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Teks -- Psalms 36:1-12 (NET)

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Konteks
Psalm 36
36:1 For the music director; written by the Lord’s servant, David; an oracle. An evil man is rebellious to the core. He does not fear God, 36:2 for he is too proud to recognize and give up his sin. 36:3 The words he speaks are sinful and deceitful; he does not care about doing what is wise and right. 36:4 He plans ways to sin while he lies in bed; he is committed to a sinful lifestyle; he does not reject what is evil. 36:5 O Lord, your loyal love reaches to the sky; your faithfulness to the clouds. 36:6 Your justice is like the highest mountains, your fairness like the deepest sea; you preserve mankind and the animal kingdom. 36:7 How precious is your loyal love, O God! The human race finds shelter under your wings. 36:8 They are filled with food from your house, and you allow them to drink from the river of your delicacies. 36:9 For you are the one who gives and sustains life. 36:10 Extend your loyal love to your faithful followers, and vindicate the morally upright! 36:11 Do not let arrogant men overtake me, or let evil men make me homeless! 36:12 I can see the evildoers! They have fallen! They have been knocked down and are unable to get up!
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel


Topik/Tema Kamus: PSALMS, BOOK OF | Praise | Wicked | God | UNCHANGEABLE; UNCHANGEABLENESS | Blessing | Salvation | Fountain | FAITHFUL; FAITHFULNESS | House | Immortality | Happiness | Flattery | Faith | Intercession | Godlessness | Lies and Deceits | Regeneration | River | Vanity | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 36:1 - No fear When I consider the manifold transgressions of ungodly men, I conclude within myself, that they have cast off all fear of the Divine majesty.

When I consider the manifold transgressions of ungodly men, I conclude within myself, that they have cast off all fear of the Divine majesty.

Wesley: Psa 36:2 - Flattereth He deceiveth himself with vain persuasions, that God does not mind his sins, or will not punish them.

He deceiveth himself with vain persuasions, that God does not mind his sins, or will not punish them.

Wesley: Psa 36:2 - Found Punish, as the same phrase is used, Num 32:23.

Punish, as the same phrase is used, Num 32:23.

Wesley: Psa 36:3 - Left off Once he had some degrees of wisdom, but now he is become an open apostate.

Once he had some degrees of wisdom, but now he is become an open apostate.

Wesley: Psa 36:4 - Deviseth Freely, from his own inclination, when none are present to provoke him to it.

Freely, from his own inclination, when none are present to provoke him to it.

Wesley: Psa 36:5 - Thy mercy Mine enemies are cruel and perfidious, but thou art infinite in mercy, and faithfulness.

Mine enemies are cruel and perfidious, but thou art infinite in mercy, and faithfulness.

Wesley: Psa 36:5 - Heavens Is infinite and incomprehensible.

Is infinite and incomprehensible.

Wesley: Psa 36:5 - Faithfulness The truth both of thy threatenings against thine enemies, and of thy promises made to good men.

The truth both of thy threatenings against thine enemies, and of thy promises made to good men.

Wesley: Psa 36:5 - The clouds Is far above our reach, greater and higher than we can apprehend.

Is far above our reach, greater and higher than we can apprehend.

Wesley: Psa 36:6 - Mountains Stedfast and unmoveable: eminent and conspicuous to all men.

Stedfast and unmoveable: eminent and conspicuous to all men.

Wesley: Psa 36:6 - Judgments The executions of thy counsels.

The executions of thy counsels.

Wesley: Psa 36:6 - Deep Unsearchable, as the ocean.

Unsearchable, as the ocean.

Wesley: Psa 36:6 - Man The worst of men; yea, the brute - beasts have experience of thy care and kindness.

The worst of men; yea, the brute - beasts have experience of thy care and kindness.

Wesley: Psa 36:7 - Loving kindness - Though all thine attributes be excellent, yet, above all, thy mercy is most excellent, or precious and amiable.

kindness - Though all thine attributes be excellent, yet, above all, thy mercy is most excellent, or precious and amiable.

Wesley: Psa 36:8 - Satisfied Who trust in thee, as he now said.

Who trust in thee, as he now said.

Wesley: Psa 36:8 - Fatness With those delightful provisions, which thou hast prepared for them in heaven.

With those delightful provisions, which thou hast prepared for them in heaven.

Wesley: Psa 36:8 - The river Which denotes both their plenty, and their perpetuity.

Which denotes both their plenty, and their perpetuity.

Wesley: Psa 36:9 - Life It is in God as in a fountain, and from him is derived to us.

It is in God as in a fountain, and from him is derived to us.

Wesley: Psa 36:9 - But Of that glorious and blessed, and endless life, which alone is worthy of the name.

