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Teks -- Luke 24:1-53 (NET)

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Konteks
The Resurrection
24:1 Now on the first day of the week, at early dawn, the women went to the tomb, taking the aromatic spices they had prepared. 24:2 They found that the stone had been rolled away from the tomb, 24:3 but when they went in, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus. 24:4 While they were perplexed about this, suddenly two men stood beside them in dazzling attire. 24:5 The women were terribly frightened and bowed their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? 24:6 He is not here, but has been raised! Remember how he told you, while he was still in Galilee, 24:7 that the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again.” 24:8 Then the women remembered his words, 24:9 and when they returned from the tomb they told all these things to the eleven and to all the rest. 24:10 Now it was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the other women with them who told these things to the apostles. 24:11 But these words seemed like pure nonsense to them, and they did not believe them. 24:12 But Peter got up and ran to the tomb. He bent down and saw only the strips of linen cloth; then he went home, wondering what had happened.
Jesus Walks the Road to Emmaus
24:13 Now that very day two of them were on their way to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem. 24:14 They were talking to each other about all the things that had happened. 24:15 While they were talking and debating these things, Jesus himself approached and began to accompany them 24:16 (but their eyes were kept from recognizing him). 24:17 Then he said to them, “What are these matters you are discussing so intently as you walk along?” And they stood still, looking sad. 24:18 Then one of them, named Cleopas, answered him, “Are you the only visitor to Jerusalem who doesn’t know the things that have happened there in these days?” 24:19 He said to them, “What things?” “The things concerning Jesus the Nazarene,” they replied, “a man who, with his powerful deeds and words, proved to be a prophet before God and all the people; 24:20 and how our chief priests and rulers handed him over to be condemned to death, and crucified him. 24:21 But we had hoped that he was the one who was going to redeem Israel. Not only this, but it is now the third day since these things happened. 24:22 Furthermore, some women of our group amazed us. They were at the tomb early this morning, 24:23 and when they did not find his body, they came back and said they had seen a vision of angels, who said he was alive. 24:24 Then some of those who were with us went to the tomb, and found it just as the women had said, but they did not see him.” 24:25 So he said to them, “You foolish people– how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken! 24:26 Wasn’t it necessary for the Christ to suffer these things and enter into his glory?” 24:27 Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them the things written about himself in all the scriptures. 24:28 So they approached the village where they were going. He acted as though he wanted to go farther, 24:29 but they urged him, “Stay with us, because it is getting toward evening and the day is almost done.” So he went in to stay with them. 24:30 When he had taken his place at the table with them, he took the bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. 24:31 At this point their eyes were opened and they recognized him. Then he vanished out of their sight. 24:32 They said to each other, “Didn’t our hearts burn within us while he was speaking with us on the road, while he was explaining the scriptures to us?” 24:33 So they got up that very hour and returned to Jerusalem. They found the eleven and those with them gathered together 24:34 and saying, “The Lord has really risen, and has appeared to Simon!” 24:35 Then they told what had happened on the road, and how they recognized him when he broke the bread.
Jesus Makes a Final Appearance
24:36 While they were saying these things, Jesus himself stood among them and said to them, “Peace be with you.” 24:37 But they were startled and terrified, thinking they saw a ghost. 24:38 Then he said to them, “Why are you frightened, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? 24:39 Look at my hands and my feet; it’s me! Touch me and see; a ghost does not have flesh and bones like you see I have.” 24:40 When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. 24:41 And while they still could not believe it (because of their joy) and were amazed, he said to them, “Do you have anything here to eat?” 24:42 So they gave him a piece of broiled fish, 24:43 and he took it and ate it in front of them.
Jesus’ Final Commission
24:44 Then he said to them, “These are my words that I spoke to you while I was still with you, that everything written about me in the law of Moses and the prophets and the psalms must be fulfilled.” 24:45 Then he opened their minds so they could understand the scriptures, 24:46 and said to them, “Thus it stands written that the Christ would suffer and would rise from the dead on the third day, 24:47 and repentance for the forgiveness of sins would be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. 24:48 You are witnesses of these things. 24:49 And look, I am sending you what my Father promised. But stay in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.”
Jesus’ Departure
24:50 Then Jesus led them out as far as Bethany, and lifting up his hands, he blessed them. 24:51 Now during the blessing he departed and was taken up into heaven. 24:52 So they worshiped him and returned to Jerusalem with great joy, 24:53 and were continually in the temple courts blessing God.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Bethany a small town on the east slope of the Mount of Olives,a town located east of the Jordan river
 · Cleopas a person, male
 · Emmaus a town about 12 km WNW of Jerusalem
 · Galilee the region of Palestine north of Sameria and west of the upper Jordan River,a region west of Lake Galilee and north of the Jezreel Valley
 · Israel a citizen of Israel.,a member of the nation of Israel
 · James a son of Zebedee; brother of John; an apostle,a son of Alpheus; an apostle,a brother of Jesus; writer of the epistle of James,the father (or brother) of the apostle Judas
 · Jerusalem the capital city of Israel,a town; the capital of Israel near the southern border of Benjamin
 · Joanna the wife of Chuza who was Herod's steward.
 · Magdalene a person (woman) from Magdala
 · Mary mother of Jesus and wife of Joseph,a woman from Magdala in Galilee,the mother of James and Joses,the wife of Cleophas,the sister of Lazarus and Martha in Bethany,the mother of John Mark who was a nephew of Barnabas,a Christian woman in Rome who helped Paul
 · Moses a son of Amram; the Levite who led Israel out of Egypt and gave them The Law of Moses,a Levite who led Israel out of Egypt and gave them the law
 · Nazareth a town in lower Galilee about halfway between the Sea of Galilee and the Mediterranean Sea
 · Peter a man who was a leader among the twelve apostles and wrote the two epistles of Peter
 · Psalm an O.T. book name and/or one of the Psalms comprising the book
 · Simon a son of Jonas and brother of Andrew; an apostle of Jesus Christ,a man who was one of the apostles of Christ and also called 'the Zealot',a brother of Jesus,a man who was a well-know victim of leprosy who had been healed by Jesus (NIV note),a man from Cyrene who was forced to carry the cross of Jesus,a Pharisee man in whose house Jesus' feet were washed with tears and anointed,the father of Judas Iscariot,a man who was a sorcerer in Samaria and who wanted to buy the gifts of the Spirit,a man who was a tanner at Joppa and with whom Peter was staying when Cornelius sent for him


Topik/Tema Kamus: RESURRECTION OF JESUS CHRIST, THE | VERSIONS, GEORGIAN, GOTHIC, SLAVONIC | LUKE, THE GOSPEL OF | JESUS CHRIST, 4F | KEYS, POWER OF THE | Jesus, The Christ | Love | Ascension | Resurrection of Christ | Trouble | Sabbath | BODY, SPIRITUAL | Unbelief | Readings, Select | Mary | Women | Peter | CHRIST, THE EXALTATION OF | Types | CHRIST, OFFICES OF | selebihnya
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Robertson: Luk 24:1 - At early dawn At early dawn ( orthrou batheos ). Genitive of time. Literally, at deep dawn. The adjective bathus (deep) was often used of time. This very idiom o...

At early dawn ( orthrou batheos ).

Genitive of time. Literally, at deep dawn. The adjective bathus (deep) was often used of time. This very idiom occurs in Aristophanes, Plato, et cetera. Joh 20:1 adds "while it was yet dark."That is, when they started, for the sun was risen when they arrived (Mar 16:2).

Robertson: Luk 24:1 - Which they had prepared Which they had prepared ( ha hētoimasan ). Mar 16:1 notes that they bought other spices after the sabbath was over besides those which they already...

Which they had prepared ( ha hētoimasan ).

Mar 16:1 notes that they bought other spices after the sabbath was over besides those which they already had (Luk 23:56).

Robertson: Luk 24:2 - Rolled away Rolled away ( apokekulismenon ). Perfect passive participle of apokuliō , late verb and in the N.T. only in this context (Mar 16:3; Mat 28:2) while...

Rolled away ( apokekulismenon ).

Perfect passive participle of apokuliō , late verb and in the N.T. only in this context (Mar 16:3; Mat 28:2) while Joh 20:1 has ērmenon (taken away).

Robertson: Luk 24:3 - Of the Lord Jesus Of the Lord Jesus ( tou kuriou Iēsou ). The Western family of documents does not have these words and Westcott and Hort bracket them as Western non...

Of the Lord Jesus ( tou kuriou Iēsou ).

The Western family of documents does not have these words and Westcott and Hort bracket them as Western non-interpolations. There are numerous instances of this shorter Western text in this chapter. For a discussion of the subject see my Introduction to the Textual Criticism of the New Testament , pp. 225-237. This precise combination (the Lord Jesus) is common in the Acts, but nowhere else in the Gospels.

Robertson: Luk 24:4 - While they were perplexed thereabout While they were perplexed thereabout ( en tōi aporeisthai autas peri toutou ). Luke’ s common Hebraistic idiom, en with the articular infini...

While they were perplexed thereabout ( en tōi aporeisthai autas peri toutou ).

Luke’ s common Hebraistic idiom, en with the articular infinitive (present passive aporeisthai from aporeō , to lose one’ s way) and the accusative of general reference.

Robertson: Luk 24:4 - Two men Two men ( andres duo ). Men, not women. Mar 16:5 speaks of a young man (neaniskon ) while Mat 28:5 has "an angel."We need not try to reconcile these...

Two men ( andres duo ).

Men, not women. Mar 16:5 speaks of a young man (neaniskon ) while Mat 28:5 has "an angel."We need not try to reconcile these varying accounts which agree in the main thing. The angel looked like a man and some remembered two. In Luk 24:23 Cleopas and his companion call them "angels."

Robertson: Luk 24:4 - Stood by Stood by ( epestēsan ). Second aorist active indicative of ephistēmi . This common verb usually means to step up suddenly, to burst upon one.

Stood by ( epestēsan ).

Second aorist active indicative of ephistēmi . This common verb usually means to step up suddenly, to burst upon one.

Robertson: Luk 24:4 - In dazzling apparel In dazzling apparel ( en esthēti astraptousēi ). This is the correct text. This common simplex verb occurs only twice in the N.T., here and Luk 1...

In dazzling apparel ( en esthēti astraptousēi ).

This is the correct text. This common simplex verb occurs only twice in the N.T., here and Luk 17:24 (the Transfiguration). It has the same root as astrapē (lightning). The "men"had the garments of "angels."

Robertson: Luk 24:5 - As they were affrighted As they were affrighted ( emphobōn genomenōn autōn ). Genitive absolute with second aorist middle of ginomai , to become. Hence, when they bec...

As they were affrighted ( emphobōn genomenōn autōn ).

Genitive absolute with second aorist middle of ginomai , to become. Hence, when they became affrighted. They had utterly forgotten the prediction of Jesus that he would rise on the third day.

Robertson: Luk 24:6 - He is not here, but is risen He is not here, but is risen ( ouk estin hōde , alla ēgerthē ). Another Western non-interpolation according to Westcott and Hort. The words are...

He is not here, but is risen ( ouk estin hōde , alla ēgerthē ).

Another Western non-interpolation according to Westcott and Hort. The words are genuine at any rate in Mar 16:6; Mat 28:7.

Robertson: Luk 24:6 - The third day rise again The third day rise again ( tēi tritēi hēmerāi anastēnai ). See note on Luk 9:22; and the note on Luk 18:32, Luk 18:33 where Jesus plainly f...

The third day rise again ( tēi tritēi hēmerāi anastēnai ).

See note on Luk 9:22; and the note on Luk 18:32, Luk 18:33 where Jesus plainly foretold this fact. And yet they had forgotten it, for it ran counter to all their ideas and hopes.

Robertson: Luk 24:9 - From the tomb From the tomb ( apo tou mnēmeiou ). Some documents omit these words. This word for tomb is like our "memorial"from mimnēskō , to remind.

From the tomb ( apo tou mnēmeiou ).

Some documents omit these words. This word for tomb is like our "memorial"from mimnēskō , to remind.

Robertson: Luk 24:9 - Told Told ( apēggeilan ). It was a wonderful proclamation. Luke does not separate the story of Mary Magdalene from that of the other women as John does ...

Told ( apēggeilan ).

It was a wonderful proclamation. Luke does not separate the story of Mary Magdalene from that of the other women as John does (John 20:2-18).

Robertson: Luk 24:11 - As idle talk As idle talk ( hōs lēros ). Old word for nonsense, only here in the N.T. Medical writers used it for the wild talk of those in delirium or hyster...

As idle talk ( hōs lēros ).

Old word for nonsense, only here in the N.T. Medical writers used it for the wild talk of those in delirium or hysteria.

Robertson: Luk 24:11 - Disbelieved Disbelieved ( e4pistoun ). Imperfect active of apisteō , old verb from apistos , without confidence or faith in. They kept on distrusting the story ...

Disbelieved ( e4pistoun ).

Imperfect active of apisteō , old verb from apistos , without confidence or faith in. They kept on distrusting the story of the women.||

Robertson: Luk 24:12 - This entire verse is a Western non-interpolation. This incident is given in complete form in Joh 18:2-10 and most of the words in this verse are there also. It is of a piece with many items in this chapter about which it is not easy to reach a final conclusion. @@Stooping and looking in This entire verse is a Western non-interpolation. This incident is given in complete form in Joh 18:2-10 and most of the words in this verse are there...

This entire verse is a Western non-interpolation. This incident is given in complete form in Joh 18:2-10 and most of the words in this verse are there also. It is of a piece with many items in this chapter about which it is not easy to reach a final conclusion. @@Stooping and looking in ( parakupsas ).

First aorist active participle of parakuptō , to stoop besides and peer into. Old verb used also in Joh 20:5, Joh 20:11; Jam 1:25; 1Pe 1:12.

Robertson: Luk 24:12 - By themselves By themselves ( mona ). Without the body.

By themselves ( mona ).

Without the body.

Robertson: Luk 24:12 - To his home To his home ( pros hauton ). Literally, "to himself."

To his home ( pros hauton ).

Literally, "to himself."

Robertson: Luk 24:13 - Were going Were going ( ēsan poreuomenoi ). Periphrastic imperfect middle of poreuomai .

Were going ( ēsan poreuomenoi ).

Periphrastic imperfect middle of poreuomai .

Robertson: Luk 24:13 - Sixty stadia Sixty stadia ( stadious hexēkonta ). About seven miles.

Sixty stadia ( stadious hexēkonta ).

About seven miles.

Robertson: Luk 24:14 - They communed They communed ( hōmiloun ). Imperfect active of homileō , old and common verb (from homilos , in company with). In the N.T. only here (and Luk 24...

They communed ( hōmiloun ).

Imperfect active of homileō , old and common verb (from homilos , in company with). In the N.T. only here (and Luk 24:15) and Act 20:11; Act 24:26. Our word homiletics is derived from this word for preaching was at first largely conversational in style and not declamatory.

Robertson: Luk 24:15 - While they communed and questioned together While they communed and questioned together ( en tōi homilein autous kai sunzētein ). Same idiom as in Luk 24:14, which see. Note sunzētein ; ...

While they communed and questioned together ( en tōi homilein autous kai sunzētein ).

Same idiom as in Luk 24:14, which see. Note sunzētein ; each questioned the other.

Robertson: Luk 24:15 - Jesus himself Jesus himself ( autos Iēsous ). In actual person.

Jesus himself ( autos Iēsous ).

In actual person.

Robertson: Luk 24:15 - Went with them Went with them ( suneporeueto autois ). Imperfect middle, was going along with them.

Went with them ( suneporeueto autois ).

Imperfect middle, was going along with them.

Robertson: Luk 24:16 - Were holden that they should not know him Were holden that they should not know him ( ekratounto tou mē epignōnai auton ). Imperfect passive of krateō , continued being held, with the a...

Were holden that they should not know him ( ekratounto tou mē epignōnai auton ).

Imperfect passive of krateō , continued being held, with the ablative case of the articular infinitive, "from recognizing him,"from knowing him fully (epi - gnōnai , ingressive aorist of epiginōsko ). The mē is a redundant negative after the negative idea in ekratounto .

Robertson: Luk 24:17 - That you have with another That you have with another ( hous antiballete pros allēlous ). Anti - ballō is an old verb and means to throw in turn, back and forth like a ...

That you have with another ( hous antiballete pros allēlous ).

Anti - ballō is an old verb and means to throw in turn, back and forth like a ball, from one to another, a beautiful picture of conversation as a game of words. Only here in the N.T.

Robertson: Luk 24:17 - They stood still They stood still ( estathēsan ). First aorist passive of histēmi , intransitive. They stopped.

They stood still ( estathēsan ).

First aorist passive of histēmi , intransitive. They stopped.

Robertson: Luk 24:17 - Looking sad Looking sad ( skuthrōpoi ). This is the correct text. It is an old adjective from skuthros , gloomy and ops , countenance. Only here in the N.T.

Looking sad ( skuthrōpoi ).

This is the correct text. It is an old adjective from skuthros , gloomy and ops , countenance. Only here in the N.T.

Robertson: Luk 24:18 - Dost thou alone sojourn? Dost thou alone sojourn? ( su monos paroikeis̱ ). Monos is predicate adjective. "Hast thou been dwelling alone (all by thyself)?"

Dost thou alone sojourn? ( su monos paroikeis̱ ).

Monos is predicate adjective. "Hast thou been dwelling alone (all by thyself)?"

Robertson: Luk 24:18 - And not know? And not know? ( kai ouk egnōs̱ ). Second aorist active indicative and difficult to put into English as the aorist often is. The verb paroikeō ...

And not know? ( kai ouk egnōs̱ ).

Second aorist active indicative and difficult to put into English as the aorist often is. The verb paroikeō means to dwell beside one, then as a stranger like paroikoi (Eph 2:19). In Jerusalem everybody was talking about Jesus.

Robertson: Luk 24:21 - But we hoped But we hoped ( hēmeis de ēlpizomen ). Imperfect active, we were hoping. Note emphasis in hēmeis (we).

But we hoped ( hēmeis de ēlpizomen ).

Imperfect active, we were hoping. Note emphasis in hēmeis (we).

Robertson: Luk 24:21 - Redeem Redeem ( lutrousthai ). From the bondage of Rome, no doubt.

Redeem ( lutrousthai ).

From the bondage of Rome, no doubt.

Robertson: Luk 24:21 - Yea and beside all this Yea and beside all this ( alla ge kai sun pāsin toutois ). Particles pile up to express their emotions.

Yea and beside all this ( alla ge kai sun pāsin toutois ).

Particles pile up to express their emotions.

Robertson: Luk 24:21 - Yea Yea ( alla here affirmative, as in Luk 24:22, not adversative) at least (ge ) also (kai ) together with all these things (sun pāsin toutois ). ...

Yea ( alla here affirmative, as in Luk 24:22, not adversative)

at least (ge ) also (kai ) together with all these things (sun pāsin toutois ). Like Pelion on Ossa with them in their perplexity.

Robertson: Luk 24:21 - Now the third day Now the third day ( tritēn tautēn hēmeran agei ). A difficult idiom for the English. "One is keeping this a third day."And he is still dead and...

Now the third day ( tritēn tautēn hēmeran agei ).

A difficult idiom for the English. "One is keeping this a third day."And he is still dead and we are still without hope.

Robertson: Luk 24:22 - Amazed us Amazed us ( exestēsan hēmas ). First aorist active (transitive) indicative with accusative hēmas of existēmi . The second aorist active is ...

Amazed us ( exestēsan hēmas ).

First aorist active (transitive) indicative with accusative hēmas of existēmi . The second aorist active is intransitive.

Robertson: Luk 24:22 - Early Early ( orthrinai ). A poetic and late form for orthrios . In the N.T. only here Luk 24:22. Predicate adjective agreeing with the women.

Early ( orthrinai ).

A poetic and late form for orthrios . In the N.T. only here Luk 24:22. Predicate adjective agreeing with the women.

Robertson: Luk 24:23 - Had seen Had seen ( heōrakenai ). Perfect active infinitive in indirect assertion after legousai . Same construction for zēin after legousin . But all t...

Had seen ( heōrakenai ).

Perfect active infinitive in indirect assertion after legousai . Same construction for zēin after legousin . But all this was too indirect and uncertain (women and angels) for Cleopas and his companion.

Robertson: Luk 24:25 - Foolish men Foolish men ( anoētoi ). Literally without sense (nous ), not understanding. Common word.

Foolish men ( anoētoi ).

Literally without sense (nous ), not understanding. Common word.

Robertson: Luk 24:25 - Slow of heart Slow of heart ( bradeis tēi kardiāi ). Slow in heart (locative case). Old word for one dull, slow to comprehend or to act.

Slow of heart ( bradeis tēi kardiāi ).

Slow in heart (locative case). Old word for one dull, slow to comprehend or to act.

Robertson: Luk 24:25 - All that All that ( pāsin hois ). Relative attracted from the accusative ha to the case of the antecedent pāsin (dative). They could only understand p...

All that ( pāsin hois ).

Relative attracted from the accusative ha to the case of the antecedent pāsin (dative). They could only understand part of the prophecies, not all.

Robertson: Luk 24:26 - Behooved it not? Behooved it not? ( ouchi edei̱ ). Was it not necessary? The very things about the death of Jesus that disturbed them so were the strongest proof tha...

Behooved it not? ( ouchi edei̱ ).

Was it not necessary? The very things about the death of Jesus that disturbed them so were the strongest proof that he was the Messiah of the Old Testament.

Robertson: Luk 24:27 - Interpreted Interpreted ( diērmēneusen ). First aorist active (constative aorist) indicative of diermēneuō (Margin has the imperfect diērmēneuen )...

Interpreted ( diērmēneusen ).

First aorist active (constative aorist) indicative of diermēneuō (Margin has the imperfect diērmēneuen ), intensive compound (dia ) of hermēneuō , the old verb to interpret from hermēneus , interpreter, and that from Hermēs , the messenger of the gods as the people of Lystra took Paul to be (Act 14:12). But what wonderful exegesis the two disciples were now hearing!

Robertson: Luk 24:27 - Concerning himself Concerning himself ( peri heauton ). Jesus found himself in the Old Testament, a thing that some modern scholars do not seem able to do.

Concerning himself ( peri heauton ).

Jesus found himself in the Old Testament, a thing that some modern scholars do not seem able to do.

Robertson: Luk 24:28 - Made as though Made as though ( prosepoiēsato ). First aorist active middle (Some MSS. have prosepoieito imperfect) indicative of prospoieō , old verb to conf...

Made as though ( prosepoiēsato ).

First aorist active middle (Some MSS. have prosepoieito imperfect) indicative of prospoieō , old verb to conform oneself to, to pretend. Only here in the N.T. Of course he would have gone on if the disciples had not urged him to stay.

Robertson: Luk 24:29 - Constrained Constrained ( parebiasanto ). Strong verb parabiazomai , to compel by use of force (Polybius and lxx). In the N.T. only here and Act 16:15. It was he...

Constrained ( parebiasanto ).

Strong verb parabiazomai , to compel by use of force (Polybius and lxx). In the N.T. only here and Act 16:15. It was here compulsion of courteous words.

Robertson: Luk 24:29 - Is far spent Is far spent ( kekliken ). Perfect active indicative of klinō . The day "has turned"toward setting.

Is far spent ( kekliken ).

Perfect active indicative of klinō . The day "has turned"toward setting.

Robertson: Luk 24:30 - When he had sat down When he had sat down ( en tōi kataklithēnai auton ). Luke’ s common idiom as in Luk 24:4, Luk 24:15. Note first aorist passive infinitive (o...

When he had sat down ( en tōi kataklithēnai auton ).

Luke’ s common idiom as in Luk 24:4, Luk 24:15. Note first aorist passive infinitive (on the reclining as to him).

Robertson: Luk 24:30 - Gave Gave ( epedidou ). Imperfect, inchoative idea, began to give to them, in contrast with the preceding aorist (punctiliar) participles.

Gave ( epedidou ).

Imperfect, inchoative idea, began to give to them, in contrast with the preceding aorist (punctiliar) participles.

Robertson: Luk 24:31 - Were opened Were opened ( diēnoichthēsan ). Ingressive first aorist passive indicative of dianoigō .

Were opened ( diēnoichthēsan ).

Ingressive first aorist passive indicative of dianoigō .

Robertson: Luk 24:31 - Knew Knew ( epegnōsan ). Effective first aorist active indicative fully recognized him. Same word in Luk 24:16.

Knew ( epegnōsan ).

Effective first aorist active indicative fully recognized him. Same word in Luk 24:16.

Robertson: Luk 24:31 - Vanished Vanished ( aphantos egeneto ). Became invisible or unmanifested. Aphantos from a privative and phainomai , to appear. Old word, only here in the ...

Vanished ( aphantos egeneto ).

Became invisible or unmanifested. Aphantos from a privative and phainomai , to appear. Old word, only here in the N.T.

Robertson: Luk 24:32 - Was not our heart burning? Was not our heart burning? ( Ouchi hē kardia hemōn kaiomenē ēṉ ). Periphrastic imperfect middle.

Was not our heart burning? ( Ouchi hē kardia hemōn kaiomenē ēṉ ).

Periphrastic imperfect middle.

Robertson: Luk 24:32 - Spake Spake ( elalei ). Imperfect active, was speaking. This common verb laleō is onomatopoetic, to utter a sound, la - la and was used of birds, c...

Spake ( elalei ).

Imperfect active, was speaking. This common verb laleō is onomatopoetic, to utter a sound, la - la and was used of birds, children chattering, and then for conversation, for preaching, for any public speech.

Robertson: Luk 24:32 - Opened Opened ( diēnoigen ). Imperfect active indicative of the same verb used of the eyes in Luk 24:31.

Opened ( diēnoigen ).

Imperfect active indicative of the same verb used of the eyes in Luk 24:31.

Robertson: Luk 24:33 - That very hour That very hour ( autēi tēi hōrāi ). Locative case and common Lukan idiom, at the hour itself. They could not wait.

That very hour ( autēi tēi hōrāi ).

Locative case and common Lukan idiom, at the hour itself. They could not wait.

Robertson: Luk 24:33 - Gathered Gathered ( ēthroismenous ). Perfect passive participle of athroizō , old verb from athroos (copulative a and throos , crowd). Only here in th...

Gathered ( ēthroismenous ).

Perfect passive participle of athroizō , old verb from athroos (copulative a and throos , crowd). Only here in the N.T.

Robertson: Luk 24:34 - Saying Saying ( legontas ). Accusative present active participle agreeing with "the eleven and those with them"in Luk 24:33.

Saying ( legontas ).

Accusative present active participle agreeing with "the eleven and those with them"in Luk 24:33.

Robertson: Luk 24:34 - Indeed Indeed ( ontōs ). Really, because "he has appeared to Simon"(ōpthē Simōni ). First aorist passive indicative of horaō . This is the crucia...

Indeed ( ontōs ).

Really, because "he has appeared to Simon"(ōpthē Simōni ). First aorist passive indicative of horaō . This is the crucial evidence that turned the scales with the disciples and explains "indeed."Paul also mentions it (1Co 15:5).

Robertson: Luk 24:35 - Rehearsed Rehearsed ( exēgounto ). Imperfect middle indicative of exēgeomai , verb to lead out, to rehearse. Our word exegesis comes from this verb. Their ...

Rehearsed ( exēgounto ).

Imperfect middle indicative of exēgeomai , verb to lead out, to rehearse. Our word exegesis comes from this verb. Their story was now confirmatory, not revolutionary. The women were right then after all.

Robertson: Luk 24:35 - Of them Of them ( autois ). To them, dative case. They did not recognize Jesus in his exegesis, but did in the breaking of bread. One is reminded of that say...

Of them ( autois ).

To them, dative case. They did not recognize Jesus in his exegesis, but did in the breaking of bread. One is reminded of that saying in the Logia of Jesus : "Raise the stone and there thou shalt find me, cleave the wood and there am I."

Robertson: Luk 24:36 - He himself stood He himself stood ( autos estē ). He himself stepped and stood. Some documents do not have "Peace be unto you."

He himself stood ( autos estē ).

He himself stepped and stood. Some documents do not have "Peace be unto you."

Robertson: Luk 24:37 - Terrified Terrified ( ptoēthentes ). First aorist passive participle of ptoeō , old verb and in the N.T. only here and Luk 21:9 which see.

Terrified ( ptoēthentes ).

First aorist passive participle of ptoeō , old verb and in the N.T. only here and Luk 21:9 which see.

Robertson: Luk 24:37 - Affrighted Affrighted ( emphoboi genomenoi ). Late adjective from en and phobos (fear). Both these terms of fear are strong.

Affrighted ( emphoboi genomenoi ).

Late adjective from en and phobos (fear). Both these terms of fear are strong.

Robertson: Luk 24:37 - Supposed Supposed ( edokoun ). Imperfect active of dokeō , kept on thinking so.

Supposed ( edokoun ).

Imperfect active of dokeō , kept on thinking so.

Robertson: Luk 24:38 - Why are ye troubled? Why are ye troubled? ( ti tetaragmenoi este̱ ). Periphrastic perfect passive indicative of tarassō , old verb, to agitate, to stir up, to get exci...

Why are ye troubled? ( ti tetaragmenoi este̱ ).

Periphrastic perfect passive indicative of tarassō , old verb, to agitate, to stir up, to get excited.

Robertson: Luk 24:39 - Myself Myself ( autos ). Jesus is patient with his proof. They were convinced before he came into the room, but that psychological shock had unnerved them a...

Myself ( autos ).

Jesus is patient with his proof. They were convinced before he came into the room, but that psychological shock had unnerved them all.

Robertson: Luk 24:39 - Handle Handle ( psēlaphēsate ). This very word is used in 1Jo 1:1 as proof of the actual human body of Jesus. It is an old verb for touching with the ha...

Handle ( psēlaphēsate ).

This very word is used in 1Jo 1:1 as proof of the actual human body of Jesus. It is an old verb for touching with the hand.

Robertson: Luk 24:39 - Flesh and bones Flesh and bones ( sarka kai ostea ). At least this proves that he is not just a ghost and that Jesus had a real human body against the Docetic Gnosti...

Flesh and bones ( sarka kai ostea ).

At least this proves that he is not just a ghost and that Jesus had a real human body against the Docetic Gnostics who denied it. But clearly we are not to understand that our resurrection bodies will have "flesh and bones."Jesus was in a transition state and had not yet been glorified. The mystery remains unsolved, but it was proof to the disciples of the identity of the Risen Christ with Jesus of Nazareth.||

Robertson: Luk 24:40 - -- @@Another Western non-interpolation according to Westcott and Hort. It is genuine in Joh 20:20.

@@Another Western non-interpolation according to Westcott and Hort. It is genuine in Joh 20:20.

Robertson: Luk 24:41 - Disbelieved for joy Disbelieved for joy ( apistountōn autōn apo tēs charas ). Genitive absolute and a quite understandable attitude. They were slowly reconvinced, ...

Disbelieved for joy ( apistountōn autōn apo tēs charas ).

Genitive absolute and a quite understandable attitude. They were slowly reconvinced, but it was after all too good to be true.

Robertson: Luk 24:41 - Anything to eat Anything to eat ( brōsimon ). Only here in the N.T., though an old word from bibrōskō , to eat.

Anything to eat ( brōsimon ).

Only here in the N.T., though an old word from bibrōskō , to eat.

Robertson: Luk 24:42 - A piece of broiled fish A piece of broiled fish ( ichthuos optou meros ). Optos is a verbal from optaō , to cook, to roast, to broil. Common word, but only here in the N...

A piece of broiled fish ( ichthuos optou meros ).

Optos is a verbal from optaō , to cook, to roast, to broil. Common word, but only here in the N.T. The best old documents omit "and a honeycomb"(kai apo melissiou kēriou ).

Robertson: Luk 24:44 - While I was yet with you While I was yet with you ( eti ōn sun humin ). Literally, Being yet with you. The participle ōn takes the time of the principal verb.

While I was yet with you ( eti ōn sun humin ).

Literally, Being yet with you. The participle ōn takes the time of the principal verb.

Robertson: Luk 24:45 - Opened he their mind Opened he their mind ( diēnoixen autōn ton noun ). The same verb as that in Luk 24:31, Luk 24:32 about the eyes and the Scriptures. Jesus had all...

Opened he their mind ( diēnoixen autōn ton noun ).

The same verb as that in Luk 24:31, Luk 24:32 about the eyes and the Scriptures. Jesus had all these years been trying to open their minds that they might understand the Scriptures about the Messiah and now at last he makes one more effort in the light of the Cross and the Resurrection. They can now see better the will and way of God, but they will still need the power of the Holy Spirit before they will fully know the mind of Christ.

Robertson: Luk 24:46 - It is written It is written ( gegraptai ). Perfect passive indicative of graphō , to write, the usual phrase for quoting Scripture. Jesus now finds in the Old Te...

It is written ( gegraptai ).

Perfect passive indicative of graphō , to write, the usual phrase for quoting Scripture. Jesus now finds in the Old Testament his suffering, his resurrection, and the preaching of repentance and forgiveness of sins to all nations. Note the infinitives pathein , anastēnai , kēruchthēnai .

Robertson: Luk 24:47 - Beginning Beginning ( arxamenoi ). Aorist middle participle of archō , but the nominative plural with no syntactical connection (an anacoluthon).

Beginning ( arxamenoi ).

Aorist middle participle of archō , but the nominative plural with no syntactical connection (an anacoluthon).

Robertson: Luk 24:49 - Until ye be clothed Until ye be clothed ( heōs hou endusēsthe ). First aorist middle subjunctive of enduō or endunō . It is an old verb for putting on a garmen...

Until ye be clothed ( heōs hou endusēsthe ).

First aorist middle subjunctive of enduō or endunō . It is an old verb for putting on a garment. It is here the indirect middle, put on yourselves power from on high as a garment. They are to wait till this experience comes to them. This is "the promise of the Father."It is an old metaphor in Homer, Aristophanes, Plutarch, and Paul uses it often.

Robertson: Luk 24:50 - Over against Bethany Over against Bethany ( heōs pros Bēthanian ). That is on Olivet. On this blessed spot near where he had delivered the great Eschatological Discou...

Over against Bethany ( heōs pros Bēthanian ).

That is on Olivet. On this blessed spot near where he had delivered the great Eschatological Discourse he could see Bethany and Jerusalem.

Robertson: Luk 24:51 - He parted from them He parted from them ( diestē ap' autōn ). Second aorist active (intransitive) indicative of diistēmi . He stood apart (dia ) and he was gone. ...

He parted from them ( diestē ap' autōn ).

Second aorist active (intransitive) indicative of diistēmi . He stood apart (dia ) and he was gone. Some manuscripts do not have the words "and was carried into heaven."But we know that Jesus was taken up into heaven on a cloud (Act 1:9).

Robertson: Luk 24:52 - Worshipped him Worshipped him ( proskunēsantes auton ). Here again we have one of Westcott and Hort’ s Western non-interpolations that may be genuine or not.

Worshipped him ( proskunēsantes auton ).

Here again we have one of Westcott and Hort’ s Western non-interpolations that may be genuine or not.

Robertson: Luk 24:52 - With great joy With great joy ( meta charas megale4s ). Now that the Ascension has come they are no longer in despair. Joy becomes the note of victory as it is today...

With great joy ( meta charas megale4s ).

Now that the Ascension has come they are no longer in despair. Joy becomes the note of victory as it is today. No other note can win victories for Christ. The bells rang in heaven to greet the return of Jesus there, but he set the carillon of joy to ringing on earth in human hearts in all lands and for all time.

Vincent: Luk 24:1 - Very early in the morning Very early in the morning ( ὄρθρου βαθέως ) Lit., at deep dawn, or the dawn being deep. It is not uncommon in Greek to find...

Very early in the morning ( ὄρθρου βαθέως )

Lit., at deep dawn, or the dawn being deep. It is not uncommon in Greek to find βαθύς , deep , used of time; as deep or late evening. Plutarch says of Alexander, that he supped " at deep evening; " i.e., late at night. Philo says that the Hebrews crossed the Red Sea " about deep dawn (as here), while others were yet in bed." So Socrates, in prison, asks Crito the time of day. He replies, ὄρθρος βαθύς , the dawn is deep, i.e. breaking (Plato, " Crito," 43).

Vincent: Luk 24:4 - Shining Shining ( ἀστραπτούσαις ) Only here and Luk 17:24, Akin to ἀστράπη , lightning. See on bright shining, Luk 11:36 ...

Shining ( ἀστραπτούσαις )

Only here and Luk 17:24, Akin to ἀστράπη , lightning. See on bright shining, Luk 11:36 and compare Luk 17:24.

Vincent: Luk 24:11 - To them To them ( ἐνώπιον αὐτῶν ) Rev., literally, in their sight

To them ( ἐνώπιον αὐτῶν )

Rev., literally, in their sight

Vincent: Luk 24:11 - Idle tales Idle tales ( λῆρος ) Lit., silly talk; nonsense. Only here in New Testament. Used in medical language of the wild talk of delirium. Wyc....

Idle tales ( λῆρος )

Lit., silly talk; nonsense. Only here in New Testament. Used in medical language of the wild talk of delirium. Wyc., madness. Tynd., feigned things.

Vincent: Luk 24:12 - Stooping down Stooping down See on looketh, Jam 1:25. The best texts omit this verse.

Stooping down

See on looketh, Jam 1:25. The best texts omit this verse.

Vincent: Luk 24:12 - Clothes Clothes Not garments, but the linen bandages in which the body had been rolled. So Rev., cloths.

Clothes

Not garments, but the linen bandages in which the body had been rolled. So Rev., cloths.

Vincent: Luk 24:13 - Threescore furlongs Threescore furlongs Seven miles.

Threescore furlongs

Seven miles.

Vincent: Luk 24:15 - Went with Went with ( συνεπορεύετο ) The use of the imperfect here is very beautiful. Jesus drew near while they were absorbed in their talk,...

Went with ( συνεπορεύετο )

The use of the imperfect here is very beautiful. Jesus drew near while they were absorbed in their talk, and was already walking with them when they observed him.

Vincent: Luk 24:17 - Ye have Ye have ( ἀντιβάλλετε ) Lit., throw back and forth; exchange. " Discussed a doubt and tossed it to and fro" (Tennyson).

Ye have ( ἀντιβάλλετε )

Lit., throw back and forth; exchange.

" Discussed a doubt and tossed it to and fro" (Tennyson).

Vincent: Luk 24:17 - And are sad And are sad ( σκυθρωποί ) Only here and Mat 6:16, on which see note. The best texts put the interrogation point after walk , add κα...

And are sad ( σκυθρωποί )

Only here and Mat 6:16, on which see note. The best texts put the interrogation point after walk , add καὶ ἐστάθησαν , and render, and they stood still, looking sad. So Rev.

Vincent: Luk 24:18 - Art thou only a stranger in Jerusalem Art thou only a stranger in Jerusalem ( σὺ μόνος παροικεῖς Ἰερουσαλὴμ ) Παροικεῖν , to dwell as a ...

Art thou only a stranger in Jerusalem ( σὺ μόνος παροικεῖς Ἰερουσαλὴμ )

Παροικεῖν , to dwell as a stranger, is used in later Greek of strangers who have no rights of citizenship, and no settled home. Compare Heb 11:9. See on strangers, 1Pe 1:1; and compare sojourning, 1Pe 1:17. The only of the A. V. is commonly understood adverbially: " Are you nothing but a stranger?" But the emphasis of the question falls there, and the word is an adjective. Render " Dost thou alone dwell as a stranger in Jerusalem?" Are you the only one who sojourns as a stranger in Jerusalem, and who does not know, etc. So, nearly, Wyc., Thou alone art a pilgrim in Jerusalem.

Vincent: Luk 24:19 - What things What things ( ποῖα ) Lit., " what kind of things."

What things ( ποῖα )

Lit., " what kind of things."

Vincent: Luk 24:21 - Trusted Trusted ( ἠλπίζομεν ) More correctly, hoped. Imperfect: were hoping all the while.

Trusted ( ἠλπίζομεν )

More correctly, hoped. Imperfect: were hoping all the while.

Vincent: Luk 24:21 - Should have redeemed Should have redeemed Rev., more correctly, should redeem (λυτροῦσθαι ). See on 1Pe 1:18.

Should have redeemed

Rev., more correctly, should redeem (λυτροῦσθαι ). See on 1Pe 1:18.

Vincent: Luk 24:21 - Beside all this Beside all this ( σὺν πᾶσιν τούτοις ) Lit., with all these things: his betrayal and crucifixion, etc.

Beside all this ( σὺν πᾶσιν τούτοις )

Lit., with all these things: his betrayal and crucifixion, etc.

Vincent: Luk 24:21 - To-day is the third day To-day is the third day ( τρίτην ταύτην ἡμέραν ἄγει σήμερον ) The best texts omit to-day. The phrase...

To-day is the third day ( τρίτην ταύτην ἡμέραν ἄγει σήμερον )

The best texts omit to-day. The phrase forms an idiom which cannot be neatly rendered. Literally it is, " He (Christ) is passing (ἄγει ) this day as the third." Rev., It is now the third day since, etc.

Vincent: Luk 24:22 - Made us astonished Made us astonished ( ἐξέστησαν ) Literally the verb means to put out of place ; and so, to drive one out of his senses. Hence th...

Made us astonished ( ἐξέστησαν )

Literally the verb means to put out of place ; and so, to drive one out of his senses. Hence the A. V. is feeble. Rev., better, amazed us.

Vincent: Luk 24:22 - Early Early ( ὀρθριναὶ ) Lit., early ones. Only here and Rev 22:16. Compare ὄρθρος , dawn, Luk 24:1.

Early ( ὀρθριναὶ )

Lit., early ones. Only here and Rev 22:16. Compare ὄρθρος , dawn, Luk 24:1.

Vincent: Luk 24:23 - That they had seen - which said That they had seen - which said Cleopas, absorbed in his story, throws himself back to the time of his interview with the women. Lit., " They cam...

That they had seen - which said

Cleopas, absorbed in his story, throws himself back to the time of his interview with the women. Lit., " They came saying that they have seen a vision of angels which say " (λέγουσιν ) .

Vincent: Luk 24:25 - Fools and slow of heart Fools and slow of heart ( ἀνόητοι καὶ βραδεῖς τῇ καρδίᾳ ) This is an unfortunate translation, in the light ...

Fools and slow of heart ( ἀνόητοι καὶ βραδεῖς τῇ καρδίᾳ )

This is an unfortunate translation, in the light of the ordinary, popular use of the word fool. Jesus would never have called those sorrowful disciples fools in that sense. The word is compounded of ἀ , not, and νοέω , which implies, besides seeing, perception of the mind as consequent upon sight. It is therefore equivalent to dull of perception. They had read what the prophets had spoken, but had failed to perceive its application to Christ. While this rebuke relates to the understanding, the following one, slow of heart, goes deeper, and contemplates the region of feeling and moral susceptibility. Your heart is dull and slow to respond to these testimonies of your own prophets. Compare hardiness of heart, Mar 16:14.

Vincent: Luk 24:25 - All All ( ἐπὶ πᾶσιν ) Rev., rightly, in all; relying upon (ἐπί ) all the utterances of the prophets.

All ( ἐπὶ πᾶσιν )

Rev., rightly, in all; relying upon (ἐπί ) all the utterances of the prophets.

Vincent: Luk 24:26 - Ought not Ought not ( οὐχὶ ἔδει ) The A. V. does not convey the precise meaning, which is, that, in the eternal order of things, and in ful...

Ought not ( οὐχὶ ἔδει )

The A. V. does not convey the precise meaning, which is, that, in the eternal order of things, and in fulfilment of the eternal counsel of God as expressed in the prophecies, it was essentially fitting that Christ should suffer. Rev. is clumsy but correct: behoved it not the Christ to suffer?

Vincent: Luk 24:27 - He expounded He expounded ( διερμήνυεν ) Or interpreted: throughout (διά ). Imperfect, he went on interpreting from passage to passage.

He expounded ( διερμήνυεν )

Or interpreted: throughout (διά ). Imperfect, he went on interpreting from passage to passage.

Vincent: Luk 24:28 - They went They went ( ἐπορεύοντο ) Imperfect, were going. So Rev,

They went ( ἐπορεύοντο )

Imperfect, were going. So Rev,

Vincent: Luk 24:28 - Made as though Made as though ( προσεποιήσατο ) The verb means originally to add or attach to; hence to take to one's self what does not ...

Made as though ( προσεποιήσατο )

The verb means originally to add or attach to; hence to take to one's self what does not belong to him; and so, to pretend; though pretending as implying anything false, does not attach to this act of Jesus. He was going on, and would have gone on but for their invitation. Only here in New Testament.

Vincent: Luk 24:29 - They constrained They constrained ( παρεβιάσαντο ) Contrary to (παρά ) his apparent intention of going on. Only here and Act 16:15.

They constrained ( παρεβιάσαντο )

Contrary to (παρά ) his apparent intention of going on. Only here and Act 16:15.

Vincent: Luk 24:29 - Is far spent Is far spent ( κέκλικεν ) Lit., has declined . Wyc., is now bowed down.

Is far spent ( κέκλικεν )

Lit., has declined . Wyc., is now bowed down.

Vincent: Luk 24:30 - And gave And gave ( ἐπεδίδου ) A very beautiful use of the imperfect, indicating that while he was in the act of distributing they recognize...

And gave ( ἐπεδίδου )

A very beautiful use of the imperfect, indicating that while he was in the act of distributing they recognized him. He blessed, and having broken, was giving it to them, when, in an instant, their eyes were opened (aorist tense).

Vincent: Luk 24:31 - They knew They knew ( ἐπέγνωσαν ) Clearly recognized.

They knew ( ἐπέγνωσαν )

Clearly recognized.

Vincent: Luk 24:31 - And he vanished out of their sight And he vanished out of their sight ( αὐτὸς ἄφαντος ἐγένετο ἀπ ' αὐτῶν ) Lit., he, invisible, became ...

And he vanished out of their sight ( αὐτὸς ἄφαντος ἐγένετο ἀπ ' αὐτῶν )

Lit., he, invisible, became away from them. It is not simply, he suddenly departed from them, but he passed away from them invisibly. The ἐγένετο , became, is construed with ἀπ ' αὐτῶν , from them.

Vincent: Luk 24:32 - Did not our heart burn - while he talked - opened Did not our heart burn - while he talked - opened. ( οὐχὶ ἡ καρδία ἡμῶν καιομένη ἦν - ὡς ἐλά...

Did not our heart burn - while he talked - opened. ( οὐχὶ ἡ καρδία ἡμῶν καιομένη ἦν - ὡς ἐλάλει - διήνοιγεν )

The A. V., as usual, pays no attention to the graphic imperfects here. They are speaking of something which was in progress: " was not our heart burning (finite verb and participle) while he was speaking, and was opening the scriptures?"

Vincent: Luk 24:34 - Is risen - appeared Is risen ( ἠγέρθη ) - appeared (ὤφθη ) Both aorists. The Lord rose and appeared. So Wyc. See on appeared, Luk 22:43.

Is risen ( ἠγέρθη ) - appeared (ὤφθη )

Both aorists. The Lord rose and appeared. So Wyc. See on appeared, Luk 22:43.

Vincent: Luk 24:35 - They told They told ( ἐξηγοῦντο ) Rev., rehearsed is better, because the verb means to tell at length or relate in full.

They told ( ἐξηγοῦντο )

Rev., rehearsed is better, because the verb means to tell at length or relate in full.

Vincent: Luk 24:36 - Jesus himself Jesus himself The best texts omit Jesus . Render as Rev., " he himself stood."

Jesus himself

The best texts omit Jesus . Render as Rev., " he himself stood."

Vincent: Luk 24:36 - And saith unto them, Peace be unto you And saith unto them, Peace be unto you The best texts omit.

And saith unto them, Peace be unto you

The best texts omit.

Vincent: Luk 24:38 - Thoughts Thoughts ( διαλογισμοὶ ) See on Jam 2:4, and deceiving, Jam 1:22. Rev., reasonings. As if he had said, " Why do you reason about...

Thoughts ( διαλογισμοὶ )

See on Jam 2:4, and deceiving, Jam 1:22. Rev., reasonings. As if he had said, " Why do you reason about a matter which your spiritual perception ought to discern at once." Compare note on fools, Luk 24:25.

Vincent: Luk 24:39 - Handle Handle ( ψηλαφήσατε ) Compare 1Jo 1:1. The word occurs also Act 17:27; Heb 12:18. " It never expresses the so handling an object as t...

Handle ( ψηλαφήσατε )

Compare 1Jo 1:1. The word occurs also Act 17:27; Heb 12:18. " It never expresses the so handling an object as to exercise a moulding, modifying influence upon it, but at most a feeling of its surface; this, it may be, with the intention of learning its composition (Gen 27:12, Gen 27:21, Gen 27:22); while, not seldom, it signifies no more than a feeling for or after an object, without any actual coming in contact with it at all" (Trench, " Synonyms" ). Compare Act 17:27. Used of groping in the dark, Job 5:14 :; of the blind, Isa 59:10; Deu 28:29; Judges, Jdg 16:26. See on Heb 12:18.

Vincent: Luk 24:41 - Meat Meat ( βρώσιμον ) Only here in New Testament. Lit., anything eatable. Wyc., anything that shall be eaten. Rev., better, anything t...

Meat ( βρώσιμον )

Only here in New Testament. Lit., anything eatable. Wyc., anything that shall be eaten. Rev., better, anything to eat, as the word meat has largely lost, in popular usage, its old sense of food in general.

Vincent: Luk 24:42 - Broiled Broiled Only here in New Testament.

Broiled

Only here in New Testament.

Vincent: Luk 24:42 - Of an honey-comb Of an honey-comb The best texts omit.

Of an honey-comb

The best texts omit.

Vincent: Luk 24:44 - The words The words The best texts insert my.

The words

The best texts insert my.

Vincent: Luk 24:44 - Must Must ( δεῖ ) See on ought not, Luk 24:26.

Must ( δεῖ )

See on ought not, Luk 24:26.

Vincent: Luk 24:45 - Understanding Understanding ( νοῦν ) Which had been closed. See on fools, Luk 24:25.

Understanding ( νοῦν )

Which had been closed. See on fools, Luk 24:25.

Vincent: Luk 24:46 - Thus it behoved Thus it behoved The best texts omit. Render, as Rev., thus it is written that the Christ should suffer.

Thus it behoved

The best texts omit. Render, as Rev., thus it is written that the Christ should suffer.

Vincent: Luk 24:46 - Christ Christ ( τὸν Χριστὸν ) Note the article, the Christ, and see on Mat 1:1.

Christ ( τὸν Χριστὸν )

Note the article, the Christ, and see on Mat 1:1.

Vincent: Luk 24:47 - Should be preached Should be preached See on preacher , 2Pe 2:5.

Should be preached

See on preacher , 2Pe 2:5.

Vincent: Luk 24:47 - In his name In his name On the foundation of (ἐπἵ ) See on Mat 24:5.

In his name

On the foundation of (ἐπἵ ) See on Mat 24:5.

Vincent: Luk 24:47 - Remission Remission See on Luk 3:3; and on forgiven, Jam 5:15.

Remission

See on Luk 3:3; and on forgiven, Jam 5:15.

Vincent: Luk 24:47 - Beginning from Jerusalem Beginning from Jerusalem Some editors place a period after nations, and join these words with the next sentence, omitting and: " beginning fr...

Beginning from Jerusalem

Some editors place a period after nations, and join these words with the next sentence, omitting and: " beginning from Jerusalem ye are witnesses."

Vincent: Luk 24:49 - I send I send ( ἐγὼ ἐξαποστέλλω ) Rev., better, send forth, giving the force of ἐξ . I emphatic.

I send ( ἐγὼ ἐξαποστέλλω )

Rev., better, send forth, giving the force of ἐξ . I emphatic.

Vincent: Luk 24:49 - Endued with power Endued with power The Rev. has properly substituted the simpler clothed, which, to the English reader, conveys the exact figure in the word. Th...

Endued with power

The Rev. has properly substituted the simpler clothed, which, to the English reader, conveys the exact figure in the word. This metaphorical sense of clothed is found in classical Greek. Aristophanes has clothed with audacity; Homer, clothed with strength; Plutarch, clothed with nobility and wealth.

Vincent: Luk 24:51 - And was carried up into heaven And was carried up into heaven Some texts omit.

And was carried up into heaven

Some texts omit.

Wesley: Luk 24:1 - Certain others with them Who had not come from Galilee. Mat 28:1; Mar 16:1; Joh 20:1.

Who had not come from Galilee. Mat 28:1; Mar 16:1; Joh 20:1.

Wesley: Luk 24:4 - Behold two Angels in the form of men. Mary had seen them a little before. They had disappeared on these women's coming to the sepulchre, but now appeared again. ...

Angels in the form of men. Mary had seen them a little before. They had disappeared on these women's coming to the sepulchre, but now appeared again. St. Matthew and Mark mention only one of them, appearing like a young man.

Wesley: Luk 24:6 - Remember how he spake to you, saying, The Son of man must be delivered This is only a repetition of the words which our Lord had spoken to them before his passion But it is observable, he never styles himself the Son of m...

This is only a repetition of the words which our Lord had spoken to them before his passion But it is observable, he never styles himself the Son of man after his resurrection.

Wesley: Luk 24:13 - -- Mar 16:12.

Wesley: Luk 24:21 - To day is the third day - The day he should have risen again, if at all.

day is the third day - The day he should have risen again, if at all.

Wesley: Luk 24:25 - O foolish Not understanding the designs and works of God: And slow of heart - Unready to believe what the prophets have so largely spoken.

Not understanding the designs and works of God: And slow of heart - Unready to believe what the prophets have so largely spoken.

Wesley: Luk 24:26 - Ought not Christ If he would redeem man, and fulfil the prophecies concerning him, to have suffered these things? - These very sufferings which occasion your doubts, a...

If he would redeem man, and fulfil the prophecies concerning him, to have suffered these things? - These very sufferings which occasion your doubts, are the proofs of his being the Messiah.

Wesley: Luk 24:26 - And to enter into his glory Which could be done no other way.

Which could be done no other way.

Wesley: Luk 24:28 - He made as though he would go farther Walking forward, as if he was going on; and he would have done it, had they not pressed him to stay.

Walking forward, as if he was going on; and he would have done it, had they not pressed him to stay.

Wesley: Luk 24:29 - They constrained him By their importunate entreaties.

By their importunate entreaties.

Wesley: Luk 24:30 - He took the bread, and blessed, and brake Just in the same manner as when ho instituted his last supper.

Just in the same manner as when ho instituted his last supper.

Wesley: Luk 24:31 - Their eyes were opened That is, the supernatural cloud was removed: And he vanished - Went away insensibly.

That is, the supernatural cloud was removed: And he vanished - Went away insensibly.

Wesley: Luk 24:32 - Did not our heart burn within us Did not we feel an unusual warmth of love! Was not our heart burning, &c.

Did not we feel an unusual warmth of love! Was not our heart burning, &c.

Wesley: Luk 24:33 - The same hour Late as it was.

Late as it was.

Wesley: Luk 24:34 - The Lord hath appeared to Simon Before he was seen of the twelve apostles, 1Co 15:5. He had, in his wonderful condescension and grace, taken an opportunity on the former part of that...

Before he was seen of the twelve apostles, 1Co 15:5. He had, in his wonderful condescension and grace, taken an opportunity on the former part of that day (though where, or in what manner, is not recorded) to show himself to Peter, that he might early relieve his distresses and fears, on account of having so shamefully denied his Master.

Wesley: Luk 24:35 - In the breaking of bread The Lord's Supper.

The Lord's Supper.

Wesley: Luk 24:36 - Jesus stood in the midst of them It was just as easy to his Divine power to open a door undiscernibly, as it was to come in at a door opened by some other hand. Mar 16:14, Mar 16:19; ...

It was just as easy to his Divine power to open a door undiscernibly, as it was to come in at a door opened by some other hand. Mar 16:14, Mar 16:19; Joh 20:19.

Wesley: Luk 24:40 - He showed them his hands and his feet That they might either see or feel the prints of the nails.

That they might either see or feel the prints of the nails.

Wesley: Luk 24:41 - While they believed not for joy They did in some sense believe: otherwise they would not have rejoiced. But their excess of joy prevented a clear, rational belief.

They did in some sense believe: otherwise they would not have rejoiced. But their excess of joy prevented a clear, rational belief.

Wesley: Luk 24:43 - He took it and ate before them Not that he had any need of food; but to give them still farther evidence.

Not that he had any need of food; but to give them still farther evidence.

Wesley: Luk 24:44 - And he said On the day of his ascension. In the law, and the prophets, and the psalms - The prophecies as well as types, relating to the Messiah, are contained ei...

On the day of his ascension. In the law, and the prophets, and the psalms - The prophecies as well as types, relating to the Messiah, are contained either in the books of Moses (usually called the law) in the Psalms, or in the writings of the prophets; little being said directly concerning him in the historical books.

Wesley: Luk 24:45 - Then opened he their understanding, to understand the Scriptures He had explained them before to the two as they went to Emmaus. But still they Understood them not, till he took off the veil from their hearts, by th...

He had explained them before to the two as they went to Emmaus. But still they Understood them not, till he took off the veil from their hearts, by the illumination of his Spirit.

Wesley: Luk 24:47 - Beginning at Jerusalem This was appointed most graciously and wisely: graciously, as it encouraged the, greatest sinners to repent, when they saw that even the murderers of ...

This was appointed most graciously and wisely: graciously, as it encouraged the, greatest sinners to repent, when they saw that even the murderers of Christ were not excepted from mercy: and wisely, as hereby Christianity was more abundantly attested; the facts being published first on the very spot where they happened.

Wesley: Luk 24:49 - Behold I send the promise Emphatically so called; the Holy Ghost.

Emphatically so called; the Holy Ghost.

Wesley: Luk 24:50 - He led them out as far as Bethany Not the town, but the district: to the mount of Olives, Act 1:12, which stood within the boundaries of Bethany.

Not the town, but the district: to the mount of Olives, Act 1:12, which stood within the boundaries of Bethany.

Wesley: Luk 24:51 - And while he was blessing them, he was parted from them It was much more proper that our Lord should ascend into heaven, than that he should rise from the dead, in the sight of the apostles. For his resurre...

It was much more proper that our Lord should ascend into heaven, than that he should rise from the dead, in the sight of the apostles. For his resurrection was proved when they saw him alive after his passion: but they could not see him in heaven while they continued on earth.

JFB: Luk 24:5 - Why, &c. Astonishing question! not "the risen," but "the Living One" (compare Rev 1:18); and the surprise expressed in it implies an incongruity in His being t...

Astonishing question! not "the risen," but "the Living One" (compare Rev 1:18); and the surprise expressed in it implies an incongruity in His being there at all, as if, though He might submit to it, "it was impossible He should be holden of it" (Act 2:24).

JFB: Luk 24:6 - in Galilee To which these women themselves belonged (Luk 23:55).

To which these women themselves belonged (Luk 23:55).

JFB: Luk 24:7 - Saying, &c. How remarkable it is to hear angels quoting a whole sentence of Christ's to the disciples, mentioning where it was uttered, and wondering it was not f...

How remarkable it is to hear angels quoting a whole sentence of Christ's to the disciples, mentioning where it was uttered, and wondering it was not fresh in their memory, as doubtless it was in theirs! (1Ti 3:16, "seen of angels," and 1Pe 1:12).

JFB: Luk 24:10 - Joanna (See on Luk 8:1-3).

(See on Luk 8:1-3).

JFB: Luk 24:12 - Peter, &c. (See on Joh 20:1-10).

(See on Joh 20:1-10).

JFB: Luk 24:13 - two of them One was Cleopas (Luk 24:18); who the other was is mere conjecture.

One was Cleopas (Luk 24:18); who the other was is mere conjecture.

JFB: Luk 24:13 - Emmaus About seven and a half miles from Jerusalem. They probably lived there and were going home after the Passover.

About seven and a half miles from Jerusalem. They probably lived there and were going home after the Passover.

JFB: Luk 24:14-16 - communed and reasoned Exchanged views and feelings, weighing afresh all the facts, as detailed in Luk 24:18-24.

Exchanged views and feelings, weighing afresh all the facts, as detailed in Luk 24:18-24.

JFB: Luk 24:14-16 - drew near Coming up behind them as from Jerusalem.

Coming up behind them as from Jerusalem.

JFB: Luk 24:14-16 - eyes holden Partly He was "in another form" (Mar 16:12), and partly there seems to have been an operation on their own vision; though certainly, as they did not b...

Partly He was "in another form" (Mar 16:12), and partly there seems to have been an operation on their own vision; though certainly, as they did not believe that He was alive, His company as a fellow traveller was the last thing they would expect,

JFB: Luk 24:17-24 - communications, &c. The words imply the earnest discussion that had appeared in their manner.

The words imply the earnest discussion that had appeared in their manner.

JFB: Luk 24:18 - knowest not, &c. If he knew not the events of the last few days in Jerusalem, he must be a mere sojourner; if he did, how could he suppose they would be talking of any...

If he knew not the events of the last few days in Jerusalem, he must be a mere sojourner; if he did, how could he suppose they would be talking of anything else? How artless all this!

JFB: Luk 24:19 - Concerning Jesus, &c. As if feeling it a relief to have someone to unburden his thoughts and feelings to, this disciple goes over the main facts in his own desponding style...

As if feeling it a relief to have someone to unburden his thoughts and feelings to, this disciple goes over the main facts in his own desponding style, and this was just what our Lord wished.

JFB: Luk 24:21 - we trusted, &c. They expected the promised Deliverance at His hand, but in the current sense of it, not by His death.

They expected the promised Deliverance at His hand, but in the current sense of it, not by His death.

JFB: Luk 24:21 - besides all this Not only did His death seem to give the fatal blow to their hopes, but He had been two days dead already, and this was the third. It is true, they add...

Not only did His death seem to give the fatal blow to their hopes, but He had been two days dead already, and this was the third. It is true, they add, some of our women gave us a surprise, telling us of a vision of angels they had at the empty grave this morning that said He was alive, and some of ourselves who went thither confirmed their statement; but then Himself they saw not. A doleful tale truly, told out of the deepest despondency.

JFB: Luk 24:25-27 - fools Senseless, without understanding.

Senseless, without understanding.

JFB: Luk 24:26 - Ought not Christ "the Christ," "the Messiah."

"the Christ," "the Messiah."

JFB: Luk 24:26 - to suffer . . . and enter That is, through the gate of suffering (and suffering "these things," or such a death) to enter into His glory. "Ye believe in the glory; but these ve...

That is, through the gate of suffering (and suffering "these things," or such a death) to enter into His glory. "Ye believe in the glory; but these very sufferings are the predicted gate of entrance into it."

JFB: Luk 24:27 - Moses and all the prophets, &c. Here our Lord both teaches us the reverence due to Old Testament Scripture, and the great burden of it--"Himself."

Here our Lord both teaches us the reverence due to Old Testament Scripture, and the great burden of it--"Himself."

JFB: Luk 24:28-31 - made as though, &c. (Compare Mar 6:48; Gen 18:3, Gen 18:5; Gen 32:24-26).

JFB: Luk 24:29 - constrained, &c. But for this, the whole design of the interview had been lost; but it was not to be lost, for He who only wished to be constrained had kindled a longi...

But for this, the whole design of the interview had been lost; but it was not to be lost, for He who only wished to be constrained had kindled a longing in the hearts of His travelling companions which was not to be so easily put off. And does not this still repeat itself in the interviews of the Saviour with His loving, longing disciples? Else why do they say,

Abide with me from morn to eve,

For without Thee I cannot live;

Abide with me when night is nigh,

For without Thee I cannot die.

KEBLE

JFB: Luk 24:30-31 - he took . . . and blessed . . . and their eyes were opened The stranger first startles them by taking the place of master at their own table, but on proceeding to that act which reproduced the whole scene of t...

The stranger first startles them by taking the place of master at their own table, but on proceeding to that act which reproduced the whole scene of the last Supper, a rush of associations and recollections disclosed their guest, and He stood confessed before their astonished gaze--THEIR RISEN LORD! They were going to gaze on Him, perhaps embrace Him, but that moment He is gone! It was enough.

JFB: Luk 24:32-34 - They now tell each to the other how their hearts burned Were fired--within them at His talk and His expositions of Scripture. "Ah! this accounts for it: We could not understand the glow of self-evidencing l...

Were fired--within them at His talk and His expositions of Scripture. "Ah! this accounts for it: We could not understand the glow of self-evidencing light, love, glory that ravished our hearts; but now we do." They cannot rest--how could they?--they must go straight back and tell the news. They find the eleven, but ere they have time to tell their tale, their ears are saluted with the thrilling news, "The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared to Simon." Most touching and precious intelligence this. The only one of the Eleven to whom He appeared alone was he, it seems, who had so shamefully denied Him. What passed at that interview we shall never know here. Probably it was too sacred for disclosure. (See on Mar 16:7). The two from Emmaus now relate what had happened to them, and while thus comparing notes of their Lord's appearances, lo! Christ Himself stands in the midst of them. What encouragement to doubting, dark, true-hearted disciples!

JFB: Luk 24:36 - Jesus . . . stood (See on Joh 20:19).

(See on Joh 20:19).

JFB: Luk 24:37-38 - a spirit The ghost of their dead Lord, but not Himself in the body (Act 12:15; Mat 14:26).

The ghost of their dead Lord, but not Himself in the body (Act 12:15; Mat 14:26).

JFB: Luk 24:37-38 - thoughts Rather, "reasonings"; that is, whether He were risen or no, and whether this was His very self.

Rather, "reasonings"; that is, whether He were risen or no, and whether this was His very self.

JFB: Luk 24:39-43 - Behold, &c. Lovingly offering them both ocular and tangible demonstration of the reality of His resurrection.

Lovingly offering them both ocular and tangible demonstration of the reality of His resurrection.

JFB: Luk 24:39-43 - a spirit hath not An important statement regarding "spirits."

An important statement regarding "spirits."

JFB: Luk 24:39-43 - flesh and bones He says not "flesh and blood"; for the blood is the life of the animal and corruptible body (Gen 9:4), which "cannot inherit the kingdom of God" (1Co ...

He says not "flesh and blood"; for the blood is the life of the animal and corruptible body (Gen 9:4), which "cannot inherit the kingdom of God" (1Co 15:50); but "flesh and bones," implying the identity, but with diversity of laws, of the resurrection body. (See on Joh 20:24-28).

JFB: Luk 24:41 - believed not for joy, &c. They did believe, else they had not rejoiced [BENGEL]. But it seemed too good to be true (Psa 126:1-2).

They did believe, else they had not rejoiced [BENGEL]. But it seemed too good to be true (Psa 126:1-2).

JFB: Luk 24:42 - honeycomb Common frugal fare, anciently.

Common frugal fare, anciently.

JFB: Luk 24:43 - eat before them That is, let them see Him doing it: not for His own necessity, but their conviction.

That is, let them see Him doing it: not for His own necessity, but their conviction.

JFB: Luk 24:44-49 - These are the words, &c. That is, "Now you will understand what seemed so dark to you when I told you about the Son of man being put to death and rising again" (Luk 18:31-34).

That is, "Now you will understand what seemed so dark to you when I told you about the Son of man being put to death and rising again" (Luk 18:31-34).

JFB: Luk 24:44-49 - while . . . yet with you A striking expression, implying that He was now, as the dead and risen Saviour, virtually dissevered from this scene of mortality, and from all ordina...

A striking expression, implying that He was now, as the dead and risen Saviour, virtually dissevered from this scene of mortality, and from all ordinary intercourse with His mortal disciples.

JFB: Luk 24:44-49 - law . . . prophets . . . psalms The three Jewish divisions of the Old Testament Scriptures.

The three Jewish divisions of the Old Testament Scriptures.

JFB: Luk 24:45 - Then opened he, &c. A statement of unspeakable value; expressing, on the one hand, Christ's immediate access to the human spirit and absolute power over it, to the adjust...

A statement of unspeakable value; expressing, on the one hand, Christ's immediate access to the human spirit and absolute power over it, to the adjustment of its vision, and permanent rectification for spiritual discernment (than which it is impossible to conceive a stronger evidence of His proper divinity); and, on the other hand, making it certain that the manner of interpreting the Old Testament which the apostles afterwards employed (see the Acts and Epistles), has the direct sanction of Christ Himself.

JFB: Luk 24:46 - behoved Christ (See on Luk 24:26).

(See on Luk 24:26).

JFB: Luk 24:47 - beginning at Jerusalem (1) As the metropolis and heart of the then existing kingdom of God:--"to the Jew first" (Rom 1:16; Act 13:46; Isa 2:3, see on Mat 10:6). (2) As the g...

(1) As the metropolis and heart of the then existing kingdom of God:--"to the Jew first" (Rom 1:16; Act 13:46; Isa 2:3, see on Mat 10:6). (2) As the great reservoir and laboratory of all the sin and crime of the nation, thus proclaiming for all time that there is mercy in Christ for the chief of sinners. (See on Mat 23:37).

JFB: Luk 24:48 - witnesses (Compare Act 1:8, Act 1:22).

(Compare Act 1:8, Act 1:22).

JFB: Luk 24:49 - I send The present tense, to intimate its nearness.

The present tense, to intimate its nearness.

JFB: Luk 24:49 - promise of my Father That is, what My Father hath promised; the Holy Ghost, of which Christ is the authoritative Dispenser (Joh 14:7; Rev 3:1; Rev 5:6).

That is, what My Father hath promised; the Holy Ghost, of which Christ is the authoritative Dispenser (Joh 14:7; Rev 3:1; Rev 5:6).

JFB: Luk 24:49 - endued Invested, or clothed with; implying, as the parallels show (Rom 13:14; 1Co 15:53; Gal 3:27; Col 3:9-10), their being so penetrated and acted upon by c...

Invested, or clothed with; implying, as the parallels show (Rom 13:14; 1Co 15:53; Gal 3:27; Col 3:9-10), their being so penetrated and acted upon by conscious supernatural power (in the full sense of that word) as to stamp with divine authority the whole exercise of their apostolic office, including, of course, their pen as well as their mouth.

JFB: Luk 24:50-53 - to Bethany Not to the village itself, but on the "descent" to it from Mount Olivet.

Not to the village itself, but on the "descent" to it from Mount Olivet.

JFB: Luk 24:51 - while he blessed . . . parted, &c. Sweet intimation! Incarnate Love, Crucified Love, Risen Love, now on the wing for heaven, waiting only those odorous gales which were to waft Him to t...

Sweet intimation! Incarnate Love, Crucified Love, Risen Love, now on the wing for heaven, waiting only those odorous gales which were to waft Him to the skies, goes away in benedictions, that in the character of Glorified, Enthroned Love, He might continue His benedictions, but in yet higher form, until He come again! And oh, if angels were so transported at His birth into this scene of tears and death, what must have been their ecstasy as they welcomed and attended Him "far above all heavens" into the presence-chamber, and conducted Him to the right hand of the Majesty on High! Thou hast an everlasting right, O my Saviour, to that august place. The brightness of the Father's glory, enshrined in our nature, hath won it well; for He poured out His soul unto death, and led captivity captive, receiving gifts for men, yea for the rebellious, that the Lord God might dwell among them. Thou art the King of glory, O Christ. Lift up your heads, O ye gates, be lifted up, ye everlasting doors, that the King of glory may come in! Even so wilt Thou change these vile bodies of ours, that they may be like unto Thine own glorious body; and then with gladness and rejoicing shall they be brought, they shall enter into the King's palace!

JFB: Luk 24:52 - worshipped him Certainly in the strictest sense of adoration.

Certainly in the strictest sense of adoration.

JFB: Luk 24:52 - returned to Jerusalem As instructed to do: but not till after gazing, as if entranced, up into the blue vault in which He had disappeared, they were gently checked by two s...

As instructed to do: but not till after gazing, as if entranced, up into the blue vault in which He had disappeared, they were gently checked by two shining ones, who assured them He would come again to them in the like manner as He had gone into heaven. (See on Act 1:10-11). This made them return, not with disappointment at His removal, but "with great joy."

JFB: Luk 24:53 - were continually in the temple That is, every day at the regular hours of prayer till the day of Pentecost.

That is, every day at the regular hours of prayer till the day of Pentecost.

Clarke: Luk 24:1 - Bringing the spices Bringing the spices - To embalm the body of our Lord: but Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea had done this before the body was laid in the tomb. See ...

Bringing the spices - To embalm the body of our Lord: but Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea had done this before the body was laid in the tomb. See Joh 19:39, Joh 19:40. But there was a second embalming found necessary: the first must have been hastily and imperfectly performed; the spices now brought by the women were intended to complete the preceding operation

Clarke: Luk 24:1 - And certain others with them And certain others with them - This clause is wanting in BCL, two others; Coptic, Ethiopic, Vulgate, and in all the Itala except two. Dionysius Alex...

And certain others with them - This clause is wanting in BCL, two others; Coptic, Ethiopic, Vulgate, and in all the Itala except two. Dionysius Alexandrinus, and Eusebius also omit it. The omission is approved by Mill, Bengel, Wetstein, Griesbach, and others. Bishop Pearce thinks it should be left out for the following reasons

1.    "They who came to the sepulchre, as is here said, being the same with those who, in Luk 23:55, are called the women which came with him from Galilee, there was no room for Luke (I think) to add as here, and some others came with them; because the words in Luk 23:55, to which these refer, include all that can be supposed to be designed by the words in question

2.    Luke has named no particular woman here, and therefore he could not add and some others, etc., these words necessarily requiring that the names of the women should have preceded, as is the case in Luk 24:10, where, when Mary Magdalene, the other Mary, and Joanna, had been named, it is very rightly added, and other women that were with them."

Clarke: Luk 24:2 - They found the stone rolled away They found the stone rolled away - An angel from God had done this before they reached the tomb, Mat 28:2 : On this case we cannot help remarking, t...

They found the stone rolled away - An angel from God had done this before they reached the tomb, Mat 28:2 : On this case we cannot help remarking, that, when persons have strong confidence in God, obstacles do not hinder them from undertaking whatever they have reason to believe he requires; and the removal of them they leave to him: and what is the consequence? They go on their way comfortably, and all difficulties vanish before them.

Clarke: Luk 24:3 - And found not the body of the Lord And found not the body of the Lord - His holy soul was in Paradise, Luk 23:43; and the evangelist mentions the body particularly, to show that this ...

And found not the body of the Lord - His holy soul was in Paradise, Luk 23:43; and the evangelist mentions the body particularly, to show that this only was subject to death. It is, I think, evident enough, from these and other words of Luke, that the doctrine of the materiality of the soul, made no part of his creed.

Clarke: Luk 24:5 - Why seek ye the living among the dead? Why seek ye the living among the dead? - This was a common form of speech among the Jews, and seems to be applied to those who were foolishly, imper...

Why seek ye the living among the dead? - This was a common form of speech among the Jews, and seems to be applied to those who were foolishly, impertinently, or absurdly employed. As places of burial were unclean, it was not reasonable to suppose that the living should frequent them; or that if any was missing he was likely to be found in such places.

Clarke: Luk 24:7 - Sinful men Sinful men - Or heathens, ανθρωπων ἁμαρτωλων, i.e. the Romans, by whom only he could be put to death; for the Jews themselves ac...

Sinful men - Or heathens, ανθρωπων ἁμαρτωλων, i.e. the Romans, by whom only he could be put to death; for the Jews themselves acknowledged that this power was now vested in the hands of the Roman governor alone. See Joh 19:15.

Clarke: Luk 24:8 - They remembered his words They remembered his words - Even the simple recollection of the words of Christ becomes often a source of comfort and support to those who are distr...

They remembered his words - Even the simple recollection of the words of Christ becomes often a source of comfort and support to those who are distressed or tempted: for his words are the words of eternal life.

Clarke: Luk 24:10 - And Joanna And Joanna - She was the wife of Chuza, Herod’ s steward. See Luk 8:3.

And Joanna - She was the wife of Chuza, Herod’ s steward. See Luk 8:3.

Clarke: Luk 24:12 - Then arose Peter Then arose Peter - John went with him, and got to the tomb before him. See Joh 20:2, Joh 20:3

Then arose Peter - John went with him, and got to the tomb before him. See Joh 20:2, Joh 20:3

Clarke: Luk 24:12 - The linen clothes laid by themselves The linen clothes laid by themselves - Or, The linen clothes only. This was the fine linen which Joseph of Arimathea bought, and wrapped the body in...

The linen clothes laid by themselves - Or, The linen clothes only. This was the fine linen which Joseph of Arimathea bought, and wrapped the body in: Mar 15:46. Small as this circumstance may at first view appear, it is, nevertheless, no mean proof of the resurrection of our Lord. Had the body been stolen away, all that was wrapped about it would have been taken away with it; as the delay which must have been occasioned by stripping it might have led to the detection of the theft; nor would the disciples have run such a risk if they had stolen him, when stripping the body could have answered no end. This circumstance is related still more particularly by John, Joh 20:5-7. Peter seeth the linen clothes lie, and the napkin that was about his head not lying with the linen clothes, but Wrapped together in a place by itself. All these circumstances prove that the thing was done leisurely; order and regularity being observed through the whole. Hurry and confusion necessarily mark every act of robbery.

Clarke: Luk 24:13 - Behold, two of them Behold, two of them - This long and interesting account is not mentioned by Matthew nor John, and is only glanced at by Mark, Mar 16:12, Mar 16:13. ...

Behold, two of them - This long and interesting account is not mentioned by Matthew nor John, and is only glanced at by Mark, Mar 16:12, Mar 16:13. One of these disciples was Cleopas, Luk 24:18, and the other is supposed by many learned men, both ancient and modern, to have been Luke himself. See the sketch of his life prefixed to these notes. Some of the ancient versions have called the other disciple Ammaus and Ammaon, reading the verse thus: Behold two of them, Ammaus and Cleopas, were going in that very day to a village about sixty furlongs distant from Jerusalem. But the Persian says positively that it was Luke who accompanied Cleopas. See the inscription to section 140 of this Gospel in the Polyglott. Dr. Lightfoot thinks it was Peter, and proves that Cleopas and Alpheus were one and the same person

Clarke: Luk 24:13 - Threescore furlongs Threescore furlongs - Some MSS. say 160 furlongs, but this is a mistake; for Josephus assigns the same distance to this village from Jerusalem as th...

Threescore furlongs - Some MSS. say 160 furlongs, but this is a mistake; for Josephus assigns the same distance to this village from Jerusalem as the evangelist does. War, b. vii. c. 6. s. 6. Αμμαους απεχει των Ἱεροσολυμων σταδιους ἑξηκοντα, Ammaus is sixty stadia distant from Jerusalem, about seven English miles and three-quarters. A stadium was about 243 yards, according to Arbuthnot.

Clarke: Luk 24:15 - And reasoned And reasoned - Συζητειν, concerning the probability or improbability of Christ being the Messiah, or of his resurrection from the dead. It ...

And reasoned - Συζητειν, concerning the probability or improbability of Christ being the Messiah, or of his resurrection from the dead. It was a laudable custom of the Jews, and very common also, to converse about the law in all their journeyings; and now they had especial reason to discourse together, both of the law and the prophets, from the transactions which had recently taken place.

Clarke: Luk 24:16 - Their eyes were holden Their eyes were holden - It does not appear that there was any thing supernatural here, for the reason why these persons (who were not apostles, see...

Their eyes were holden - It does not appear that there was any thing supernatural here, for the reason why these persons (who were not apostles, see Luk 24:33) did not recollect our Lord is given by Mark, Mar 16:12, who says that Christ appeared to them in another form.

Clarke: Luk 24:18 - Cleopas Cleopas - The same as Alpheus, father of the Apostle James, Mar 3:18, and husband of the sister of the virgin. Joh 19:25

Cleopas - The same as Alpheus, father of the Apostle James, Mar 3:18, and husband of the sister of the virgin. Joh 19:25

Clarke: Luk 24:18 - Art thou only a stranger Art thou only a stranger - As if he had said, What has been done it Jerusalem, within these few days, has been so public, so awful, and so universal...

Art thou only a stranger - As if he had said, What has been done it Jerusalem, within these few days, has been so public, so awful, and so universally known, that, if thou hadst been but a lodger in the city for a single night, I cannot conceive how thou couldst miss hearing of these things: indeed, thou appearest to be the only person unacquainted with them.

Clarke: Luk 24:19 - Which was a prophet Which was a prophet - Ανηρ προφητης, a man prophet, a genuine prophet; but this has been considered as a Hebraism: "for, in Exo 2:14, a...

Which was a prophet - Ανηρ προφητης, a man prophet, a genuine prophet; but this has been considered as a Hebraism: "for, in Exo 2:14, a man prince is simply a prince; and in 1Sa 31:3, men archers mean no more than archers."But my own opinion is, that this word is often used to deepen the signification, so in the above quotations: Who made thee a man prince (i.e. a mighty sovereign) and a judge over us! Exo 2:14. And, the battle went sore against Saul, and the men archers (i.e. the stout, or well aiming archers) hit him, 1Sa 31:3. So in Palaephatus, de Incredib. c. 38. p. 47, quoted by Kypke, ην ανηρ βασιλευς μεγας, He was a great and eminent king. So ανηρ προφητης here signifies, he was a Genuine prophet, nothing like those false ones by whom the people have been so often deceived; and he has proved the divinity of his mission by his heavenly teaching, and astonishing miracles

Clarke: Luk 24:19 - Mighty in - word Mighty in - word - Irresistibly eloquent. Powerful in deed, working incontrovertible miracles. See Kypke in loco.

Mighty in - word - Irresistibly eloquent. Powerful in deed, working incontrovertible miracles. See Kypke in loco.

Clarke: Luk 24:21-24 - To-day is the third day To-day is the third day - Our Lord had often said that he would rise again the third day; and though Alpheus had little hope of this resurrection, ye...

To-day is the third day - Our Lord had often said that he would rise again the third day; and though Alpheus had little hope of this resurrection, yet he could not help recollecting the words he had heard, especially as they seemed to be confirmed by the relation of the women, Luk 24:22-24.

Clarke: Luk 24:25 - O fools and slow of heart to believe O fools and slow of heart to believe - Inconsiderate men, justly termed such, because they had not properly attended to the description given of the...

O fools and slow of heart to believe - Inconsiderate men, justly termed such, because they had not properly attended to the description given of the Messiah by the prophets, nor to his teaching and miracles, as proofs that He alone was the person they described

Slow of heart - Backward, not easy to be persuaded of the truth, always giving way to doubtfulness and distrust. This very imperfection in them is a strong evidence of the truth of the doctrine which they afterwards believed, and proclaimed to the world. Had they not had the fullest assurance of these things, they never would have credited them; and it is no small honor to the new-covenant Scriptures that such persons were chosen, first, to believe them; secondly, to proclaim them in the world; and, thirdly, to die on the evidence of those truths, the blessed influence of which they felt in their own hearts, and fully exemplified in their lives.

Clarke: Luk 24:26 - Ought not Christ to have suffered Ought not Christ to have suffered - Ουχι εδει παθειν τον Χριστον, Was it not necessary that the Christ should suffer. This ...

Ought not Christ to have suffered - Ουχι εδει παθειν τον Χριστον, Was it not necessary that the Christ should suffer. This was the way in which sin must be expiated, and, without this, no soul could have been saved. The suffering Messiah is he alone by whom Israel and the world can be saved.

Clarke: Luk 24:27 - Beginning at Moses, etc. Beginning at Moses, etc. - What a sermon this must have been, where all the prophecies relative to the incarnation, birth, teaching, miracles, suffe...

Beginning at Moses, etc. - What a sermon this must have been, where all the prophecies relative to the incarnation, birth, teaching, miracles, sufferings, death, and resurrection of the blessed Jesus were all adduced, illustrated, and applied to himself, by an appeal to the well known facts which had taken place during his life! We are almost irresistibly impelled to exclaim, What a pity this discourse had not been preserved! No wonder their hearts burned within them, while hearing such a sermon, from such a preacher. The law and the prophets had all borne testimony, either directly or indirectly, to Christ; and we may naturally suppose that these prophecies and references were those which our Lord at this time explained and applied to himself. See Luk 24:32.

Clarke: Luk 24:28 - He made as though he would have gone farther He made as though he would have gone farther - That is, he was going on, as though he intended to go farther; and so he doubtless would had they not...

He made as though he would have gone farther - That is, he was going on, as though he intended to go farther; and so he doubtless would had they not earnestly pressed him to lodge with them. His preaching had made a deep impression upon their hearts, Luk 24:32, and now they feel it their greatest privilege to entertain the preacher

This is a constant effect of the doctrine of Christ: wherever it is felt, the Author of it, the ever-blessed Jesus, is earnestly entreated to dwell in the heart; and he who preaches it, is amply provided with the necessaries of life by those who have received his testimony.

Clarke: Luk 24:29 - For it is toward evening For it is toward evening - And consequently both inconvenient and unsafe to proceed to another village. Reader! it is probably the eve of thy life, ...

For it is toward evening - And consequently both inconvenient and unsafe to proceed to another village. Reader! it is probably the eve of thy life, whether thou be old or young: thy day may have already declined, and there is, possibly, but a step between thee and the eternal world! Hath the Lord Jesus taught thee by his word and Spirit to believe in him, that thou mightest be saved? Is he come into thy heart? Hast thou the witness of his Spirit that thy sin is blotted out through his blood? Rom 8:16; Gal 4:6; 1Jo 5:10-12. If thou have not, get thee to God right humbly. Jesus is about to pass by, perhaps for ever! O, constrain him, by earnest faith and prayer, to enter into thy soul, and lodge with thee! May God open Thy eyes! May he stir up and inflame Thy heart

Clarke: Luk 24:29 - And he went in And he went in - And so he will to thee, thou penitent soul! Therefore take courage, and be not faithless but believing.

And he went in - And so he will to thee, thou penitent soul! Therefore take courage, and be not faithless but believing.

Clarke: Luk 24:30 - He took bread He took bread - This was the office of the master and father of a family, and this was our Lord’ s usual custom among his disciples. Those whom...

He took bread - This was the office of the master and father of a family, and this was our Lord’ s usual custom among his disciples. Those whom Christ lodges with he feeds, and feeds too with bread that himself hath blessed, and this feeding not only strengthens, but also enlightens the soul.

Clarke: Luk 24:31 - Their eyes were opened Their eyes were opened - But we are not to imagine that he administered the holy eucharist at this time; there is not the most distant evidence of t...

Their eyes were opened - But we are not to imagine that he administered the holy eucharist at this time; there is not the most distant evidence of this. It was a mere family meal, and ended before it was well begun

Clarke: Luk 24:31 - They knew him They knew him - His acting as father of the family, in taking, blessing, and distributing the bread among them, caused them to recollect those lips ...

They knew him - His acting as father of the family, in taking, blessing, and distributing the bread among them, caused them to recollect those lips which they had often heard speak, and those hands by which they had often been fed. Perhaps he also threw off the disguise which he had before assumed; and now appeared in his own person

Clarke: Luk 24:31 - He vanished out of their sight He vanished out of their sight - Probably, during their surprise, he took the opportunity of withdrawing from the place; leaving them to reflect and...

He vanished out of their sight - Probably, during their surprise, he took the opportunity of withdrawing from the place; leaving them to reflect and meditate on what they had heard and seen.

Clarke: Luk 24:32 - Did not our heart burn within us Did not our heart burn within us - His word was in our heart as a burning fire, Jer 20:9. Our hearts waxed hot within us, and while we were musing t...

Did not our heart burn within us - His word was in our heart as a burning fire, Jer 20:9. Our hearts waxed hot within us, and while we were musing the fire burned, Psa 39:3. In some such way as this the words of the disciples may be understood: but there is a very remarkable reading here in the Codex Bezae; instead of καιομενη, burned, it has κεκαλυμμενη, veiled; and one of the Itala has, fuit excaecatum , was blinded. Was not our heart veiled (blinded) when he conversed with us on the way, and while he unfolded the Scriptures to us, seeing we did not know him?

Clarke: Luk 24:34 - Saying, The Lord is risen indeed Saying, The Lord is risen indeed - The meaning here is, that these two disciples found the apostles, and those who were with them, unanimously testi...

Saying, The Lord is risen indeed - The meaning here is, that these two disciples found the apostles, and those who were with them, unanimously testifying that Christ had risen from the dead. It is not the two disciples to whom we are to refer the word λεγοντας, saying; but to the body of the disciples. See the note on Mar 16:12.

Clarke: Luk 24:35 - And they And they - The two disciples who were just come from Emmaus, related what had happened to them on the way, going to Emmaus, and how he had been know...

And they - The two disciples who were just come from Emmaus, related what had happened to them on the way, going to Emmaus, and how he had been known unto them in the breaking of bread, while supping together at the above village. See on Luk 24:31 (note).

Clarke: Luk 24:36 - And as they thus spake And as they thus spake - While the two disciples who were going to Emmaus were conversing about Christ, he joined himself to their company. Now, whi...

And as they thus spake - While the two disciples who were going to Emmaus were conversing about Christ, he joined himself to their company. Now, while they and the apostles are confirming each other in their belief of his resurrection, Jesus comes in, to remove every doubt, and to give them the fullest evidence of it. And it is ever true that, wherever two or three are gathered together in his name, he is in the midst of them

Clarke: Luk 24:36 - Peace be unto you Peace be unto you - The usual salutation among the Jews. May you prosper in body and soul, and enjoy every heavenly and earthly good! See the notes ...

Peace be unto you - The usual salutation among the Jews. May you prosper in body and soul, and enjoy every heavenly and earthly good! See the notes on Mat 5:9; Mat 10:12.

Clarke: Luk 24:37 - And supposed that they had seen a spirit And supposed that they had seen a spirit - But if there be no such thing as a disembodied spirit, would not our Lord have shown them their error? In...

And supposed that they had seen a spirit - But if there be no such thing as a disembodied spirit, would not our Lord have shown them their error? Instead of this, he confirms them in their opinion, by saying, A spirit hath not flesh and bones as you see me have, Luk 24:39; therefore he says, handle me and see me. They probably imagined that it was the soul only of our blessed Lord which they saw; but they were soon fully convinced of the identity of his person, and the reality of his resurrection; for

1.    They saw his body

2.    They heard him speak

3.    They handled him

4.    They saw him eat a piece of broiled fish and honeycomb, which they gave him

In these things it was impossible for them to have been deceived.

Clarke: Luk 24:41 - They - believed not for joy They - believed not for joy - They were so overcome with the joy of his resurrection, that they did not, for some time, properly receive the evidenc...

They - believed not for joy - They were so overcome with the joy of his resurrection, that they did not, for some time, properly receive the evidence that was before them - as we phrase it, they thought the news too good to be true.

Clarke: Luk 24:44 - The law - the prophets - the psalms The law - the prophets - the psalms - This was the Jewish division of the whole old covenant. The Law contained the five books of Moses; the Prophet...

The law - the prophets - the psalms - This was the Jewish division of the whole old covenant. The Law contained the five books of Moses; the Prophets, the Jews divided into former and latter; they were, according to Josephus, thirteen. "The Psalms included not only the book still so named, but also three other books, Proverbs, Job, and Canticles

These all,"says the above author, "contain hymns to God, and rules for the conduct of the lives of men."Joseph. Cont. App. i. 8. This account is imperfect: the common Jewish division of the writings of the old covenant is the following, and indeed seems to be the same to which our Lord alludes: -

I.    The Law, תורה thorah , including Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy

II.    The Prophets, נביאים, nabiaim , or teachers, including Joshua, Judges, the two books of Samuel, and the two books of Kings: these were termed the former prophets. Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi: these were termed the latter prophets

III.    The Hagiographa, (holy writings), כתובים kethuvim , which comprehended the Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Canticles, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and the two books of Chronicles. The Jews made anciently only twenty-two books of the whole, to bring them to the number of the letters in the Hebrew alphabet; and this they did by joining Ruth to Judges, making the two books of Samuel only one; and so of Kings and Chronicles; joining the Lamentations to Jeremiah, and making the twelve minor prophets only one book.

Clarke: Luk 24:45 - Then opened he their understanding Then opened he their understanding - Διηνοιξεν, He fully opened. They had a measure of light before, so that they discerned the Scriptures...

Then opened he their understanding - Διηνοιξεν, He fully opened. They had a measure of light before, so that they discerned the Scriptures to be the true word of God, and to speak of the Messiah; but they had not light sufficient to enable them to apply these Scriptures to their Lord and Master; but now, by the influence of Christ, they see, not only, the prophecies which pointed out the Messiah, but also the Messiah who was pointed out by these prophecies. The book of God may be received in general as a Divine revelation, but the proper meaning, reference, and application of the Scriptures can only be discerned by the light of Christ. Even the very plain word of God is a dead letter to those who are not enlightened by the grace of Christ; and why? because this word speaks of spiritual and heavenly things; and the carnal mind of man cannot discern them. They who receive not this inward teaching continue dark and dead while they live.

Clarke: Luk 24:47 - Repentance Repentance - See its nature fully explained on Mat 3:1 (note)

Repentance - See its nature fully explained on Mat 3:1 (note)

Clarke: Luk 24:47 - Remission of sins Remission of sins - Αφεσιν ἁμαρτιων, The taking away - removal of sins, in general every thing that relates to the destruction of t...

Remission of sins - Αφεσιν ἁμαρτιων, The taking away - removal of sins, in general every thing that relates to the destruction of the power, the pardoning of the guilt, and the purification of the heart from the very nature of sin

Clarke: Luk 24:47 - Should be preached in his name Should be preached in his name - See the office of a proclaimer, herald, or preacher, explained in the note on Mat 3:1 (note), and particularly at t...

Should be preached in his name - See the office of a proclaimer, herald, or preacher, explained in the note on Mat 3:1 (note), and particularly at the end of that chapter

In his name - On his authority, and in virtue of the atonement made by him: for on what other ground could the inhabitants of the earth expect remission of sins

Clarke: Luk 24:47 - Among all nations Among all nations - Because God wills the salvation of All; and Jesus Christ by his grace has tasted death for Every man. Heb 2:9

Among all nations - Because God wills the salvation of All; and Jesus Christ by his grace has tasted death for Every man. Heb 2:9

Clarke: Luk 24:47 - Beginning at Jerusalem Beginning at Jerusalem - Making the first overtures of mercy to my murderers! If, then, the sinners of Jerusalem might repent, believe, and be saved...

Beginning at Jerusalem - Making the first overtures of mercy to my murderers! If, then, the sinners of Jerusalem might repent, believe, and be saved, none, on this side hell, need despair.

Clarke: Luk 24:48 - Ye are witnesses of these things Ye are witnesses of these things - He gave them a full commission to proclaim these glad tidings of peace and salvation to a lost world. The discipl...

Ye are witnesses of these things - He gave them a full commission to proclaim these glad tidings of peace and salvation to a lost world. The disciples were witnesses not only that Christ had suffered and rose again from the dead; but also that he opens the understanding by the inspiration of his Spirit, that he gives repentance, that he pardons sin, and purifies from all unrighteousness, and that he is not willing that any should perish, but that all should come unto the knowledge of the truth and be saved. And these are the things of which their successors in the Gospel ministry must bear witness. As far as a man steadily and affectionately proclaims these doctrines, so far God will bless his labor to the salvation of those who hear him. But no man can with any propriety bear witness of that grace that saves the soul, whose own soul is not saved by that grace.

Clarke: Luk 24:49 - The promise of my Father The promise of my Father - That is, the Holy Ghost, promised, Joh 15:26. See Act 1:4; Act 2:33

The promise of my Father - That is, the Holy Ghost, promised, Joh 15:26. See Act 1:4; Act 2:33

Clarke: Luk 24:49 - Until ye be endued with power Until ye be endued with power - The energy of the Holy Ghost was to be communicated to them for three particular purposes 1.    That ...

Until ye be endued with power - The energy of the Holy Ghost was to be communicated to them for three particular purposes

1.    That he might be in them, a sanctifying comforter, fortifying their souls and bringing to their remembrance whatever Jesus had before spoken to them

2.    That their preaching might be accompanied by his demonstration and power to the hearts of their hearers, so that they might believe and be saved

3.    That they might be able to work miracles to confirm their pretensions to a Divine mission, and to establish the truth of the doctrines they preached.

Clarke: Luk 24:50 - He led them out as far as to Bethany He led them out as far as to Bethany - The difficulties in this verse, when collated with the accounts given by the other evangelists, are thus reco...

He led them out as far as to Bethany - The difficulties in this verse, when collated with the accounts given by the other evangelists, are thus reconciled by Dr. Lightfoot

"I.    This very evangelist (Act 1:12) tells us, that when the disciples came back from the place where our Lord had ascended, they returned from mount Olivet, distant from Jerusalem a Sabbath day’ s journey. But now the town of Bethany was about fifteen furlongs from Jerusalem, Joh 11:18, and that is double a Sabbath day’ s journey

"II.    Josephus tells us that mount Olivet was but five furlongs from the city, and a Sabbath day’ s journey was seven furlongs and a half. Antiq. lib. 20, cap. 6. About that time there came to Jerusalem a certain Egyptian, pretending himself a prophet, and persuading the people that they should go out with him to the mount of Olives, Ὁ και της πολεως αντικρυς κειμενον, απεχει σταδια πεντε ; which, being situated on the front of the city, is distant five furlongs. These things are all true

1.    That the mount of Olives lay but five furlongs distant from Jerusalem

2.    That the town of Bethany was fifteen furlongs

3.    That the disciples were brought by Christ as far as Bethany

4.    That, when they returned from the mount of Olives, they traveled more than five furlongs. And

5.    Returning from Bethany, they traveled but a Sabbath day’ s journey

    All which may be easily reconciled, if we would observe: - That the first space from the city was called Bethphage, which I have cleared elsewhere from Talmudic authors, the evangelists themselves also confirming it. That part of that mount was known by that name to the length of about a Sabbath day’ s journey, till it came to that part which is called Bethany. For there was a Bethany, a tract of the mount, and the town of Bethany. The town was distant from the city about fifteen furlongs, i.e. about two miles, or a double Sabbath day’ s journey: but the first border of this tract (which also bore the name of Bethany) was distant but one mile, or a single Sabbath day’ s journey

    "Our Savior led out his disciples, when he was about to ascend, to the very first region or tract of mount Olivet, which was called Bethany, and was distant from the city a Sabbath day’ s journey. And so far from the city itself did that tract extend itself which was called Bethphage; and when he was come to that place where the bounds of Bethphage and Bethany met and touched one another, he then ascended; in that very place where he got upon the ass when he rode into Jerusalem, Mar 11:1. Whereas, therefore, Josephus saith that mount Olivet was but five furlongs from the city, he means the first brink and border of it. But our evangelist must be understood of the place where Christ ascended, where the name of Olivet began, as it was distinguished from Bethphage.

Between the appearance of Christ to his apostles, mentioned in Luk 24:36, etc., almost all the forty days had passed, before he led them out to Bethany. They went by his order into Galilee, Mat 26:32; Mat 28:10; Mar 14:28; Mar 16:7; and there he appeared to them, as is mentioned by Matthew, Mat 28:16, etc., and more particularly by John, Joh 21:1, etc. See Bishop Pearce

Clarke: Luk 24:50 - Lifted up his hands Lifted up his hands - Probably to lay them on their heads, for this was the ordinary way in which the paternal blessing was conveyed, See Gen 48:8-2...

Lifted up his hands - Probably to lay them on their heads, for this was the ordinary way in which the paternal blessing was conveyed, See Gen 48:8-20.

Clarke: Luk 24:51 - Carried up into heaven Carried up into heaven - Ανεφερετο - into that heaven from which he had descended, Joh 1:18; Joh 3:13. This was forty days after his resu...

Carried up into heaven - Ανεφερετο - into that heaven from which he had descended, Joh 1:18; Joh 3:13. This was forty days after his resurrection, Act 1:3, during which time he had given the most convincing proofs of that resurrection, not only to the apostles, but to many others - to upwards of five hundred at one time, 1Co 15:6

As in his life they had seen the way to the kingdom, and in his death the price of the kingdom, so in his ascension they had the fullest proof of the immortality of the soul, the resurrection of the human body, and of his continual intercession at the right hand of God

There are some remarkable circumstances relative to this ascension mentioned in Act 1:4-12.

Clarke: Luk 24:52 - They worshipped him They worshipped him - Let it be observed that this worship was not given by way of civil respect, for it was after he was parted from them, and carr...

They worshipped him - Let it be observed that this worship was not given by way of civil respect, for it was after he was parted from them, and carried back into heaven, that they offered it to him; but acts of civil respect are always performed in the presence of the person. They adored him as their God, and were certainly too much enlightened to be capable of any species of idolatry

Clarke: Luk 24:52 - Returned to Jerusalem with great joy Returned to Jerusalem with great joy - Having the fullest proof that Jesus was the promised Messiah; and that they had a full commission to preach r...

Returned to Jerusalem with great joy - Having the fullest proof that Jesus was the promised Messiah; and that they had a full commission to preach repentance and remission of sin to mankind, and that they should be Divinely qualified for this great work by receiving the promise of the Father, Luk 24:49.

Clarke: Luk 24:53 - Were continually in the temple Were continually in the temple - Especially till the day of pentecost came, when they received the promise, mentioned Luk 24:49

Were continually in the temple - Especially till the day of pentecost came, when they received the promise, mentioned Luk 24:49

Clarke: Luk 24:53 - Praising and blessing God Praising and blessing God - Magnifying his mercy, and speaking good of his name. Thus the days of their mourning were ended; and they began that lif...

Praising and blessing God - Magnifying his mercy, and speaking good of his name. Thus the days of their mourning were ended; and they began that life upon earth in which they still live in the kingdom of God. May the God of infinite love give the reader the same portion in time and in eternity, through the same glorious and ever-blessed Jesus! Amen and amen

There are various subscriptions to this book in the MSS. and versions. The following are the principal

Through the assistance of the Most High God, the Gospel of St. Luke the physician, the proclaimer of eternal life, is finished. Arab. - The most holy Gospel of Luke the Evangelist is completed. Syr. - The end of the holy Gospel according to Luke - written in Greek - published in Alexandria the Great, - in Troas, - in Rome, - in the confines of Achaia and Baeotia, - in Bithynia, - in Macedonia, - in the Italic (or Latin) character, fifteen years after the ascension of Christ

It is likely, the word Amen was added by the Church, on the reading of this book; but there is no evidence that it was affixed by the evangelist. It is omitted by some of the best MSS. and versions

It is evident that, at the conclusion of this Gospel, St. Luke passes very rapidly over a number of interesting circumstances related by the other evangelists, and particularly by St. John, concerning the last forty days of our Lord’ s sojourning on earth; but, to compensate for this, he has mentioned a variety of important particulars which the others have passed by, a list of which I think it necessary to subjoin. It seems as if the providence of God had designed that none of these evangelists should stand alone: each has his peculiar excellence, and each his own style and mode of narration. They are all witnesses to the truth in general; and each most pointedly to every great fact of the Gospel history. In each there is something new; and no serious reader ever finds that the perusal of any one supersedes the necessity of carefully consulting and reading the others. The same facts and doctrines are exhibited by all in different points of view, which renders them both impressive and interesting; and this one circumstance serves to fix the narrative more firmly in the memory. We should have had slighter impressions from the Gospel history, had we not had the narrative at four different hands. This variety is of great service to the Church of God, and has contributed very much to diffuse the knowledge of the facts and doctrines contained in this history. Parallel passages have been carefully studied, and the different shades of meaning accurately marked out; and the consequence has been, what the wisdom of God designed, the fuller edification of the faithful. It is not the business of a commentator to point out beauties in the composition of the sacred text. Many might be selected from the evangelists in general, and not a few from Luke, who not only tells a true story, but tells it well; especially when he has occasion to connect the different parts of the narration with observations of his own. But this is his least praise: from his own account we learn that he took the utmost pains to get the most accurate and circumstantial information relative to the facts he was to relate: see the note on Luk 1:3. While, therefore, he thus diligently and conscientiously sought for truth, the unerring Spirit of God led him into all truth. Even he who expected the revelation of the Almighty, and to be inspired by the Holy Spirit, that he might correctly, forcibly, and successfully proclaim the truth and righteousness of his Maker, must stand upon his watch, and set himself upon his tower, and watch to see what God would speak In him, Hab 2:1. In a similar spirit we may expect the fruits of these revelations. He who carefully and conscientiously uses the means may expect the accomplishment of the end

I cannot close these observations with a more profitable word than what is contained in that truly apostolic and sublime prayer for the second Sunday in Advent; and may he who reads it weigh every word in the spirit of faith and devotion! "Blessed God! who hast caused all holy scriptures to be written for our learning; grant that we may in such wise hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them, that, by patience and comfort of thy holy word, we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life, which thou hast given us in our Savior Jesus Christ!

Now to him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood, and hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father, to Him be glory and dominion for ever and ever! Amen

Calvin: Luk 24:8 - And they remembered his words; Luk 24:8.And they remembered his words; by which we are taught that, though they had made little proficiency in the doctrine of Christ, still it was n...

Luk 24:8.And they remembered his words; by which we are taught that, though they had made little proficiency in the doctrine of Christ, still it was not lost, but was choked up, until in due time it yielded fruit.

Calvin: Luk 24:12 - And Peter arose, and ran to the tomb Luk 24:12.And Peter arose, and ran to the tomb I have no doubt that Luke here inverts the order of the narrative, as may be readily inferred from the ...

Luk 24:12.And Peter arose, and ran to the tomb I have no doubt that Luke here inverts the order of the narrative, as may be readily inferred from the words of John, (Joh 20:3;) and, in my opinion, the word ran (ἔδραμεν) might justly be rendered as a pluperfect tense, had run. All who possess a tolerable acquaintance with Scripture are aware that it is customary with Hebrew writers to relate afterwards those occurrences which had been omitted in their proper place. Luke mentions this circumstance for the purpose of showing more strongly the obstinacy of the apostles ill despising the words of the women, when Peter had already seen the empty grave, and had been compelled to wonder at an evident proof of the resurrection.

Calvin: Luk 24:13 - And lo, two of them Luk 24:13.And lo, two of them Although Mark touches slightly and briefly on this narrative, and Matthew and John say not a single word respecting it; ...

Luk 24:13.And lo, two of them Although Mark touches slightly and briefly on this narrative, and Matthew and John say not a single word respecting it; yet as it is highly useful to be known and worthy of being remembered, it is not without reason that Luke treats it with so much exactness. But I have already mentioned on various occasions, that each of the Evangelists had his portion so appropriately assigned to him by the Spirit of God, that what is not to be found in one or two of them may be learned from the others. For there are also many appearances 312 which are mentioned by John, but are passed over in silence by our three Evangelists.

Before I come to the minute details, it will be proper to begin with stating briefly, that those were two chosen witnesses, by whom the Lord intended, not to convince the apostles that he was risen, but to reprove their slowness; for though at first; they were of no service, yet their testimony, strengthened by other aids, had at length its due weight with the apostles. Who they were is uncertain, except that from the name of one of them, whom we shah find that Luke shortly afterwards calls Cleopas, we may conjecture that they did not belong; to the eleven. Emmaus was an ancient, and by no means inconsiderable, town, which the Romans afterwards called Nicopolis and was not at a great distance from Jerusalem, for sixty furlongs are not more than seven thousand and four hundred paces. 313 But the place is named by Luke, not so much on account of its celebrity, as to add certainty to the narrative.

Calvin: Luk 24:14 - And they were conversing with each other 14.And they were conversing with each other It was a proof of godliness that they endeavored to cherish their faith in Christ: though small and weak;...

14.And they were conversing with each other It was a proof of godliness that they endeavored to cherish their faith in Christ: though small and weak; for their conversation had no other object than to employ their reverence for their Master as a shield against the offense of the cross. Now though their questions and disputes showed an ignorance which was worthy of reproof — since, after having been informed that the resurrection of Christ would take place, they were astonished at hearing it mentioned—still their docility afforded Christ an opportunity of removing their error. For many persons intentionally put questions, because they have resolved obstinately to reject the truth; but when men are desirous to embrace the truth submissively, though they may waver on account of very small objections, and stop at slight difficulties, their holy desire to obey God finds favor in his sight, so that he stretches out his hand to them, brings them to full conviction, and does not permit them to remain irresolute. We ought, at least, to hold it as certain, that when we inquire about Christ, if this be done from a modest desire to learn, the door is opened for him to assist us; nay, we may almost say that we then call for himself to be our Teacher; as irreligious men, by their unholy speeches, drive him to a distance from them.

Calvin: Luk 24:16 - But their eyes were restrained 16.But their eyes were restrained The Evangelist expressly states this, lest any one should think that the aspect of Christ’s body was changed, and...

16.But their eyes were restrained The Evangelist expressly states this, lest any one should think that the aspect of Christ’s body was changed, and that the features of his countenance were different from what they had formerly been. 314 For though Christ remained like himself, he was not recognized, because the eyes of beholders were held; and this takes away all suspicion of a phantom or false imagination. But hence we learn how great is the weakness of all our senses, since neither eyes nor ears discharge their office, unless so far as power is incessantly communicated to them from heaven. Our members do indeed possess their natural properties; but to make us more fully sensible that they are held by us at the will of another, God retains in his own hand the use of them, so that we ought ever to reckon it to be one of his daily favors, that our ears hear and our eyes see; for if he does not every hour quicken our senses, all their power will immediately give way. I readily acknowledge that our senses are not frequently held in the same manner as happened at that time, so as to make so gross a mistake about an object presented to us; but by a single example God shows that it is in his power to direct the faculties which he has. bestowed, so as to assure us that nature is subject to his will. Now if the bodily eyes, to which peculiarly belongs the power of seeing, are held, whenever it pleases the Lord, so as not to perceive the objects presented to them, our understandings would possess no greater acuteness, even though their original condition remained unimpaired; but no in this wretched corruption, after having been deprived of their light, they are liable to innumerable deceptions, and are sunk into such gross stupidity, that they can do nothing but commit mistakes, as happens to us incessantly. The proper discrimination between truth and falsehood, therefore, does not arise from the sagacity of our own mind, but comes to us from the Spirit of wisdom. But it is chiefly in the contemplation of heavenly things that our stupidity is discovered; for not only do we imagine false appearances to be true, but we turn the clear light into darkness.

Calvin: Luk 24:17 - What are those discourses which you hold with each other? 17.What are those discourses which you hold with each other? What was at that time, as we perceive, done openly by Christ, we daily feel to be accomp...

17.What are those discourses which you hold with each other? What was at that time, as we perceive, done openly by Christ, we daily feel to be accomplished in ourselves in a secret manner; which is, that of his own accord he approaches us unperceived for the purpose of instructing us. Now from the reply of Cleopas it is still more evident that, as I have lately mentioned, though they were in doubt and uncertainty about the resurrection of Christ, yet they had in their hearts a reverence for his doctrine, so that they were far from having any inclination to revolt. For they do not expect that Christ will anticipate them by making himself known, or that this fellow-traveler, whoever he may be, will speak of him respectfully; but, on the contrary, having but a small and obscure light, Cleopas throws out a few sparks on an unknown man, which were intended to enlighten his mind, if he were ignorant and uninformed. The name of Christ was, at that time, so generally held in hatred and detestation, that it was not safe to speak of him respectfully; but spurning from him suspicion, he calls Christ a prophet of God, and declares that he is one of his disciples. And though this designation falls greatly below the Divine Majesty of Christ, yet the commendation which he bestows, though moderate, is laudable; for Cleopas had no other intention than to procure for Christ disciples who would submit to his Gospel. It is uncertain, however, if it was through ignorance that Cleopas spoke of Christ in terms less magnificent than the case required, or if he intended to begin with first principles, which were better known, and to rise higher by degrees. Certain it is, that a little afterwards, he does not simply place Christ in the ordinary rank of prophets, but says that he and others believed him to be the redeemer.

Calvin: Luk 24:19 - Powerful in deed and in word // Before God and all the people 19.Powerful in deed and in word Luke has employed nearly the same form of expression in reference to the person of Stephen, (Act 7:22,) where he says...

19.Powerful in deed and in word Luke has employed nearly the same form of expression in reference to the person of Stephen, (Act 7:22,) where he says of Moses, by way of commendation, that he was powerful in words and in actions. But in this passage it is uncertain if it is on account of miracles that Christ is said to be powerful in actions, (as if it had been said that he was endued with divine virtues which proved that he was sent from heaven;) or if the phrase is more extensive, and means that he excelled both in ability to teach, and in holiness of life and other remarkable endowments. I prefer the latter of these views.

Before God and all the people The addition of these words ought not to be reckoned superfluous; for they mean that the high excellence of Christ was so well known, and was demonstrated by such undoubted proofs, that he had no hypocrisy or vain ostentation. And hence we may obtain a brief definition of a true Prophet, namely, that to what he speaks he will likewise add power in actions, and will not only endeavor to appear excellent before men, but to act with sincerity as under the eyes of God.

Calvin: Luk 24:21 - But we hoped 21.But we hoped From what follows it is evident that the hope which they had entertained respecting Christ was not broken off, though at first sight ...

21.But we hoped From what follows it is evident that the hope which they had entertained respecting Christ was not broken off, though at first sight such might appear to be the import of their words. But as a person who had received no previous instruction in the Gospel might be apt to be prejudiced by the narrative which he was about to give respecting the condemnation of Christ, that he was condemned by the rulers of the Church, Cleopas meets this offense by the hope of redemption. And though he afterwards shows that it is with trembling and hesitation that he continues in this hope, yet he industriously collects all that can contribute to its support. For it is probable that he mentions the third day for no other reason than that the Lord had promised that after three days he would rise again. When he afterwards relates that the women had not fouled the body, and that they tad seen a vision of angels, and that what the women had said about the empty grave was likewise confirmed by the testimony of the men, the whole amounts to this, that Christ had risen. Thus the holy man, hesitating between faith and fear, employs what is adapted to nourish faith, and struggles against fear to the utmost of his power.

Calvin: Luk 24:25 - And he said to them 25.And he said to them This reproof appears to be too harsh and severe for a weak man such as this was; but whoever attends to all the circumstances ...

25.And he said to them This reproof appears to be too harsh and severe for a weak man such as this was; but whoever attends to all the circumstances will have no difficulty in perceiving that our Lord had good reason for rebuking so sharply those on whom he had long bestowed labor to little purpose, and almost without any fruit. For it ought to be observed, that; what is here said was not confined to these two persons, but, as a reproof of a common fault, was intended to be conveyed by their lips to the rest of their companions. So frequently had Christ forewarned them of his death — so frequently had he even discoursed about a new and spiritual life, and confirmed his doctrine by the inspired statements of the prophets — that he would seem to have spoken to the deaf, or rather to blocks and stones; for they are struck with such horror at his death, that they know not to what hand to turn. This hesitation, therefore, he justly attributes to folly, and assigns as the reason of it their carelessness in not having been more ready to believe. Nor does he only reprove them because, while they had the best Teacher, they were dull and slow to learn, but because they had not attended to the instructions of the Prophets; as if he had said, that their insensibility admitted of no excuse, because it was owing to themselves alone, since the doctrine of the Prophets was abundantly clear, and had been fully expounded to them. In like manner, the greater part of men, at the present day, remain in ignorance through their own fault, because they are obstinate, and refuse to be instructed. But let us observe that Christ, perceiving that his disciples are excessively sluggish; commences with reproof, in order to arouse them; for this is the way in which we must subdue those whom we have found to be hardened or indolent.

Calvin: Luk 24:26 - Ought not Christ to have suffered these things? 26.Ought not Christ to have suffered these things? There is no room to doubt that our Lord discoursed to them about the office of Messiah, as it is d...

26.Ought not Christ to have suffered these things? There is no room to doubt that our Lord discoursed to them about the office of Messiah, as it is described by the Prophets, that they might not take offense at his death; and a journey of three or four hours afforded abundance of time for a full explanation of those matters. Christ did not, therefore, assert in three words, that Christ ought to have suffered, but explained at great length that he had been sent in order that he might expiate, by the sacrifice of his death, the sins of the world, — that he might become a curse in order to remove the curse, — that by having guilt imputed to him he might wash away the pollutions of others. Luke has put this sentence in the form of a question, in order to present it with greater force; from which it may be inferred, that he employed arguments for showing the necessity of his death. The sum of what is stated is, that the disciples are wrong in distressing their minds about their Master’s death, (without which he could not discharge what belonged to Christ; because his sacrifice was the most important part of redemption;) for in this way they shut the gate, that he might not enter into his kingdom. This ought to be carefully observed; for since Christ is deprived of the honor due to him, if he is not reckoned to be a sacrifice for sins, the only way by which he could enter into his glory was that humiliation or emptying, (Phi 2:7,) out of which the Redeemer had arisen. But we see that no trivial offense is committed among at the present day, by the inversion of this order; for among the multitude of those who declare, in magnificent language, that Christ is King, and who extol him by divine titles, hardly one person in ten thinks of the grace which has been brought to us by his death.

Calvin: Luk 24:27 - And beginning at Moses. This // Bucer, 27.And beginning at Moses. This passage shows us in what manner Christ is made known to us through the Gospel. It is when light is thrown on the know...

27.And beginning at Moses. This passage shows us in what manner Christ is made known to us through the Gospel. It is when light is thrown on the knowledge of him by the Law and the Prophets. For never was there a more able or skillful teacher of the Gospel than our Lord himself; and we see that he borrows from the Law and the Prophets the proof of his doctrine. If it be objected that he began with easy lessons, that the disciples might gradually dismiss the Prophets, and pass on to the perfect Gospel, this conjecture is easily refuted; for we shall afterwards find it stated, that all the apostles had their understanding opened, not to be wise without the assistance of the Law, but to understand the Scriptures. In order that Christ may be made known to us through the Gospel, it is therefore necessary that Moses and the Prophets should go before as guides, to show us the way. It is necessary to remind readers of this, that they may not lend an ear to fanatics, who, by suppressing the Law and the Prophets, wickedly mutilate the Gospel; as if God intended that any testimony which he has ever given respecting his Son should become useless.

In what manner we must apply to Christ those passages respecting him which are to be found in every part of the Law and the Prophets, we have not now leisure to explain. 315 Let it suffice to state briefly, that there are good reasons why Christ is called the end of the law, (Rom 10:4.) For however obscurely and at a distance Moses may exhibit Christ in shadows, rather than in a full portrait, (Heb 10:1,) this, at least, is beyond dispute, that unless there be in the family of Abraham one exalted Head, under whom the people may be united in one body, the covenant which God made with the holy fathers will be nullified and revoked. Besides, since God commanded that the tabernacle and the ceremonies of the law should be adjusted to a heavenly pattern, (Exo 25:40; Heb 8:5,) it follows that the sacrifices and the other parts of the service of the temple, if the reality of them is to be found nowhere else, would be an idle and useless sport. 316 This very argument is copiously illustrated by the apostle, (Heb 9:1;) for, assuming this principle, that the visible ceremonies of the law are shadows of spiritual things, he shows that in the whole of the legal priesthood, in the sacrifices, and in the form of the sanctuary, we ought to seek Christ.

Bucer, too, somewhere throws out a judicious conjecture, that, amidst this obscurity, the Jews were accustomed to pursue a certain method of interpreting Scripture which had been handed down to them by tradition from the fathers. But that I may not involve my inquiries in any uncertainty, I shall satisfy myself with that natural and simple method which is found universally in all the prophets, who were eminently skilled in the exposition of the Law. From the Law, therefore, we may properly learn Christ, if we consider that the covenant which God made with the fathers was founded on the Mediator; that the sanctuary, by which God manifested the presence of his grace, was consecrated by his blood; that the Law itself, with its promises, was sanctioned by the shedding of blood; that a single priest was chosen out of the whole people, to appear in the presence of God, in the name of all, not as an ordinary mortal, but clothed in sacred garments; and that no hope of reconciliation with God was held out to men but through the offering of sacrifice. Besides, there is a remarkable prediction, that the kingdom would be perpetuated in the tribe of Judah, (Gen 49:10.) The prophets themselves, as we have hinted, drew far more striking portraits of the Mediator, though they had derived their earliest acquaintance with him from Moses; for no other office was assigned to them than to renew the remembrance of the covenant, to point out more clearly the spiritual worship of God, to found on the Mediator the hope of salvation, and to show more clearly the method of reconciliation. Yet since it had pleased God to delay the full revelation till the coming of his Son, the interpretation of them was not superfluous.

Calvin: Luk 24:28 - And they drew near to the village // And he seemed as if he would go farther 28.And they drew near to the village There is no reason for supposing, as some commentators have done, that this was a different place from Emmaus; ...

28.And they drew near to the village There is no reason for supposing, as some commentators have done, that this was a different place from Emmaus; for the journey was not so long as to make it necessary for them to take rest for the night at a nearer lodging. We know that seven thousand paces—even though a person were to walk slowly for his own gratification—would be accomplished in four hours at the utmost; and, therefore, I have no doubt that Christ had now reached Emmaus.

And he seemed as if he would go farther Now as to the question, Can insincerity apply to him who is the eternal truth of God? I answer, that the Son of God was under no obligation to make all his designs known. Still, as insincerity of any kind is a sort of falsehood, the difficulty is not yet removed; more especially as this example is adduced by many to prove that they are at liberty to tell lies. But I reply, that Christ might without falsehood have pretended what is here mentioned, in the same manner that he gave himself out to be a stranger passing along the road; for there was the same reason for both. A somewhat more ingenious solution is given by Augustine, (in his work addressed To Consentius, Book II., chap. 13, and in the book of Questions on the Gospels, chap. 51,) for he chooses to enumerate this kind of feigning among tropes and figures, and afterwards among parables and fables. For my own part, I am satisfied with this single consideration, that as Christ for the time threw a veil over the eyes of those with whom he was conversing, so that he had assumed a different character, and was regarded by them as all ordinary stranger, so, when he appeared for the time to intend to go farther, it was not through pretending any thing else than what he had resolved to do, but because he wished to conceal the manner of his departure; for none will deny that he did go farther, since he had then withdrawn from human society. So then by this feigning he did not deceive his disciples, but held them for a little in suspense, till the proper time should arrive for making himself known. It is, therefore, highly improper to attempt to make Christ an advocate of falsehood; and we are no more at liberty to plead his example for feigning any thing, than to endeavor to equal his divine power in shutting the eyes of men. Our safest course is to adhere to the rule which has been laid down to us, to speak with truth and simplicity; not that our Lord himself ever departed from the law of his Father, but because, without confining himself to the letter of the commandments, he kept by the true meaning of the law; but we, on account of the weakness of our senses, need to be restrained in a different manner.

Calvin: Luk 24:30 - He took bread. Augustine, 30.He took bread. Augustine, and the greater part of other commentators along with him, have thought that Christ gave the bread, not as an ordinary...

30.He took bread. Augustine, and the greater part of other commentators along with him, have thought that Christ gave the bread, not as an ordinary meal, but as the sacred symbol of his body. And, indeed, it might be said with some plausibility, that the Lord was at length recognized in the spiritual mirror of the Lord’s Supper; for the disciples did not know him, when they beheld him with the bodily eyes. But as this conjecture rests on no probable grounds, I choose rather to view the words of Luke as meaning that Christ, in taking the bread, gave thanks according to his custom. But it appears that he employed his peculiar and ordinary form of prayer, to which he knew that the disciples had been habitually accustomed, that, warned by this sign, they might arouse their senses. In the meantime, let us learn by the example of our Master, whenever we eat bread, to offer thanksgiving to the Author of life, — an action which will distinguish us from irreligious men.

Calvin: Luk 24:31 - And their eyes were opened Luk 24:31.And their eyes were opened By these words, we are taught that there was not in Christ any metamorphosis, or variety of forms, by which h...

Luk 24:31.And their eyes were opened By these words, we are taught that there was not in Christ any metamorphosis, or variety of forms, by which he might impose on the eyes of men, (as the poets feign their Proteus,) but that, on the contrary, the eyes of beholders were mistaken, because they were covered; just as, shortly afterwards, he vanished from the eyes of those very persons, not because his body was in itself invisible, but because God, by withdrawing their rigor, blunted their acuteness. Nor ought we to wonder that Christ, as soon as he was recognized, immediately disappeared; for it was not advantageous that they should any longer behold him, lest, as they were naturally too much addicted to the earth, they might desire again to bring him back to an earthly life. So far, then, as it was necessary to assure them of his resurrection, he made himself visible to them; but by the sudden departure, he taught them that they must seek him elsewhere than in the world, because the completion of the new life was his ascension to heaven.

Calvin: Luk 24:32 - Did not our heart burn within us? 32.Did not our heart burn within us? Their recognition of Christ led the disciples to a lively perception of the secret and hidden grace of the Spiri...

32.Did not our heart burn within us? Their recognition of Christ led the disciples to a lively perception of the secret and hidden grace of the Spirit, which he had formerly bestowed upon them. For God sometimes works in his people in such a manner, that for a time they are not aware of the power of the Spirit, (of which, however, they are not destitute,) or, at least, that they do not perceive it distinctly, but only feel it by a secret movement. Thus the disciples had formerly indeed felt an ardor, which they now remember, but which they had not then observed: now that Christ has made himself known to them, they at length begin to consider the grace which they had formerly, as it were, swallowed without tasting it, and perceive that they were stupid. For they accuse themselves of indifference, as if they had said, “How did it happen that we did not recognize him while he was talking? for when he penetrated into our hearts, we ought to have perceived who he was.” But they conclude that he is Christ, not simply from the bare sign that his word was efficacious to inflame their hearts, but because they ascribe to him the honor which belongs to him, that when he speaks with the mouth, he likewise inflames their hearts inwardly by the warmth of his Spirit. Paul, indeed, boasts that the ministration of the Spirit was given to him, (2Co 3:8;) and Scripture frequently adorns the ministers of the word with such titles as the following; that they convert the hearts, enlighten the understandings, and renew men so as to become pure and holy sacrifices; but then it is not to show what they do by their own power, but rather what the Lord accomplishes by means of them. But both belong equally to Christ alone, to pronounce the outward voice, and to form the hearts efficaciously to the obedience of faith.

It cannot be doubted that he then engraved an uncommon Mark on the hearts of these two men, that they might at length perceive that in speaking he had breathed into them a divine warmth. For though the word of the Lord is always fire, yet a fiery rigor was at that time manifested in a peculiar and unusual, manner in the discourse of Christ, and was intended to be an evident proof of his divine power; for it is he alone who baptizeth in the Holy Ghost and in fire, (Luk 3:16.) Yet let us remember that it is the proper fruit of heavenly doctrine, whoever may be the minister of it, to kindle the fire of the Spirit in the hearts of men, to purify and cleanse the affections of the flesh, or rather to burn them up, and to kindle a truly fervent love of God; and by its flame, as it were, to carry away men entirely to heaven.

Calvin: Luk 24:33 - And they arose in the same hour 33.And they arose in the same hour 320 The circumstance of the time, and the distance of the places, show with what ardor those two men turned to con...

33.And they arose in the same hour 320 The circumstance of the time, and the distance of the places, show with what ardor those two men turned to convey the intelligence to their fellow-disciples. As they entered a lodging towards evening, it is probable that the Lord had not made himself known to them before night came on. To perform a journey of three hours in the dead of night was exceedingly inconvenient; yet they rise that very instant, and return in haste to Jerusalem. And, indeed, if they had only gone thither next day, their tardiness might have exposed them to suspicion; but as they chose rather to deprive themselves of the repose of the night than to allow the slightest delay in making the apostles partakers of their joy, the very haste gave additional credit to their narrative. Now whenLuke says that they arose in the same hour, 321 it is probable that they came to the disciples about midnight. But, according to the testimony of the same Luke, the disciples were at that time conversing together; and hence we learn their anxiety, and industry, and ardor, in spending almost the whole night without sleep, and unceasingly making inquiries at each other, until the resurrection of Christ was ascertained by a multitude of testimonies.

Calvin: Luk 24:34 - Saying, The Lord is actually risen 34.Saying, The Lord is actually risen By these words Luke means that those persons who had brought to the apostles joyful intelligence to confirm the...

34.Saying, The Lord is actually risen By these words Luke means that those persons who had brought to the apostles joyful intelligence to confirm their minds, were informed by the disciples respecting another appearance. Nor can it be doubled that this mutual confirmation was the reward which God bestowed on them for their holy diligence. By a comparison of the time, we may conclude that Peter, after having returned from the sepulcher, was in a state of great perplexity and uncertainty, until Christ showed himself to him, and that, on the very day that he had visited the sepulcher, he obtained his wish. Hence arose that mutual congratulation among the eleven, that there was now no reason to doubt, because the Lord had appeared to Simon.

But this appears to disagree with the words of Mark, who says, that the eleven did not even believe those two persons; for how could it be that those who were already certain now rejected additional witnesses, and remained in their former hesitation? By saying that he is actually risen, they acknowledge that the matter is beyond all doubt. First, I reply, that the general phrase contains a synecdoche; for some were harder or less ready to believe, and Thomas was more obstinate than all the rest, (Joh 20:25.) Secondly, We may easily infer that they were convinced in the same way as usually happens to persons who are astonished, and who do not consider the matter calmly; and we know that such persons are continually falling into various doubts. However that may be, it is evident from Luke, that the greater part of them, in the midst of that overpowering amazement, not, only embraced willingly what was told them, but contended with their own distrust; for by the word actually they cut off all ground for doubt. And yet we shall soon afterwards see that, a second and a third time, in consequence of their astonishment, they fell back into their former doubts.

Calvin: Luk 24:36 - Jesus himself stood in the midst of them 36.Jesus himself stood in the midst of them While the Evangelist John copiously details the same narrative, (Joh 20:19,) he differs from Luke in some...

36.Jesus himself stood in the midst of them While the Evangelist John copiously details the same narrative, (Joh 20:19,) he differs from Luke in some circumstances. Mark, too, differs somewhat in his brief statement. As to John, since he only collects what Luke omitted, both may be easily reconciled. There is no contradiction about the substance of the fact; unless some person were to raise a debate about the time: for it is there said that Jesus entered in the evening, while it is evident, from the thread of the narrative, that he appeared at a late hour in the night, when the disciples had returned from Emmaus. But I do not think it right to insist precisely on the hour of the evening. On the contrary, we may easily and properly extend to a late hour of the night what is here said, and understand it to mean that Christ came to them after the evening, when the apostles had shut the doors, and kept themselves concealed within the house. In short, John does not describe the very commencement of the night, but simply means that, when the day was past, and after sunset, and even at the dead hour of night, Christ came to the disciples contrary to their expectation.

Still there arises here another question, since Mark and Luke relate that the eleven were assembled, when Christ appeared to them; and John says that Thomas was then absent, (Joh 20:24.) But there is no absurdity in saying that the number — the eleven — is here put for the apostles themselves, though one of their company was absent. We have lately stated—and the fact makes it evident—that John enters into the details with greater distinctness, because it was his design to relate what the others had omitted. Besides, it is beyond a doubt that the three Evangelists relate the same narrative; since John expressly says that it was only twice that Christ appeared to his disciples at Jerusalem, before they went to Galilee; for he says that he appeared to them the third time at the sea of Tiberias, (Joh 21:1) He had already described two appearances of our Lord, one which took place on the day after his resurrection, (Joh 20:19,) and the other which followed eight days afterwards, (Joh 20:26) though, were any one to choose rather to explain the second appearance to be that which is found in the Gospel by Mark, I should not greatly object.

I now return to the words of Luke. He does not, indeed, say that Christ, by his divine power, opened for himself the doors which were shut, (Joh 20:26;) but something of this sort is indirectly suggested by the phrase which he employs, Jesus stood. For how could our Lord suddenly, during the night, stand in the midst of them, if he had not entered in a miraculous manner? The same form of salutation is employed by both, Peace be to you; by which the Hebrews mean, that for the person whom they address they wish happiness and prosperity.

Calvin: Luk 24:37 - And they were terrified and affrighted 37.And they were terrified and affrighted John does not mention this terror; but as he also says that Christ showed his hands and sides to the discip...

37.And they were terrified and affrighted John does not mention this terror; but as he also says that Christ showed his hands and sides to the disciples, we may conjecture that some circumstance had been omitted by him. Nor is it at all unusual with the Evangelists, when they aim at brevity, to glance only at a part of the facts. From Luke, too, we learn that the terror excited in them by the strangeness of the spectacle was such, that they dare not trust their eyes. But a little ago, they had come to the conclusion that the Lord was risen, (verse 34,) and had spoken of it unhesitatingly as a matter fully ascertained; and now, when they behold him with their eyes, their senses are struck with astonishment, so that they think he is a spirit. Though this error, which arose from weakness, was not free from blame, still they did not so far forget themselves as to be afraid of enchantments. But though they did not think that they are imposed upon, still they are more inclined to believe that an image of the resurrection is exhibited to them in vision by the Spirit, than that Christ himself, who lately died on the cross, is alive and present. So then they did not suspect that this was a vision intended to deceive them, as if it had been an idle phantom, but, seized with fear, they thought only that there was exhibited to them in spirit what was actually placed before their eyes.

Calvin: Luk 24:38 - Why are you troubled? // And why do thoughts arise in your hearts? 38.Why are you troubled? By these words they are exhorted to lay aside terror, and regain the possession of their minds, that, having returned to the...

38.Why are you troubled? By these words they are exhorted to lay aside terror, and regain the possession of their minds, that, having returned to the rigor of their senses, they may judge of a matter which is fully ascertained; for so long as men are seized with perturbation, they are blind amidst the clearest light. In order, therefore, that the disciples may obtain undoubted information, they are enjoined to weigh the matter with calmness and composure.

And why do thoughts arise in your hearts? In this second clause, Christ reproves another fault, which is, that by the variety of their thoughts they throw difficulties in their own way. By saying that thoughts arise, he means that the knowledge of the truth is choked in them in such a manner, that seeing they do not see, (Mat 13:14;) for they do not restrain their wicked imaginations, but, on the contrary, by giving them free scope, they permit them to gain the superiority. And certainly we find it to be too true, that as, when the sky has been clear in the morning, clouds afterwards arise to darken the clear light of the sun; so when we allow our reasonings to arise with excessive freedom in opposition to the word of God, what formerly appeared clear to us is withdrawn from our eyes. We have a right, indeed, when any appearance of absurdity presents itself, to inquire by weighing the arguments on both sides; and, indeed, so long as matters are doubtful, our minds must inevitably be driven about in every direction: but we must observe sobriety and moderation, lest the flesh exalt itself more highly than it ought, and throw out its thoughts far and wide against heaven.

Calvin: Luk 24:39 - Look at my hands and my feet 39.Look at my hands and my feet He calls upon their bodily senses as witnesses, that they may not suppose that a shadow is exhibited to them instead ...

39.Look at my hands and my feet He calls upon their bodily senses as witnesses, that they may not suppose that a shadow is exhibited to them instead of a body. And, first, he distinguishes between a corporeal man and a spirit; as if he had said, “Sight and touch will prove that I am a real man, who have formerly conversed with you; for I am clothed with that flesh which was crucified, and which still bears the marks of it.” Again, when Christ declares that his body may be touched, and that it has solid bones, this passage is justly and appropriately adduced by those who adhere to us, for the purpose of refuting the gross error about the transubstantiation of bread into the body, or about the local presence of the body, which men foolishly imagine to exist in the Holy Supper. For they would have us to believe that the body of Christ is in a place where no Mark of a body can be seen; and in this way it will follow that it has changed its nature, so that it has ceased to be what it was, and from which Christ proves it to be a real body. If it be objected, on the other hand, that his side was then pierced, and that his feet and hands were pierced and wounded by the nails, but that now Christ is in heaven without any vestige of wound or injury, it is easy to dispose of this objection; for the present question is not merely in what form Christ appeared, but what he declares as to the real nature of his flesh. Now he pronounces it to be, as it were, a distinguishing character of his body, that he may be handled, and therefore differs from a spirit. We must therefore hold that the distinction between flesh and spirit, which the words of Christ authorize us to regard as perpetual, exists in the present day.

As to the wounds, we ought to look upon this as a proof by which it was intended to prove to us all, that Christ rose rather for us them for himself; since, after having vanquished death, and obtained a blessed and heavenly immortality, yet, on our account, he continued for a time to bear some remaining marks of the cross. It certainly was an astonishing act of condescension towards the disciples, that he chose rather to want something that was necessary to render perfect the glory of the resurrection, than to deprive their faith of such a support. But it was a foolish and an old wife’s dream, to imagine that he will still continue to bear the marks of the wounds, when he shall come to judge the world.

Calvin: Luk 24:41 - But while they yet believed not for joy Luk 24:41.But while they yet believed not for joy This passage shows also that they were not purposely incredulous, like persons who deliberately reso...

Luk 24:41.But while they yet believed not for joy This passage shows also that they were not purposely incredulous, like persons who deliberately resolve not to believe; but while their will led them to believe eagerly, they were held bound by the vehemence of their feelings, so that they could not rest satisfied. For certainly the joy which Luke mentions arose from nothing but faith; and yet it hindered their faith from gaining the victory. Let us therefore observe with what suspicion we ought to regard the vehemence of our feelings, which, though it may have good beginnings, hurries us out of the right path. We are also reminded how earnestly we ought to struggle against every thing that retards faith, since the joy which sprung up in the minds of the apostles from the presence of Christ was the cause of their unbelief.

Calvin: Luk 24:43 - And he took, and ate it in their presence 43.And he took, and ate it in their presence Here we perceive, on the other hand, how kindly and gently Christ bears with the weakness of his followe...

43.And he took, and ate it in their presence Here we perceive, on the other hand, how kindly and gently Christ bears with the weakness of his followers, since he does not fail to give them this new support when they are falling. And, indeed, though he has obtained a new and heavenly life, and has no more need of meat and drink than angels have, still he voluntarily condescends to join in the common usages of mortals. During the whole course of his life, he had subjected himself to the necessity of eating and drinking; and now, though relieved from that necessity, he eats for the purpose of convincing his disciples of the certainty of his resurrection. Thus we see how he disregarded himself, and chose always to be devoted to our interests. This is the true and pious meditation on this narrative, in which believers may advantageously rest, dismissing questions of mere curiosity, such as, “Was this corruptible food digested?” “What sort of nourishment did the body of Christ derive from it?” and, “What became of what did not go to nourishment?” As if it had not been in the power of Him who created all things out of nothing to reduce to nothing a small portion of food, whenever he thought fit. As Christ really tasted the fish and the honeycomb, in order to show that he was a man, so we cannot doubt that by his divine power he consumed what was not needed to pass into nourishment. Thus the angels, at the table of Abraham, (Gen 18:1,) having been clothed with real bodies, did actually, I have no doubt, eat and drink; but yet I do not therefore admit that the meat and drink yielded them that refreshment which the weakness of the flesh demands; but as they were clothed with a human form for the sake of Abraham, so the Lord granted this favor to his servant, that those heavenly visitors ate before his tent. Now if we acknowledge that the bodies which they assumed for a time were reduced to nothing after they had discharged their embassy, who will deny that the same thing happened as to the food?

Calvin: Luk 24:44 - These are the words // All things which are written concerning me 44.These are the words Though it will afterwards appear from Matthew and Mark that a discourse similar to this was delivered in Galilee, yet I think ...

44.These are the words Though it will afterwards appear from Matthew and Mark that a discourse similar to this was delivered in Galilee, yet I think it probable that Luke now relates what happened on the day after his resurrection. For what John says of that day, that he breathed on them, that they might receive the Holy Ghost, (Joh 20:22) agrees with the words of Luke which here immediately follow, that he opened their understanding, that they might understand the Scriptures. By these words Christ indirectly reproves their gross and shameful forgetfulness, that, though they had long ago been fully informed of his future resurrection, they were as much astonished as if it had never been mentioned to them. The import of his words is: “Why do you hesitate as if this had been a new and unexpected occurrence, while it is only what I frequently predicted to you? Why do you not rather remember my words? For if hitherto you have reckoned me worthy of credit, this ought to have been known to you from my instructions before it happened.” In short, Christ tacitly complains that his labor has been thrown away on the apostles, since his instruction has been forgotten.

All things which are written concerning me He now rebukes them more sharply for their slowness, by declaring that he brought forward nothing that was new but that he only reminded them of what had been declared by the Law and the Prophets, with which they ought to have been familiar from their childhood. But though they had been ignorant of the whole doctrine of religion, nothing could have been more unreasonable than not to embrace readily what they knew to have undoubtedly proceeded from God; for it was a principle admitted by the whole nation, that there was no religion but what was contained in the Law and the Prophets. The present division of the Scriptures is more copious than what we find in other passages; for besides the Law and the Prophets, he adds, in the third place, the Psalms, which, though they might with propriety have been reckoned among the Prophets, have, something distinct and peculiar to themselves. Yet the division into two par which we have seen elsewhere, (Luk 16:16; Joh 1:45,) embraces notwithstanding the whole of Scripture.

Calvin: Luk 24:45 - Then he opened their understanding // That they might understand the Scriptures 45.Then he opened their understanding As the Lord had formerly discharged the office of Teacher, with little or no improvement on the part of the dis...

45.Then he opened their understanding As the Lord had formerly discharged the office of Teacher, with little or no improvement on the part of the disciples, he now begins to teach them inwardly by his Spirit; for words are icily wasted on the air, until the minds are enlightened by the gift of understanding. It is true, indeed, that

the word of God is like a lamp,
(Psa 119:105;)

but it shines in darkness and amidst the blind, until the inward light is given by the Lord, to whom it peculiarly belongs to enlighten the blind, (Psa 146:8.) And hence it is evident how great is the corruption of our nature, since the light of life exhibited to us in the heavenly oracles is of no avail to us. Now if we do not perceive by the understanding what is right, how would the will be sufficient for yielding obedience? We ought, therefore, to acknowledge that we come short in every respect, so that the heavenly doctrine proves to be useful and efficacious to us, only so far as the Spirit both forms our minds to understand it, and our hearts to submit to its yoke; and, therefore, that in order to our being properly qualified for becoming his disciples, we must lay aside all confidence in our own abilities, and seek light from heaven; and, abandoning the foolish opinion of free-will, must give ourselves up to be governed by God. Nor is it without reason that Paul bids men

become fools, that they may be wise to God,
(1Co 3:18;)

for no darkness is more dangerous for quenching the light of the Spirit than reliance on our own sagacity.

That they might understand the Scriptures Let the reader next observe, that the disciples had not the eyes of their mind opened, so as to comprehend the mysteries of God without any assistance, but so far as they are contained in the Scriptures; and thus was fulfilled what is said,

(Psa 119:18,) Enlighten mine eyes,
that I may behold the wonders of thy law.

For God does not bestow the Spirit on his people, in order to set aside the use of his word, but rather to render it fruitful. It is highly improper, therefore, in fanatics, under the pretense of revelations, to take upon themselves the liberty of despising the Scriptures; for what we now read in reference to the apostles is daily accomplished by Christ in all his people, namely, that by his Spirit he guides us to understand the Scriptures, and does not hurry us away into the idle raptures of enthusiasm.

But it may be asked, Why did Christ choose to lose his labor, during the entire period of three years, in teaching them, rather than to open their understandings from the very outset? I reply, first, though the fruit of his labor did not immediately appear, still it was not useless; for when the new light was given to them, they likewise perceived the advantage of the former period. For I regard these words as meaning, not only that he opened their understandings, that, in future they might be ready to receive instruction, if any thing were stated to them, but that they might call to remembrance his doctrine, which they had formerly heard without any advantage. Next, let us learn that this ignorance, which lasted during three years, was of great use for informing them that from no other source than from the heavenly light did they obtain their new discernment. Besides, by this fact Christ gave an undoubted proof of his Divinity; for he not only was the minister of the outward voice, which sounded in their ears, but by his hidden power he penetrated into their minds, and thus showed that what, Paul tells us, does not belong to the teachers of the Church is the prerogative of Him alone, (1Co 3:7.) Yet it ought to be observed, that the apostles were not so destitute of the light of understanding as not to hold certain elementary principles; but as it was only a slight taste, it is reckoned to be a commencement of true understanding when the veil is removed, and they behold Christ in the Law and the Prophets.

Calvin: Luk 24:46 - And he said to them, Thus it is written 46.And he said to them, Thus it is written The connection of these words refutes the calumny of those who allege that outward doctrine would be super...

46.And he said to them, Thus it is written The connection of these words refutes the calumny of those who allege that outward doctrine would be superfluous, if we did not naturally possess some power of understanding. “Why,” say they, “would the Lord speak to the deaf?” But we see that, when the Spirit of Christ, who is the inward Teacher, performs his office, the labor of the minister who speaks is not thrown away; for Christ, after having bestowed on his followers the gift of understanding, instructs them out of the Scriptures with real advantage. With the reprobate, indeed, though the outward word passes away as if it were dead, still it renders them inexcusable.

As to the words of Christ, they are founded on this principle: Whatever is written must be fulfilled, for God declared nothing by his prophets but what he will undoubtedly accomplish.” But by these words we are likewise taught what it is that we ought chiefly to learn from the Law and the Prophets; namely, that since Christ is the end and the soul of the law, (Rom 10:4,) whatever we learn without him, and apart from him, is idle and unprofitable. Whoever then desires to make great proficiency in the Scriptures ought always to keep this end in view. Now Christ here places first in order his death and resurrection, and afterwards the fruit which we derive from both. For whence come repentance and forgiveness of sins, but because our old man is crucified with Christ, (Rom 6:6,) that by his grace we may rise to newness of life; and because our sins have been expiated by the sacrifice of his death, our pollution has been washed away by his blood, and we have, obtained righteousness through his resurrection? He teaches, therefore, that in his death and resurrection we ought to seek the cause and grounds of our salvation; because hence arise reconciliation to God, and regeneration to a new and spiritual life. Thus it is expressly stated that neither forgiveness of sins nor repentance can be preached but in his name; for, on the one hand, we have no right to expect the imputation of righteousness, and, on the other hand, we do not obtain self-denial and newness of life, except so far as

he is made to us righteousness and sanctification,
(1Co 1:30.)

But as we have elsewhere treated copiously of this summary of the Gospel, it is better to refer my readers to those passages for what they happen not to remember, than to load them with repetitions.

Calvin: Luk 24:47 - To all nations, beginning at Jerusalem 47.To all nations, beginning at Jerusalem Christ now discovers clearly what he had formerly concealed—that the grace of the redemption brought by h...

47.To all nations, beginning at Jerusalem Christ now discovers clearly what he had formerly concealed—that the grace of the redemption brought by him extends alike to all nations. For though the prophets had frequently predicted the calling of the Gentiles, still it was not revealed in such a manner that the Jews could willingly admit the Gentiles to share with them in the hope of salvation. Till his resurrection, therefore, Christ was not acknowledged to be any thing more than the Redeemer of the chosen people alone; and then, for the first time, was the wall of partition (Eph 2:14) thrown down, that they who had been strangers, (Eph 2:19,) and who had formerly been scattered, might be gathered into the fold of the Lord. In the meantime, however, that the covenant of God might not seem to be made void, Christ has assigned to the Jews the first rank, enjoining the apostles to begin at Jerusalem. For since God had peculiarly adopted the posterity of Abraham, they must have been preferred to the rest of the world. This is the privilege of the firstborn which Jeremiah ascribes to them, when Jehovah says, I am a father to Israel, and Ephraim is first-born, (Jer 30:9.) This order, too, Paul everywhere observes with the greatest care, telling us that Christ came and proclaimed peace to those who were near, and afterwards to strangers who were at a distance, (Eph 2:17.)

Calvin: Luk 24:48 - And you are witnesses of those things 48.And you are witnesses of those things He does not yet commission them to preach the gospel, but only reminds them to what service he has appointed...

48.And you are witnesses of those things He does not yet commission them to preach the gospel, but only reminds them to what service he has appointed them, that they may prepare themselves for it in due time. He holds out this, partly as a consolation to soothe their grief, and partly as a spur to correct their sloth. Conscious of their recent departure from their Master, they must have been in a state of dejection and here, contrary to all expectation, Christ bestows on them incredible honor, enjoining them to publish to the whole world the message of eternal salvation. In this manner he not only restores them to their former condition, but by the extent of this new favor he utterly obliterates the recollection of their heinous crimes; but at the same time, as I have said, he stimulates them, that they may not be so slow and dilatory in reference to the faith of which they were appointed to be preachers.

Calvin: Luk 24:49 - And, lo, I send // But remain you in the city of Jerusalem 49.And, lo, I send That the apostles may not be terrified by their weakness, he invites them to expect new and extraordinary grace; as if he had said...

49.And, lo, I send That the apostles may not be terrified by their weakness, he invites them to expect new and extraordinary grace; as if he had said, though you feel yourselves to be unfit for such a charge, there is no reason why you should despond, because I will send you from heaven that power which I know that you do not possess. The more fully to confirm them in this confidence, he mentions that the Father had promised to them the Holy Spirit; for, in order that they might prepare themselves with greater alacrity for the work, God had already encouraged them by his promise, as a remedy for their distrust. Christ now puts himself in the place of the Father, and undertakes to perform the promise; in which he again claims for himself divine power. To invest feeble men with heavenly power, is a part of that glory which God swears that he will not give to another: and, therefore, if it belongs to Christ, it follows that he is that God who formerly spoke by the mouth of the prophet, (Isa 42:8.) And though God promised special grace to the apostles, and Christ bestowed it on them, we ought to hold universally that no mortal is of himself qualified for preaching the gospel, except so far as God clothes him with his Spirit, to supply his nakedness and poverty. And certainly, as it is not in reference to the apostles alone that Paul exclaims,

(2Co 2:16,)
And who shall be found sufficient for these things?

so all whom God raises up to be ministers of the gospel must be endued with the heavenly Spirit; and, therefore, in every part of Scripture he is promised to all the teachers of the Church without exception.

But remain you in the city of Jerusalem That they may not advance to teach before the proper time, Christ enjoins on them silence and repose, until, sending them out according to his pleasure, he may make a seasonable use of their labors. And this was a useful trial of their obedience, that, after having been endued with the understanding of the Scripture, and after having had the grace of the Spirit breathed on them, (Joh 20:22;) yet because the Lord had forbidden them to speak, they were silent as if they had been dumb. For we know that those who expect to gain applause and admiration from their hearers are very desirous to appear in public. Perhaps, too, by this delay, Christ intended to punish them for indolence, because they did not, in compliance with his injunction, set out immediately, on the same day, for Galilee. However that may be, we are taught by their example, that we ought to attempt nothing but as the Lord calls us to it; and, therefore, though they may possess some ability to teach in public, let men remain in silence and retirement, until the Lord lead them by the hand into the public assembly. When they are commanded to remain at Jerusalem, we must understand this to mean, after they had returned from Galilee. For, as we shortly afterwards learn from Matthew, though he gave them an opportunity of seeing him at Jerusalem, still he did not change his original intention to go to Galilee, (Mat 26:32.) The meaning of the word, therefore, is, that after having given them injunctions at the appointed place, he wishes them to remain silent for a time, until he supplies them with new rigor.

Calvin: Luk 24:50 - And lifted up his hands, and blessed them; Luk 24:50.And lifted up his hands, and blessed them; by which he showed that the office of blessing, which was enjoined on the priests under the law...

Luk 24:50.And lifted up his hands, and blessed them; by which he showed that the office of blessing, which was enjoined on the priests under the law, belonged truly and properly to himself. When men bless one another it is nothing else than praying in behalf of their brethren; but with God it is otherwise, for he does not merely befriend us by wishes, but by a simple act of his will grants what is desirable for us. But while He is the only Author of all blessing, yet that men might obtain a familiar view of his grace, he chose that at first the priests should bless in his name as mediators. Thus Melchizedek blessed Abraham, (Gen 14:19,) and in Num 6:23, a perpetual law is laid down in reference to this matter. To this purport also is what we read in Psa 118:26, We bless you out of the house of the Lord In short, the apostle has told us that to bless others is a Mark of superiority; for the less, he says, is blessed by the greater, (Heb 7:7.) Now when Christ, the true Melchizedek and eternal Priest, was manifested, it was necessary that in him should be fulfilled what had been shadowed out by the figures of the law; as Paul also shows that we are blessed in him by God the Father, that we may be rich in all heavenly blessings, (Eph 1:3.) Openly and solemnly he once blessed the apostles, that believers may go direct to himself, if they desire to be partakers of his grace. In the lifting up of the hands is described an ancient ceremony which, we know:, was formerly used by the priests.

Calvin: Luk 24:52 - NO PHRASE 52.=== And === having worshipped him, they returned. By the word worship, Luke means, first, that the apostles were relieved from all doubt, becau...

