TB NETBible YUN-IBR Ref. Silang Nama Gambar Himne

Matius 6:7-15

Konteks
6:7 When 1  you pray, do not babble repetitiously like the Gentiles, because they think that by their many words they will be heard. 6:8 Do 2  not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him. 6:9 So pray this way: 3 

Our Father 4  in heaven, may your name be honored, 5 

6:10 may your kingdom come, 6 

may your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

6:11 Give us today our daily bread, 7 

6:12 and forgive us our debts, as we ourselves 8  have forgiven our debtors.

6:13 And do not lead us into temptation, 9  but deliver us from the evil one. 10 

6:14 “For if you forgive others 11  their sins, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. 6:15 But if you do not forgive others, your Father will not forgive you your sins.

Matius 7:7-11

Konteks
Ask, Seek, Knock

7:7 “Ask 12  and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door 13  will be opened for you. 7:8 For everyone who asks 14  receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened. 7:9 Is 15  there anyone among you who, if his son asks for bread, will give him a stone? 7:10 Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a snake? 16  7:11 If you then, although you are evil, 17  know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give good gifts 18  to those who ask him!

Lukas 11:1-13

Konteks
Instructions on Prayer

11:1 Now 19  Jesus 20  was praying in a certain place. When 21  he stopped, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, just as John 22  taught 23  his disciples.” 11:2 So he said to them, “When you pray, 24  say:

Father, 25  may your name be honored; 26 

may your kingdom come. 27 

11:3 Give us each day our daily bread, 28 

11:4 and forgive us our sins,

for we also forgive everyone who sins 29  against us.

And do not lead us into temptation.” 30 

11:5 Then 31  he said to them, “Suppose one of you 32  has a friend, and you go to him 33  at midnight and say to him, ‘Friend, lend me three loaves of bread, 34  11:6 because a friend of mine has stopped here while on a journey, 35  and I have nothing to set before 36  him.’ 11:7 Then 37  he will reply 38  from inside, ‘Do not bother me. The door is already shut, and my children and I are in bed. 39  I cannot get up and give you anything.’ 40  11:8 I tell you, even though the man inside 41  will not get up and give him anything because he is his friend, yet because of the first man’s 42  sheer persistence 43  he will get up and give him whatever he needs.

11:9 “So 44  I tell you: Ask, 45  and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and the door 46  will be opened for you. 11:10 For everyone who asks 47  receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks, the door 48  will be opened. 11:11 What father among you, if your 49  son asks for 50  a fish, will give him a snake 51  instead of a fish? 11:12 Or if he asks for an egg, will give him a scorpion? 52  11:13 If you then, although you are 53  evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit 54  to those who ask him!”

Seret untuk mengatur ukuranSeret untuk mengatur ukuran

[6:7]  1 tn Here δέ (de) has not been translated.

[6:8]  2 tn Grk “So do not.” Here οὖν (oun) has not been translated.

[6:9]  3 sn Pray this way. What follows, although traditionally known as the Lord’s prayer, is really the disciples’ prayer. It represents how they are to approach God, by acknowledging his uniqueness and their need for his provision and protection.

[6:9]  4 sn God is addressed in terms of intimacy (Father). The original Semitic term here was probably Abba. The term is a little unusual in a personal prayer, especially as it lacks qualification. It is not the exact equivalent of “daddy” (as is sometimes popularly suggested), but it does suggest a close, familial relationship.

[6:9]  5 tn Grk “hallowed be your name.”

[6:10]  6 sn Your kingdom come represents the hope for the full manifestation of God’s promised rule.

[6:11]  7 tn Or “Give us bread today for the coming day,” or “Give us today the bread we need for today.” The term ἐπιούσιος (epiousio") does not occur outside of early Christian literature (other occurrences are in Luke 11:3 and Didache 8:2), so its meaning is difficult to determine. Various suggestions include “daily,” “the coming day,” and “for existence.” See BDAG 376-77 s.v.; L&N 67:183, 206.

[6:12]  8 tn Or “as even we.” The phrase ὡς καὶ ἡμεῖς (Jw" kai Jhmei") makes ἡμεῖς emphatic. The translation above adds an appropriate emphasis to the passage.

[6:13]  9 tn Or “into a time of testing.”

[6:13]  sn The request do not lead us into temptation is not to suggest God causes temptation, but is a rhetorical way to ask for his protection from sin.

[6:13]  10 tc Most mss (L W Θ 0233 Ë13 33 Ï sy sa Didache) read (though some with slight variation) ὅτι σοῦ ἐστιν ἡ βασιλεία καὶ ἡ δύναμις καὶ ἡ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας, ἀμήν (“for yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever, amen”) here. The reading without this sentence, though, is attested by generally better witnesses (א B D Z 0170 Ë1 pc lat mae Or). The phrase was probably composed for the liturgy of the early church and most likely was based on 1 Chr 29:11-13; a scribe probably added the phrase at this point in the text for use in public scripture reading (see TCGNT 13-14). Both external and internal evidence argue for the shorter reading.

[6:13]  tn The term πονηροῦ (ponhrou) may be understood as specific and personified, referring to the devil, or possibly as a general reference to evil. It is most likely personified since it is articular (τοῦ πονηροῦ, tou ponhrou). Cf. also “the evildoer” in 5:39, which is the same construction.

[6:14]  11 tn Here ἄνθρωπος (anqrwpo") is used in a generic sense: “people, others.”

[7:7]  12 sn The three present imperatives in this verse (Ask…seek…knock) are probably intended to call for a repeated or continual approach before God.

[7:7]  13 tn Grk “it”; the referent (a door) is implied by the context and has been specified in the translation here and in v. 8 for clarity.

[7:8]  14 sn The actions of asking, seeking, and knocking are repeated here from v. 7 with the encouragement that God does respond.

[7:9]  15 tn Grk “Or is there.”

[7:10]  16 sn The two questions of vv. 9-10 expect the answer, “No parent would do this!”

[7:11]  17 tn The participle ὄντες (ontes) has been translated concessively.

[7:11]  18 sn The provision of the good gifts is probably a reference to the wisdom and guidance supplied in response to repeated requests. The teaching as a whole stresses not that we get everything we want, but that God gives the good that we need.

[11:1]  19 tn Grk “And it happened that while.” The introductory phrase ἐγένετο (egeneto, “it happened that”), common in Luke (69 times) and Acts (54 times), is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated. Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

[11:1]  20 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[11:1]  21 tn Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation.

[11:1]  22 sn John refers to John the Baptist.

[11:1]  23 sn It was not unusual for Jewish groups to have their own prayer as a way of expressing corporate identity. Judaism had the Eighteen Benedictions and apparently John the Baptist had a prayer for his disciples as well.

[11:2]  24 sn When you pray. What follows, although traditionally known as the Lord’s prayer, is really the disciples’ prayer. It represents how they are to approach God, by acknowledging his uniqueness and their need for his provision and protection.

[11:2]  25 tc Most mss, including later majority (A C D W Θ Ψ 070 Ë13 33vid Ï it), add ἡμῶν ὁ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς (Jhmwn Jo en toi" oujranoi", “our [Father] in heaven”) here. This makes the prayer begin like the version in Matt 6:9. The shorter version is read by Ì75 א B (L: + ἡμῶν) 1 700 pc as well as some versions and fathers. Given this more weighty external evidence, combined with the scribal tendency to harmonize Gospel parallels, the shorter reading is preferred.

[11:2]  sn God is addressed in terms of intimacy (Father). The original Semitic term here was probably Abba. The term is a little unusual in a personal prayer, especially as it lacks qualification. It is not the exact equivalent of “Daddy” (as is sometimes popularly suggested), but it does suggest a close, familial relationship.

[11:2]  26 tn Grk “hallowed be your name.”

[11:2]  27 tc Most mss (א A C D W Θ Ψ 070 Ë13 33vid Ï it) read at the end of the verse “may your will be done on earth as [it is] in heaven,” making this version parallel to Matt 6:10. The shorter reading is found, however, in weighty mss (Ì75 B L pc), and cannot be easily explained as arising from the longer reading.

[11:2]  sn Your kingdom come represents the hope for the full manifestation of God’s promised rule.

[11:3]  28 tn Or “Give us bread each day for the coming day,” or “Give us each day the bread we need for today.” The term ἐπιούσιος (epiousio") does not occur outside of early Christian literature (other occurrences are in Matt 6:11 and Didache 8:2), so its meaning is difficult to determine. Various suggestions include “daily,” “the coming day,” and “for existence.” See BDAG 376 s.v.; L&N 67:183, 206.

[11:4]  29 tn Grk “who is indebted to us” (an idiom). The picture of sin as debt is not unusual. As for forgiveness offered and forgiveness given, see 1 Pet 3:7.

[11:4]  30 tc Most mss (א1 A C D W Θ Ψ 070 Ë13 33 Ï it syc,p,h) add “but deliver us from the evil one,” an assimilation to Matt 6:13. The shorter reading has better attestation (Ì75 א*,2 B L 1 700 pc vg sa Or). Internally, since the mss that have the longer reading here display the same tendency throughout the Lord’s Prayer to assimilate the Lukan version to the Matthean version, the shorter reading should be regarded as authentic in Luke.

[11:4]  tn Or “into a time of testing.”

[11:4]  sn The request Do not lead us into temptation is not to suggest that God causes temptation, but is a rhetorical way to ask for his protection from sin.

[11:5]  31 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[11:5]  32 tn Grk “Who among you will have a friend and go to him.”

[11:5]  33 tn Grk “he will go to him.”

[11:5]  34 tn The words “of bread” are not in the Greek text, but are implied by ἄρτους (artou", “loaves”).

[11:6]  35 tn Grk “has come to me from the road.”

[11:6]  36 sn The background to the statement I have nothing to set before him is that in ancient Middle Eastern culture it was a matter of cultural honor to be a good host to visitors.

[11:7]  37 tn Κἀκεῖνος (kakeino") has been translated “Then he.”

[11:7]  38 tn Grk “answering, he will say.” This is redundant in contemporary English and has been simplified to “he will reply.”

[11:7]  39 tn Grk “my children are with me in the bed.” In Jewish homes in the time of Jesus, the beds were often all together in one room; thus the householder may be speaking of individual beds (using a collective singular) rather than a common bed.

[11:7]  40 tn The syntax of vv. 6-7 is complex. In the Greek text Jesus’ words in v. 6 begin as a question. Some see Jesus’ question ending at v. 6, but the reply starting in v. 8 favors extending the question through the entire illustration. The translation breaks up the long sentence at the beginning of v. 7 and translates Jesus’ words as a statement for reasons of English style.

[11:8]  41 tn Grk “he”; the referent (the man in bed in the house) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[11:8]  42 tn Grk “his”; the referent (the first man mentioned) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[11:8]  43 tn The term ἀναίδεια (anaideia) is hard to translate. It refers to a combination of ideas, a boldness that persists over time, or “audacity,” which comes close. It most likely describes the one making the request, since the unit’s teaching is an exhortation about persistence in prayer. Some translate the term “shamelessness” which is the term’s normal meaning, and apply it to the neighbor as an illustration of God responding for the sake of his honor. But the original question was posed in terms of the first man who makes the request, not of the neighbor, so the teaching underscores the action of the one making the request.

[11:9]  44 tn Here καί (kai, from καγώ [kagw]) has been translated as “so” to indicate the conclusion drawn from the preceding parable.

[11:9]  45 sn The three present imperatives in this verse (Ask…seek…knock) are probably intended to call for a repeated or continual approach before God.

[11:9]  46 tn Grk “it”; the referent (a door) is implied by the context and has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[11:10]  47 sn The actions of asking, seeking, and knocking are repeated here from v. 9 with the encouragement that God does respond.

[11:10]  48 tn Grk “it”; the referent (a door) is implied by the context and has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[11:11]  49 tn Grk “the”; in context the article is used as a possessive pronoun (ExSyn 215).

[11:11]  50 tc Most mss (א A C D L W Θ Ψ Ë1,13 33 Ï lat syc,p,h bo) have “bread, does not give him a stone instead, or” before “a fish”; the longer reading, however, looks like a harmonization to Matt 7:9. The shorter reading is thus preferred, attested by Ì45,75 B 1241 pc sys sa.

[11:11]  51 sn The snake probably refers to a water snake.

[11:12]  52 sn The two questions of vv. 11-12 expect the answer, “No father would do this!”

[11:13]  53 tn The participle ὑπάρχοντες (Juparconte") has been translated as a concessive participle.

[11:13]  54 sn The provision of the Holy Spirit is probably a reference to the wisdom and guidance supplied in response to repeated requests. Some apply it to the general provision of the Spirit, but this would seem to look only at one request in a context that speaks of repeated asking. The teaching as a whole stresses not that God gives everything his children want, but that God gives the good that they need. The parallel account in Matthew (7:11) refers to good things where Luke mentions the Holy Spirit.



TIP #21: Untuk mempelajari Sejarah/Latar Belakang kitab/pasal Alkitab, gunakan Boks Temuan pada Tampilan Alkitab. [SEMUA]
dibuat dalam 0.04 detik
dipersembahkan oleh YLSA