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Teks -- Isaiah 50:1-11 (NET)

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Konteks
50:1 This is what the Lord says: “Where is your mother’s divorce certificate by which I divorced her? Or to which of my creditors did I sell you? Look, you were sold because of your sins; because of your rebellious acts I divorced your mother. 50:2 Why does no one challenge me when I come? Why does no one respond when I call? Is my hand too weak to deliver you? Do I lack the power to rescue you? Look, with a mere shout I can dry up the sea; I can turn streams into a desert, so the fish rot away and die from lack of water. 50:3 I can clothe the sky in darkness; I can cover it with sackcloth.”
The Servant Perseveres
50:4 The sovereign Lord has given me the capacity to be his spokesman, so that I know how to help the weary. He wakes me up every morning; he makes me alert so I can listen attentively as disciples do. 50:5 The sovereign Lord has spoken to me clearly; I have not rebelled, I have not turned back. 50:6 I offered my back to those who attacked, my jaws to those who tore out my beard; I did not hide my face from insults and spitting. 50:7 But the sovereign Lord helps me, so I am not humiliated. For that reason I am steadfastly resolved; I know I will not be put to shame. 50:8 The one who vindicates me is close by. Who dares to argue with me? Let us confront each other! Who is my accuser? Let him challenge me! 50:9 Look, the sovereign Lord helps me. Who dares to condemn me? Look, all of them will wear out like clothes; a moth will eat away at them. 50:10 Who among you fears the Lord? Who obeys his servant? Whoever walks in deep darkness, without light, should trust in the name of the Lord and rely on his God. 50:11 Look, all of you who start a fire and who equip yourselves with flaming arrows, walk in the light of the fire you started and among the flaming arrows you ignited! This is what you will receive from me: you will lie down in a place of pain.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · sea the Dead Sea, at the southern end of the Jordan River,the Mediterranean Sea,the Persian Gulf south east of Babylon,the Red Sea


Topik/Tema Kamus: Isaiah, The Book of | Isaiah | Jesus, The Christ | ISAIAH, 8-9 | SERVANT OF JEHOVAH; SERVANT OF THE LORD; SERVANT OF YAHWEH | Afflictions and Adversities | Faith | Righteous | Moth | BEARD | Flint | FIRE | REVELATION, 3-4 | PUNISHMENTS | MEDIATION; MEDIATOR | God | Wicked | Colors | Self-righteousness | Sin | selebihnya
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Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

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Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

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NET Notes , Geneva Bible

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Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable , Guzik

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Wesley: Isa 50:1 - Thus saith the Lord The scope of this and the next chapter, is to vindicate God's justice and to convince the Jews that they were the causes of their own calamities.

The scope of this and the next chapter, is to vindicate God's justice and to convince the Jews that they were the causes of their own calamities.

Wesley: Isa 50:1 - Behold You can blame none but yourselves and your own sins, for all your captivities and miseries.

You can blame none but yourselves and your own sins, for all your captivities and miseries.

Wesley: Isa 50:2 - Wherefore The general accusation delivered in the last words he now proves by particular instances.

The general accusation delivered in the last words he now proves by particular instances.

Wesley: Isa 50:2 - When When I, first by my prophets, came to call them to repentance.

When I, first by my prophets, came to call them to repentance.

Wesley: Isa 50:2 - No man That complied with my call.

That complied with my call.

Wesley: Isa 50:2 - To answer To come at my call.

To come at my call.

Wesley: Isa 50:2 - Is my hand What is the reason of this contempt? Is it because you think I am either unwilling or unable to save you? A wilderness - As dry and fit for travelling...

What is the reason of this contempt? Is it because you think I am either unwilling or unable to save you? A wilderness - As dry and fit for travelling as a wilderness.

Wesley: Isa 50:3 - I clothe When it is necessary to save my people, I cover them with thick and dark clouds black as sackcloth, Rev 6:12.

When it is necessary to save my people, I cover them with thick and dark clouds black as sackcloth, Rev 6:12.

Wesley: Isa 50:4 - Given me This and the following passages may be in some sort understood of the prophet Isaiah, but they are far more evidently and eminently verified in Christ...

This and the following passages may be in some sort understood of the prophet Isaiah, but they are far more evidently and eminently verified in Christ, and indeed seem to be meant directly of him.

Wesley: Isa 50:4 - The tongue All ability of speaking plainly, and convincingly, and persuasively.

All ability of speaking plainly, and convincingly, and persuasively.

Wesley: Isa 50:4 - Weary Burdened with the sense of his, deplorable condition.

Burdened with the sense of his, deplorable condition.

Wesley: Isa 50:4 - Wakeneth Me, from time to time, and continually.

Me, from time to time, and continually.

Wesley: Isa 50:4 - To hear He by his Divine power assists me to the practice of all his commands and my duties, with all attention and diligence.

He by his Divine power assists me to the practice of all his commands and my duties, with all attention and diligence.

Wesley: Isa 50:6 - I gave I patiently yielded up myself to those who smote me.

I patiently yielded up myself to those who smote me.

Wesley: Isa 50:8 - Justifieth God will clear up my righteousness, and shew by many and mighty signs and wonders, that I lived and died his faithful servant.

God will clear up my righteousness, and shew by many and mighty signs and wonders, that I lived and died his faithful servant.

Wesley: Isa 50:8 - Let him come l am conscious of mine own innocency, and I know that God will give sentence for me.

l am conscious of mine own innocency, and I know that God will give sentence for me.

Wesley: Isa 50:9 - They Mine accusers and enemies.

Mine accusers and enemies.

Wesley: Isa 50:9 - The moth Shall be cut off and consumed by a secret curse.

Shall be cut off and consumed by a secret curse.

Wesley: Isa 50:10 - The voice Of Christ, who is called God's servant, by way of eminency and to intimate that though he was God, yet he would take upon himself the form of a servan...

Of Christ, who is called God's servant, by way of eminency and to intimate that though he was God, yet he would take upon himself the form of a servant.

Wesley: Isa 50:10 - In darkness Not in sin, but in misery, that lives in a disconsolate and calamitous condition.

Not in sin, but in misery, that lives in a disconsolate and calamitous condition.

Wesley: Isa 50:10 - No light No comfort.

No comfort.

Wesley: Isa 50:10 - Trust Let him fix his faith and hope in the mercy, and faithfulness, of the Lord, declared in his word, and in his interest in God, who by the mediation of ...

Let him fix his faith and hope in the mercy, and faithfulness, of the Lord, declared in his word, and in his interest in God, who by the mediation of this servant is reconciled to him and made his God.

Wesley: Isa 50:11 - All ye You that reject the light which God hath set up, and seek for comfort and safety, by your own inventions.

You that reject the light which God hath set up, and seek for comfort and safety, by your own inventions.

Wesley: Isa 50:11 - Walk Use your utmost endeavours to get comfort from these devices.

Use your utmost endeavours to get comfort from these devices.

Wesley: Isa 50:11 - This This shall be the fruit of all, you shall receive nothing but vexation and misery.

This shall be the fruit of all, you shall receive nothing but vexation and misery.

JFB: Isa 50:1 - Where . . . mothers divorcement Zion is "the mother"; the Jews are the children; and God the Husband and Father (Isa 54:5; Isa 62:5; Jer 3:14). GESENIUS thinks that God means by the ...

Zion is "the mother"; the Jews are the children; and God the Husband and Father (Isa 54:5; Isa 62:5; Jer 3:14). GESENIUS thinks that God means by the question to deny that He had given "a bill of divorcement" to her, as was often done on slight pretexts by a husband (Deu 24:1), or that He had "sold" His and her "children," as a poor parent sometimes did (Exo 21:7; 2Ki 4:1; Neh 5:5) under pressure of his "creditors"; that it was they who sold themselves through their own sins. MAURER explains, "Show the bill of your mother's divorcement, whom . . . ; produce the creditors to whom ye have been sold; so it will be seen that it was not from any caprice of Mine, but through your own fault, your mother has been put away, and you sold" (Isa 52:3). HORSLEY best explains (as the antithesis between "I" and "yourselves" shows, though LOWTH translates, "Ye are sold") I have never given your mother a regular bill of divorcement; I have merely "put her away" for a time, and can, therefore, by right as her husband still take her back on her submission; I have not made you, the children, over to any "creditor" to satisfy a debt; I therefore still have the right of a father over you, and can take you back on repentance, though as rebellious children you have sold yourselves to sin and its penalty (1Ki 21:25).

JFB: Isa 50:1 - bill . . . whom Rather, "the bill with which I have put her away" [MAURER].

Rather, "the bill with which I have put her away" [MAURER].

JFB: Isa 50:2 - I Messiah.

Messiah.

JFB: Isa 50:2 - no man Willing to believe in and obey Me (Isa 52:1, Isa 52:3). The same Divine Person had "come" by His prophets in the Old Testament (appealing to them, but...

Willing to believe in and obey Me (Isa 52:1, Isa 52:3). The same Divine Person had "come" by His prophets in the Old Testament (appealing to them, but in vain, Jer 7:25-26), who was about to come under the New Testament.

JFB: Isa 50:2 - hand shortened The Oriental emblem of weakness, as the long stretched-out hand is of power (Isa 59:1). Notwithstanding your sins, I can still "redeem" you from your ...

The Oriental emblem of weakness, as the long stretched-out hand is of power (Isa 59:1). Notwithstanding your sins, I can still "redeem" you from your bondage and dispersion.

JFB: Isa 50:2 - dry up . . . sea (Exo 14:21). The second exodus shall exceed, while it resembles in wonders, the first (Isa 11:11, Isa 11:15; Isa 51:15).

(Exo 14:21). The second exodus shall exceed, while it resembles in wonders, the first (Isa 11:11, Isa 11:15; Isa 51:15).

JFB: Isa 50:2 - make . . . rivers . . . wilderness Turn the prosperity of Israel's foes into adversity.

Turn the prosperity of Israel's foes into adversity.

JFB: Isa 50:2 - fish stinketh The very judgment inflicted on their Egyptian enemies at the first exodus (Exo 7:18, Exo 7:21).

The very judgment inflicted on their Egyptian enemies at the first exodus (Exo 7:18, Exo 7:21).

JFB: Isa 50:3 - heavens . . . blackness Another of the judgments on Egypt to be repeated hereafter on the last enemy of God's people (Exo 10:21).

Another of the judgments on Egypt to be repeated hereafter on the last enemy of God's people (Exo 10:21).

JFB: Isa 50:3 - sackcloth (Rev 6:12).

JFB: Isa 50:4 - -- Messiah, as "the servant of Jehovah" (Isa 42:1), declares that the office has been assigned to Him of encouraging the "weary" exiles of Israel by "wor...

Messiah, as "the servant of Jehovah" (Isa 42:1), declares that the office has been assigned to Him of encouraging the "weary" exiles of Israel by "words in season" suited to their case; and that, whatever suffering it is to cost Himself, He does not shrink from it (Isa 50:5-6), for that He knows His cause will triumph at last (Isa 50:7-8).

JFB: Isa 50:4 - learned Not in mere human learning, but in divinely taught modes of instruction and eloquence (Isa 49:2; Exo 4:11; Mat 7:28-29; Mat 13:54).

Not in mere human learning, but in divinely taught modes of instruction and eloquence (Isa 49:2; Exo 4:11; Mat 7:28-29; Mat 13:54).

JFB: Isa 50:4 - speak a word in season (Pro 15:23; Pro 25:11). Literally, "to succor by words," namely, in their season of need, the "weary" dispersed ones of Israel (Deu 28:65-67). Also, ...

(Pro 15:23; Pro 25:11). Literally, "to succor by words," namely, in their season of need, the "weary" dispersed ones of Israel (Deu 28:65-67). Also, the spiritual "weary" (Isa 42:3; Mat 11:28).

JFB: Isa 50:4 - wakeneth morning by morning, &c. Compare "daily rising up early" (Jer 7:25; Mar 1:35). The image is drawn from a master wakening his pupils early for instruction.

Compare "daily rising up early" (Jer 7:25; Mar 1:35). The image is drawn from a master wakening his pupils early for instruction.

JFB: Isa 50:4 - wakeneth . . . ear Prepares me for receiving His divine instructions.

Prepares me for receiving His divine instructions.

JFB: Isa 50:4 - as the learned As one taught by Him. He "learned obedience," experimentally, "by the things which He suffered"; thus gaining that practical learning which adapted Hi...

As one taught by Him. He "learned obedience," experimentally, "by the things which He suffered"; thus gaining that practical learning which adapted Him for "speaking a word in season" to suffering men (Heb 5:8).

JFB: Isa 50:5 - opened . . . ear (See on Isa 42:20; Isa 48:8); that is, hath made me obediently attentive (but MAURER, "hath informed me of my duty"), as a servant to his master (comp...

(See on Isa 42:20; Isa 48:8); that is, hath made me obediently attentive (but MAURER, "hath informed me of my duty"), as a servant to his master (compare Psa 40:6-8, with Phi 2:7; Isa 42:1; Isa 49:3, Isa 49:6; Isa 52:13; Isa 53:11; Mat 20:28; Luk 22:27).

JFB: Isa 50:5 - not rebellious But, on the contrary, most willing to do the Father's will in proclaiming and procuring salvation for man, at the cost of His own sufferings (Heb 10:5...

But, on the contrary, most willing to do the Father's will in proclaiming and procuring salvation for man, at the cost of His own sufferings (Heb 10:5-10).

JFB: Isa 50:6 - smiters With scourges and with the open hand (Isa 52:14; Mar 14:65). Literally fulfilled (Mat 27:26; Mat 26:27; Luk 18:33). To "pluck the hair" is the highest...

With scourges and with the open hand (Isa 52:14; Mar 14:65). Literally fulfilled (Mat 27:26; Mat 26:27; Luk 18:33). To "pluck the hair" is the highest insult that can be offered an Oriental (2Sa 10:4; Lam 3:30). "I gave" implies the voluntary nature of His sufferings; His example corresponds to His precept (Mat 5:39).

JFB: Isa 50:6 - spitting To spit in another's presence is an insult in the East, much more on one; most of all in the face (Job 30:10; Mat 27:30; Luk 18:32).

To spit in another's presence is an insult in the East, much more on one; most of all in the face (Job 30:10; Mat 27:30; Luk 18:32).

JFB: Isa 50:7 - -- Sample of His not being "discouraged" (Isa 42:4; Isa 49:5).

Sample of His not being "discouraged" (Isa 42:4; Isa 49:5).

JFB: Isa 50:7 - set . . . face like . . . flint Set Myself resolutely, not to be daunted from My work of love by shame or suffering (Eze 3:8-9).

Set Myself resolutely, not to be daunted from My work of love by shame or suffering (Eze 3:8-9).

JFB: Isa 50:8 - -- (Isa 49:4). The believer, by virtue of his oneness with Christ, uses the same language (Psa 138:8; Rom 8:32-34). But "justify" in His case, is God's j...

(Isa 49:4). The believer, by virtue of his oneness with Christ, uses the same language (Psa 138:8; Rom 8:32-34). But "justify" in His case, is God's judicial acceptance and vindication of Him on the ground of His own righteousness (Luk 23:44-47; Rom 1:4; 1Ti 3:16, with which compare 1Pe 3:18); in their case, on the ground of His righteousness and meritorious death imputed to them (Rom 5:19).

JFB: Isa 50:8 - stand together In judgment, to try the issue.

In judgment, to try the issue.

JFB: Isa 50:8 - adversary Literally, "master of my cause," that is, who has real ground of accusation against me, so that he can demand judgment to be given in his favor (compa...

Literally, "master of my cause," that is, who has real ground of accusation against me, so that he can demand judgment to be given in his favor (compare Zec 3:1, &c. Rev 12:10).

JFB: Isa 50:9 - -- (Compare "deal," or "proper," Isa 52:13, Margin; Isa 53:10; Psa 118:6; Jer 23:5).

(Compare "deal," or "proper," Isa 52:13, Margin; Isa 53:10; Psa 118:6; Jer 23:5).

JFB: Isa 50:9 - as a garment (Isa 51:6, Isa 51:8; Psa 102:26). A leading constituent of wealth in the East is change of raiment, which is always liable to the inroads of the moth...

(Isa 51:6, Isa 51:8; Psa 102:26). A leading constituent of wealth in the East is change of raiment, which is always liable to the inroads of the moth; hence the frequency of the image in Scripture.

JFB: Isa 50:10 - -- Messiah exhorts the godly after His example (Isa 49:4-5; Isa 42:4) when in circumstances of trial ("darkness," Isa 47:5), to trust in the arm of Jehov...

Messiah exhorts the godly after His example (Isa 49:4-5; Isa 42:4) when in circumstances of trial ("darkness," Isa 47:5), to trust in the arm of Jehovah alone.

JFB: Isa 50:10 - Who is, &c. That is, Whosoever (Jdg 7:3).

That is, Whosoever (Jdg 7:3).

JFB: Isa 50:10 - obeyeth . . . servant Namely, Messiah. The godly "honor the Son, even as they honor the Father" (Joh 5:23).

Namely, Messiah. The godly "honor the Son, even as they honor the Father" (Joh 5:23).

JFB: Isa 50:10 - darkness (Mic 7:8-9). God never had a son who was not sometimes in the dark. For even Christ, His only Son, cried out, "My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken...

(Mic 7:8-9). God never had a son who was not sometimes in the dark. For even Christ, His only Son, cried out, "My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?"

JFB: Isa 50:10 - light Rather, "splendor"; bright sunshine; for the servant of God is never wholly without "light" [VITRINGA]. A godly man's way may be dark, but his end sha...

Rather, "splendor"; bright sunshine; for the servant of God is never wholly without "light" [VITRINGA]. A godly man's way may be dark, but his end shall be peace and light. A wicked man's way may be bright, but his end shall be utter darkness (Psa 112:4; Psa 97:11; Psa 37:24).

JFB: Isa 50:10 - let him trust in the name of the Lord As Messiah did (Isa 50:8-9).

As Messiah did (Isa 50:8-9).

JFB: Isa 50:11 - -- In contrast to the godly (Isa 50:10), the wicked, in times of darkness, instead of trusting in God, trust in themselves (kindle a light for themselves...

In contrast to the godly (Isa 50:10), the wicked, in times of darkness, instead of trusting in God, trust in themselves (kindle a light for themselves to walk by) (Ecc 11:9). The image is continued from Isa 50:10, "darkness"; human devices for salvation (Pro 19:21; Pro 16:9, Pro 16:25) are like the spark that goes out in an instant in darkness (compare Job 18:6; Job 21:17, with Psa 18:28).

JFB: Isa 50:11 - sparks Not a steady light, but blazing sparks extinguished in a moment.

Not a steady light, but blazing sparks extinguished in a moment.

JFB: Isa 50:11 - walk Not a command, but implying that as surely as they would do so, they should lie down in sorrow (Jer 3:25). In exact proportion to mystic Babylon's pre...

Not a command, but implying that as surely as they would do so, they should lie down in sorrow (Jer 3:25). In exact proportion to mystic Babylon's previous "glorifying" of herself shall be her sorrow (Mat 25:30; Mat 8:12; Rev 18:7).

Clarke: Isa 50:1 - Thus saith the Lord Thus saith the Lord - This chapter has been understood of the prophet himself; but it certainly speaks more clearly about Jesus of Nazareth than of ...

Thus saith the Lord - This chapter has been understood of the prophet himself; but it certainly speaks more clearly about Jesus of Nazareth than of Isaiah, the son of Amos

Where is the bill "Where is this bill"- Husbands, through moroseness or levity of temper, often sent bills of divorcement to their wives on slight occasions, as they were permitted to do by the law of Moses, Deu 24:1. And fathers, being oppressed with debt, often sold their children, which they might do for a time, till the year of release, Exo 21:7. That this was frequently practiced, appears from many passages of Scripture, and that the persons and the liberty of the children were answerable for the debts of the father. The widow, 2Ki 4:1, complains "that the creditor is come to take unto him her two sons to be bondmen."And in the parable, Mat 18:25 : "The lord, forasmuch as his servant had not to pay, commands him to be sold, and his wife and children, and all that he had, and payment to be made."Sir John Chardin’ s MS. note on this place of Isaiah is as follows: En Orient on paye ses dettes avec ses esclaves, car ils sont des principaux meubles; et en plusieurs lieux on les paye aussi de ses enfans . "In the east they pay their debts by giving up their slaves, for these are their chief property of a disposable kind; and in many places they give their children to their creditors."But this, saith God, cannot be my case, I am not governed by any such motives, neither am I urged by any such necessity. Your captivity therefore and your afflictions are to be imputed to yourselves, and to your own folly and wickedness.

Clarke: Isa 50:2 - -- Their fish stinketh "Their fish is dried up"- For תבאש tibaosh , stinketh, read תיבש tibash , is dried up; so it stands in the Bodl. MS., ...

Their fish stinketh "Their fish is dried up"- For תבאש tibaosh , stinketh, read תיבש tibash , is dried up; so it stands in the Bodl. MS., and it is confirmed by the Septuagint, ξηρανθησονται, they shall be dried up.

Clarke: Isa 50:5 - -- Neither turned away back "Neither did I withdraw myself backward"- Eleven MSS. and the oldest edition prefix the conjunction ו vau ; and so also ...

Neither turned away back "Neither did I withdraw myself backward"- Eleven MSS. and the oldest edition prefix the conjunction ו vau ; and so also the Septuagint and Syriac.

Clarke: Isa 50:6 - And my cheeks to them that plunked off the hair And my cheeks to them that plunked off the hair - The greatest indignity that could possibly be offered. See the note on Isa 7:20 (note)

And my cheeks to them that plunked off the hair - The greatest indignity that could possibly be offered. See the note on Isa 7:20 (note)

Clarke: Isa 50:6 - I hid not my face from shame and spitting I hid not my face from shame and spitting - Another instance of the utmost contempt and detestation. It was ordered by the law of Moses as a severe ...

I hid not my face from shame and spitting - Another instance of the utmost contempt and detestation. It was ordered by the law of Moses as a severe punishment, carrying with it a lasting disgrace; Deu 25:9. Among the Medes it was highly offensive to spit in any one’ s presence, Herod. 1:99; and so likewise among the Persians, Xenophon, Cyrop. Lib. i., p. 18

"They abhor me; they flee far from me

They forbear not to spit in my face.

Job 30:10

"And Jehovah said unto Moses, If her father had but spit in her face, should she not be ashamed seven days?"Num 22:14. On which place Sir John Chardin remarks, that "spitting before any one, or spitting upon the ground in speaking of any one’ s actions, is through the east an expression of extreme detestation."- Harmer’ s Observ. 2:509. See also, of the same notions of the Arabs in this respect, Niebuhr, Description de l’ Arabie, p. 26. It so evidently appears that in those countries spitting has ever been an expression of the utmost detestation, that the learned doubt whether in the passages of Scripture above quoted any thing more is meant than spitting, - not in the face, which perhaps the words do not necessarily imply, - but only in the presence of the person affronted. But in this place it certainly means spitting in the face; so it is understood in St. Luke, where our Lord plainly refers to this prophecy: "All things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of man shall be accomplished; for he shall be delivered to the Gentiles, and shall be mocked and spitefully entreated, and spitted on, εμπτυσθησεται, "Luk 18:31, Luk 18:32, which was in fact fulfilled; και ηρξεαντο τινες εμπτυειν αυτῳ, "and some began to spit on him,"Mar 14:65, Mar 15:19. If spitting in a person’ s presence was such an indignity, how much more spitting in his face?

Clarke: Isa 50:7 - Therefore have I set my face like a flint Therefore have I set my face like a flint - The Prophet Ezekiel, Eze 2:8, Eze 2:9, has expressed this with great force in his bold and vehement mann...

Therefore have I set my face like a flint - The Prophet Ezekiel, Eze 2:8, Eze 2:9, has expressed this with great force in his bold and vehement manner

"Behold, I have made thy face strong against their faces

And thy forehead strong against their foreheads

As an adamant, harder than a rock, have I made thy forehead

Fear them not, neither be dismayed at their looks

Though they be a rebellious house."

Clarke: Isa 50:8 - Who will contend with me Who will contend with me - The Bodleian MS. and another add the word הוא hu ; מי הוא יריב mi hu yarib , as in the like phrase in the ...

Who will contend with me - The Bodleian MS. and another add the word הוא hu ; מי הוא יריב mi hu yarib , as in the like phrase in the next verse; and in the very same phrase Job 13:19, and so likewise in many other places, Job 17:3; Job 41:1. Sometimes on the like occasions it is מי זה mi zeh , and מי הוא זה mi hu zeh , "Who is this one?"The word has probably been lost out of the present text; and the reading of the MSS. above mentioned seems to be genuine.

Clarke: Isa 50:10 - Who is among you that feareth the Lord Who is among you that feareth the Lord - I believe this passage has been generally, if not dangerously, misunderstood. It has been quoted, and preac...

Who is among you that feareth the Lord - I believe this passage has been generally, if not dangerously, misunderstood. It has been quoted, and preached upon, to prove that "a man might conscientiously fear God, and be obedient to the words of the law and the prophets; obey the voice of his servant-of Jesus Christ himself, that is, be sincerely and regularly obedient to the moral law and the commands of our blessed Lord, and yet walk in darkness and have no light, no sense of God’ s approbation, and no evidence of the safety of his state. "This is utterly impossible; for Jesus hath said, "He that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life."If there be some religious persons who, under the influence of morbid melancholy, are continually writing bitter things against themselves, the word of God should not be bent down to their state. There are other modes of spiritual and Scriptural comfort. But does not the text speak of such a case? And are not the words precise in reference to it? I think not: and Bishop Lowth’ s translation has set the whole in the clearest light, though he does not appear to have been apprehensive that the bad use I mention had been made of the text as it stands in our common Version. The text contains two questions, to each of which a particular answer is given: -

Q. 1. "Who is there among you that feareth Jehovah

Ans. Let him hearken unto the voice of his servant

Q. 2. Who that walketh in darkness and hath no light

Ans. Let him trust in the name of Jehovah

And lean himself (prop himself) upon his God.

Now, a man awakened to a sense of his sin and misery, may have a dread of Jehovah, and tremble at his word, and what should such a person do? Why he should hear what God’ s servant saith: "Come unto me, all ye who labor and are heavy laden; and I will give you rest."There may be a sincere penitent, walking in darkness, having no light of salvation; for this is the case of all when they first begin to turn to God. What should such do? They should trust, believe on, the Lord Jesus, who died for them, and lean upon his all-sufficient merits for the light of salvation which God has promised. Thus acting, they will soon have a sure trust and confidence that God for Christ’ s sake has forgiven them their sin, and thus they shall have the light of life.

Clarke: Isa 50:10 - -- That obeyeth the voice of his servant "Let him hearken unto the voice of his servant"- For שמע shomea , pointed as the participle, the Septuagin...

That obeyeth the voice of his servant "Let him hearken unto the voice of his servant"- For שמע shomea , pointed as the participle, the Septuagint and Syriac read ישמע yishma , future or imperative. This gives a much more elegant turn and distribution to the sentence.

Clarke: Isa 50:11 - Ye that kindle a fire Ye that kindle a fire - The fire of their own kindling, by the light of which they walk with security and satisfaction, is an image designed to expr...

Ye that kindle a fire - The fire of their own kindling, by the light of which they walk with security and satisfaction, is an image designed to express, in general, human devices and mere worldly policy, exclusive of faith, and trust in God; which, though they flatter themselves for a while with pleasing expectations and some appearance of success, shall in the end turn to the confusion of the authors. Or more particularly, as Vitringa explains it, it may mean the designs of the turbulent and factious Jews in the times succeeding those of Christ, who, in pursuit of their own desperate schemes, stirred up the war against the Romans, and kindled a fire which consumed their city and nation

Clarke: Isa 50:11 - That compass yourselves about with sparks "Who heap the fuel round about" That compass yourselves about with sparks "Who heap the fuel round about" - " מגוזלי megozeley , accendentes, Syr.; forte leperunt pro מאז...

That compass yourselves about with sparks "Who heap the fuel round about" - " מגוזלי megozeley , accendentes, Syr.; forte leperunt pro מאזרי meazzerey מאירי meirey ; nam sequitur אור ur ."- Secker. Lud. Capellus, in his criticism on this place, thinks it should be מאזרי meazzerey , from the Septuagint, κατισχυοντες

There are others who are widely different from those already described. Without faith, repentance, or a holy life, they are bold in their professed confidence in God - presumptuous in their trust in the mercy of God; and, while destitute of all preparation for and right to the kingdom of heaven, would think it criminal to doubt their final salvation! Living in this way, what can they have at the hand of God but an endless bed of sorrow! Ye shall lie down in sorrow

But there is a general sense, and accordant to the design of the prophecy, in which these words may be understood and paraphrased: Behold, all ye that kindle a fire - provoke war and contention; compass yourselves about with sparks - stirring up seditions and rebellions: walk in the light of your fire - go on in your lust of power and restless ambition. Ye shall lie down in sorrow - it will turn to your own perdition. See the Targum. This seems to refer to the restless spirit of the Jews, always stirring up confusion and strife; rebelling against and provoking the Romans, till at last their city was taken, their temple burnt to the ground, and upwards of a million of themselves destroyed, and the rest led into captivity!

Calvin: Isa 50:1 - Where is that bill of divorcement? // Or who is the creditor to whom I sold you? // Lo, for your iniquities ye have been sold 1.Where is that bill of divorcement? There are various interpretations of this passage, but very few of the commentators have understood the Prophet...

1.Where is that bill of divorcement? There are various interpretations of this passage, but very few of the commentators have understood the Prophet’s meaning. In order to have a general understanding of it, we must observe that union by which the Lord everywhere testifies that his people are bound to him; that is, that he occupies the place of a husband, and that we occupy the place of a wife. It is a spiritual marriage, which has been consecrated by his eternal doctrine and sealed by the blood of Christ. In the same manner, therefore, as he takes us under his protection as a early beloved wife, on condition that we preserve our fidelity to him by chastity; so when we have been false to him, he rejects us; and then he is said to issue a lawful divorce against us, as when a husband banished from his house an adulterous wife.

Thus, when the Jews were oppressed by calamities so many and so great, that it was easy to conclude that God had rejected and divorced them, the cause of the divorce came to be the subject of inquiry. Now, as men are usually eloquent in apologizing for themselves, and endeavor to throw back the blame on God, the Jews also complained at that time about their condition, as if the Lord had done wrong in divorcing them; because they were far from thinking that the promises had been made void, and the covenant annulled, by their crimes. They even laid the blame on their ancestors, as if they were punished for the sins of others. Hence those taunts and complaints which Ezekiel relates.

“Our fathers ate a sour grape, and our teeth are set on edge.” (Eze 18:2.)

Speeches of this kind being universally current among them, the Lord demands that they shall produce the “bill of divorcement,” by means of which they may prove that they are free from blame and have been rejected without cause.

Now, a “bill of divorcement” was granted to wives who were unjustly divorced; for by it the husband was constrained to testify that his wife had lived chastely and honorably, so that it was evident that there was no other ground for the divorce than that she did not please the husband. Thus the woman was at liberty to go away, and the blame rested solely on the husband, to whose sullenness and bad temper was ascribed the cause of the divorce. (Deu 24:1.) This law of divorcement, as Ezekiel shews, (Mat 19:8,) was given by Moses on account of the hard-heartedness of that nation. By a highly appropriate metaphor, therefore, the Lord shews that he is not the author of the divorce, but that the people went away by their own fault, and followed their lusts, so that they had utterly broken the bond of marriage. This is the reason why he asks where is “that bill” of which they boasted; for there is emphasis in the demonstrative pronoun, זה (zeh), that, by which he intended to expose their idle excuses; as if he had said, that they throw off the accusation, and lay blame on God, as if they had been provided with a defense, whereas they had violated the bond of marriage, and could produce nothing to make the divorce lawful.

Or who is the creditor to whom I sold you? By another metaphor he demonstrates the same thing. When a man was overwhelmed by debt, so that he could not satisfy his creditors, he was compelled to give his children in payment. The Lord therefore asks, “Has he been constrained to do this? Has he sold them, or given them in payment to another creditor? Is he like spendthrifts or bad managers, who allow themselves to be overwhelmed by debt?” As if he had said, “You cannot bring this reproach against me; and therefore it is evident that, on account of your transgressions, you have been sold and reduced to slavery.”

Lo, for your iniquities ye have been sold Thus the Lord defends his majesty from all slanders, and refutes them by this second clause, in which he declares that it is by their own fault that the Jews have been divorced and “sold.” The same mode of expression is employed by Paul, when he says that we are “sold under sin,” (Rom 7:14,) but in a different sense; in the same manner as the Hebrew writers are wont to speak of abandoned men, whose wickedness is desperate. But here the Prophet intended merely to charge the Jews with guilt, because, by their own transgressions, they had brought upon themselves all the evils that they endured.

If it be asked, “Did the Lord divorce his heritage? Did he make void the covenant?” Certainly not; but the Lord is said to “divorce,” as he is elsewhere said to profane, his heritage, (Psa 89:39; Eze 24:21,) because no other conclusion can be drawn from present appearances; for, when he did not bestow upon them his wonted favor, it was a kind of divorce or rejection. In a word, we ought to attend to these two contrasts, that the wife is divorced, either by the husband’s fault, or because she is unchaste and adulterous; and likewise that children are sold, either for their father’s poverty or by their own fault. And thus the course of argument in this passage will be manifest.

Calvin: Isa 50:2 - Why did I come? // Why did I call, and no one answered? // By shortening hath my hand been shortened? 2.Why did I come? This might be a reason assigned, that the people have not only brought upon themselves all immense mass of evils by provoking God...

2.Why did I come? This might be a reason assigned, that the people have not only brought upon themselves all immense mass of evils by provoking God’s anger, but have likewise, by their obstinacy, cut off the hope of obtaining pardon and salvation. But I think that God proceeds still further. After having explained that he had good reason for divorcing the people, because they had of their own accord given themselves up to bondage, when they might have been free, he adds that still it is not he who prevents them from being immediately set at liberty. As he shewed, in the former verse, that the whole blame rests with the Jews, so now he declares that it arises from their own fault that they grow old and rot in their distresses; for the Lord was ready to assist them, if they had not rejected his grace and kindness. In a word, he shows that both the beginning and the progress of the evil arise from the fault of the people, in order that he may free God from all blame, and may shew that the Jews act wickedly in accusing him as the author of evil, or in complaining that he will not assist them.

First, then, the Lord says that he “came;” and why, but that he might stretch out his hand to the Jews? Whence it follows that they are justly deprived; for they would not receive his grace. Now, the Lord is said to “come,” when he gives any token of his presence. He approaches by the preaching of the Word, and he approaches also by various benefits which he bestows on us, and by the tokens which he employs for manifesting his fatherly kindness toward us.

“Was there ever any people,” as Moses says, “that saw so many signs, and heard the voice of God speaking, like this people?” (Deu 4:33.)

Constant invitation having been of no advantage to them, when he held out the hope of pardon and exhorted them to repentance, it is with good reason that he speaks of it as a monstrous thing, and asks why there was no man to meet him. They are therefore held to be convicted of ingratitude, because, while they ought to have sought God, they did not even choose to meet him when he came; for it is an instance of extreme ingratitude to refuse to accept the grace of God which is freely offered.

Why did I call, and no one answered? In the word call there is a repetition of the same statement in different words. When God “calls,” we ought to be ready and submissive; for this is the “answer” which, he complains, was refused to him; that is, we ought to yield implicitly to his word. But this expression applies strictly to the matter now in hand; because God, when he offered a termination to their distresses, was obstinately despised, as if he had spoken to the deaf and dumb. Hence he infers that on themselves lies the blame of not having been sooner delivered; and he supports this by former proofs, because he had formerly shewn to the fathers that he possessed abundance of power to assist them. Again, that they may not cavil and excuse themselves by saying that they had not obtained salvation, though they heartily desired it, he maintains, on the other hand, that the cause of the change ought to be sought somewhere else than in him, (for his power was not at all diminished,) and therefore that he would not have delayed to stretch out his hand to them in distress, if they had not wickedly refused his aid.

By shortening hath my hand been shortened? By this interrogation he expresses greater boldness, as if he were affirming what could not be called in question; for who would venture to plead against God that his power was diminished? He therefore relates how powerfully he rescued his people out of Egypt, that they may not now imagine that he is less powerful, but may acknowledge that their sins were the hinderance. 14 He says that by his reproof he “dried up the sea,” as if he had struck terror by a threatening word; for by his authority, and at his command, the seas were divided, so that a passage was opened up, (Exo 14:21,) and Jordan was driven back. (Jos 3:16.) The consequence was, that “the fishes,” being deprived of water, died and putrified.

Calvin: Isa 50:3 - I clothe the heavens with blackness 3.I clothe the heavens with blackness He mentions also that thick darkness which was spread over all Egypt during the space of three days. (Exo 10:22...

3.I clothe the heavens with blackness He mentions also that thick darkness which was spread over all Egypt during the space of three days. (Exo 10:22.) At that time the heaven was clothed as with a mouming dress; for, as fine weather has a gladdening influence, so blackness and darkness produce melancholy; and therefore he says, that the heavens were covered as with sackcloth or with a mouming dress, as if they had been tokens and expressions of mouming, 15 If any one prefer to view them as general statements, let him enjoy his opinion; but I think it probable that he glances at the history of the deliverance from Egypt, 16 front which it might easily be inferred that God, who had so miraculously assisted the fathers, was prevented by their ingratitude from granting relief to the miseries which now oppressed them.

Calvin: Isa 50:4 - The Lord Jehovah // Hath given me the tongue of the learned // That I may know a word in season to the weary // He will waken in the morning // That I may hear as the learned 4.The Lord Jehovah After having twice convicted them of guilt, he adds a consolation in his usual manner; for when the Lord covers us with shame, he ...

4.The Lord Jehovah After having twice convicted them of guilt, he adds a consolation in his usual manner; for when the Lord covers us with shame, he intends immediately to free us from shame. Although, therefore, he shewed that the people had been rejected for the best possible reasons, and had perished by their own fault, because they proved themselves to be even unworthy of deliverance, yet he promises assistance to them. Again, because in a matter so difficult to be believed there needed more than ordinary proof, he begins by saying that God has sent and instructed him to execute his commands. This passage is commonly explained so as to relate to Christ, as if it had not been applicable to the Prophet, because he afterwards says, that he had been beaten with rods, which we nowhere read was done to Isaiah. But there is no great force in this argument; for David complains that his garments were divided, (Psa 22:18,) which applies literally to Christ, (Mat 27:35; Joh 19:24,) and yet it does not follow that this did not happen to David himself. For my own part, I have no doubt, that Isaiah comes forward as one who represents all the servants of God, not only those who were from the beginning, but those who should come afterwards.

Hath given me the tongue of the learned He says that the Lord hath given him a “tongue,” that the promises bywhieh he cheers the people may have greater weight. Our faith wavers, if we suspect that a man speaks from himself; and the condition of that people was so wretched that no human arguments could induce them to entertain the hope of deliverance. It amounts to this, that the message of approaching salvation is brought to them from heaven; and if any person do not receive it, he must prove himself to be rebellious and disobedient. Although these words are literally intended by the Prophet to secure the belief of his statements, yet we may infer from them generally, that no man is fit to teach who has not first been qualified by God. This reminds all godly teachers to ask from the Spirit of God what otherwise they could not at all possess. They must indeed study diligently, so as not to ascend the pulpit till they have been fully prepared; but they must hold by this principle, that all things necessary for discharging their office are gifts of the Holy Spirit. And, indeed, if they were not organs of the Holy Spirit, it would be extreme rashness to come forth publicly in the name of God.

That I may know a word in season to the weary Some verb must be supplied here, such as, “to administer” or “to utter.” The word “know” includes wisdom and skill, which a pastor ought to possess, that the word of God may be faithfully and profitably administered by him; as if he had said that he has been well instructed in the school of God, and thus knows well what is suitable to those who are wretched and who groan under a burden. 17 The term “weary” is applied to those who are overwhelmed by many afflictions; as we have formerly seen, “who giveth strength to the weary.” (Isa 40:29.) Thus also Christ speaks, “Come to me, all ye that are weary and heavy laden.” (Mat 11:28.) He therefore means that God has been his teacher and instructor, that he may be able to soothe wretched men by appropriate consolation, that by means of it their dejected hearts may be encouraged by feeling the mercy of God.

Hence we infer that the most important duty of the ministers of the word is, to comfort wretched men, who are oppressed by afflictions, or who bend under their weight, and, in short, to point out what is true rest and serenity of mind, as we have formerly seen. (Isa 33:20.) We are likewise taught what each of us ought chiefly to seek in the Scriptures, namely, that we may be fumished with doctrine appropriate and suitable for relieving our distresses, He who, by seasonable consolation, in afflictive or even desperate affairs, can cheer and support his heart, ought to know that he has made good proficiency in the Gospel. I acknowledge that doctrine has indeed various uses; for not only is it useful for comforting the afflicted and feeble, but it likewise contains severe reproofs and threatenings against the obstinate. (2Ti 3:16.) But Isaiah shews that the chief duty incumbent on him is, to bring some consolation to the Jews who, in the present distress, are ready to faint.

He will waken in the morning The Prophet here testifies that the Lord is so careful about wretched and oppressed persons that he aids them “in the morning,” that is, seasonably. I do acknowledge that we are often destitute of consolation; but, although God often permits us to languish, yet he knows every moment that is suitable for seasonably meeting the necessity by his aid. Besides, if his assistance be somewhat late, this happens through our own fault; for not only by our indolence, but likewise by rebellion, we withdraw ourselves from his grace. However that may be, he always watches carefully and runs to give aid; and even when we fly and resist, he calls us to him, that we may be refreshed by tasting his grace and kindness.

He twice repeats the phrase, “in the morning,” by which he expresses continuance and earnestness, that we may not think that he is liable to sudden impulses like men, to cast off or quickly forget those whom he has once undertaken to guard, whom he continues, on the contrary, to make the objects of his grace till the end, and never leaves destitute of consolation.

That I may hear as the learned He means that his ear has not only been pulled or twitched, as for sluggish and indolent persons, but has been formed and trained. Yet by his example he shews that God efficaciously teaches all whose ministry he intends to employ for the salvation of his Church; for it would have been a small matter to be instructed after the manner of men, if they had not within them the Spirit of God as their instructor. This makes still more evident the truth of what we have formerly said, that none are good teachers but those who have been good scholars. He calls them “learned’and “well-instructed;” for they who do not deign to learn, because they think that they are wise enough, are doubly fools; since they alone, in the judgment of God, are reckoned to be “well-instructed” and “learned,” who permit themselves to be taught before discharging the office of teachers, that they may have clear knowledge of those things which they communicate to others, and may publicly bring forward nothing but what they can testify to have proceeded from God; and, in a word, they alone are “learned,” 18 who, by continually learning, do not refuse to make constant progress. Some read the word in the accusative, meaning, “that I may hear as (hearing) the learned;” but that is harsh and at variance with the true meaning.

Calvin: Isa 50:5 - The Lord Jehovah hath opened mine ear 5.The Lord Jehovah hath opened mine ear He again repeats what he had formerly said, and here includes everything that belongs to the office of a teac...

5.The Lord Jehovah hath opened mine ear He again repeats what he had formerly said, and here includes everything that belongs to the office of a teacher; for the “opening of the ear” must be understood to refer not only to doctrine, but to the whole calling; that is, when he takes one to be his servant, and intbrms of his duty him whom he has determined to send, when he gives commands, and enjoins him to execute what he commands. But the Lord “opens the ear,” not only when he declares what is his will, but when he powerfully affects a man’s heart and moves him to render obedience, as it is said,

“Thou hast bored mine ear.” (Psa 40:6.)

And Christ says,

“Whosoever hath heard and learned from the Father cometh to me.”
(Joh 6:45.)

Such is also the import of the second clause, And I was not rebellious, the meaning of which may be thus summed up: “He undertakes nothing at random, but, being fully convinced of God’s calling, he discharges the office of a teacher, though it is laborious and difficult, because he is ready to obey.”

Calvin: Isa 50:6 - I exposed my body to the smiters // My face I did not hide from shame and spitting 6.I exposed my body to the smiters With the reproaches, jeers, and insolence of wicked men, he contrasts the unshaken courage which he possesses; as ...

6.I exposed my body to the smiters With the reproaches, jeers, and insolence of wicked men, he contrasts the unshaken courage which he possesses; as if he had said that, “whatever resistancemay be attempted by the despisers of God, yet he will baffle all their insults, so that he will never repent of the labors which he has undertaken.” Yet this passage plainly shows that the ministers of the word cannot perform their office faithfully without being exposed to a contest with the world, and even without being fiercely assailed on all sides; for as soon as Isaiah says that he has obeyed the command of God, he likewise adds that “He has exposed his body to the smiters.” The faithful servants of God, when they administer the doctrine of the word, cannot escape from this condition, but must endure fights, reproaches, hatred, slanders, and various attacks from adversaries, who loathe that liberty of advising and reproving which it is necessary for them to use. Let them, therefore, arm themselves with steadfastness and faith; for a dreadful battle is prepared for them. And not only does he describe the persecutions of wicked men, but the reproach of the world; because wicked men desire to be thought to have good cause for opposing the ministers of the word and persecuting their doctrine, and wish that those ministers should be regarded as criminals and malefactors, and held up to universal hatred and abhorrence. For these reasons they lead them with various slanders, and do not refrain from any kind of reproach, as we know well enough by experience in the present day, when our adversaries call us heretics, deceivers, seditious persons, and assail us with other slanders, which were also directed against Christ and the Apostles. (Mat 27:63; Joh 7:12; Act 16:20.)

My face I did not hide from shame and spitting He not only says that open and outward foes spat and inflicted blows on him, but glances at the slanders which he is compelled to bear from foes who are within and belong to the household; for out of the very bosom of the Church there always spring up wicked men and despisers of God, who insolently attack the prophets. They who wish to serve God must be prepared to endure all these things calmly, that they may walk through evil report and through good report, (2Co 6:8,) and may despise not only banishment, stripes, imprisonment, and death, but likewise reproaches and disgrace, though they may sometimes appear harder to endure than death itself. While this doctrine belongs to all believers, it belongs especially to the teachers of the word, who ought to go before others, and to be, as it were, standard-bearers.

Calvin: Isa 50:7 - For the Lord Jehovah will help me // Therefore I have set my face as a flint // Therefore I was not ashamed // I shall not be confounded 7.For the Lord Jehovah will help me The Prophet declares whence comes so great courage, which he and the other servants of God need to possess, in or...

7.For the Lord Jehovah will help me The Prophet declares whence comes so great courage, which he and the other servants of God need to possess, in order to withstand courageously the attacks of every one. It comes from God’s assistance, by relying on whom he declares that he is fortified against all the attacks of the world. After having, with lofty fortitude, looked down contemptuously on all that was opposed to him, he exhorts others also to maintain the same firmness, and gives what may be called a picture of the condition of all the ministers of the word; that, by tuming aside from the world, they may tum wholly to God and have their eyes entirely fixed upon him. There never will be a contest so arduous that they shall not gain the victory by trusting to such a leader.

Therefore I have set my face as a flint By the metaphor of “a flint” he shews that, whatever may happen, he will not be afraid; for terror or alarm, like other passions, makes itself visible in the face. The countenance itself speaks, and shews what are our feelings. The servants of God, being so shamefully treated, must inevitably have sunk under such attacks, had they not withstood them with a forehead of stone or of iron. In this sense of the term, Jeremiah also is said to have been “set for a fortified city, an iron pillar, and a brazen wall, against the kings of Judah, and the princes, and the people,” (Jer 1:18;) and to Ezekiel is said to have been given “a strong forehead, and even one of adamant, and harder than that, that he might not be dismayed at the obstinacy of the people.” (Eze 3:9.)

Therefore I was not ashamed The word “ashamed” is twice used in this verse, but in different senses; for in the former clause it relates to the feeling, and in the latter to the thing itself or the effect. Accordingly, in the beginning of the verse, where he boasts that he is not confounded with shame, because God is on his side, he means that it is not enough that God is willing to help us, if we do not also feel it; for of what advantage to us will the promises of God be, if we distrust him? Confidence, therefore, is demanded, that we may be supported by it, and may assuredly know that we enjoy God’s favor.

I shall not be confounded In the conclusion of the verse he boldly declares his conviction that the end will be prosperous. Thus “to be confounded” means “to be disappointed;” for they who had entertained a vain and deceitful hope are liable to be mocked. Here we see that some special assistance is promised to godly teachers and ministers of the word; so that the fiercer the attacks of Satan, and the stronger the hostility of the world, so much the more does the Lord defend and guard them by extraordinary protection. And hence we ought to conclude, that all those who, when they come to the contest, tremble and lose courage, have never been duly qualified for discharging their office; for he who knows not how to strive knows not how to serve God and the Church, and is not fitted for administering the doctrine of the word.

Calvin: Isa 50:8 - He is near that justifieth me // Let us stand together // Let him draw near to 8.He is near that justifieth me We ought always to keep in remembrance that the Prophet mentions nothing that is peculiar to himself, but testifies w...

8.He is near that justifieth me We ought always to keep in remembrance that the Prophet mentions nothing that is peculiar to himself, but testifies what the Lord chooses to be, and will always be, towards faithful ministers, that whosoever has this testimony, that God has sent him, and knows that he discharges his office faithfully, may boldly despise all adversaries, and may not be moved by their reproaches, for he is “justified” by the Lord; and, in like manner, the Lord always is, and will be, near to defend and maintain his truth. Besides, that any one may be able to make this protestation, it is necessary that his conscience be pure; for, if any man thrust himself rashly into the office, and have no testimony of his calling, or bring forward his dreams publicly, in vain will he boast of this promise, which belongs only to those who have been called by God, and who sincerely and uprightly perform their duty. Now, although either hypocrites or despisers never cease to annoy the servants of God, yet Isaiah advances to meet them, as if none would venture to pick a quarrel or utter a slander; not that he can keep them in check, 19 but because they will gain nothing by all their attempts. He therefore declares, that he looks down with utter contempt on the false accusations which the enemies of sound doctrine pour out against its teachers. There is no crime with which they do not upbraid them; but their efforts are fruitless; for the Judge, by whom their integrity is maintained, is not far off. They may, therefore, as Paul did, boldly appeal from the wicked and unjust judgments of men to “the day of the Lord,” by whom their innocence will be made manifest. (1Co 4:4.)

Let us stand together Godly teachers ought to have so great confidence as not to hesitate to give a bold defiance to adversaries. Satan, with his agents, does not always venture to attack openly, especially when he fights by falsehoods, but by ambuscade, and by burrowing under ground, endeavors to take them by surprise; but the servants of God are not afraid to “stand up” openly, and enter into contest with the enemy, and contend by arguments, provided that adversaries are willing to enter into the lists. So great is the force of truth that it does not dread the light of day, as we say that Isaiah here attacks boldly those whom he perceives to be plotting against him; and therefore he repeats, —

Let him draw near to me. Godly ministers ought to be ready to assign a reason for their doctrine. But where is the man that is willing to hear them patiently, and to consider what is the nature of that doctrine which they publicly declare? True indeed, adversaries will approach, but it is to draw their swords to slay them; to sharpen their tongues, that by every kind of slander they may tear them in pieces. In short, their whole defense consists in arms or deceitful stratagems; for they do not venture to contend by scriptural arguments. Relying, therefore, on the justice of our cause, we may freely defy them to the conflict. Though they condemn us without listening to our vindication, and though they have many that support the sentence which they have pronounced, we have no reason to be afraid; for God, whose cause we plead, is our Judge, and will at length acquit us.

Calvin: Isa 50:9 - Who is he that condemmeth me? // Lo, they shall all wax old as a garment 9.Who is he that condemmeth me? Paul appears to allude to this passage, in his Epistle to the Romans, when he says, “It is God that justifieth; who...

9.Who is he that condemmeth me? Paul appears to allude to this passage, in his Epistle to the Romans, when he says, “It is God that justifieth; who shall condemn?” (Rom 8:33.) We may safely have recourse to the judgment-seat of God, when we are well assured that we have obtained his righteousness by free grace through Christ. But here Isaiah handles a different subject; for he does not speak of the universal salvation of men, but of the ministry of the Word, which the Lord will defend against the attacks of wicked men, and will not suffer his people to be overwhelmed by their fraud or violence.

Lo, they shall all wax old as a garment He now shews more clearly that it is not in the shade or at case that he boasts of his courage, as if none were giving him any disturbance; but he declares that, though he is assailed by deadly foes, still he boldly maintains his position; because all who fight with the Word of God shall fall and vanish away through their own frailty. In order to place the matter before their own eyes, he employs a demonstrative particle, “Behold, like garments shall they perish, being consumed by worms.” The Psalmist makes use of the same metaphor, when he compares the men of this world to the children of God. (Psa 49:14.) The former, though they make a show and shine like dazzling garments, shall perish; but believers, who now are covered with filth, shall at length obtain new brightness and shine brilliantly like the stars. Here he speaks literally of fierce dogs that attack and bark at godly teachers. Though such persons are held in high estimation by men, and possess very high authority among them, yet their lustre shall perish and fade away, like that of garments which are eaten by worms.

Calvin: Isa 50:10 - Who is among you that feareth the Lord? // Let him hear the voice of his servant // He who hath walked in darkness 10.Who is among you that feareth the Lord? After having spoken of God’s invincible aid, by which all prophets are protected, he directs his discour...

10.Who is among you that feareth the Lord? After having spoken of God’s invincible aid, by which all prophets are protected, he directs his discourse to believers, that they may suffer themselves to be guided by the Word of God, and may become obedient. Hence we may infer how far a holy boasting raised him above his slanderers; for, in consequence of wicked men, through their vast numbers, possessing at that time great influence among the Jews, there was a risk of overwhelming the faith of the small minority. 20 When he asks, “Where are they that fear God?” he points out that their number is small. Yet he addresses them separately, that they may detach themselves from the mixed crowd, and not take part in counsels which are wicked, and which God has condemned. In like manner we have formerly met with these words, “Say ye not, A confederacy.” (Isa 8:12.) Although therefore the enemies of God are so numerous as to constitute a vast army, yet Isaiah does not hesitate to say that there are some left who shall profit by his doctrine.

He speaks to those who “fear God;” for, wherever there is no religion and no fear of God, there can be also no entrance for doctrine. We see how audaciously doctrine is rejected by those who, in other respects, wish to be reckoned acute and sagacious; for, in consequence of being swelled with pride, they detest modesty and humility, and are exceedingly stupid in this wisdom of God. It is not without good reason, therefore, that he lays this foundation, namely, the fear of God, that his Word may be attentively and diligently heard. Hence also it is evident that true fear of God is nowhere to be found, unless where men listen to his Word; for hypocrites do proudly and haughtily boast of piety and the fear of God, but they manifest rebellious contempt, when they reject the doctrine of the Gospel and all godly exhortations. The clear proof of such persons is, that the mask which they desire to wear is torn off.

Let him hear the voice of his servant He might have simply said, “the voice of God,” but he expressly says, “of his servant;” for God does not wish to be heard but by the voice of his ministers, whom he employs to instruct us. Isaiah speaks first of himself, and next of all others who have been invested with the same office; and there is an implied contrast between that “hearing” which he demands and that wicked eagerness to despise doctrine in which irreligious men indulge, while they also, by their insolence, encourage many idle and foolish persons to practice similar contempt.

He who hath walked in darkness Believers might have brought it as an objection, that the fruit of their piety was not visible, but that they were miserably afflicted, as if they had lived a life of abandoned wickedness; and therefore the Prophet anticipates and sets aside this complaint, by affirming that believers, though hitherto they have been harshly treated, yet do not in vain obey God and his Word; for, if they “have walked in darkness,” they shall at length enjoy the light of the Lord. By “darkness” the Prophet here means not the ignorance or blindness of the human understanding, but the afflictions by which the children of God are almost always overwhelmed. And this is the consolation which he formerly mentioned, when he declared that “the tongue of the learned had been given to him, that he might speak a word to one who was faint.” (Ver. 4.) Thus he promises that they who have hitherto been discouraged and almost overwhelmed by so many distresses shall receive consolation.

Calvin: Isa 50:11 - Lo, all of you kindle a fire // Walk in the light of your fire // From my hand 11.Lo, all of you kindle a fire He upbraids the Jews with choosing to kindle for themselves their own light, instead of drawing near to the light of ...

11.Lo, all of you kindle a fire He upbraids the Jews with choosing to kindle for themselves their own light, instead of drawing near to the light of God. This passage has been badly expounded; and if we wish to understand its true meaning, we must attend to the contrast between the light of God and the light of men; that is, between the consolation which is brought to us by the Word of God and the empty words of comfort uttered by men, when by idle and useless things they attempt and toil to alleviate their distresses. Having formerly spoken of “light” and “darkness,” and having promised light to believers, who hear the voice of the Lord, he shews that the Jews had rejected this light, in order to kindle another light for themselves, and threatens that ultimately they shall be consumed by this light, as by a conflagration. Thus Christ upbraids the Jews with “rejoicing in John’s light,” (Joh 5:35,) because they made a wrong use of his official character, in order to obscure or rather to extinguish the glory of Christ. To bring forward John’s official character, in order to cover with darkness the glory of Christ, was nothing else than to extinguish the light of God shining in a mortal man, in order to kindle another light for themselves, not that it might guide them by pointing out the road, but that, by foolishly rejoicing in it, they might be driven about in every direction.

When he says that they are surrounded by sparks, he glances at their various thoughts, by which they were agitated and carried about in uncertainty sometimes in one direction and sometimes in another; and in this way he mocks at their folly, because they willingly and eagerly ran wheresoever their foolish pleasures drew them.

Walk in the light of your fire As if he had said, “You shall know by experience how useless and transitory is your light, when your unwarranted hopes shall have deceived you.” The ironical permission denotes disappointment. Others explain it, that wicked men kindle against themselves the fire of God’s wrath; but the Prophet looked higher, and that sentiment appears not to agree with this passage.

From my hand Because wicked men, being intoxicated by false confidence, think that they are placed beyond the reach of all danger, and, viewing the future with reckless disregard, trust to “their own light,” that is, to the means of defense with which they imagine themselves to be very abundantly provided; the Lord declares, that they shall lie down in sorrow, and that this shall proceed “from his hand;” and, in a word, that men who have forsaken the light of the Word, and who seek consolation from some other quarter, shall miserably perish.

Defender: Isa 50:4 - tongue of the learned Isa 50:4-9 speaks prophetically of the Messiah as God's suffering servant, Jesus in His humanity. He spoke words such as no man could speak (Luk 2:40,...

Isa 50:4-9 speaks prophetically of the Messiah as God's suffering servant, Jesus in His humanity. He spoke words such as no man could speak (Luk 2:40, Luk 2:47; Joh 7:46; Mat 7:28, Mat 7:29; Mat 13:54)."

Defender: Isa 50:5 - opened mine ear The opening of His ear was in reference to the boring of a hole in the ear of a servant willing to remain with his master instead of claiming his free...

The opening of His ear was in reference to the boring of a hole in the ear of a servant willing to remain with his master instead of claiming his freedom (Exo 21:2-6), symbolic of listening only to the word of his lord (compare Joh 5:30)."

Defender: Isa 50:6 - to the smiters Fulfilled when Jesus was arrested and brought before the high priest Caiaphas (Mat 26:67; Mat 27:30)."

Fulfilled when Jesus was arrested and brought before the high priest Caiaphas (Mat 26:67; Mat 27:30)."

Defender: Isa 50:7 - like a flint Knowing that He would face death in Jerusalem, Christ nevertheless determined to go, for this was the Father's will and the only way to save lost sinn...

Knowing that He would face death in Jerusalem, Christ nevertheless determined to go, for this was the Father's will and the only way to save lost sinners (Luk 9:53)."

TSK: Isa 50:1 - the bill // or which // Behold // for your iniquities the bill : Deu 24:1-4; Jer 3:1, Jer 3:8; Hos 2:2-4; Mar 10:4-12 or which : Exo 21:7; Lev 25:39; Deu 32:30; 2Ki 4:1; Neh 5:5; Est 7:4; Psa 44:12; Mat 1...

the bill : Deu 24:1-4; Jer 3:1, Jer 3:8; Hos 2:2-4; Mar 10:4-12

or which : Exo 21:7; Lev 25:39; Deu 32:30; 2Ki 4:1; Neh 5:5; Est 7:4; Psa 44:12; Mat 18:25

Behold : Husbands often sent bills of divorcement to their wives on slight occasions; and fathers, oppressed with debt, sold their children till the year of release. But this, saith God, cannot be my case: I am not governed by any such motives, nor am I urged by any such necessity. Your captivity and afflictions are the fruits of your own folly and wickedness.

for your iniquities : Isa 52:3, Isa 59:1, Isa 59:2; 1Ki 21:25; 2Ki 17:17; Jer 3:8, Jer 4:18

TSK: Isa 50:2 - when I came // Is my // have I // at my // I dry // their fish when I came : Isa 59:16, Isa 65:12, Isa 66:4; Pro 1:24; Jer 5:1, Jer 7:13, Jer 8:6, Jer 35:15; Hos 11:2, Hos 11:7; Joh 1:11, Joh 3:19 Is my : Isa 59:1...

TSK: Isa 50:3 - -- Exo 10:21; Psa 18:11, Psa 18:12; Mat 27:45; Rev 6:12

TSK: Isa 50:4 - God // a word // as the God : Exo 4:11, Exo 4:12; Psa 45:2; Jer 1:9; Mat 22:46; Luk 4:22, Luk 21:15; Joh 7:46 a word : Isa 57:15-19; Pro 15:23, Pro 25:11; Mat 11:28, Mat 13:5...

TSK: Isa 50:5 - -- Isa 48:8; Psa 40:6-8; Mat 26:39; Joh 8:29, Joh 14:31, Joh 15:10; Phi 2:8; Heb 5:8; Heb 10:5-9

TSK: Isa 50:6 - gave // my cheeks // that plucked // I hid gave : Lam 3:30; Mic 5:1; Mat 5:39, Mat 26:67, Mat 27:26; Mar 14:65, Mar 15:19; Luk 22:63, Luk 22:64; Joh 18:22; Heb 12:2 my cheeks : The eastern peop...

gave : Lam 3:30; Mic 5:1; Mat 5:39, Mat 26:67, Mat 27:26; Mar 14:65, Mar 15:19; Luk 22:63, Luk 22:64; Joh 18:22; Heb 12:2

my cheeks : The eastern people always held the beard in great veneration; and to pluck a man’ s beard is one of the grossest indignities that can be offered. D’ Arvieux gives a remarkable instance of an Arab, who, having received a wound in his jaw, chose to hazard his life rather than suffer the surgeon to cut off his beard. See note on 2Sa 10:4.

that plucked : Neh 13:25

I hid : Another instance of the utmost contempt and detestation. Throughout the East it is highly offensive to spit in any one’ s presence; and if this is such an indignity, how much more spitting in the face?

TSK: Isa 50:7 - the Lord // I set the Lord : Isa 50:9, Isa 42:1, Isa 49:8; Psa 89:21-27, Psa 110:1; Joh 16:33; Heb 13:6 I set : Jer 1:18; Eze 3:8, Eze 3:9; Matt. 23:13-36; Luk 9:51, 11...

TSK: Isa 50:8 - near that // let us // mine adversary near that : Rom 8:32-34; 1Ti 3:16 let us : Isa 41:1, Isa 41:21; Exo 22:9; Deu 19:17; Job 23:3-7; Mat 5:25 mine adversary : Heb. the master of my cause...

near that : Rom 8:32-34; 1Ti 3:16

let us : Isa 41:1, Isa 41:21; Exo 22:9; Deu 19:17; Job 23:3-7; Mat 5:25

mine adversary : Heb. the master of my cause, Zec 3:1-10; Rev 12:10

TSK: Isa 50:9 - they all they all : Isa 51:6-8; Job 13:28; Psa 39:11, Psa 102:26; Heb 1:11, Heb 1:12

TSK: Isa 50:10 - is among // obeyeth // that walketh // let is among : Psa 25:12, Psa 25:14, Psa 111:10, Psa 112:1, Psa 128:1; Ecc 12:13; Mal 3:16 obeyeth : Isa 42:1, Isa 49:3, Isa 53:11; Heb 5:9 that walketh :...

TSK: Isa 50:11 - all ye // walk // This shall // ye shall all ye : Isa 28:15-20, Isa 30:15, Isa 30:16, Isa 55:2; Psa 20:7, Psa 20:8; Jer 17:5-7; Jon 2:8; Mat 15:6-8; Rom 1:21, Rom 1:22, Rom 10:3 walk : Exo 11...

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Poole: Isa 50:1 - Thus saith the Lord // Where is the bill of your mother’ s divorcement? // Which of my creditors is it to whom I have sold you? // For your iniquities have ye sold yourselves Thus saith the Lord: this is another sermon begun here, and continued in the next chapter. The main scope of it is to vindicate God’ s justice,...

Thus saith the Lord: this is another sermon begun here, and continued in the next chapter. The main scope of it is to vindicate God’ s justice, and to convince the Jews that they were the causes of all their calamities which they imputed to God.

Where is the bill of your mother’ s divorcement? God had formerly espoused’ the Israelites to himself in a kind of matrimonial covenant, but seemed to cast them off when he sent them to Babylon, and did wholly reject them afterward from being his people, and took the Gentiles into their stead; which great and wonderful change was foretold in the Old Testament, as hath been already observed, and we shall see again, and accomplished in the New. And because God foresaw that those strange dispensations would provoke the Jews to murmur and quarrel with God for, casting them off without sufficient cause, as indeed they were always prone to accuse God, and to vindicate themselves, he bids them produce their bill of divorce; for those husbands which put away their wives merely out of levity or passion were obliged to give their wives a bill of divorce, which vindicated the wife’ s innocency, and declared that the husband’ s will and pleasure was the cause of the divorce; of which see the notes on Deu 24:1 Mat 19:3 .

Which of my creditors is it to whom I have sold you? have I any creditors to whom I was obliged or willing to sell you for the payment of my debt? Produce then the bill of sale to witness against me. Parents might, and in some cases were forced to sell their children to their creditors; of which see on Exo 21:7 , and 2Ki 4:1 .

For your iniquities have ye sold yourselves & c.; you can blame none but yourselves and your own sins for all your captivities and miseries.

Poole: Isa 50:2 - When I called // None to answer // At my rebuke // I dry up The general accusation delivered in the last words he now proveth by particular instances. When I came; when I , first by my prophets, and at last ...

The general accusation delivered in the last words he now proveth by particular instances. When I came; when I , first by my prophets, and at last by my Son, came unto them, to call them to repentance, and to redeem and deliver them, as it is explained in the following clauses of this verse. No man that regarded and received me, that complied with my call and offer of grace, as it follows; whereby he implies that the generality of the Jews were guilty of gross infidelity and obstinate disobedience, and therefore might justly be rejected.

When I called called them to repentance, or to come unto me, or to do my will, as masters call their servants.

None to answer to come at my call, to obey my commands. Have I no power to deliver ? what is the reason of this horrible contempt and rebellion? Is it because you expect no good from me, but think that I am either unwilling or unable to save you? Because you see no miracles wrought for you to save you from the Babylonians; and because my Son, your Messiah, cometh not with pomp and power, as you expect, but in the form of a servant, poor, and exposed to contempt and death; do you therefore believe that my power to deliver you is less than it was?

At my rebuke: this phrase is borrowed from Psa 106:9 , and it is used Mat 8:26 . At my word or command, whereby I rebuke and check its proud waves.

I dry up Heb. I will dry up ; or, I can dry up ; the future verb being put potentially. As I did it once, so I can and will do it again, when occasion requires it. I make the rivers a wilderness ; as dry and fit for travel as a wilderness.

Poole: Isa 50:3 - I clothe the heavens with blackness // I make sackcloth their covering I clothe the heavens with blackness or, I will or can clothe &c. What I once did in Egypt, when I drew black curtains before all the heavenly light...

I clothe the heavens with blackness or, I will or can clothe &c. What I once did in Egypt, when I drew black curtains before all the heavenly lights, and caused an unparalleled and amazing darkness for three days together, to the great terror of mine enemies, so I can and will do still when it is necessary to save my people. And therefore you have no reason to distrust me.

I make sackcloth their covering I cover them with thick and dark clouds, black as sackcloth, as is said, Rev 6:12 , or as that stuff of which the tents of Kedar were made, Son 1:5 . From this and some other expressions it appears that they wore a black sackcloth, which also was most suitable to the state of mourners, by whom it was used.

Poole: Isa 50:4 - The tongue of the learned // Him that is weary // He wakeneth // He wakeneth mine ear to hear // As the learned God having asserted his own power, to show the groundlessness of the infidelity of the Jews, he proceeds to show what excellent and effectual means ...

God having asserted his own power, to show the groundlessness of the infidelity of the Jews, he proceeds to show what excellent and effectual means he used to bring them to repentance and salvation; which he mentions as a great aggravation of their unbelief and rebellion, which by this means was without all excuse. This and the following passages may be in some sort understood of the prophet Isaiah, though but obscurely and imperfectly; but they are far more evidently and eminently verified in Christ, and indeed seem to be meant directly of him. For seeing there are many other passages in this prophecy which are directly meant of Christ, and of his ministry, and not at all of the prophet, why may not this be added to the number of them? especially considering that there is nothing here which forceth us to understand this place of Isaiah, and several of these passages are expounded of Christ in the New Testament, as is confessed. Besides, this seems to suit best with the coherence; for according to this exposition the same person speaketh here who hath spoken in all the foregoing verses of the chapter, even the Lord himself considered as man, because he was both God and man, as is abundantly evident from many scriptures, both of the Old and New Testament, as hath been already proved, and will hereafter be more fully evinced.

The tongue of the learned an ability of speaking plainly, and convincingly, and persuadingly, and in all points so as becometh a person taught of God, and filled with all Divine and heavenly wisdom and knowledge, and with a singular skill of winning souls, and of working upon men’ s hearts and consciences.

Him that is weary burdened with the sense of his sad and deplorable condition, in which case a word of comfort is most seasonable and acceptable. This was the proper and principal design of Christ’ s ministry, to give rest and comfort to distressed souls, according to what is said with respect to this place, Mat 11:28 ; and all the doctrines, reproofs, and threatenings of Christ were directed to this end, to make men fit for comfort and salvation.

He wakeneth to wit, me, the pronoun being oft understood; or, as it follows, mine ear. Morning by morning ; from time to time, and continually.

He wakeneth mine ear to hear because human nature is of itself weak and slothful, he by his Divine power assisteth and stirreth me up to the observation and practice of all his commands and my duties.

As the learned either,

1. As learned men or teachers use to awaken their scholars to hear and learn of them from time to time; or rather,

2. As those that are or desire and endeavour, up to be learned use to hear with all possible attention and diligence; for this title of learned is in the former part of the verse given not to the teacher, who is said to be God, but to the person taught by him.

Poole: Isa 50:5 - Hath opened mine ear // I was not rebellious // Neither turned away back Hath opened mine ear hath revealed unto me; or rather, hath given me a power and will to hear and receive his commands, as this phrase is used, Psa 4...

Hath opened mine ear hath revealed unto me; or rather, hath given me a power and will to hear and receive his commands, as this phrase is used, Psa 40:6 Isa 35:5 , and elsewhere.

I was not rebellious I readily did and suffered what he required of me.

Neither turned away back: the same thing repeated in other words. I did not turn away mine ear from hearing any of God’ s commands, nor my feet from gong where God sent me, how difficult or dangerous soever my employment was. He seems to allude to the former prophets, who had, divers of them, shrunk back, and for a time refused such work as God called them to, as Moses, Exo 3:11,13, Jon 1:8 , and others.

Poole: Isa 50:6 - I gave my back to the smiters // Plucked off the hair // I hid not my face from shame // And spitting I gave my back to the smiters I patiently yielded up myself, and turned my back to those who smote me. I was willing not only to do, but to suffer, t...

I gave my back to the smiters I patiently yielded up myself, and turned my back to those who smote me. I was willing not only to do, but to suffer, the will of God, and the injuries of men. This and the following passages were literally fulfilled in Christ, as is expressly affirmed, Mat 26:57,67 27:26,30 , and elsewhere; but we read of no such thing concerning Isaiah. And therefore it is most safe and reasonable to understand it of Christ; the rather, because it is not usual with the prophets to commend themselves so highly as the prophet here commends the person of whom he speaketh.

Plucked off the hair which was a contumely or punishment inflicted upon malefactors, Neh 13:25 .

I hid not my face from shame from all manner of reproachful usages; but did knowingly and willingly submit myself there unto.

And spitting: spitting in a man’ s face was used in token of contempt and detestation, Num 12:14 Job 30:10 ; and this was literally fulfilled in Christ, Mat 26:67 .

Poole: Isa 50:7 - For // The Lord God will help me // Therefore shall I not be confounded // Therefore have I set my face like a flint For or rather, But , as this particle is oft rendered. For God’ s favour is here opposed to the injuries of men. The Lord God will help me th...

For or rather, But , as this particle is oft rendered. For God’ s favour is here opposed to the injuries of men.

The Lord God will help me though as a man I am weak and inconsiderable, yet God will strengthen me to go through my great and hard work.

Therefore shall I not be confounded therefore I assure myself of success in my employment, and of victory over all mine enemies.

Therefore have I set my face like a flint I have hardened myself with resolution and courage against all opposition. So this or the like phrase is used Eze 3:8,9 , which elsewhere signifies obstinacy and impudence, as Jer 5:3 Zec 7:12 ; so that it notes any settled and unmovable purpose, whether good or evil.

Poole: Isa 50:8 - He is near // That justifieth me // Let him come near to me He is near God, though he seem to be at a distance, and to hide his face from me, yet he is in truth at my right hand, and ready to help me. That ju...

He is near God, though he seem to be at a distance, and to hide his face from me, yet he is in truth at my right hand, and ready to help me.

That justifieth me that will publicly acquit me from all the calumnies of mine adversaries, who say that I am a transgressor of the law, a false teacher and deceiver, a blasphemer, and a devil, and the like, in which opinion they are confirmed by my death and sufferings. But God will clear up my righteousness, and show by many and mighty signs and wonders that he is well pleased with me, and that I lived and died his faithful servant.

Let him come near to me I challenge all my accusers to stand and appear before the Judge face to face, and to produce all their charges against me; for I am conscious of mine own innocency, and I know that God will give sentence for me.

Poole: Isa 50:9 - That shall condemn me // They all // moth That shall condemn me that dare attempt it, or can justly do it. They all mine accusers and enemies, shall wax old as a garment the moth shall ea...

That shall condemn me that dare attempt it, or can justly do it.

They all mine accusers and enemies,

shall wax old as a garment the moth shall eat them up: shall pine away in their iniquity, as God threatened, Lev 26:39 ; shall be cut off and consumed by a secret curse and judgment of God, which is compared to a

moth Hos 5:12 , whilst I shall survive and flourish, and the pleasure of God shall prosper in my hands , as is said, Isa 53:10 .

Poole: Isa 50:10 - Who is among you that feareth the Lord? // Of his servant // In darkness // No light // Let him trust in the name of the Lord, and stay upon his God // of the Lord Who is among you that feareth the Lord? he now turneth his speech from the unbelieving and rebellious Jews to those of them who were or should be pio...

Who is among you that feareth the Lord? he now turneth his speech from the unbelieving and rebellious Jews to those of them who were or should be pious.

Of his servant of the same person of whom he hath hitherto spoken; of Christ, who is called God’ s servant, Isa 52:13 53:11 , partly by way of eminency, and partly to intimate that although he was God, yet he should take upon himself the form of a servant , as is said, Phi 2:7 . He hereby signifies that the grace of God, and the comfort here following, belongeth to none but to those that hear and believe this great Prophet of the church; which also was declared by Moses, Deu 18:15 , compared with Act 3:22,23 .

In darkness not in sin, which is oft called darkness; as walking in darkness is put for living in wickedness, 1Jo 1:6 ; but in misery, which also frequently cometh under the name of darkness: that liveth in a most disconsolate and calamitous condition, together with great despondency or dejection of spirit.

No light no comfort nor hope left.

Let him trust in the name of the Lord, and stay upon his God let him fix his faith and hope in the name, i.e. in the most excellent and amiable nature, and infinite perfections, and especially in the free grace, and mercy, and faithfulness,

of the Lord declared in his word; and in his propriety or interest in God, who by the mediation of this Servant is reconciled to him, and made his God.

Poole: Isa 50:11 - All ye that kindle a fire // That compass yourselves about // With sparks // Walk in the light of your fire, and in the sparks that ye have kindled // This shall ye have of mine hand, ye shall lie down in sorrow All ye that kindle a fire that you may enjoy the light and comfort of it, as it is explained in the following words. You that reject the light which ...

All ye that kindle a fire that you may enjoy the light and comfort of it, as it is explained in the following words. You that reject the light which God hath set up, and refuse the counsel of his servant, and seek for comfort, and safety, and the knowledge of God’ s mind, and the enjoyment of his favour, by your own inventions; which was the common error of the Jews in all ages, and especially in the days of the Messiah, when they refused him, and that way of righteousness and salvation which he appointed, and rested upon their own traditions and devices, going about to establish their own righteousness, and not submitting unto the righteousness of God , as is expressed, Rom 10:3 .

That compass yourselves about endeavouring to warm and refresh yourselves on all sides.

With sparks or rather, with firebrands , as this very word is fitly rendered, Pro 26:18 , which is better than sparks or flames , which is there put in the margin, because firebrands only, and not sparks or flames, are capable of being thrown by one man at another. And this word is no where else used in Scripture. He mentions firebrands , either to imply that these fires yielded more smoke than heat or light, of because these were the usual materials of a fire.

Walk in the light of your fire, and in the sparks that ye have kindled use your utmost endeavours to get comfort and satisfaction from these devices.

This shall ye have of mine hand, ye shall lie down in sorrow this shall be the fruit of all, through my just judgment, that instead of that comfort and security which you expect by these means, you shall receive nothing but vexation and misery, which shall pursue you both living and dying; for this word, which is here rendered lie down, is frequently used for dying, as Gen 47:30 Job 21:26 , and elsewhere. Or it is a metaphor from a man that lying down on his bed for rest and ease, meets with nothing but trouble and pain, as Job complained, Job 7:13,14 .

PBC: Isa 50:10 - -- See Philpot: THE HEIR OF HEAVEN WALKING IN DARKNESS AND THE HEIR OF HELL WALKING IN LIGHT

See Philpot: THE HEIR OF HEAVEN WALKING IN DARKNESS AND THE HEIR OF HELL WALKING IN LIGHT

Haydock: Isa 50:1 - Away // Sold you Away. Such a one could not be received again, if she had taken another husband, Deuteronomy xxiv. 3. Some explain this of the captives. But God re...

Away. Such a one could not be received again, if she had taken another husband, Deuteronomy xxiv. 3. Some explain this of the captives. But God restored them to favour. It seems rather to relate to the reprobation (Calmet) of the synagogue, which will never again become the true Church, (Haydock) though many of Israel will be converted, Romans xi. 25. ---

Sold you, as a father might do, Exodus xxi. 1., and Matthew xviii. 15. St. Ambrose (Tob.[Tobias?] viii.) inveighs against such cruel parents, as the Christian religion had not then entirely repressed this inhumanity. (Calmet) ---

God rejected the synagogue, not out of hard-heartedness or want, but because of her sins. (Worthington)

Haydock: Isa 50:2 - Hear // Sea Hear. My spouse had gone after other lovers. The people refused to hear the prophets; and the priests were become as corrupt as the rest, when the ...

Hear. My spouse had gone after other lovers. The people refused to hear the prophets; and the priests were become as corrupt as the rest, when the city was taken by the Chaldeans and by the Romans. (Calmet) ---

Sea. Babylon, chap. xxi. (Haydock) ---

I could work the same miracles, as I did when Israel came out of Egypt.

Haydock: Isa 50:4 - Weary // Wakeneth // Vellit // Hear Weary. Isaias speaks in the name of Christ, whose words carried conviction and comfort along with them, John vi. 69., and vii. 46. (Calmet) --- Wa...

Weary. Isaias speaks in the name of Christ, whose words carried conviction and comfort along with them, John vi. 69., and vii. 46. (Calmet) ---

Wakeneth. Literally, "lifteth up." Cynthius aurem ---

Vellit. ([Virgil?]Ec. vi.) ---

Hear, or obey. (Haydock) ---

Christ preached more powerfully than Isaias, and continues to do so by his pastors. (St. Jerome) (Worthington)

Haydock: Isa 50:6 - Spit Spit. The greatest indignity, Job xxx. 10., and Deuteronomy xxv. 9. Yet this was the treatment of our Saviour, Luke xviii. 31., and Matthew xxvi. 6...

Spit. The greatest indignity, Job xxx. 10., and Deuteronomy xxv. 9. Yet this was the treatment of our Saviour, Luke xviii. 31., and Matthew xxvi. 67. (Calmet) ---

"The great Grotius, (I wish he were great in explaining the prophets)" applies this to Jeremias. (Houbigant)

Haydock: Isa 50:7 - Rock Rock. Christ heard the accusations of his enemies unmoved, as the had not been afraid to blame the conduct of the Pharisees.

Rock. Christ heard the accusations of his enemies unmoved, as the had not been afraid to blame the conduct of the Pharisees.

Haydock: Isa 50:10 - Light Light. The faithful are exhorted to take courage, while the Romans will destroy the rebellious Jews, (ver. 11.; Calmet) and the wicked shall dwell i...

Light. The faithful are exhorted to take courage, while the Romans will destroy the rebellious Jews, (ver. 11.; Calmet) and the wicked shall dwell in hell fire. (Menochius)

Gill: Isa 50:1 - Thus saith the Lord // where is the bill of your mother's divorcement, whom I have put away // or which of my creditors is it to whom I have sold you // behold, for your iniquities have ye sold yourselves // and for your transgressions is your mother put away Thus saith the Lord,.... Here begins a new discourse or prophecy, and therefore thus prefaced, and is continued in the following chapter: where is ...

Thus saith the Lord,.... Here begins a new discourse or prophecy, and therefore thus prefaced, and is continued in the following chapter:

where is the bill of your mother's divorcement, whom I have put away? these words are directed to the Jews, who stood in the same relation to the Jewish church, or synagogue, as children to a mother; and so the Targum interprets "your mother" by "your congregation", or synagogue; who were rejected from being a church and people; had a "loammi" written upon them, which became very manifest when their city and temple were destroyed by the Romans; and this is signified by a divorce, alluding to the law of divorce among the Jews, Deu 24:1, when a man put away his wife, he gave her a bill of divorce, assigning the causes of his putting her away. Now, the Lord, either as denying that he had put away their mother, the Jewish church, she having departed from him herself, and therefore challenges them to produce any such bill; a bill of divorce being always put into the woman's hands, and so capable of being produced by her; or if there was such an one, see Jer 3:8, he requires it might be looked into, and seen whether the fault was his, or the cause in themselves, which latter would appear:

or which of my creditors is it to whom I have sold you? referring to a practice used, that when men were in debt, and could not pay their debts, they sold their children for the payment of them; see Exo 21:7, but this could not be the case here; the Lord has no creditors, not any to whom he is indebted, nor could any advantage possibly accrue to him by the sale of them; it is true they were sold to the Romans, or delivered into their hands, which, though a loss to them, was no gain to him; nor was it he that sold them, but they themselves; he was not the cause of it, but their own sins, as follows:

behold, for your iniquities have ye sold yourselves; or, "are sold" w; they were sold for them, or delivered up into the hands of their enemies on account of them; they had sold themselves to work wickedness, and therefore it was but just that they should be sold, and become slaves:

and for your transgressions is your mother put away; and they her children along with her, out of their own land, and from being the church and people of God.

Gill: Isa 50:2 - Wherefore, when I came, was there no man // when I called, was there none to answer // is my hand shortened at all, that it cannot redeem? or have I no power to deliver // behold, at my rebuke I dry up the sea // I make the rivers a wilderness // their flesh stinketh because there is no water, and dieth for thirst Wherefore, when I came, was there no man?.... The Targum is, "why have I sent my prophets, and they are not converted?'' And so Aben Ezra and Ki...

Wherefore, when I came, was there no man?.... The Targum is,

"why have I sent my prophets, and they are not converted?''

And so Aben Ezra and Kimchi interpret it of the prophets that prophesied unto them, to bring them to repentance: the Lord might be said to come by his prophets, his messengers; but they did not receive them, nor their messages, but despised and rejected them, and therefore were carried captive, 2Ch 36:15, but it is best to understand it of the coming of Christ in the flesh; when there were none that would receive, nor even come to him, but hid their faces from him, nor suffer others to be gathered unto him, or attend his ministry; they would neither go in themselves into the kingdom of the Messiah, nor let others go in that were entering, Joh 1:11,

when I called, was there none to answer? he called them to the marriage feast, to his word and ordinances, but they made light of it, and went about their worldly business; many were called externally in his ministry, but few were chosen, and effectually wrought upon; he called, but there was no answer given; for there was no internal principle in them, no grace to answer to the call; he stretched out his hands to a rebellious and gainsaying people, Mat 22:2,

is my hand shortened at all, that it cannot redeem? or have I no power to deliver? they did not know him to be the mighty God; they took him to be a mere man; and being descended from such mean parents, and making such a mean appearance, they could not think he was able to be their Redeemer and Saviour; but that he had sufficient ability appears by what follows:

behold, at my rebuke I dry up the sea; he was able to do it, and did do it for the children of Israel, and made a passage through the Red sea for them, as on dry land; which was done by a strong east wind he caused to blow, here called his "rebuke", Exo 14:20, of Christ's rebuking the sea, see Mat 8:26.

I make the rivers a wilderness; as dry as the wilderness, and parched ground; in which persons may pass as on dry ground, and as travellers pass through a wilderness; so Jordan was made for the Israelites, Jos 3:17, and may be here particularly meant; called "rivers" because of the excellency of it, and the abundance of water in it, which sometimes overflowed its banks; and because other rivers fall into it, as Kimchi observes:

their flesh stinketh because there is no water, and dieth for thirst; as they did when the rivers of Egypt were turned into blood, Exo 7:21.

Gill: Isa 50:3 - I clothe the heavens with blackness // and I make sackcloth their covering I clothe the heavens with blackness,.... With gross and thick darkness; perhaps referring to the three days' darkness the Egyptians were in, Exo 10:12...

I clothe the heavens with blackness,.... With gross and thick darkness; perhaps referring to the three days' darkness the Egyptians were in, Exo 10:12, or with thick and black clouds, as in tempestuous weather frequently; or by eclipses of the sun; there was an extraordinary instance of great darkness at the time of Christ's crucifixion, Mat 27:45.

and I make sackcloth their covering; that being black, and used in times of mourning; the allusion may be to the tents of Kedar, which were covered with sackcloth, or such like black stuff. The fall of the Pagan empire, through the power of Christ and his Gospel, is signified by the sun becoming black as sackcloth of hair, Rev 6:12. Jarchi interprets this parabolically of the princes of the nations, when the Lord shall come to take vengeance upon them; as Kimchi does the sea, and the rivers, in the preceding verse, of the good things of the nations of the world, which they had in great abundance, and should be destroyed.

Gill: Isa 50:4 - The Lord God hath given me the tongue of the learned // that I should know how to speak a word in season to him that is weary // He wakeneth morning by morning // He wakeneth mine ear to hear as the learned The Lord God hath given me the tongue of the learned,.... These are not the words of the prophet, as Aben Ezra, Kimchi, and others think; though what ...

The Lord God hath given me the tongue of the learned,.... These are not the words of the prophet, as Aben Ezra, Kimchi, and others think; though what is here said is applicable to ministers of the word, who have to do with weary souls, and it is their work to comfort and refresh them; and which work requires knowledge and experience of their case, a good degree of elocution to speak aptly and with propriety, even to have the tongue of the learned, especially in a spiritual sense; as such have who have learned of the Father, and have been taught by the Spirit of God, and are well versed in the Scriptures, and can speak in the taught words of the Holy Ghost, comparing spiritual things with spiritual; and they have need of great prudence to time things right, to speak fitly and opportunely, and give to each their portion in due season, to whom they minister; and also great diligence and assiduity in prayer, reading, and meditation; and such as are teachers of others must be the Lord's hearers, and should be very diligent and attentive ones; all which are gifts from the Lord, and to be ascribed to him. But the words are to be understood of Christ, the same person that is speaking in the preceding verses; who being anointed by the Spirit of the Lord God, as man, whose gifts and graces he received without measure, he was abundantly qualified for the discharge of his prophetic office; and was capable of speaking as never man did, and with such power and authority as the Scribes and Pharisees did not, and with so much wisdom and eloquence as were surprising to all that heard him; he had the Spirit of wisdom on him, and the treasures of wisdom and knowledge hid in him:

that I should know how to speak a word in season to him that is weary; not only saints, weary with sin, their own and others, and with troubles from the world, from Satan, and by afflictive providences; but sinners under first awakenings, distressed and uneasy in their minds at a sight of sin, in its exceeding sinfulness; pressed with the guilt of it, filled with a sense of divine wrath on account of it, and terrified with the thoughts of death, and a future judgment; and are weary with labouring for bread which satisfies not, for righteousness and life, and in seeking for resting places, being in want of spiritual rest, peace, and comfort; and who are hungry and thirsting after righteousness, after pardoning grace and mercy, after Christ and salvation by him, after his word and ordinances, after communion with him, and conformity to him; who are weak and without strength, and ready to faint for want of refreshment. The word for "weary" signifies "thirsty", according to Jarchi, Kimchi, and Ben Melech; who explain it of persons that thirst after hearing the word of the Lord: the Targum is,

"to know how to teach the righteous that weary themselves at the words of the law;''

or, as some render it, that pant after the words of the law: but not the law, but the Gospel, is "the word in season", to be spoken to weary souls; which proclaims pardon, preaches peace, is the word of righteousness and salvation; which directs hungry and thirsty souls to Christ, as the bread and water of life, and invites weary ones to him for rest. That word of his, Mat 11:28 is a word in season to such persons: such a word Christ spoke when he was here on earth in his own person, and now speaks by his ministers in the preaching of the Gospel, and by his Spirit applying it to his people.

He wakeneth morning by morning; one after another continually, meaning himself; the allusion is to masters calling their scholars early to their studies; the morning being the fittest season for instruction and learning.

He wakeneth mine ear to hear as the learned; who hear attentively, and with great pleasure and profit. This and the preceding clause seem to denote both the earliness in which Christ entered on his prophetic office, and his attentiveness in hearkening to all that was said in the eternal council and covenant by his divine Father; which he, as the Prophet of his church, makes known unto his people, Joh 15:15.

Gill: Isa 50:5 - The Lord God hath opened mine ear // And I was not rebellious // neither turned away back The Lord God hath opened mine ear,.... To hear most freely, and receive most fully, what is said by him, and to observe and do it: the allusion seems ...

The Lord God hath opened mine ear,.... To hear most freely, and receive most fully, what is said by him, and to observe and do it: the allusion seems to be to the servant that had his ears bored, being willing to serve his master for ever, Exo 21:5 which phrase of boring or opening the ear is used of Christ, Psa 40:6. It is expressive of his voluntary obedience, as Mediator, to his divine Father, engaging in, and performing with the greatest readiness and cheerfulness, the great work of man's redemption and salvation.

And I was not rebellious; not to his earthly parents, to whom he was subject; nor to civil magistrates, to whom he paid tribute; nor to God, he always did the things that pleased him: he was obedient to the precepts of the moral law, and to the penalty of it, death itself, and readily submitted to the will of God in suffering for his people; which obedience of his was entirely free and voluntary, full, complete, and perfect, done in the room and stead of his people; is the measure of their righteousness, and by which they become righteous; is well pleasing to God, and infinitely preferable to the obedience of men and angels:

neither turned away back; he did not decline the work proposed to him, but readily engaged in it; he never stopped in it, or desisted from it, until he had finished it; he did not hesitate about it, as Moses and Jeremy; or flee from it, as Jonah.

Gill: Isa 50:6 - I gave my back to the smiters // and my cheeks to them that plucked off the hair // I hid not my face from shame and spitting I gave my back to the smiters,.... To Pontius Pilate, and those he ordered to scourge him, Mat 27:26. and my cheeks to them that plucked off the ha...

I gave my back to the smiters,.... To Pontius Pilate, and those he ordered to scourge him, Mat 27:26.

and my cheeks to them that plucked off the hair; of the beard; which, is painful, so a great indignity and affront. The Septuagint renders it, "and my cheeks to blows"; εις ραπισματα, a word used by the evangelists when they speak of Christ being smitten and stricken with the palms of men's hands, and seem to refer to this passage, Mar 14:65,

I hid not my face from shame and spitting; or from shameful spitting; they spit in his face, and exposed him to shame, and which was a shameful usage of him, and yet he took it patiently, Mat 26:67, these are all instances of great shame and reproach; as what is more reproachful among us, or more exposes a man, than to be stripped of his clothes, receive lashes on his bare back, and that in public? in which ignominious manner Christ was used: or what reckoned more scandalous, than for a man to have his beard plucked by a mob? which used to be done by rude and wanton boys, to such as were accounted idiots, and little better than brutes x; and nothing is more affronting than to spit in a man's face. So Job was used, which he mentions as a great indignity done to him, Job 30:10. With some people, and in some countries, particular places, that were mean and despicable, were appointed for that use particularly to spit in. Hence Aristippus the philosopher, being shown a fine room in a house, beautifully and richly paved, spat in the face of the owner of it; at which he being angry, and resenting it, the philosopher replied, that he had not a fitter place to spit in y.

Gill: Isa 50:7 - For the Lord God will help me // therefore shall I not be confounded // therefore have I set my face like a flint // And I know that I shall not be ashamed For the Lord God will help me,.... As he promised he would, and did, Psa 89:21, which is no contradiction to the deity of Christ, nor any suggestion o...

For the Lord God will help me,.... As he promised he would, and did, Psa 89:21, which is no contradiction to the deity of Christ, nor any suggestion of weakness in him; for he is the true God, and has all divine perfections in him; is equal to his Father in power, as well as in glory, and therefore equal to the work of redemption, as his other works show him to be; but this is to be understood of him as man, and expresses his strong faith and confidence in God, and in his promises as such; and in his human nature he was weak, and was crucified through weakness, and in it he was made strong by the Lord, and was held and upheld by him: and this shows the greatness of the work of man's redemption, that it was such that no mere creature could effect; even Christ as man needed help and assistance in it; and also the concern that all the divine Persons had in it:

therefore shall I not be confounded; or "made ashamed" z; though shamefully used, yet not confounded; so as to have nothing to say for himself, or so as to be ashamed of his work; which is perfect in itself, and well pleasing to God:

therefore have I set my face like a flint: or like "steel" a; or as an adamant stone, as some b render it; hardened against all opposition; resolute and undaunted; constant and unmoved by the words and blows of men; not to be browbeaten, or put out of countenance, by anything they can say or do. He was not dismayed at his enemies who came to apprehend him, though they came to him as a thief, with swords and staves; nor in the high priest's palace, nor in Pilate's hall, in both which places he was roughly used; nor at Satan, and his principalities and powers; nor at death itself, with all its terrors.

And I know that I shall not be ashamed, neither of his ministry, which was with power and authority; nor of his miracles, which were proofs of his deity and Messiahship; nor of his obedience, which was pure, and perfect, and pleasing to God; nor of his sufferings, which were for the sake of his people; nor of the work of redemption and salvation, in which he was not frustrated nor disappointed of his end.

Gill: Isa 50:8 - He is near that justifieth me // Who will contend with me // Let us stand together // who is mine adversary // let him come near to me He is near that justifieth me,.... His Father was "near" him in his whole state of humiliation; he left him not alone; he was at his right hand, and t...

He is near that justifieth me,.... His Father was "near" him in his whole state of humiliation; he left him not alone; he was at his right hand, and therefore he was not moved; and "justified" him from all the calumnies of his enemies, or the false charges they brought against him, and from all the sins of his people that were upon him; these he took upon him, and bore them, and made satisfaction for them, upon which he was acquitted; and which is evident by his resurrection from the dead, by his ascension to heaven, and session at the right hand of God; and by the gifts of the Spirit, extraordinary and ordinary, he received for men, and gave unto them; see 1Ti 3:16.

Who will contend with me? being thus acquitted; will the law and justice of God litigate the point with him? they are both satisfied; will Satan dispute the matter with him? he is foiled, conquered, and destroyed; or will the wicked Jews enter the argument with him? wrath is come upon them to the uttermost.

Let us stand together; face to face, if they dare; let them face me, if they can:

who is mine adversary? let him appear, that he may be known:

let him come near to me: and engage with me, if he has courage or skill. This is bidding defiance to all his enemies, and triumphing over them.

Gill: Isa 50:9 - Behold, the Lord God will help me // who is he that shall condemn me // lo, they all shall waste old as doth a garment // the moth shall eat them up Behold, the Lord God will help me,.... This is repeated from Isa 50:7; see Gill on Isa 50:7; to show the certainty of it, the strength of his faith in...

Behold, the Lord God will help me,.... This is repeated from Isa 50:7; see Gill on Isa 50:7; to show the certainty of it, the strength of his faith in it, and to discourage his enemies:

who is he that shall condemn me? make me out a wicked person c, prove me guilty, and pass sentence upon me, when thus acquitted and justified by the Lord God? The Apostle Paul seems to have some reference to this passage in Rom 8:33,

lo, they all shall waste old as doth a garment; his enemies, those that accused him, the Scribes, Pharisees, and chief priests; and those that condemned him, the Jewish sanhedrim, and the Roman governor:

the moth shall eat them up; they shall be like a worn out or motheaten garment, that can never be used more. The phrases denote how secret, insensible, and irrecoverable, their ruin should be, both in their civil and church state, all being abolished and done away.

Gill: Isa 50:10 - Who is among you that feareth the Lord // that obeyeth the voice of his servant // that walketh in darkness // and hath no light // Let him trust in the name of the Lord // And stay upon his God Who is among you that feareth the Lord?.... Not with a slavish fear of the awful majesty of God, or of his tremendous judgments, or of wrath to come, ...

Who is among you that feareth the Lord?.... Not with a slavish fear of the awful majesty of God, or of his tremendous judgments, or of wrath to come, but with a filial fear, a fear of the Lord, and his goodness, which is an internal principle in the heart, a reverential affection for God, a godly fear of him; is attended with faith in him, and joy of him; which makes holy, and keeps humble, and takes in the whole worship of God: of men of this character there are but few, and especially there were but few among the Jews at this time which the prophecy refers to; the greatest part were rejecters of Christ, before spoken of, and to; and from whom the Lord turns himself, and addresses these few. There are none that naturally fear the Lord, only such who have the grace bestowed on them; their number is but small, but there are always some in the worst of times, and these are taken notice of by the Lord, Mal 3:16,

that obeyeth the voice of his servant: not the prophet, as the Targum adds, and as it is commonly interpreted by the Jewish writers, and others; though some of them say d this is "Metatron", a name of the Messiah with them; and indeed he is meant, before spoken of as the Lord's servant, and represented as an obedient one, and afterwards as righteous; see Isa 49:3 and by his "voice" is meant either his Gospel, which is a soul quickening and comforting voice, a charming and alluring one; and which is obeyed, heard, and hearkened to, by his people, externally and internally, when they receive it by faith, and in the love of it; or else his commands, precepts, and ordinances, which love constrains his people to an obedience unto; and where there is the fear of God, there will be hearing of his word, and submission to his ordinances:

that walketh in darkness: not the Lord's servant, but the man that fears the Lord, and obeys his servant's voice, such an one may be in darkness, and walk in it; or "in darknesses" e, as in the original; not only in affliction and misery, often expressed by darkness in Scripture, but in desertion, under the hidings of God's face; and which may continue for a while:

and hath no light? or "shining" f: not without the light of nature, nor without the light of grace, but without the light of God's countenance shining upon him; without the light of spiritual joy and comfort shining in his heart; and this must be a very distressing case indeed.

Let him trust in the name of the Lord; not in himself, nor in any creature, but in the Lord himself; in the perfections of his nature, his mercy, grace, and goodness; in the name of the Lord, which is a strong tower, and in whom is salvation; in Christ, in whom the name of the Lord is, and whose name is the Lord our Righteousness; and to trust in him, when in the dark, is a glorious act of faith; this is believing in hope against hope.

And stay upon his God; covenant interest continues in the darkest dispensation; God is the believer's God still; and faith is a staying or leaning upon him, as such; a dependence upon his power to protect, on his wisdom to guide, and on his grace, goodness, and all sufficiency, to supply.

Gill: Isa 50:11 - Behold, all ye that kindle a fire // that compass yourselves about with sparks // walk in the light of your fire, and in the sparks that ye have kindled // this shall ye have of mine hand // ye shall lie down in sorrow Behold, all ye that kindle a fire,.... To enlighten and warm yourselves; who, rejecting Christ the Light of the world, and despising the glorious ligh...

Behold, all ye that kindle a fire,.... To enlighten and warm yourselves; who, rejecting Christ the Light of the world, and despising the glorious light of his Gospel, and loving darkness rather than light, set up the light of nature and reason as the rule of faith and practice; or the traditions and doctrines of men to be guided by; or their own righteousness for their justification before God, and acceptance with him:

that compass yourselves about with sparks, that fly out of the fire kindled, or are struck out of a flint, which have little light and no heat, and are soon out; which may denote the short lived pleasures and comforts which are had from the creature, or from anything of a man's own:

walk in the light of your fire, and in the sparks that ye have kindled; an ironical expression, bidding them take all the comfort and satisfaction they could in their own works and doings, and get all the light and heat they could from thence:

this shall ye have of mine hand; which you may depend upon receiving from me, for rejecting me and my righteousness, and trusting in your own:

ye shall lie down in sorrow; instead of being justified hereby, and having peace with God, and entering into heaven, ye shall be pressed down with sore distress, die in your sins, and enter into an everlasting state of condemnation and death; see Mar 16:16. This was the case and state of the Jews, Rom 9:31. This is one of the passages the Jews g say is repeated by the company of angels, which meet a wicked man at death.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Isa 50:1 The Lord admits he did divorce Zion, but that too was the result of the nation’s sins. The force of the earlier rhetorical question comes into c...

NET Notes: Isa 50:2 Heb “the fish stink from lack of water and die from thirst.”

NET Notes: Isa 50:4 Heb “he arouses for me an ear, to hear like disciples.”

NET Notes: Isa 50:5 Or perhaps, “makes me obedient.” The text reads literally, “has opened for me an ear.”

NET Notes: Isa 50:6 Or perhaps, “who beat [me].”

NET Notes: Isa 50:7 Heb “Therefore I set my face like flint.”

NET Notes: Isa 50:8 Heb “let him approach me”; NAB, NIV “Let him confront me.”

NET Notes: Isa 50:10 The plural indicates degree. Darkness may refer to exile and/or moral evil.

NET Notes: Isa 50:11 The imagery may be that of a person who becomes ill and is forced to lie down in pain on a sickbed. Some see this as an allusion to a fiery place of d...

Geneva Bible: Isa 50:1 Thus saith the LORD, Where [is] the ( a ) bill of your mother's divorcement, ( b ) whom I have put away? or which of my creditors [is it] ( c ) to who...

Geneva Bible: Isa 50:2 ( d ) Why, when I came, [was there] no man? when I called, [was there] none to answer? Is my hand ( e ) shortened at all, that it cannot redeem? or ha...

Geneva Bible: Isa 50:3 I clothe the heavens with blackness, and I make ( f ) sackcloth their covering. ( f ) As I did in Egypt in token of my displeasure, (Exo 10:21).

Geneva Bible: Isa 50:4 The Lord GOD hath given ( g ) me the tongue of the learned, that I should know how to speak a word in season to [him that is] ( h ) weary: he awakenet...

Geneva Bible: Isa 50:6 I gave my back to the ( k ) smiters, and my cheeks to them that plucked off the hair: I hid not my face from shame and spitting. ( k ) I did not shri...

Geneva Bible: Isa 50:10 ( l ) Who [is] among you that feareth the LORD, that obeyeth the voice of his servant, that walketh [in] darkness, and hath no light? let him trust in...

Geneva Bible: Isa 50:11 Behold, all ye that kindle ( m ) a fire, that surround [yourselves] with sparks: walk in the light of your fire, and in the sparks [that] ye have kind...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Isa 50:4 - A Libation To Jehovah The Servant's Words To The Weary The Lord God hath given me the tongue of them that are taught, that I should know how to sustain with words him that...

Maclaren: Isa 50:5 - A Libation To Jehovah The Servant's Obedience I was not rebellious, neither turned away back.'--Isaiah 50:5. I. The secret of Christ's life, filial obedience. ...

Maclaren: Isa 50:7 - A Libation To Jehovah The Servant's Inflexible Resolve For the Lord God will help Me; therefore shall I not be confounded: therefore have I set My face like a flint.' --Is...

Maclaren: Isa 50:11 - A Libation To Jehovah Dying Fires Behold, all ye that kindle a fire, that gird yourselves about with firebrands: walk ye in the flame of your fire, and among the brands th...

MHCC: Isa 50:1-3 - --Those who have professed to be people of God, and seem to be dealt severely with, are apt to complain, as if God had been hard with them. Here is an a...

MHCC: Isa 50:4-9 - --As Jesus was God and man in one person, we find him sometimes speaking, or spoken of, as the Lord God; at other times, as man and the servant of Jehov...

MHCC: Isa 50:10-11 - --A child of God is afraid of incurring his displeasure. This grace usually appears most in believers when in darkness, when other graces appear not. Th...

Matthew Henry: Isa 50:1-3 - -- Those who have professed to be the people of God, and yet seem to be dealt severely with, are apt to complain of God, and to lay the fault upon him,...

Matthew Henry: Isa 50:4-9 - -- Our Lord Jesus, having proved himself able to save, here shows himself as willing as he is able to save, here shows himself as willing as he is able...

Matthew Henry: Isa 50:10-11 - -- The prophet, having the tongue of the learned given him, that he might give to every one his portion, here makes use of it, rightly dividing the wor...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 50:1 - -- The words are no longer addressed to Zion, but to her children. "Thus saith Jehovah, Where is your mother's bill of divorce, with which I put her a...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 50:2-3 - -- The radical sin, however, which has lasted from the time of the captivity down to the present time, is disobedience to the word of God. This sin bro...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 50:4 - -- He in whom Jehovah came to His nation, and proclaimed to it, in the midst of its self-induced misery, the way and work of salvation, is He who speak...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 50:5-6 - -- His calling is to save, not to destroy; and for this calling he has Jehovah as a teacher, and to Him he has submitted himself in docile susceptibili...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 50:7 - -- But no shame makes him faint-hearted; he trusts in Him who hath called him, and looks to the end. "But the Lord Jehovah will help me; therefore hav...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 50:8-9 - -- In the midst of his continued sufferings he was still certain of victory, feeling himself exalted above every human accusation, and knowing that Jeh...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 50:10-11 - -- Thus far we have the words of the servant. The prophecy opened with words of Jehovah (Isa 50:1-3), and with such words it closes, as we may see from...

Constable: Isa 40:1--55:13 - --IV. Israel's calling in the world chs. 40--55 This part of Isaiah picks up a theme from chapters 1-39 and develo...

Constable: Isa 49:1--55:13 - --B. God's atonement for Israel chs. 49-55 In the previous section (chs. 40-48), Isaiah revealed that God ...

Constable: Isa 49:1--52:13 - --1. Anticipation of salvation 49:1-52:12 This first segment focuses on the anticipation of salvat...

Constable: Isa 49:14--50:4 - --God's remembrance of Zion 49:14-50:3 This pericope focuses on God's salvation of the Isr...

Constable: Isa 50:1-3 - --God's will and power to deliver 50:1-3 The Lord turned from addressing His "wife" to her children. Both figures describe Israel, collectively and part...

Constable: Isa 50:4-9 - --The Servant's confidence 50:4-9 This is the third Servant Song (cf. 42:1-4; 49:1-6; 52:13-53:12). Like the second song, this one is autobiographical, ...

Constable: Isa 50:10--51:9 - --Obedience to the Servant 50:10-51:8 The following section is a call to listen to the Ser...

Constable: Isa 50:10-11 - --Walking in light or darkness 50:10-11 This short pericope is another transition. It connects with the third Servant Song, but it introduces a new spea...

Guzik: Isa 50:1-11 - The Messiah's Steadfast Obedience Isaiah 50 - The Messiah's Steadfast Obedience A. The LORD's question to Zion. 1. (1-2a) God does care, and will lovingly confront those in Zion who ...

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JFB: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) ISAIAH, son of Amoz (not Amos); contemporary of Jonah, Amos, Hosea, in Israel, but younger than they; and of Micah, in Judah. His call to a higher deg...

JFB: Isaiah (Garis Besar) PARABLE OF JEHOVAH'S VINEYARD. (Isa. 5:1-30) SIX DISTINCT WOES AGAINST CRIMES. (Isa. 5:8-23) (Lev 25:13; Mic 2:2). The jubilee restoration of posses...

TSK: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) Isaiah has, with singular propriety, been denominated the Evangelical Prophet, on account of the number and variety of his prophecies concerning the a...

TSK: Isaiah 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Isa 50:1, Christ shews that the dereliction of the Jews is not to be imputed to him, by his ability to save; Isa 50:5, by his obedience i...

Poole: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE ARGUMENT THE teachers of the ancient church were of two sorts: 1. Ordinary, the priests and Levites. 2. Extraordinary, the prophets. These we...

Poole: Isaiah 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 50 The dereliction of the Jews is not of Christ; for he hath power to save, Isa 50:1-4 ; and was obedient in that work; and God is present ...

MHCC: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) Isaiah prophesied in the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah. He has been well called the evangelical prophet, on account of his numerous and...

MHCC: Isaiah 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Isa 50:1-3) The rejection of the Jews. (Isa 50:4-9) The sufferings and exaltation of the Messiah. (Isa 50:10, Isa 50:11) Consolation to the believe...

Matthew Henry: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, With Practical Observations, of The Book of the Prophet Isaiah Prophet is a title that sounds very great to those that understand it, t...

Matthew Henry: Isaiah 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) In this chapter, I. Those to whom God sends are justly charged with bringing all the troubles they were in upon themselves, by their own wilfulnes...

Constable: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title and writer The title of this book of the Bible, as is true of the o...

Constable: Isaiah (Garis Besar) Outline I. Introduction chs. 1-5 A. Israel's condition and God's solution ch. 1 ...

Constable: Isaiah Isaiah Bibliography Alexander, Joseph Addison. Commentary on the Prophecies of Isaiah. 1846, 1847. Revised ed. ...

Haydock: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE PROPHECY OF ISAIAS. INTRODUCTION. This inspired writer is called by the Holy Ghost, (Ecclesiasticus xlviii. 25.) the great prophet; from t...

Gill: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO ISAIAH This book is called, in the New Testament, sometimes "the Book of the Words of the Prophet Esaias", Luk 3:4 sometimes only t...

Gill: Isaiah 50 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO ISAIAH 50 This chapter is a prophecy of the rejection of the Jews, for their neglect and contempt of the Messiah; and of his discha...

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