52.=== And === having worshipped him, they returned. By the word worship, Luke means, first, that the apostles were relieved from all doubt, because at that time the majesty of Christ shone on all sides, so that there was no longer any room for doubting of his resurrection; and, secondly, that for the same reason they began to honor him with greater reverence than when they enjoyed his society on earth. For the worship which is here mentioned was rendered to him not only as Master or Prophet, nor even as the Messiah, whose character had been but half known, but as the King of glory and the Judge of the world. Now as Luke intended to give a longer narrative, he only states briefly what the apostles did during ten days. The amount of what is said is, that through the fervor of their joy they broke out openly into the praises of God, and were continually in the temple; not that they remained there by day and by night, but that they attended the public assemblies, and were present at the ordinary and stated hours to render thanksgiving to God. This joy is contrasted with the fear which formerly kept them retired and concealed at home.

Defender: Luk 24:4 - two men The account in Mat 28:2 says there was an angel there, and Mar 16:5 says it was a "young man." The two on the road to Emmaus said the women had "seen ...

The account in Mat 28:2 says there was an angel there, and Mar 16:5 says it was a "young man." The two on the road to Emmaus said the women had "seen a vision of angels" (Luk 23:23). Angels can appear as men, and probably the women did see two angels appearing as men, only one of whom did the speaking. Perhaps he was Gabriel, who had earlier announced the birth of Christ (Luk 1:26, Luk 1:31). There is also the intriguing possibility that these "two men" who "stood by" at the tomb were also the "two men" who "stood by" at the ascension (Act 1:10) and are God's "two witnesses" in the last days who "stand before the God of the earth" (Rev 11:3, Rev 11:4).

See also Zec 4:14, which notes that the two witnesses are "the two anointed ones, that stand by the Lord of the whole earth." These witnesses cannot be angels since they will be slain, then rise again (Rev 11:7, Rev 11:11). But if they are men, waiting in heaven and standing by God, they could well be Enoch and Elijah. See notes on Rev 11:3-12 for further discussion of this possibility."

Defender: Luk 24:18 - Cleopas The second of the "two of them" who lived in Emmaus (Luk 24:13) was evidently "Mary the wife of Cleophas" (Joh 19:25), for the two evidently had a hom...

The second of the "two of them" who lived in Emmaus (Luk 24:13) was evidently "Mary the wife of Cleophas" (Joh 19:25), for the two evidently had a home in Emmaus where they could invite this "stranger" in for supper and rest (Luk 24:28-30). She had actually observed the crucifixion and may have been among the women who had gone to the tomb that morning."

Defender: Luk 24:25 - believe all The resurrected Lord Jesus thus confirmed the doctrine of plenary inspiration; it is foolish and wrong-hearted to reject anything written in the Old T...

The resurrected Lord Jesus thus confirmed the doctrine of plenary inspiration; it is foolish and wrong-hearted to reject anything written in the Old Testament."

Defender: Luk 24:26 - enter into his glory The Messianic Scriptures clearly teach that Christ would be crucified (Psalm 22, Isa 53:1-12), then be raised (Psa 16:1-11) and enter into His glory (...

The Messianic Scriptures clearly teach that Christ would be crucified (Psalm 22, Isa 53:1-12), then be raised (Psa 16:1-11) and enter into His glory (Psa 110:1-7), so that those who knew and believed the Scriptures should have been expecting these events.

Defender: Luk 24:26 - beginning at Moses It is significant that when the greatest Bible teacher - in fact the Author of the Book - taught Biblical truths, He began at the beginning. Genesis i...

It is significant that when the greatest Bible teacher - in fact the Author of the Book - taught Biblical truths, He began at the beginning. Genesis is the foundational book of the Bible, and it is essential that we understand and believe God's revelation in Genesis if we would understand the rest of Scripture."

Defender: Luk 24:27 - concerning himself Jesus here confirms that all the Scriptures point, in one way or another, to the person and work of the Savior."

Jesus here confirms that all the Scriptures point, in one way or another, to the person and work of the Savior."

Defender: Luk 24:30 - blessed it, and brake There are nine occasions recorded in the gospels when Jesus took bread, blessed, broke and fed it to His disciples. No wonder they recognized Him "in ...

There are nine occasions recorded in the gospels when Jesus took bread, blessed, broke and fed it to His disciples. No wonder they recognized Him "in breaking of bread" (Luk 24:35)."

Defender: Luk 24:32 - our heart burn "Christian heartburn" results when the Lord - through the indwelling Spirit - opens the Scriptures today as we read and obey God's Word: "His word was...

"Christian heartburn" results when the Lord - through the indwelling Spirit - opens the Scriptures today as we read and obey God's Word: "His word was in mine heart as a burning fire shut up in my bones, and I was weary with forbearing, and I could not stay" (Jer 20:9)."

Defender: Luk 24:32 - opened to us Note the order of this passage. When the Scriptures were opened, first their eyes were opened (Luk 24:31) and then their understanding was opened (Luk...

Note the order of this passage. When the Scriptures were opened, first their eyes were opened (Luk 24:31) and then their understanding was opened (Luk 24:45)."

Defender: Luk 24:39 - my feet It seems the Lord answers modern theologians who interpret the resurrection as spiritual, rather than physical. His spirit never died so could not be ...

It seems the Lord answers modern theologians who interpret the resurrection as spiritual, rather than physical. His spirit never died so could not be resurrected. He also refutes those who argue that the "appearances" to His disciples were "spiritual appearances," or even hallucinations. Even they at first thought He was a spirit, but He then showed them the scars of the spikes that had pierced His hands and feet and even ate part of a fish and a honeycomb before them (Luk 24:37, Luk 24:40, Luk 24:42). They could no longer doubt the reality of His bodily resurrection, nor did they ever doubt it thereafter.

Defender: Luk 24:39 - flesh and bones It is significant that Christ did not use the more common phrase, "flesh and blood." His blood had been shed on the cross as the price of our redempti...

It is significant that Christ did not use the more common phrase, "flesh and blood." His blood had been shed on the cross as the price of our redemption (1Pe 1:18, 1Pe 1:19), and now "flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God" (1Co 15:50)."

Defender: Luk 24:44 - must be fulfilled Every promise of God concerning the person and work of Christ must be fulfilled either at His first coming or at His second coming. "The Scripture can...

Every promise of God concerning the person and work of Christ must be fulfilled either at His first coming or at His second coming. "The Scripture cannot be broken," Jesus has assured us (Joh 10:35).

Defender: Luk 24:44 - the psalms This threefold division actually embraces the entire Old Testament canon. Another way of expressing this would be the historical writings, the poetica...

This threefold division actually embraces the entire Old Testament canon. Another way of expressing this would be the historical writings, the poetical writings, and the prophetical writings. All are divinely inspired and inerrant in their very words."

Defender: Luk 24:45 - their understanding The Bible is not like any other book. While it is easy enough to be understood by the sincere and diligent believer, it is often incomprehensible fool...

The Bible is not like any other book. While it is easy enough to be understood by the sincere and diligent believer, it is often incomprehensible foolishness to the unbeliever, for "the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God ... they are spiritually discerned" (1Co 2:14). When Christ, by His indwelling Holy Spirit, opens our understanding, only then do we "understand the scriptures.""

Defender: Luk 24:49 - promise of my Father This promise was the promise of the Holy Spirit, a promise made to the disciples in the upper room before the crucifixion (Joh 14:16, Joh 14:17). Chri...

This promise was the promise of the Holy Spirit, a promise made to the disciples in the upper room before the crucifixion (Joh 14:16, Joh 14:17). Christ also had told them He was sending them out into the world (Joh 20:21), but first they had to wait until the promised Spirit was sent to empower them for that service. These concluding verses of Luke's gospel correlate with the first section of his continuing narrative in the book of Acts (Act 1:1-11)."

TSK: Luk 24:1 - upon // they came upon : Mat 28:1; Mar 16:1, Mar 16:2; Joh 20:1, Joh 20:2 they came : Luk 24:10, Luk 8:2, Luk 8:3, Luk 23:55, Luk 23:56; Mat 27:55, Mat 27:56; Mar 15:40

TSK: Luk 24:2 - -- Mat 27:60-66, Mat 28:2; Mar 15:46, Mar 15:47, Mar 16:3, Mar 16:4; Joh 20:1, Joh 20:2

TSK: Luk 24:3 - -- Luk 24:23; Mat 16:5; Joh 20:6, Joh 20:7

TSK: Luk 24:4 - two men two men : Gen 18:2; Mat 28:2-6; Mar 16:5; Joh 20:11, Joh 20:12; Act 1:10 (see note on Mar 16:2.)

TSK: Luk 24:5 - they // the living they : Luk 1:12, Luk 1:13, Luk 1:29; Dan 8:17, Dan 8:18, Dan 10:7-12, Dan 10:16, Dan 10:19; Mat 28:3-5; Mar 16:5, Mar 16:6; Act 10:3, Act 10:4 the liv...

TSK: Luk 24:6 - remember remember : Luk 24:44-46, Luk 9:22, Luk 18:31-33; Mat 12:40, Mat 16:21, Mat 17:22, Mat 17:23, Mat 20:18, Mat 20:19, Mat 27:63; Mat 28:6; Mar 8:31, Mar ...

TSK: Luk 24:8 - -- Joh 2:19-22, Joh 12:16, Joh 14:26

TSK: Luk 24:9 - -- Luk 24:22-24; Mat 28:7, Mat 28:8; Mar 16:7, Mar 16:8, Mar 16:10

TSK: Luk 24:10 - -- Luk 8:2, Luk 8:3; Mar 15:40,Mar 15:41, Mar 16:9-11; Joh 20:11-18

TSK: Luk 24:11 - idle idle : Luk 24:25; Gen 19:14; 2Ki 7:2; Job 9:16; Psa 126:1; Act 12:9

TSK: Luk 24:12 - -- Joh 20:3-10

TSK: Luk 24:13 - two // Emmaus two : Luk 24:18; Mar 16:12, Mar 16:13 Emmaus : Emmaus was situated, according to the testimony both of Luke and Josephus, sixty furlongs from Jerusale...

two : Luk 24:18; Mar 16:12, Mar 16:13

Emmaus : Emmaus was situated, according to the testimony both of Luke and Josephus, sixty furlongs from Jerusalem, that is, about seven miles and a half. It has generally been confounded with Emmaus, a city of Judah, afterwards called Nicopolis; but Reland has satisfactorily shown that they were distinct places; the latter, according to the old Itinerary of Palestine, being situated 10 miles from Lydda, and 22 miles from Jerusalem. D’ Arvieux states, that going from Jerusalem to Rama, he took the right from the high road to Rama, at some little distance from Jerusalem, and ""travelled a good league over rocks and flint stones, to the end of the valley of terebinthine trees,""until he reached Emmaus; which ""seems, by the ruins which surround it, to have been formerly larger that it was in our Saviour’ s time. The Christians, while masters of the Holy Land, re-established it a little, and built several churches. Emmaus was not worth the trouble of having come out of the way to see it.""

TSK: Luk 24:14 - -- Luk 6:45; Deu 6:7; Mal 3:6

TSK: Luk 24:15 - Jesus Jesus : Luk 24:36; Mat 18:20; Joh 14:18, Joh 14:19

TSK: Luk 24:16 - -- Luk 24:31; 2Ki 6:18-20; Mar 16:12; Joh 20:14, Joh 21:4

TSK: Luk 24:17 - and are and are : Eze 9:4-6; Joh 16:6, Joh 16:20-22

TSK: Luk 24:18 - Cleopas Cleopas : Joh 19:25

Cleopas : Joh 19:25

TSK: Luk 24:19 - Concerning // mighty Concerning : Luk 7:16; Mat 21:11; Joh 3:2, Joh 4:19, Joh 6:14, Joh 7:40-42, Joh 7:52; Act 2:22, Act 10:38 mighty : Act 7:22

TSK: Luk 24:20 - -- Luk 22:66-71, Luk 23:1-5; Mat 27:1, Mat 27:2, Mat 27:20; Mar 15:1; Act 3:13-15, Act 4:8-10; Act 4:27, Act 4:28, Act 5:30,Act 5:31, Act 13:27-29

TSK: Luk 24:21 - -- Luk 1:68, Luk 2:38; Psa 130:8; Isa 59:20; Act 1:6; 1Pe 1:18, 1Pe 1:19; Rev 5:9

TSK: Luk 24:22 - -- Luk 24:9-11; Mat 28:7, Mat 28:8; Mar 16:9, Mar 16:10; Joh 20:1, Joh 20:2, Joh 20:18

TSK: Luk 24:24 - went went : Luk 24:12; Joh 20:1-10

TSK: Luk 24:25 - O fools O fools : Rather, inconsiderate men, ανοητοι [Strong’ s G453], justly termed such, because they had not attended to the description of ...

O fools : Rather, inconsiderate men, ανοητοι [Strong’ s G453], justly termed such, because they had not attended to the description of the Messiah by the prophets, nor to His teaching and miracles, as proofs that He alone was the person described. Mar 7:18, Mar 8:17, Mar 8:18, Mar 9:19, Mar 16:14; Heb 5:11, Heb 5:12

TSK: Luk 24:26 - -- Luk 24:46; Psa. 22:1-31, 69:1-36; Isa 53:1-12; Zec 13:7; Act 17:3; 1Co 15:3, 1Co 15:4; Heb 2:8-10, Heb 9:22, Heb 9:23; 1Pe 1:3, 1Pe 1:11

TSK: Luk 24:27 - beginning // and all beginning : Luk 24:44; Gen 3:15, Gen 22:18, Gen 26:4, Gen 49:10; Num 21:6-9; Deu 18:15; Joh 5:39, Joh 5:45-47; Act 3:22, Act 7:37 and all : Luk 24:25;...

TSK: Luk 24:28 - he made he made : That is, he was directing his steps as if to go onwards; and so he doubtless would, had he not been withheld by their friendly importunities...

he made : That is, he was directing his steps as if to go onwards; and so he doubtless would, had he not been withheld by their friendly importunities. There is not the smallest ground for founding a charge of dissimulation against our Saviour, or affording any encouragement to dissimulation in others. Gen 19:2, Gen 32:26, Gen 42:7; Mar 6:48

TSK: Luk 24:29 - -- Luk 14:23; Gen 19:3; 2Ki 4:8; Act 16:14

TSK: Luk 24:30 - he took he took : Luk 24:35, Luk 9:16, Luk 22:19; Mat 14:19, Mat 15:36, Mat 26:26; Mar 6:41, Mar 8:6, Mar 14:22; Joh 6:11; Act 27:35

TSK: Luk 24:31 - their eyes // vanished out of their sight their eyes : Luk 24:16; Joh 20:13-16 vanished out of their sight : or, ceased to be seen of them, Luk 4:30; Joh 8:59

their eyes : Luk 24:16; Joh 20:13-16

vanished out of their sight : or, ceased to be seen of them, Luk 4:30; Joh 8:59

TSK: Luk 24:32 - Did // opened Did : Psa 39:3, Psa 104:34; Pro 27:9, Pro 27:17; Isa 50:4; Jer 15:16, Jer 20:9, Jer 23:29; Joh 6:63; Heb 4:12 opened : Luk 24:45; Act 17:2, Act 17:3, ...

TSK: Luk 24:33 - and found and found : Joh 20:19-26

and found : Joh 20:19-26

TSK: Luk 24:34 - Saying // hath Saying : From Mar 16:13, we learn that the apostles did not believe the testimony even of the two disciples from Emmaus, while it is here asserted the...

Saying : From Mar 16:13, we learn that the apostles did not believe the testimony even of the two disciples from Emmaus, while it is here asserted they were saying, when they entered the room, ""The Lord is risen""etc. This difficulty is removed by rendering interrogatively, ""Has the Lord risen,""etc?

hath : Luk 22:54-62; Mar 16:7; 1Co 15:5

TSK: Luk 24:35 - -- Mar 16:12, Mar 16:13

TSK: Luk 24:36 - Jesus // Peace Jesus : Mar 16:14; Joh 20:19-23; 1Co 15:5 Peace : Luk 10:5; Isa 57:18; Mat 10:13; Joh 14:27, Joh 16:33, Joh 20:26; 2Th 3:16; Rev 1:4

TSK: Luk 24:37 - -- Luk 16:30; 1Sa 28:13; Job 4:14-16; Mat 14:26, Mat 14:27; Mar 6:49, Mar 6:50; Act 12:15

TSK: Luk 24:38 - and why and why : Jer 4:14; Dan 4:5, Dan 4:19; Mat 16:8; Heb 4:13

TSK: Luk 24:39 - my hands // for my hands : Joh 20:20,Joh 20:25, Joh 20:27; Act 1:3; 1Jo 1:1 for : Luk 23:46; Num 16:22; Ecc 12:7; 1Th 5:23; Heb 12:9

TSK: Luk 24:41 - believed // Have believed : Gen 45:26-28; Job 9:16; Psa 126:1, Psa 126:2; Joh 16:22 Have : Joh 21:5, Joh 21:10-13

TSK: Luk 24:43 - -- Act 10:41

TSK: Luk 24:44 - These // while // that all // in the law // in the prophets // in the psalms These : Luk 24:6, Luk 24:7, Luk 9:22, Luk 18:31-33; Mat 16:21, Mat 17:22, Mat 17:23, Mat 20:18, Mat 20:19; Mar 8:31, Mar 8:32, Mar 9:31; Mar 10:33, Ma...

TSK: Luk 24:45 - -- Exo 4:11; Job 33:16; Psa 119:18; Isa 29:10-12, Isa 29:18, Isa 29:19; Act 16:14, Act 26:18; 2Co 3:14-18, 2Co 4:4-6; Eph 5:14; Rev 3:7

TSK: Luk 24:46 - -- Luk 24:26, Luk 24:27, Luk 24:44; Psa. 22:1-31; Isa 50:6, Isa 53:2-12; Act 4:12, Act 17:3; 1Pe 1:3

TSK: Luk 24:47 - that // among // beginning that : Dan 9:24; Mat 3:2, Mat 9:13; Act 2:38, Act 3:19, Act 5:31, Act 11:18, Act 13:38, Act 13:39, Act 13:46; Act 17:30,Act 17:31, Act 20:21, Act 26:2...

TSK: Luk 24:48 - -- Joh 15:27; Act 1:8, Act 1:22, Act 2:32, Act 3:15, Act 4:33, Act 5:32, Act 10:39, Act 10:41, Act 13:31, Act 22:15; Heb 2:3, Heb 2:4; 1Jo 1:2, 1Jo 1:3

TSK: Luk 24:49 - I send // but I send : Isa 44:3, Isa 44:4, Isa 59:20,Isa 59:21; Joe 2:28-32; Joh 14:16, Joh 14:17, Joh 14:26, Joh 15:26, Joh 16:7-16 but : Isa 32:15; Act 1:4, Act 1...

TSK: Luk 24:50 - as far // he lifted as far : Mar 11:1; Act 1:12 he lifted : Gen 14:18-20, Gen 27:4, Gen 48:9, Gen 49:28; Num 6:23-27; Mar 10:16; Heb 7:5-7

TSK: Luk 24:51 - he was he was : 2Ki 2:11; Mar 16:19; Joh 20:17; Act 1:9; Eph 4:8-10; Heb 1:3, Heb 4:14

TSK: Luk 24:52 - they // with they : Mat 28:9, Mat 28:17; Joh 20:28 with : Psa 30:11; Joh 14:28, Joh 16:7, Joh 16:22; 1Pe 1:8

TSK: Luk 24:53 - in // Amen in : Act 2:46, Act 2:47, Act 5:41, Act 5:42 Amen : Mat 28:20; Mar 16:20; Rev 22:21

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Poole: Luk 24:1 - -- Luk 24:1-11 Christ’ s resurrection is declared by two angels to the women that came to the sepulchre, who report it to others, but are not beli...

Luk 24:1-11 Christ’ s resurrection is declared by two angels to

the women that came to the sepulchre, who report it

to others, but are not believed.

Luk 24:12 Peter visiteth the sepulchre.

Luk 24:13-35 Christ appeareth to two disciples going to Emmaus,

Luk 24:36-48 and to the apostles, eating before them, and

explaining the Scriptures concerning himself.

Luk 24:49 He promises them the Holy Ghost,

Luk 24:50-53 and ascendeth into heaven.

Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses were the two women that took up their seat right over against the sepulchre, to see where Christ was laid, Mat 27:61 Mar 15:47 . They had bought spices some time of that day after they knew he must die, or else they bought them immediately after his burial, as they went home, for they rested on the sabbath day. They had now got some others into their society, and came very early upon the first day of the week,

( See Poole on "Mat 28:1" , as to the particular time), intending to show their last act of love to their friend by embalming his body.

Poole: Luk 24:2 - -- The stone which Joseph had rolled to the mouth of the sepulchre, when he had laid in the body, Mat 27:60 , and the Jews had sealed, Mat 27:66 , and ...

The stone which Joseph had rolled to the mouth of the sepulchre, when he had laid in the body, Mat 27:60 , and the Jews had sealed, Mat 27:66 , and which, as they came walking, they were so troubled about, how they should get it removed, Mar 16:3 . How it came to be rolled away Matthew telleth us, Mat 28:2 .

Poole: Luk 24:3 - -- Probably when they entered in they saw no angels, for one may reasonably suppose, that if they had they would hardly have adventured to enter in; bu...

Probably when they entered in they saw no angels, for one may reasonably suppose, that if they had they would hardly have adventured to enter in; but at their coming out, being satisfied that the body was not there, the angels made themselves visible to them; for it followeth, (see Luk 24:4-8 ).

Poole: Luk 24:4-8 - -- Ver. 4-8. These two men were two angels in human shape. See Poole on "Mat 28:5" and following verses to Mat 28:7 .

Ver. 4-8. These two men were two angels in human shape. See Poole on "Mat 28:5" and following verses to Mat 28:7 .

Poole: Luk 24:9-12 - -- Ver. 9-12. See Poole on "Mat 28:8" , and following verses to Mat 28:10 , but more fully, See Poole on "Joh 20:2" , and following verses to Joh 20:9...

Ver. 9-12. See Poole on "Mat 28:8" , and following verses to Mat 28:10 , but more fully, See Poole on "Joh 20:2" , and following verses to Joh 20:9 , who repeateth this piece of history more largely than the rest. It is plain that scarce any of the disciples gave credit to the first relation of the women; but yet, it being near the city, Peter and John thought it worth the while to go and see. For though Peter alone be mentioned here, yet John is mentioned, Joh 20:3-5 , under the notion of that other disciple; and he is said to have outrun Peter, and to have come first to the sepulchre. But concerning that part of the history relating to the resurrection, we shall reserve ourselves till we come to Joh 20:1-31 . We now pass on to a piece of history relating to the evidencing of Christ’ s resurrection, which is neither touched by Matthew nor by Luke. Mark toucheth it shortly, Mar 16:12,13 , After that he appeared in another form to two of them, as they walked, and went into the country. And they went and told it unto the residue; neither believed they them. We shall now hear Luke giving us a more full and perfect account.

Poole: Luk 24:13 - -- Who those two were is variously guessed; that the name of the one was Cleopas, appeareth from Luk 24:18 . Some will have the other to have been L...

Who those two were is variously guessed; that the name of the one was Cleopas, appeareth from Luk 24:18 . Some will have the other to have been Luke, but he in the beginning of his Gospel distinguishes himself from eyewitnesses, Luk 1:2 . Some will have it to have been Nathanael; others will have it to have been Simon, from Luk 24:34 , and 1Co 15:5 . But these things are so uncertain, that all the instruction we can learn from them is the vanity and uncertainty of traditions. This Emmaus was from Jerusalem about sixty furlongs, which make seven miles and a half, according to our computation.

Poole: Luk 24:14 - -- There is nothing more ordinary, than for persons walking and riding upon roads to make the present news of the time. The subject of their discourse....

There is nothing more ordinary, than for persons walking and riding upon roads to make the present news of the time. The subject of their discourse. There had great things happened in Jerusalem, the death of our Saviour was such; and those things which attended his death were very extraordinary; and it is not at all to be wondered that a discourse of them should fill every mouth, especially every disciple’ s mouth.

Poole: Luk 24:15 - -- He overtook them upon the way, and joined himself to their company. It is a good thing to be discoursing of Christ, it is the way to have his presen...

He overtook them upon the way, and joined himself to their company. It is a good thing to be discoursing of Christ, it is the way to have his presence and company with us.

Poole: Luk 24:16 - -- God by his providence restrained their eyes, that though they saw a man, yet they could not discern who he was. We may learn from hence that the for...

God by his providence restrained their eyes, that though they saw a man, yet they could not discern who he was. We may learn from hence that the form or figure of Christ’ s body after his resurrection was not changed. His body had the same dimensions, the same quantity, colour, and figure, and was in itself a proper object for human eyes; for otherwise there had been no need for their eyes to be held. From hence also we may learn the influence which God hath upon all our members and senses, and how much we depend upon God for a daily power to exercise our natural faculties. Our Lord had no mind that these two disciples should at first discern who he was, that he might draw out their following discourses, and from them take occasion to prove from Scripture the certainty of his resurrection. From this text we may gather, how hard the Lutherans are put to it to maintain the real presence of the body of Christ, wherever the sacrament of the Lord’ s supper is administered; for this they must maintain, that although the body of Christ after his resurrection was the same that was crucified, and so obvious to sense, yet he had not only a power to make it insensible and invisible, which we grant, but that he hath also a power to multiply it, and make it in one and the same instant to be in so many places as his supper is administered in; and also that he willeth it at the same time to be imperceptible by any human senses in all those places: for it is apparent from hence, that it was not at all times imperceptible; it might at this time have been seen, had not the disciples eyes been held, that they could not know him.

Poole: Luk 24:17 - -- Not that he, from whom the secrets of no hearts are hidden, did not know what they were discoursing about, but that he had a mind to hear them repea...

Not that he, from whom the secrets of no hearts are hidden, did not know what they were discoursing about, but that he had a mind to hear them repeated from them, that from their repetition of them he might take the better advantage to instruct them.

Poole: Luk 24:18-19 - What things? Ver. 18,19. The things which had lately happened in Jerusalem were so many, and so unusual, that the disciples wonder that any one coming from Jerusa...

Ver. 18,19. The things which had lately happened in Jerusalem were so many, and so unusual, that the disciples wonder that any one coming from Jerusalem should ask, What things? They therefore ask him if he were a mere stranger in Jerusalem, coming from some other country, or from some remoter parts of Judea or Galilee? Or, if he were the only man who had been unconcerned in what was the common discourse both of the town and country? Still our Saviour draws out the discourse from them, by asking them,

What things? They tell him, Concerning Jesus of Nazareth, a Prophet mighty in deed and word in which phrase Stephen celebrated Moses, Act 7:22 ; that is, one who did not only in an extraordinary manner reveal the will of God unto men, but also did many great and mighty works, and lived a most holy and most exemplary life and conversation, so as that he was not only highly favoured of God, but in great repute and estimation also amongst the people.

Poole: Luk 24:20-21 - the third day since these things were done Ver. 20,21. It is from hence evident, that as yet they neither had a true notion of Christ as God man in one person, nor yet of the Messiah, but stil...

Ver. 20,21. It is from hence evident, that as yet they neither had a true notion of Christ as God man in one person, nor yet of the Messiah, but still remained in an opinion of a temporal deliverance to be effected for the Jews by the Messiah, when he should come. The words also showed a great weakness in the disciples’ faith as to Christ; they speak as if they were quite out of breath, and their faith began to fail. We were, say they, once of the mind, and maintained some hope, that this Jesus of Nazareth had been he whom God had designed for the Messiah, and now it is

the third day since these things were done This mention of the third day is a good argument to prove that these were some old disciples of Christ, who had taken notice of his promise, or prophecy, that he should rise again the third day, Luk 18:33 . They ought to have had patience till night, and to have considered, that though the third day were begun, yet it was not yet past.

Poole: Luk 24:21 - -- Ver. 21 . See Poole on "Luk 24:20 "

Ver. 21 . See Poole on "Luk 24:20 "

Poole: Luk 24:22 - -- Ver 22-24. It is plain from the relation of these two disciples, that they had whatsoever might conduce to a moral persuasion. They had the revelatio...

Ver 22-24. It is plain from the relation of these two disciples, that they had whatsoever might conduce to a moral persuasion. They had the revelation of the word, from the mouth of Christ himself. They had evidences from the women, from the apparition of angels, from some among themselves, that his body was not there. The angels said he was risen. Why do they hesitate then? Why do they not believe? Is the fault in the perverseness of their wills? Had they no mind to believe, that the thing they had hoped, longed, waited for, was true? Certainly there was nothing they more desired. Let the patrons of the power of man’ s will to believe, or perform any actions spiritually good, tell us (if they can) what could hinder these disciples actual believing the resurrection of Christ, but the impotency of their wills, God not yet pleasing to influence and assist their wills actually to believe what they had the greatest propensions and inclinations imaginable to have believed.

Poole: Luk 24:25-27 - -- Ver. 25-27. By our Saviour’ s form of reprehending his disciples, we may both learn: 1. That it is not every saying, Thou fool, but a saying...

Ver. 25-27. By our Saviour’ s form of reprehending his disciples, we may both learn:

1. That it is not every saying, Thou fool, but a saying of it from a root of hatred, malice, and anger, which our Saviour makes to be a breach of the sixth commandment, Mat 5:21,22 . Our Saviour’ s reprehension of them was out of a principle of love, and a root of good will to them.

2. That the best of us are very slow of heart to believe what cometh to us upon the mere credit of a Divine revelation. It is also observable from what we have, Luk 24:27 , that Moses and the prophets are not to be rejected by Christians; they also have much concerning Christ; out of them Christ instructs these two disciples in the things concerning himself.

Poole: Luk 24:28-29 - made as though he would have gone further Ver. 28,29. I do not understand how some conclude from hence the lawfulness of dissembling, or telling a lie, in some cases, because the evangelist s...

Ver. 28,29. I do not understand how some conclude from hence the lawfulness of dissembling, or telling a lie, in some cases, because the evangelist saith our Saviour

made as though he would have gone further and did not; for without doubt our Saviour had gone further if the disciples had not been urgent with him to have staid: nor did he stay long there, as we shall hear by and by.

Poole: Luk 24:30-31 - -- Ver. 30,31. Some would have this bread to be sacramental bread, as if our Lord at this time celebrated his supper; and some of the papists are mighti...

Ver. 30,31. Some would have this bread to be sacramental bread, as if our Lord at this time celebrated his supper; and some of the papists are mightily zealous for that interpretation, thinking that they have in it a mighty argument to justify their lame administration of it in one kind (for here is no mention of the cup at all); but they do not consider, that this text will prove (if it be taken with relation to the supper) more than they would have it; as,

1. That priests may consecrate without wine, which themselves will not grant, though they say that, both elements being consecrated, the people sufficiently partake if they share but in one.