Of that glorious and blessed, and endless life, which alone is worthy of the name.

Wesley: Psa 36:9 - Light In the light of thy glorious presence, which shall be fully manifested, when we see thee face to face.

In the light of thy glorious presence, which shall be fully manifested, when we see thee face to face.

Wesley: Psa 36:9 - Light Joy and comfort, and happiness: the word light is elegantly repeated in another signification; in the former clause it is light discovering, in this l...

Joy and comfort, and happiness: the word light is elegantly repeated in another signification; in the former clause it is light discovering, in this light, discovered or enjoyed.

Wesley: Psa 36:11 - The foot Of my proud and insolent enemies.

Of my proud and insolent enemies.

Wesley: Psa 36:11 - Come So as to overthrow me.

So as to overthrow me.

Wesley: Psa 36:12 - There He seems as it were to point at the place, as if it were already done.

He seems as it were to point at the place, as if it were already done.

JFB: Psa 36:1 - -- On servant of the Lord, see on Psa 18:1, title. The wickedness of man contrasted with the excellency of God's perfections and dispensations; and the b...

On servant of the Lord, see on Psa 18:1, title. The wickedness of man contrasted with the excellency of God's perfections and dispensations; and the benefit of the latter sought, and the evils of the former deprecated. (Psa 36:1-12)

The general sense of this difficult verse is, "that the wicked have no fear of God." The first clause may be rendered, "Saith transgression in my heart, in respect to the wicked, there is no fear," &c., that is, such is my reflection on men's transgressions.

JFB: Psa 36:2-4 - -- This reflection detailed.

This reflection detailed.

JFB: Psa 36:2-4 - until his iniquity Literally, "for finding his iniquity for hating"; that is, he persuades himself God will not so find it--"for hating" involving the idea of punishing....

Literally, "for finding his iniquity for hating"; that is, he persuades himself God will not so find it--"for hating" involving the idea of punishing. Hence his words of iniquity and deceit, and his bold rejection of all right principles of conduct. The climax is that he deliberately adopts and patronizes evil. The negative forms affirm more emphatically their contraries.

JFB: Psa 36:5-6 - mercy . . . and . . . faithfulness As mercy and truth (Psa 25:10).

As mercy and truth (Psa 25:10).

JFB: Psa 36:6 - righteousness [and] judgments Qualities of a good government (Psa 5:8; Psa 31:1). These all are set forth, by the figures used, as unbounded.

Qualities of a good government (Psa 5:8; Psa 31:1). These all are set forth, by the figures used, as unbounded.

JFB: Psa 36:7 - shadow of thy wings (Compare Deu 32:11; Psa 91:1).

(Compare Deu 32:11; Psa 91:1).

JFB: Psa 36:8 - fatness Richness.

Richness.

JFB: Psa 36:8 - thy house Residence--for the privileges and blessings of communion with God (Psa 23:6; Psa 27:4).

Residence--for the privileges and blessings of communion with God (Psa 23:6; Psa 27:4).

JFB: Psa 36:8 - river of thy pleasures Plenteous supply; may allude to Eden.

Plenteous supply; may allude to Eden.

JFB: Psa 36:9 - -- Light is an emblem of all blessings, given of God as a means to gain more.

Light is an emblem of all blessings, given of God as a means to gain more.

JFB: Psa 36:10 - that know thee Right knowledge of God is the source of right affections and conduct.

Right knowledge of God is the source of right affections and conduct.

JFB: Psa 36:11 - foot of . . . hand . . . wicked All kinds of violent dealing.

All kinds of violent dealing.

JFB: Psa 36:12 - There In the acting of violence, they are overthrown. A signal defeat.

In the acting of violence, they are overthrown. A signal defeat.

Clarke: Psa 36:1 - The transgression of the wicked saith within my heart The transgression of the wicked saith within my heart - It is difficult to make any sense of this line as it now stands. How can the transgression o...

The transgression of the wicked saith within my heart - It is difficult to make any sense of this line as it now stands. How can the transgression of the wicked speak with in my heart? But instead of לבי libbi , My heart, four of Kennicott’ s and De Rossi’ s MSS. have לבו libbo , His heart. "The speech of transgression to the wicked is in the midst of his heart.""There is no fear of God before his eyes."It is not by example that such a person sins; the fountain that sends forth the impure streams is in his own heart. There the spirit of transgression lives and reigns; and, as he has no knowledge of God, so he has no fear of God; therefore, there is no check to his wicked propensities: all come to full effect. Lust is conceived, sin is brought forth vigorously, and transgression is multiplied. The reading above proposed, and which should be adopted, is supported by the Vulgate, Septuagint, Syriac, