1-6 - -- 1 Then began Bildad the Shuhite, and said: 2 Dominion and terror are with Him, He maketh peace in His high places. 3 Is there any number to His a...

Constable: Job 22:1--27:23 - --D. The Third cycle of Speeches between Job and His Three Friends chs. 22-27 In round one of the debate J...

Constable: Job 25:1-6 - --3. Bildad's third speech ch. 25 The brevity of this speech reflects the fact that Job's companio...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) JOB A REAL PERSON.--It has been supposed by some that the book of Job is an allegory, not a real narrative, on account of the artificial character of ...

JFB: Job (Garis Besar) THE HOLINESS OF JOB, HIS WEALTH, &c. (Job 1:1-5) SATAN, APPEARING BEFORE GOD, FALSELY ACCUSES JOB. (Job 1:6-12) SATAN FURTHER TEMPTS JOB. (Job 2:1-8)...

TSK: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) A large aquatic animal, perhaps the extinct dinosaur, plesiosaurus, the exact meaning is unknown. Some think this to be a crocodile but from the desc...

TSK: Job 25 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Job 25:1, Bildad shews that man cannot be justified before God.

Poole: Job 25 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 25 Bildad’ s answer: God’ s majesty and purity is such as that man cannot be justified before God: before him the heavenly lights...

MHCC: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) This book is so called from Job, whose prosperity, afflictions, and restoration, are here recorded. He lived soon after Abraham, or perhaps before tha...

MHCC: Job 25 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Bildad shows that man cannot be justified before God.

Matthew Henry: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Job This book of Job stands by itself, is not connected with any other, and is therefore to...

Matthew Henry: Job 25 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Bildad here makes a very short reply to Job's last discourse, as one that began to be tired of the cause. He drops the main question concerning the...

Constable: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title This book, like many others in the Old Testament, got its name from...

Constable: Job (Garis Besar) Outline I. Prologue chs. 1-2 A. Job's character 1:1-5 B. Job's calamitie...

Constable: Job Job Bibliography Andersen, Francis I. Job. Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries series. Leicester, Eng. and Downe...

Haydock: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF JOB. INTRODUCTION. This Book takes its name from the holy man, of whom it treats; who, according to the more probable opinion, was ...

Gill: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO JOB This book, in the Hebrew copies, generally goes by this name, from Job, who is however the subject, if not the writer of it. In...

Gill: Job 25 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO JOB 25 This chapter contains Bildad's reply to Job, such an one as it is; in which, declining the controversy between them, he ende...

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