2. It will also prove that a priest may consecrate without using those substantial words, This is my body. But it is a most improbable thing, that our Saviour coming just out of his journey should fall upon his administration of this ordinance.

The text is certainly to be meant of bodily bread, which our Saviour never took without a previous blessing of it, Mat 14:19 . How their eyes were opened the evangelist tells us. Some think they knew him by his form of blessing. It is a wonder then they did not know him before by his style in three or four hours discourse by the way. Others think they knew him by taking upon him the office of the master of the feast, to bless the table, and to carve to the guests. But all this is vain. He withdrew the veil from their eyes, which alone hindered their discerning him before, for the object was visible, only the medium of their sight was indisposed.

And he vanished out of their sight. Our Saviour had now obtained his end, viz. to satisfy them that he was indeed risen; now he disappears, for that he had a power to make his body imperceptible to the disciples’ senses is out of doubt.

Poole: Luk 24:32 - -- There was a mighty difference, no doubt, between Christ’ s preaching and his ministers’ : he preached as one who had authority, not as the...

There was a mighty difference, no doubt, between Christ’ s preaching and his ministers’ : he preached as one who had authority, not as the scribes, not as ordinary ministers, but with more majesty and power; but as to the saving efficacy of his words, that depended upon his will; where he pleased to put forth such efficacious grace, there his words became effectual; where he did not, they were not so: Christ preached in the hearing of hundreds, who yet continued unbelievers, and perished in their unbelief. There is a great deal of difference also between one minister’ s preaching and another’ s; some kind of preaching of itself makes men’ s hearts to freeze, others make them to burn; but where preaching makes our heart to burn within us, Christ throws in the coal, which the best preacher doth but blow up: only the Spirit of God is pleased to work (as Erasmus saith) secundum quod nactus est organon, according to the instrument it worketh by, and to concur with rational and spiritual means in order to rational and spiritual ends. But wherever any soul is baptized with fire at hearing a sermon, it is also baptized with the Holy Ghost. Christ will not always cure blind eyes with clay and spittle, though he did it once. These were disciples before the fire was kindled in their hearts; Christ’ s preaching did but blow it up. We ought so to speak in our preaching, so to open and apply the Scriptures, as our discourses may have a rational tendency to make the hearts of our hearers to burn within them, not so as to make them dead, and sleepy, and cold, or lukewarm; and then to know that it must be Christ’ s work to inflame them, when we have said all that we can say.

Poole: Luk 24:33-35 - -- Ver. 33-35. Luk 24:34 , compared with 1Co 15:5 , makes some great authors think, that Simon was one of the two, and that Cleopus (who was the other) ...

Ver. 33-35. Luk 24:34 , compared with 1Co 15:5 , makes some great authors think, that Simon was one of the two, and that Cleopus (who was the other) spake this. They make no stay at Emmaus, but come presently to Jerusalem, and acquaint the disciples, that for certain Christ was risen, and that he had appeared to them in the way, and was known of them at their breaking of bread.

Poole: Luk 24:36 - -- Ver. 36 . See Poole on "Luk 24:33"

Ver. 36 . See Poole on "Luk 24:33"

Poole: Luk 24:37 - -- Spirits sometimes (by God’ s permission or direction) assumed human shapes. They seeing a human shape, and not able on the sudden to conceive h...

Spirits sometimes (by God’ s permission or direction) assumed human shapes. They seeing a human shape, and not able on the sudden to conceive how a human body should come into the midst among them, without any more noise or notice taken of it, were affrighted, as we usually are at the sight of apprehended apparitions. From hence we may conclude, that either the world, and the best men in it, have been in all ages deceived, and a few atheists have been wiser than them all, or there are such beings as spirits.

Poole: Luk 24:38-40 - -- Ver. 38-40. If either the papists or the Lutherans could show us Christ’ s hands or feet, while they impose upon us to believe that Christ’...

Ver. 38-40. If either the papists or the Lutherans could show us Christ’ s hands or feet, while they impose upon us to believe that Christ’ s body is really present at or in the Lord’ s supper, they would not so fright us, nor make so many thoughts arise in us, as they do, about their apprehensions of the nature of a body. But while the papists allow us to handle and to taste the bread, and we find no such things, and the Lutherans suffer our eyes to be open, and we can see no such things, we cannot but conclude, that the body of Christ which they talk of must certainly be a spirit, which (according to our Saviour’ s notion) is a substance which hath neither flesh nor bones, as we see the body they would have us to believe hath not; that is to say, that the body they talk of is no body. Our Saviour here proveth that it was his true body, which appeared to them, because,

1. It had integral parts, hands and feet.

2. Because it might be seen.

3. It might be handled.

4. It had flesh and bones, which a spirit hath not.

Then he shows them his hands and feet. So then our Saviour did not think that the judgment of our senses was to be rejected, concerning the nature of bodies, and his body in particular, and that in its state of exaltation, when it was raised from the dead; Do any of them say that Christ’ s body here came through the door, or it could not have been here? How shall that be proved? We can easily tell them how his body might be in the midst of them, though it were not discerned while he was there; even as the eyes of the two disciples were held, Luk 24:16 , that they could not discern Christ, so the eyes of the disciples might be held now, till he was in the midst amongst them.

Poole: Luk 24:41-43 - did eat before them Ver. 41-43. Believed not for joy yet if they had not now believed, they doubtless would not have rejoiced, but their faith was the cause of their jo...

Ver. 41-43. Believed not for joy yet if they had not now believed, they doubtless would not have rejoiced, but their faith was the cause of their joy; yet the excess of their joy was the hinderance of their faith; so dangerous are the excessive motions of our affections. Christ here gives them another evidence of the truth of his body, he

did eat before them though very ordinary country diet, a piece of broiled fish, and of a honey comb such a meal as we read of that he had at the lake of Tiberius, Joh 21:9 . He did not eat to uphold, but only to testify, his life. Thus when he had raised the daughter of Jairus, Luk 8:55 , he bid them give her something to eat; and for this end Lazarus sat at meat with the rest, Joh 12:2 and Peter proves the resurrection of Christ from their eating and drinking with him, Act 10:41 . Let not profane wits seek knots in bulrushes, inquiring what became of this meat? &c. Let them first tell us what became of the meat the angels did eat with Abraham, Gen 18:8 , and learn to believe, that it was easy with the power of God to annihilate again that meat, which was not necessary for the sustentation of the body of Christ, now freed from all the cravings of natural appetite, though he did eat it to satisfy them that he was truly risen from the dead.

Poole: Luk 24:44 - -- The Jews ordinarily divided the Old Testament into the law, the prophets, and the holy writings, which they called the Hagiographa. The Book of Ps...

The Jews ordinarily divided the Old Testament into the law, the prophets, and the holy writings, which they called the Hagiographa. The Book of Psalms was one of the last sort, and one of the most noted amongst them. So as by these three terms our Saviour understands all the Scriptures of the Old Testament. He tells them, that he had before his death, while he conversed with them, told them that all things (which were very many) which were found in any of these books concerning him must be fulfilled: he had told them so, Luk 18:31 Mat 16:21 17:22 20:18 Mar 9:31 10:34 .

Poole: Luk 24:45 - -- He did not open their understanding without the Scriptures, he sends them thither; and he knew the Scriptures would not sufficiently give them a kno...

He did not open their understanding without the Scriptures, he sends them thither; and he knew the Scriptures would not sufficiently give them a knowledge of him, and the things of God, without the influence and illumination of his Spirit: they are truly taught of God, who are taught by his Spirit to understand the Scriptures. Christ gives a great honour to the Scriptures. The devil cheats those souls whom he persuades to cast away the Scriptures in expectation of a teaching by the Spirit. The Spirit teacheth by, not without, not contrary to, the Holy Scriptures.

Poole: Luk 24:46 - -- All the Divine predictions are certain and infallible. The Jews did maliciously and freely prosecute our Saviour to death, and God did certainly for...

All the Divine predictions are certain and infallible. The Jews did maliciously and freely prosecute our Saviour to death, and God did certainly foresee how their wills would be determined, and the event was accomplished accordingly.

Poole: Luk 24:47-48 - -- Ver. 47,48. The few words in Luk 24:47 are comprehensive of the great duty of the apostles: 1. To preach repentance and remission of sins 2. In C...

Ver. 47,48. The few words in Luk 24:47 are comprehensive of the great duty of the apostles:

1. To preach repentance and remission of sins

2. In Christ’ s name

3. To all nations

4. Beginning at Jerusalem

They were to preach repentance, that is, a turning from sinful courses into a course of life consonant to the will of God; and remission of sins, that is, upon repentance; this they were to preach in his name, which may refer either to their preaching; then our Saviour lets them know that they were to be his ministers, and to preach by his authority, to be ambassadors for Christ , 2Co 5:20 , stewards of his mysteries. Or else it may refer to repentance and remission of sins, which are to be preached in his name, for the sake of merits and satisfaction. They were to preach this among all nations. This was prophesied of plentifully, Psa 2:8 Isa 49:6 Dan 7:14 Hos 2:23 Joe 2:32 . This was a piece of Divine revelation which Christ had till this time concealed in a great measure; when he sent out the twelve, Mat 5:5 , he commanded them not to go to the Gentiles. Beginning at Jerusalem, that is, amongst the Jews. He was prophesied of under the notion of a King, to be set upon the Lord’ s holy hill of Zion, Psa 2:6 . So Psa 110:2 Isa 2:3 28:16 45:1 . In pursuance of this, we shall find the apostles preaching only in Judea, till they had judged themselves unworthy of everlasting life , then they, turned to the Gentiles, Act 13:38,46 .

Poole: Luk 24:49 - -- It is questioned by none, but by the promise of the Father our Lord meaneth the promise of the Spirit, as it came down in the days of Pentecost. Th...

It is questioned by none, but by the promise of the Father our Lord meaneth the promise of the Spirit, as it came down in the days of Pentecost. This effusion of the Spirit was promised under the Old Testament, Isa 44:3 Jer 31:33 Eze 36:27 ; most eminently, Joe 2:28 , the apostle himself interpreting this prophecy, Act 2:16-18 . See also Act 1:8 , where the fulfilling of this promise of the Father, as it is called Act 1:4 , is put before— and ye shall be witnesses unto me, both in Jerusalem, and in Judea and in Samaria; and is also expounded by, But ye shall receive power, after the Holy Ghost is come upon you. Our Lord also had said, I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever. Joh 14:16 . In this text he saith, that he will send him; so also Joh 15:26 Joh 16:7 ; thereby confirming his disciples in this, that he was equal with the Father, and that the Holy Ghost was sent by the Father and him, yet sent by the Father upon the prayer of the Son, and in his name, Joh 14:16,26 . This Holy Spirit is also called, power from on high; the power of the Highest, Luk 1:35 . But here the gifts of the Holy Ghost may be understood, as also in Act 1:8 , where it is said this power should be received after that the Holy Ghost should come upon them: until this time should come, which was in the days of Pentecost, Act 2:1 , the disciples were bound to stay at Jerusalem, which accordingly they did. And we may from hence conclude, that these words of our Saviour were spoken to his disciples after his appearance to them in Galilee, (of which Luke saith nothing), which was the place where (as most think) he was seen of above five hundred brethren at once, 1Co 15:6 .

Poole: Luk 24:50-51 - And he led them out as far as Bethany // While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven Ver. 50,51. This must be understood to have happened forty days after our Saviour’ s resurrection, for so Luke himself tells us, Act 1:3 . And ...

Ver. 50,51. This must be understood to have happened forty days after our Saviour’ s resurrection, for so Luke himself tells us, Act 1:3 .

And he led them out as far as Bethany not the village Bethany, but that part of the mount of Olives which belonged to Bethany. Our Saviour had been often there praying; from thence he now ascendeth into heaven.

And he lifted up his hands and blessed them: some think that by blessing here is meant praying, and the lifting up of his hands was accommodated to that religious action. Others think that blessing here signifieth a more authoritative act; and that his lifting up of his hands was a stretching out of his hands, as a sign of that effectual blessing of them.

While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven that is, he moved upward as if he had been carried, for it is certain that our Saviour ascended by his own power. Luke saith, Act 1:9 , He was taken up, and a cloud received him out of their sight. As Elijah went up to heaven in a whirlwind, 2Ki 2:11 , so Christ went up in a cloud; but with this difference, Christ ascended by his own power, Elijah could not without the help of an angel.

Poole: Luk 24:52-53 - and were continually in the temple, praising and blessing God. Amen Ver. 52,53. We never before read of any act of adoration which the disciples performed to Christ. Their faith was now come to the highest pitch. They...

Ver. 52,53. We never before read of any act of adoration which the disciples performed to Christ. Their faith was now come to the highest pitch. They did no longer look upon him only as one sent of God, a great Prophet, nor only as the Son of David, the promised Messiah; in the mean time not rightly taking the notion of the Messiah, but looking upon him as one who should be a temporal saviour, and deliverer of his people; they now believe him to be the eternal Son of God, being so manifested by his resurrection from the dead, and ascension into heaven before their eyes. According to his commandment, they return to Jerusalem, full of joy:

and were continually in the temple, praising and blessing God. Amen It is said, Act 1:13,14 , that being returned they went into an upper room, and continued in prayer and supplication. Some think that this upper room was appendant to the temple. But continually here may reasonably be interpreted often, or ordinarily, or at temple hours of prayer; as the morning and evening sacrifice are called the continual burnt offering, Exo 29:42 Num 28:3 . Their work was to praise and bless God. It is not said for what, but easily understood: as for other mercies, so more especially for his sending the Messiah for our redemption, and the confirmation and perfecting their faith in him.

Lightfoot: Luk 24:5 - Why seek ye the living among the dead And as they were afraid, and bowed down their faces to the earth, they said unto them, Why seek ye the living among the dead?   [Why see...

And as they were afraid, and bowed down their faces to the earth, they said unto them, Why seek ye the living among the dead?   

[Why seek ye the living among the dead?] "A parable. A certain priest (who had a foolish servant) went somewhere without the city. The servant seeking about for his master, goes into the place of burial, and there calls out to people standing there. 'Did you see my master here?' They say unto him, 'Is not thy master a priest?' He said, 'Yes.' Then said they unto him, 'Thou fool, who ever saw a priest among tombs?' So say Moses and Aaron to Pharaoh; 'Thou fool, is it the custom to seek the dead among the living? (or perhaps the living among the dead?) Our God is the living God; but the gods of whom thou speakest are dead,' " etc.

Lightfoot: Luk 24:13 - And behold two of them were going, etc. And, behold, two of them went that same day to a village called Emmaus, which was from Jerusalem about threescore furlongs.   [And behol...

And, behold, two of them went that same day to a village called Emmaus, which was from Jerusalem about threescore furlongs.   

[And behold two of them were going, etc.] one of these was Cleopas, Luk 24:18, whom we have elsewhere shewn to be the very same with Alpheus, both from the agreement of the name, and also by comparing Joh 19:25; with Mar 15:47; and Mat 27:56. That Peter was the other, I do not at all question, grounding my confidence upon verse 34 of this chapter Luk 24:34; and 1Co 15:5. This Cleopas or Alpheus, we see, is the speaker here, and not Peter, being older than Peter, as being the father of four of the apostles.

Lightfoot: Luk 24:15 - Jesus himself drew near, and went along with them And it came to pass, that, while they communed together and reasoned, Jesus himself drew near, and went with them.   [Jesus himself dre...

And it came to pass, that, while they communed together and reasoned, Jesus himself drew near, and went with them.   

[Jesus himself drew near, and went along with them.] "After that, he appeared in another form unto two of them, as they walked, and went into the country." But what form that was, it would be something bold to determine. But it seems to be different from the form of a gardener; and indeed not the form of any plebeian; but rather of some scholar, because he instructs them while they were upon the road, and giveth thanks for them when they sat at meat. So cfb Beracoth; "If two eat together, the one of them a learned man; the other of them an unlearned man; he that is the learned man gives thanks." Hence that passage: "Janneus the king calls out Simeon Ben Shetahh, vice-president of the Sanhedrim, and a doctor, to say grace after supper: and thus he begins; 'Blessed be God for the meat which Janneus and his guests have eaten.' To whom the king, 'How long wilt thou persist in thy frowardness?' Saith the other, 'Why, what should I have said? Must we bless God for the meat that we have eaten, when as I have eaten none at all?'"

Lightfoot: Luk 24:21 - We trusted, etc.// Today is the third day, etc. But we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel: and beside all this, today is the third day since these things were done. &nb...

But we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel: and beside all this, today is the third day since these things were done.   

[We trusted, etc.] "We trusted it had been he that should have redeemed Israel": viz., in the sense that that nation had of a redemption; which they hoped for from the Gentile yoke. But the poverty and meanness of Jesus gave them no ground to hope that any such thing should be brought about by arms, as that people had generally dreamed; they hoped, however, it might have been miraculously accomplished, as their first redemption from Egypt had been.  

[Today is the third day, etc.] it is worthy our observation what notice the Rabbins take of the third day; "Abraham lifted up his eyes the third day, Gen 22:4. It is written, After two days will he revive us: in the third day he will raise us up, and we shall live in his sight, Hos 6:2. It is written, concerning the third day of the tribes, Joseph said unto them, The third day; Gen 42:18. Concerning the third day also of the spies: Hide yourselves there three days; Jos 2:16. And it is said of the third day of the promulgation of the law, And it came to pass on the third day; Exo 19:16. It is written also of the third day of Jonas, Jonas was in the belly of the fish three days and three nights, Jon 1:17. It is written also of the third day of those that came up out of the captivity. And there abode we in tents three days; Ezr 8:15. It is written also of the third day of the resurrection from the dead, After two days will he revive us, and the third day he will raise us up. It is written also of the third day of Esther, And on the third day Esther put on her royal apparel, Est 5:1. The Targumist adds, On the third day of the Passover." And that indeed is the day we are at present concerned in, namely, the third day of the Passover. If these things were taken so much notice of concerning the third day; at that time, in the schools and synagogues, (as I see no reason why it should be denied), then these words of Cleopas may seem to look a little that way, as speaking according to the vulgar conceptions of the Jews. For whereas it had been plain enough to have said, today is the third day; but he further adds, beside all this; and the word this; too; there seems a peculiar force in that addition, and an emphasis in that word. As if the meaning of it were this: "That same Jesus was mighty in word and deed, and shewed himself such a one, that we conceived him the true Messiah, and him that was to redeem Israel: and besides all these things which bear witness for him to be such, this very day bears witness also. For whereas there is so great an observation amongst us concerning the third day; this is the third day since he was crucified; and there are some women amongst us, that say they have been told by angels that he is risen again."

Lightfoot: Luk 24:30 - He took bread, and blessed it, etc. And it came to pass, as he sat at meat with them, he took bread, and blessed it; and brake, and gave to them.   [He took bread, and b...

And it came to pass, as he sat at meat with them, he took bread, and blessed it; and brake, and gave to them.   

[He took bread, and blessed it, etc.] It is strange that any should expound this breaking of bread of the holy eucharist, when Christ had determined with himself to disappear in the very distribution of the bread and so interrupt the supper. And where indeed doth it appear that any of them tasted a bit? For the supper was ended before it began.  

" If three eat together; they are bound to say grace"; that is, as it is afterward explained, "One of them saith, 'Let us bless': but if there be three and himself, then he saith, 'Bless ye.' " Although I do not believe Christ tied himself exactly to that custom of saying, 'Let us bless'; nor yet to the common form of blessing before meat; yet is it very probable he did use some form of blessing, and not the words, 'This is my body.'

Lightfoot: Luk 24:32 - Did not our hearts burn within us And they said one to another, Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures? &nbs...

And they said one to another, Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures?   

[Did not our hearts burn within us?] beza saith, "In one copy we read it written, Was not our heart hid? " Heinsius saith, "It is written hidden; in the best copies." Why then should it not be so in the best translations too? But this reading favours his interpretation, which amounts to this: "Were we not fools, that we should not know him while he was discoursing with us in the way?" I had rather expound it by some such parallel places as these: "My heart waxed hot within me, and while I was musing the fire burned," Psa 39:4; "His word was in mine heart as a burning fire," Jer 20:9. This meaning is, That their hearts were so affected, and grew so warm, that they could hold no longer, but must break silence and utter themselves. So these, 'Were we not so mightily affected, while he talked with us in the way, and while he opened to us the Scriptures, that we were just breaking out into the acknowledgment of him, and ready to have saluted him as our Lord?'  

That is a far-fetched conceit in Taanith; "R. Alai Bar Barachiah saith, If two disciples of the wise men journey together, and do not maintain some discourse betwixt themselves concerning the law, they deserve to be burnt; according as it is said, It came to pass, as they still went on and talked, behold a chariot of fire, and horses of fire," etc. 2 Kings_2.

Lightfoot: Luk 24:34 - Saying, The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared to Simon Saying, The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared to Simon.   [Saying, The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared to Simon.] I. Tha...

Saying, The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared to Simon.   

[Saying, The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared to Simon.] I. That these are the words of the Eleven appears from the case in which the word the eleven is put. They found the eleven and them that were with them, saying. They having returned from Emmaus, found the eleven and the rest, saying to them, when they came into their presence, "The Lord is risen indeed, and hath appeared unto Simon." But do they speak these things amongst themselves as certain and believed? Or do they tell them to the two disciples that were come from Emmaus, as things true and unquestionable? It is plain from St. Mark, that the eleven did not believe the resurrection of our Saviour, till he himself had shewed himself in the midst of them. They could not, therefore, say these words, "The Lord is risen, and hath appeared unto Simon," as if they were confidently assured of the truth of them: but when they saw Simon so suddenly and unexpectedly returning, whom they knew to have taken a journey towards Galilee, to try if he could there meet with Jesus, they conclude hence, "Oh! Surely the Lord is risen, and hath appeared to Simon," otherwise he would not have returned back so soon.  

Which brings to mind that of the messenger of the death of Maximin: "The messenger that was sent from Aquileia to Rome, changing his horses often, came with so great speed that he got to Rome in four days. It chanced to be a day wherein some games were celebrating, when on a sudden, as Balbinus and Gordianus were sitting in the theatre, the messenger came in; and before it could be told, all the people cry out, 'Maximin is slain'; and so prevented him in the news he brought," etc.  

We cannot well think that any worldly affairs could have called away these two from the feast before the appointed time, nor indeed from the company of their fellow-disciples, but something greater and more urgent than any worldly occasions. And now imagine with what anguish and perplexity poor Peter's thoughts were harassed for having denied his Master: what emotions of mind he felt, when the women had told him, that they were commanded by angels to let Peter particularly know that the Lord was risen, and went before them into Galilee, and they might see him there, Mar 16:7; that it seems to me beyond all question, that one of these disciples going towards Emmaus was Peter, who as soon as he had heard this from the women, taking Alpheus as a companion of his journey, makes towards Galilee, not without communicating beforehand to his fellow-disciples the design of that progress: they, therefore, finding him so suddenly and unexpectedly returned, make the conjecture amongst themselves, that certainly the Lord had appeared to him, else he would never have come back so soon. Compare but that of the apostle, 1Co 15:5, he was seen of Cephas, then of the twelve; and nothing can seem expressed more clearly in the confirmation of this matter.  

Object. But it may be objected, that those two returning from Emmaus found the eleven apostles gathered and sitting together. Now if Simon was not amongst them, they were not eleven. Therefore he was not one of those two.  

Ans. I. If it should be granted that Peter was there and sat amongst them, yet were they not exactly eleven then; for Thomas was absent, Joh 20:24. II. When the eleven are mentioned, we must not suppose it exactly meant of the number of apostles then present, but the present number of the apostles.

Lightfoot: Luk 24:37 - They supposed they had seen a spirit But they were terrified and affrighted, and supposed that they had seen a spirit.   [They supposed they had seen a spirit.] Whereas the Je...

But they were terrified and affrighted, and supposed that they had seen a spirit.   

[They supposed they had seen a spirit.] Whereas the Jews distinguished between angels and spirits and demons; spirits are defined by R. Hoshaniah to be "such to whom souls are created, but they have not a body made for those souls." But it is a question, whether they included all spirits or souls under this notion, when it is more than probable that apparitions of ghosts, or deceased persons who once had a body, were reckoned by them under the same title. Nor do I apprehend the disciples had any other imagination at this time, than that this was not Christ indeed, in his own person, as newly raised from the dead; but a spectrum only in his shape, himself being still dead. And when the Pharisees speak concerning Paul, Act 23:9; "That if an angel or a spirit had spoken to him," I would easily believe they might mean it of the apparition of some prophet, or some other departed just person, than of any soul that had never yet any body created to it. I the rather incline thus to think, because it is so evident, that it were needless to prove how deeply impressed that nation was with an opinion of the apparitions of departed ghosts.

Lightfoot: Luk 24:44 - In the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms And he said unto them, These are the words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled, which were writt...

And he said unto them, These are the words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms, concerning me.   

[In the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms.] It is a known division of the Old Testament into the Law, the Prophets, and the Holy writings.  

I. The books of the law and their order need not be insisted upon, commonly called by us, the Pentateuch; but by some of the Rabbins, the Heptateuch; and by some Christians, the Octateuch. "R. Samuel Bar Nachman saith, R. Jonathan saith, 'Wisdom hath hewn out her seven pillars.' These are the seven books of the law." But are there not but five books only? "Ben Kaphra saith, The Book of Numbers is made three books. From the beginning of the book to And it came to pass when the ark set forward [ul Num_10:35], is a book by itself. That verse Num 10:35 and the following is a book by itself: and from thence to the end of the book is a book by itself"...  

Eulogius, speaking concerning Dosthes or Dositheus, a famous seducer of the Samaritans, hath this passage: He adulterated the Octateuch of Moses with spurious writings, and all kind of corrupt falsifyings. There is mention also of a book with this title, The Christians' Book, an Exposition upon the Octateuch. Whether this was the Octateuch of Moses it is neither certain nor much worth our inquiry; for Photius judgeth him a corrupt author: besides that it may be shewn by and by, that there was a twofold Octateuch besides that of Moses. Now if any man should ask, how it come to pass that Eulogius (and that probably from the common notion of the thing) should divide the books of Moses into an Octateuch; I had rather any one else than myself should resolve him in it. But if any consent that he owned the Heptateuch we have already mentioned, we should be ready to reckon the last chapter of Deuteronomy for the eighth part.  

Aben Ezra will smile here, who in that his obscure and disguised denial of the books of the Pentateuch, as if they were not writ by the pen of Moses, instances, in that chapter in the first place, as far as I can guess, as a testimony against it. You have his words in his Commentary upon the Book of Deuteronomy, a little from the beginning, But if you understand the mystery of the twelve; etc., i.e. of the twelve verses of the last chapter of the book (for so his own countrymen expound him), "thou wilt know the truth"; i.e. that Moses did not write the whole Pentateuch; an argument neither worth answering, nor becoming so great a philosopher. For as it is a ridiculous thing to suppose that the chapter that treats of the death and burial of Moses should be written by himself, so would it not be much less ridiculous to affix that chapter to any other volume than the Pentateuch. But these things are not the proper subject for our present handling.  

II. There also was an Octateuch of the prophets too: "All the books of the prophets are eight; Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Isaiah, and the twelve." For the historical books also were read in their synagogues under the notion of the prophets, as well as the prophets themselves, whose names are set down. You will see the title prefixed to them in the Hebrew Bibles, The former prophets; as well as to the others, The latter prophets. The doctors give us the reason why they dispose the prophets in that order, that Jeremiah is named first, Ezekiel next, and Isaiah last, which I have quoted in notes upon Mat 27:9; and let not the reader think it irksome to repeat it here.  

"Whereas the Book of Kings ends in destruction, and the whole Book of Jeremiah treats about destruction; whereas Ezekiel begins with destruction, and ends in consolation; and whereas Isaiah is all in consolation, they joined destruction with destruction, and consolation with consolation."  

III. The third division of the Bible is entitled the Holy Writings. And here also is found an Octateuch by somebody (as it seems), though I know not where to find it.  

"Herbanus the Jew was a man excellently well instructed in the law, and holy books of the prophets, and the Octateuch, and all the other writings." What this Octateuch should be, distinct from the law and the prophets, and indeed what all the other writings besides should be, is not easily guessed. This Octateuch perhaps may seem to have some reference to the Hagiographa; or Holy Writings; for it is probable enough that, speaking of a Jew well skilled in the Holy Scriptures, he might design the partition of the Bible according to the manner of the Jews' dividing it: but who then can pick out books that should make it up? Let the reader pick out the eight; and then I would say, that the other four are all the other writings. But we will not much disquiet ourselves about this matter.  

It may be asked, why these books should be called the Scriptures; when the whole Bible goes under the name of the Holy Scriptures. Nor can any thing be more readily answered to this, than that by this title they would keep up their dignity and just esteem for them. They did not indeed read them in their synagogues, but that they might acknowledge them of most holy and divine authority, out of them they confirm their traditions, and they expound them mystically; yea, and give them the same title with the rest of the Holy Scriptures.  

"This is the order of the Hagiographa; Ruth, the Book of Psalms, Job, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Canticles, the Lamentations, Daniel, the Book of Esther, Ezra, and the Chronicles." It is here disputed, that if Job was in the days of Moses, why then is not his book put in the first place? The answer is, They do not begin with vengeance or affliction; and such is that Book of Job. They reply, Ruth also begins with affliction; viz. with the story of a famine, and the death of Elimelech's sons. "But that was (say they) an affliction that had a joyful ending." So they might have said of the book and affliction of Job too. We see it is disputed there, why the Book of Ruth should be placed the first in that rank, and not the Book of Job. But we might inquire, whether the Book of Psalms ought not to have been placed the first, rather than the Book of Ruth.  

IV. In this passage at present before us, who would think otherwise but that our Saviour alludes to the common and most known partition of the Bible? And although he name the Psalms only, yet that under that title he includes that whole volume. For we must of necessity say, that either he excluded all the books of that third division excepting the Book of Psalms, which is not probable; or that he included them under the title of the Prophets; which was not customary; or else that under the title of the Psalms he comprehended all the rest. That he did not exclude them, reason will tell us; for in several books of that division is he himself spoken of, as well as in the Psalms: and that he did not include them in the title of the Prophets reason also will dictate: because we would not suppose him speaking differently from the common and received opinion of that nation. There is very little question, therefore, but the apostles might understand him speaking with the vulgar; and by the Psalms to have meant all the books of that volume, those especially wherein any thing was written concerning himself. For let it be granted that Ruth, as to the time of the history and the time of its writing, might challenge to itself the first place in order (and it is that kind of priority the Gemarists are arguing), yet, certainly, amongst all those books that mention any thing of Christ, the Book of Psalms deservedly obtains the first place; so far that in the naming of this the rest may be understood. So St. Matthew, Mat 27:9, under the name of Jeremiah; comprehends that whole volume of the Prophets; because he was placed the first in that rank: which observation we have made in notes upon that place.

Lightfoot: Luk 24:45 - Then opened he their understanding Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures,   [Then opened he their understanding.] When it is said, t...

Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures,   

[Then opened he their understanding.] When it is said, that by the imposition of the hands of the apostles the gift of tongues and of prophecy was conferred ("they spake with tongues, and they prophesied," Act 19:6), by 'prophecy' nothing may be better understood than this very thing, that the minds of such were opened, that they might understand the Scriptures; and perhaps their 'speaking with tongues' might look this way in the first notion of it, viz., that they could understand the original wherein the Scriptures were writ.

Lightfoot: Luk 24:50 - As far as Bethany And he led them out as far as to Bethany, and he lifted up his hands, and blessed them.   [As far as Bethany.] How many difficulties aris...

And he led them out as far as to Bethany, and he lifted up his hands, and blessed them.   

[As far as Bethany.] How many difficulties arise here!  

I. This very evangelist (Act 1:12) tells us, that when the disciples came back from the place where our Lord ascended, "they returned from mount Olivet, distant from Jerusalem a sabbath day's journey." But now the town of Bethany was about fifteen furlongs from Jerusalem, Joh 11:18; that is, double a sabbath day's journey.  

II. Josephus tells us that the mount of Olives was but five furlongs from the city; and a sabbath day's journey was seven furlongs and a half. "About that time there came to Jerusalem a certain Egyptian, pretending himself a prophet, and persuading the people that they would go out with him to the mount of Olives, which, being situated on the front of the city, is distant five furlongs." These things are all true: 1. That the mount of Olives lay but five furlongs' distance from Jerusalem. 2. That the town of Bethany was fifteen furlongs. 3. That the disciples were brought by Christ as far as Bethany. 4. That when they returned form the mount of Olives they travelled more than five furlongs. And, 5. Returning from Bethany; they travelled but a sabbath day's journey. All which may be easily reconciled, if we would observe that the first space from the city towards this mount was called Bethphage; which I have cleared elsewhere from Talmudic authors, the evangelists themselves also confirming it. That part of that mount was known by that name to the length of about a sabbath day's journey, till it came to that part which was called Bethany. For there was Bethany; a tract of the mount, and the town of Bethany. The town was distance from the city about fifteen furlongs, i.e., two miles, or a double sabbath day's journey: but the first border of this tract (which also bore the name of Bethany) was distant but one mile, or a single sabbath day's journey only.  

Our Saviour led out his disciples, when he was about to ascend, to the very first brink of that region or tract of mount Olivet which was called Bethany; and was distant from the city a sabbath day's journey. And so far from the city itself did that tract extend which was called Bethphage; and when he was come to that place where the bounds of Bethphage and Bethany met and touched one another, he there ascended; in that very place where he got upon the ass when he rode into Jerusalem, Mar 11:1. Whereas, therefore, Josephus saith that mount Olivet was but five furlongs from the city, he means the first brink and border of it: but our evangelist must be understood of the place where Christ ascended, where the name of Olivet began, as it was distinguished from Bethphage.  

And since we have so frequent mention of a sabbath day's journey, and it is not very foreign from our present purpose to observe something concerning it, let me take notice of these few things:  

I. The space of a sabbath day's bound was two thousand cubits. "Naomi and to Ruth, 'We are commanded to observe the sabbaths, and the feasts, but we are not to go beyond two thousand cubits.' " "It is ordained by the scribes, that no man go out of the city beyond two thousands cubits." Instances of this kind are endless. But it is disputed upon what foundation this constitution of theirs is built. "Whence comes it to be thus ordained concerning the two thousand cubits? It is founded upon this, 'Let no man go out of his place on the seventh day,' " Exo 16:29. "Where are these two thousand cubits mentioned? They have their tradition from hence, Abide ye every man in his place; Exo 16:29. These are four cubits. Let no man go out of his place: these are two thousand cubits." It is true, indeed, we cannot gain so much as one cubit out of any of these Scriptures, much less two thousand; however, we may learn from hence the pleasant art they have of working any thing out of any thing.  

"Asai Ben Akibah saith, 'They are fetched from hence,' in that it is said, Place, place. Here place is said [Let no man go out of his place]. And it is said elsewhere, I will appoint thee a place; Exo 21:13. As the place that is said elsewhere is two thousand cubits, so the place that is spoken of here is two thousand cubits." But how do they prove that the place mentioned elsewhere is two thousand cubits? "I will appoint thee a place whither he shall flee that kills a man unawares: this teaches us that the Israelites in the wilderness" (i.e. those that had slain any one) "betook themselves to a place of refuge. And whither did they flee? To the camp of the Levites."  

Now, therefore, when the Israelites' camp in the wilderness was distant from the tabernacle and from the Levites' camp that was pitched about the tabernacle, two thousand cubits, which thing they gather from Jos 3:4; and whereas it was lawful for them at that distance to approach the tabernacle on the sabbath day; hence they argue for the two thousand cubits as the sabbath day's journey, which we are now inquiring into. But, by the way, let us take notice of the "four cubits," which they gathered from those words, "Abide ye every man in his place." Which must be thus understood: "If any person through ignorance, or by any accident, had gone beyond the limits of the sabbath, and afterward came to know his transgression, he was confined within four cubits, so that he must not stir beyond them till the sabbath was done and over."  

They further instance in another foundation for the two thousand cubits: "'Ye shall measure from without the city on the east side two thousand cubits,' Num 35:5. But another Scripture saith, 'From the wall of the city and outward ye shall measure a thousand cubits': the thousand cubits are the suburbs of the city, and the two thousand cubits are the sabbatical limits." Maimonides very largely discourseth in what manner and by what lines they measured these two thousand cubits from each city: but it makes very little to our purpose. Only let me add this one thing; that if any one was overtaken in his journeying in the fields or wilderness by the night, when the sabbath was coming in, and did not exactly know the space of two thousand cubits, then he might walk " two thousand ordinary paces; and these were accounted the sabbatical bounds."  

So far from the city was that place of mount Olivet, where Christ ascended; viz., that part of the mount where Bethphage ended and Bethany began. Perhaps the very same place mentioned 2Sa 15:32; or certainly not far off, where David in his flight taking leave of the ark and sanctuary, looked back and worshipped God. Where if any one would be at the pains to inquire why the Greek interpreters retain the word Ros; both here and in 2Sa 16:1; and David came unto Ros; and and David passed on a little way from Ros; he will find a knot not easy to be untied. The Talmudists would have it a place of idolatry, but by a reason very far-fetched indeed. The Jewish commentators, with a little more probability, conceive that it was a place from whence David, when he went towards Jerusalem, looking towards the place where the tabernacle was seated, was wont to worship God.

PBC: Luk 24:21 - we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel "we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel" Have you ever been there?  Have your words of faith ever betrayed your lack of fa...

"we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel"

Have you ever been there?  Have your words of faith ever betrayed your lack of faith when you said, "I thought that God was going to do it this way, I believed He was going to help me through this situation" or "I was sure that He was going to sustain me and here I am crumbling?"  You used the past tense in relation to your trust in God?  Well, that's what they did and their lack of faith was reflected in that very language.  Not only that, but notice the things that they speak of as in terms of fact.  They say of the events of the last 24 hours or so - "He was crucified, (Jesus of Nazarath was crucified), that He was condemned to death."  Then they go on to say, "and certain of our women went to the sepulchre and they found not His body." These are all facts.  "Also, certain of them that were with us went to the sepulchre and they found it just as the women said but they did not see Him."  These are all facts.  But notice what they did not report as a fact - "these women (these women who had gone to the sepulchre) came saying that they also had seen a vision of angels which said that He was alive."  The one beam of promise in that whole situation, the one in the whole list of facts, the one fact if it were a fact would have turned everything else on it's head was to them recorded as hearsay.  They said, "oh, the women say" - "look, it's a fact that He was crucified, it's a fact He was condemned, it's a fact that they went there and they didn't find Him, it's a fact that someone else has gone and confirmed that."  Then they said, "And the women said that they saw an angel."

Have you ever been like that in your time of trial?  All the facts - you list all of them out and then you list the promises of God over here and you say, "And God  SAID this or He promised this but these are the facts, these are the facts over here - I am going through this trial, I am going through this difficulty, I don't see the end of this trial, I don't see the end of this difficulty, there's no way that this pain I am going through can be a growing or a helping experience to my life - so there's no way, these are the facts and over here is what people say from the Bible, the preacher said this or someone came to visit me and they shared this with me - but here's the facts."

Too often we miss out on the peace and even the joy that we could have even amidst the trial, before the trial is over, because we refuse to recognize God's promises as realities.  We forget to recognize that what He has promised in His word is verily so, that there's no other way that it will ever turn out otherwise than how He has promised in His word.  And, so as you list the facts of your situation you be sure to list with those facts the things that God has promised to do for you, in you, by you - and with all these trials what He has promised the end of it will be.

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Lu 24:21 " But we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel: and beside all this, to day is the third day since these things were done."

All the visions they might have had of an earthly kingdom and earthly honors had passed as a myth from their minds, and they were content to return to their fishing, and live by it. They had no thought of the resurrection, and would not believe it until they had seen the person of Jesus, handled him, examined his hands and side, and found every mark possible to identify his person. Witnesses never could more conscientiously and critically examine a fact to know it was a fact than did these witnesses.

It seems that they never comprehended his teaching until after his resurrection, ascension, and descent of the Holy Ghost on the day of Pentecost. The highest ideas they seemed to have of Christ and his kingdom were temporal and earthly. Although he had plainly taught them that he would be put to death, and that they would be persecuted and brought before the kings and rulers of this world, and by them be condemned, they seemed not to comprehend it, but looked upon Christ as the one that was to free Israel from political bondage, and make her the mistress of the world. The resurrection of Christ from the dead seemed not to have entered their minds.

When those who had seen Jesus told it to Thomas, one of the twelve, he said unto them, " Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into his side, I will not believe;" Joh 20:25. It seems that none of them were willing to believe that Christ had risen from the dead; the thing looked to them unreasonable, and was what they were not looking for, or thinking of. Let those in whom they had the utmost confidence, and would believe any thing they said about other things, tell them and solemnly affirm that they had seen the Lord, yet they would not believe. Now look at the character and conduct of these witnesses, and who can question their veracity! First, they were poor and illiterate men, not capable of concocting a deep-laid plan of deception; second, they did not expect any thing but a temporal deliverer in Christ; third, they did not think of his resurrection, or comprehend the benefits to be derived from it, and would not believe it when reported to them by their nearest and dearest friends. Nothing but to see him with their own eyes would satisfy them, or make them believe. Is this the caution of men who will bear false witness?

Elder Gregg Thompson

Haydock: Luk 24:5 - -- It is worthy of remark, that none of the disciples or friends of Christ, were so much astonished and struck at the many apparitions of angels, &c. as ...

It is worthy of remark, that none of the disciples or friends of Christ, were so much astonished and struck at the many apparitions of angels, &c. as to be cast down to the ground, as the guards and his enemies were, but only through respect and reverential fear looked down upon the ground. Nor even did any of them fall down prostrate to adore our Saviour, when he appeared to them; because Christ was not now to be sought in the earth, among the dead, but was risen, and was to be looked for from heaven. Hence is derived the Catholic custom of praying in Pascal time, and on all Sundays, &c. not on the knee, but with the body respectfully bent, and bowing down their countenance towards the ground. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Luk 24:13 - -- St. Jerome thinks the Cleophas, one of the two disciples, was a citizen of Emmaus, and that he invited Jesus to take meat in his house. His house was...

St. Jerome thinks the Cleophas, one of the two disciples, was a citizen of Emmaus, and that he invited Jesus to take meat in his house. His house was afterwards changed into a church, which the same Father says existed in his time. Some think Cleophas was brother to St. Joseph; others, that he was husband of Mary, sister of the blessed Virgin Mary, and father of St. James the less. Both the Latins and Greeks keep the feast of St. Cleophas, and give him the name of an apostle. Usuard says he was martyred by the Jews. (Calmet)

Haydock: Luk 24:16 - But their eyes were held But their eyes were held: either by our Saviour's changing his features, or in what manner he pleased. (Witham)

But their eyes were held: either by our Saviour's changing his features, or in what manner he pleased. (Witham)

Haydock: Luk 24:18 - Art thou alone a stranger in Jerusalem? Art thou alone a stranger in Jerusalem? or, art thou the only stranger in Jerusalem? which was to signify, that every one must needs have heard of ...

Art thou alone a stranger in Jerusalem? or, art thou the only stranger in Jerusalem? which was to signify, that every one must needs have heard of what had passed in regard to Jesus. (Witham)

Haydock: Luk 24:21 - We hoped We hoped, &c. as if they had lost their former hopes, or now knew not what to hope for: but perhaps, as St. Augustine observes, they might use this c...

We hoped, &c. as if they had lost their former hopes, or now knew not what to hope for: but perhaps, as St. Augustine observes, they might use this caution speaking before a stranger. (Witham) ---

These two disciples were in the same error as the other Jews; who expected that the Messias would deliver them from subjection to strangers, and re-establish them in their ancient liberty. The cross and passion had been a subject of scandal and fall to them. They say, we did hope; as if their hopes were now at an end. What increased their diffidence was, that Christ had promised to rise again the third day, and some of the women had said that he really had risen. But they expected as public and glorious a manifestation of his resurrection, as his death had been ignominious and known to the whole world. Behold, now this is already the third day since these things are passed:; if he had wished to manifest his power, he should have done it already. Thus the disciples reason, as if the third day were already past, and as if it were certain that he was not risen again. So difficult a thing is it to believed what we very ardently wish? (Calmet) Proprium hoc miseros sequitur vitum

Nunquam rebus credere lætis.

Haydock: Luk 24:30 - -- The ancient Fathers think our Saviour consecrated, on this occasion, and administered the Eucharist to the two disciples. In the Acts of the Apostles...

The ancient Fathers think our Saviour consecrated, on this occasion, and administered the Eucharist to the two disciples. In the Acts of the Apostles, this same term, breaking of bread, is explained without difficulty of the Eucharist. St. Luke seems fond of this manner of expression, to signify that sacrament. (Calmet)

Haydock: Luk 24:37 - -- The apostles thought they saw a Spirit, either good or bad, that had taken the form of Jesus, and was come to deceive them. For that they did not dou...

The apostles thought they saw a Spirit, either good or bad, that had taken the form of Jesus, and was come to deceive them. For that they did not doubt spirits appeared, we have abundant proofs throughout the whole New Testament: and our Saviour, instead of combating this opinion, seems rather to have confirmed it on more than one occasion. Indeed St. Augustine thinks it cannot, without temerity, be denied, that there are occasional apparitions of angels, of demons, and the souls of the dead. (Calmet) ---

This, however, will not justify the credulity of many ignorant and weak people, who think that nobody can die, but their spirit is sure to appear; much less will it justify the superstitious observations of unusual occurrences, which are so commonly reported to happen, as significant of a departed soul. These occurrences are rare; nor should we suppose that the Almighty would be willing to suspend or change the established laws of nature without a sufficient cause, viz. some known good either to the departed soul, or surviving friends. (Haydock)

Haydock: Luk 24:39 - A spirit hath not flesh and bones, as you see me to have A spirit hath not flesh and bones, as you see me to have. This was one argument of a true and real body. We may take notice, that Christ brought su...

A spirit hath not flesh and bones, as you see me to have. This was one argument of a true and real body. We may take notice, that Christ brought such proofs, as he knew were sufficient to convince them of his resurrection, though they were not of themselves demonstrations. For when they imagined they saw or touched a body, and that the eat with them, these things might apparently be done by a spirit. See Genesis xviii. ver. 9. and Genesis xix. ver. 3. and ver. 16. where we read that angels, in the shape of men, eat, and took Lot and his wife, and his daughters, by the hand, and led them away from Sodom. Our senses, therefore, may sometimes be deceived, as may be shewn by divers other instances. But the arguments which Christ made us of at this time, to induce the apostles to believe his resurrection, are to be taken with all the circumstances: as 1st, with the corroborating testimonies of the Holy Scriptures, in which his resurrection was foretold; 2ndly, they called to their minds what he himself had told them so often, that he would rise again the third day; 3rdly, concurred also the testimonies already given by the angels, that he was risen; 4thly, the miracles at his death and resurrection; 5thly, Christ himself at the same time opened their understanding, to know and believe this truth, that he was truly risen. (Witham)

Haydock: Luk 24:43 - -- Christ eat, not because he stood in need of food to sustain himself after his resurrection, as we sustain our bodies and lives by corporal refreshment...

Christ eat, not because he stood in need of food to sustain himself after his resurrection, as we sustain our bodies and lives by corporal refreshment; but he did it, to shew his disciples that his body was really risen from the dead. (Ven. Bede)

Haydock: Luk 24:45 - -- If, after all the extraordinary opportunities of instruction, which the apostles had had from the mouth of our divine Saviour, it was still necessary ...

If, after all the extraordinary opportunities of instruction, which the apostles had had from the mouth of our divine Saviour, it was still necessary that he should instil into them a new light, by opening their minds to understand the Scriptures; what are we to think of the presumptuous attempts of the numerous tribe of modern self-inspired interpreters, who are always ready to descant on the word of the Lord; though so perfectly ignorant that their authority, so far from being admitted, would be laughed to scorn, were they to attempt to explain the slightest difficulty, on the most indifferent subject of profane literature? To such a degree has the spirit of seduction spread itself at the present day! (Haydock)

Haydock: Luk 24:47 - Beginning at Jerusalem Beginning at Jerusalem. The sense is, that they were first to preach to the Jews, and afterwards to all nations. (Witham)

Beginning at Jerusalem. The sense is, that they were first to preach to the Jews, and afterwards to all nations. (Witham)

Haydock: Luk 24:49 - The promise of my Father The promise of my Father; i.e. the Holy Ghost, whom Christ had promised that his Father and he would send. (John xiv. 26. and xvii. 7.) (Witham)

The promise of my Father; i.e. the Holy Ghost, whom Christ had promised that his Father and he would send. (John xiv. 26. and xvii. 7.) (Witham)

Haydock: Luk 24:51 - -- Like a second Elias he was taken into heaven, but in a much more glorious manner. Elias was taken up in a mortal and corruptible body: but our divine...

Like a second Elias he was taken into heaven, but in a much more glorious manner. Elias was taken up in a mortal and corruptible body: but our divine Saviour, in a glorious, impassible, and immortal state; where now he is our head, having taken upon himself the nature of man, and is crowned with more than angel's glory. (Theophylactus) ---

What a glory this for us! Our head is clothed with everlasting glory; so shall we, his members, receive a share in his eternal kingdom. (St. John Chrysostom)

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Gill: Luk 24:1 - Now upon the first day of the week // very early in the morning // when it was yet dark // they came unto the sepulchre // bringing the spices which they had prepared // and certain others with them Now upon the first day of the week,.... On which day it appears by what follows, Christ rose from the dead, and which was the third day from his death...

Now upon the first day of the week,.... On which day it appears by what follows, Christ rose from the dead, and which was the third day from his death, and so verified the Scriptures, and his own predictions:

very early in the morning; just as light began to spring, the day to dawn, and break; the first appearance of the morning; when it first began to dawn;

when it was yet dark, as in Joh 20:1 and so read the Syriac and Persic versions here; and the Ethiopic version, "while it was yet night": this must be understood of the time when the women set out from the city, or suburbs; for by that time they got to the sepulchre it was at sunrise, Mar 16:2 and shows their great love, zeal, and devotion for Christ, and great courage and fearlessness to go out of the city at such a time, without any man with them, and to a grave:

they came unto the sepulchre, where Christ was laid; that is, the women who came with Christ from Galilee, and who had observed where, and how his body was interred:

bringing the spices which they had prepared; on the sabbath eve, to anoint the body, but were prevented by reason of the sabbath; see Luk 23:56

and certain others with them; that is, other women; besides Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of Joses, and Salome, and other Galilean women, there were other Jerusalem women, or of Bethany, it may be, Mary, and Martha, the sisters of Lazarus, and of the parts adjacent: this clause is left out in the Vulgate Latin, and Ethiopic versions, and in one ancient copy of Beza's; but is retained in the Syriac, Arabic, and Persic versions.

Gill: Luk 24:2 - And they found the stone rolled away the sepulchre. And they found the stone rolled away the sepulchre. Which Joseph had laid there, security of the body, and in the sight of these women; and which gave...

And they found the stone rolled away the sepulchre. Which Joseph had laid there, security of the body, and in the sight of these women; and which gave them a concern, as they went along, seeing they were all women, who should roll away the stone for them, Mar 16:3 but when they came to the sepulchre, to their great surprise, they found it rolled away, which was done by an angel, Mat 28:2.

Gill: Luk 24:3 - And they entered in // and found not the body of the Lord Jesus And they entered in,.... To the sepulchre, being invited, encouraged, and led on by the angel that sat upon the stone; for the Jews' sepulchres were b...

And they entered in,.... To the sepulchre, being invited, encouraged, and led on by the angel that sat upon the stone; for the Jews' sepulchres were built large enough for persons to go into; See Gill on Mar 16:5.

and found not the body of the Lord Jesus; as they expected, having seen him put there, and had observed in what cave in the sepulchre, and in what form he was laid.

Gill: Luk 24:4 - And it came to pass as they were much perplexed thereabout // behold, two men stood by them in shining garments And it came to pass as they were much perplexed thereabout,.... About the body of Christ, and its being gone, what should become of it, whither it was...

And it came to pass as they were much perplexed thereabout,.... About the body of Christ, and its being gone, what should become of it, whither it was removed, and by what means, and by whom; whether by a friend, or foe, for they had no thought, nor expectation of a resurrection;

behold, two men stood by them in shining garments; who were angels in the form of men; and as these were the first witnesses of Christs resurrection, there were two of them; for by the mouth of two or three witnesses every thing is established. Matthew and Mark take notice but of one; but John makes mention of two, as here, seen by Mary Magdalene, though in a different posture; they were sitting, the one at the head, the other at the feet, where the body of Jesus had lain; but when the rest of the women came, they were risen up, and stood close by them, on a sudden, at an unawares, being arrayed in white raiment, as white as snow, as a token of their purity and innocence, and as bringers of good tidings; and as joining in the triumph of their Lord's resurrection: their garments were bright and glittering like lightning, to set forth the glory and majesty of these celestial spirits, and that they might be known to be what they were.

Gill: Luk 24:5 - And as they were afraid // and bowed down their faces to the earth // they said unto them // why seek ye the living among the dead And as they were afraid,.... That is, the women were afraid of these angels; these bright appearances and majestic forms, as it was usual for good men...

And as they were afraid,.... That is, the women were afraid of these angels; these bright appearances and majestic forms, as it was usual for good men and women to be, as appears from the cases of Zacharias, the Virgin Mary, and others:

and bowed down their faces to the earth, through great fear and reverence of these heavenly spirits, and as not being able to bear the lustre of their countenances and garments:

they said unto them, that is, the angels:

why seek ye the living among the dead? intimating, that Christ, though he had been dead, was now living, and not to be sought for in a sepulchre; a way of speaking, much like this, is used in a parable of R. Levi's, concerning Pharaoh's not finding the name of God among the gods of the nations, upon searching for it. Moses and Aaron said to Pharaoh,

"thou fool, is it usual for the dead to "seek" them among the living? שמא החיים אצל המתים, "or ever the living among the dead?" our God is living, these thou speakest of are dead i.''

Nor is Christ to be found among dead sinners, or lifeless professors, but among living saints, and among the churches of the living God; nor is life to be found among the dead works of the law, or to be obtained by lifeless performances on the dead letter of the law.

Gill: Luk 24:6 - He is not here, but is risen // remember how he spake unto you when he was yet in Galilee He is not here, but is risen,.... So in Mat 28:6 see the note there: remember how he spake unto you when he was yet in Galilee; for these women tha...

He is not here, but is risen,.... So in Mat 28:6 see the note there:

remember how he spake unto you when he was yet in Galilee; for these women that followed him from Galilee were along with the disciples when he said the following words to them; and which are recorded in Mat 17:22.

Gill: Luk 24:7 - Saying, the son of man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men // and be crucified // and the third day rise again Saying, the son of man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men,.... As Christ was, who is intended by the son of man, he being the son of David...

Saying, the son of man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men,.... As Christ was, who is intended by the son of man, he being the son of David, and the son of Abraham, and the son of Adam, though he was the seed of the woman, and born of a virgin; he was truly man, and subject to the infirmities of men; for this is sometimes used as a diminutive expression, though a title of the Messiah in the Old Testament, and regards him in his state of humiliation. He was delivered into the hands of the band of men and officers by Judas, who came against him with swords and staves, as against a thief; and by the Jews to Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor, a very wicked man; and by him, to the will of the Jews, who, with wicked hands, took him, and slew him; and into the hands of the Roman soldiers, who crucified him, and who may more especially be meant by sinful men, the Gentiles; and especially Heathen soldiers, being reckoned by the Jews notorious sinners: to be among sinners, in the company of such sinful men, must needs be very disagreeable to the holy and harmless Lamb of God; but to be in their hands, and at their mercy, whose tender mercies are cruel, must be very afflicting:

and be crucified: which was a Roman death, and a very shameful, and painful one:

and the third day rise again; it is for the sake of this chiefly that the angels put the women in mind of this whole paragraph, which so fully confirms their testimony of his resurrection; and which the women might be assured of, upon calling to mind these words, which they themselves had heard from Christ's mouth; and it being now the third day since the death of Christ. The words declare, that all these things must be; that there was a necessity of them; partly on account of the decrees of God, by which it was determined they should be; and partly on account of the covenant engagements of Christ, in which he agreed unto them; and also, by reason of the prophecies of the Old Testament, which gave out, that thus it must be; yea, our Lord's own predictions made them necessary; and the law and justice of God required them; or otherwise, the salvation of God's people could not have been obtained.

Gill: Luk 24:8 - And they remembered his words. And they remembered his words. That is, the words of Christ, as the Persic version expresses it; which they had forgot, and it may be had never truly ...

And they remembered his words. That is, the words of Christ, as the Persic version expresses it; which they had forgot, and it may be had never truly understood until now; and had now their memories refreshed with them by the angels, and their understandings opened by the Spirit of God. Saints are sometimes apt to forget even the gracious promises of God, they have understood and received comfort from; the word, or words, on which they have been caused to hope, until the Spirit of God, who is their best remembrancer, puts them in mind of them.

Gill: Luk 24:9 - And returned from the sepulchre // and told all these things // unto the eleven, and to all the rest And returned from the sepulchre,.... Quickly, immediately, as soon as ever the angel had done speaking to them; they fled from the sepulchre in great ...

And returned from the sepulchre,.... Quickly, immediately, as soon as ever the angel had done speaking to them; they fled from the sepulchre in great haste, as persons frightened and amazed, with fear and reverence, on account of the vision they saw, and with joy at what was told them; see Mat 28:8

and told all these things; as that the stone was rolled away from the sepulchre: and that they found not the body of Jesus in it; that they had seen a vision of angels, who had told them, that Christ was risen, and had put them in mind of some words of his spoken to the disciples in their hearing in Galilee:

unto the eleven, and to all the rest; of the disciples: not only to the eleven apostles, but the seventy disciples, and as many others as were assembled together, perhaps the hundred and twenty, Act 1:15. The Persic version very wrongly reads, "to all the twelve"; for Judas was not now one of them, nor alive; and Matthias was not yet chosen.

Gill: Luk 24:10 - It was Mary Magdalene // and Joanna // and Mary the mother of James // and other women that were with them // which told these things unto the apostles It was Mary Magdalene,.... Out of whom Christ had cast seven devils, who was a sincere penitent, a true believer in Christ, and an affectionate lover ...

It was Mary Magdalene,.... Out of whom Christ had cast seven devils, who was a sincere penitent, a true believer in Christ, and an affectionate lover of him, and to whom he first appeared:

and Joanna; the wife of Chuza, Herod's steward, one that had been a follower of Christ, and had ministered to him of her substance; see Luk 8:2

and Mary the mother of James; called the less; and also of Joses, and Simon, and Judas, the brethren, or kinsmen of Christ; this Mary, being the wife of Cleophas, or Alphaeus, said k to be the brother of Joseph, the husband of Mary, the mother of our Lord:

and other women that were with them; as Salome, the mother of Zebedee's children, and others, that came from Galilee; Mar 15:40.

which told these things unto the apostles; before observed.

Gill: Luk 24:11 - And their words seemed to them as idle tales // and they believed them not And their words seemed to them as idle tales,.... As fabulous things, as mere whims, and the fancies of their brains: "as a dream", according to the P...

And their words seemed to them as idle tales,.... As fabulous things, as mere whims, and the fancies of their brains: "as a dream", according to the Persic version; or, "as a jest", as the Arabic version renders it. They looked upon them as mere deceptions and delusions, and not real things; the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions read, "these words"; what they related concerning what they saw, and heard, at the sepulchre:

and they believed them not: for they had no thought, nor expectation of Christ's rising from the dead; they did not know that he was to rise again, according to the Scriptures; nor did they understand him when he told them of his rising again; and had no faith in it, nor hope concerning it, and could give no credit to it, when it was told them; and the Arabic version reads, "they did not believe it"; the word or report which the women delivered to them.

Gill: Luk 24:12 - Then arose Peter // and ran unto the sepulchre // and stooping down // he beheld the linen clothes laid by themselves // and departed // wondering in himself at that which was come to pass Then arose Peter,.... Who, though he did not believe the report made, yet listened to it, and was alarmed and aroused by it, and was willing to know t...

Then arose Peter,.... Who, though he did not believe the report made, yet listened to it, and was alarmed and aroused by it, and was willing to know the truth of it:

and ran unto the sepulchre; not alone, but with John, being in haste to be satisfied, how things were:

and stooping down; See Gill on Mar 16:5. See Gill on Joh 20:5.

he beheld the linen clothes laid by themselves; in which the body of Jesus was wrapped; these lay by themselves, without the body, in one place; and the napkin about his head was wrapped together, and lay in another place by itself: so that it was a plain case, the body was not stolen, nor taken away; for neither friends, nor foes, would have taken the pains, or have lost so much time, as to have stripped the body, but would rather have carried off the clothes along with it. The Alexandrian copy leaves out the word μονα, alone, or by themselves:

and departed; from the sepulchre to Jerusalem, to John's house there:

wondering in himself at that which was come to pass; that the body should not be there, and yet the clothes should remain; he could not tell what to make of it. As for a resurrection, he had no notion of that, and yet could not account for the removal of the body, either by friends or foes, and the clothes left behind.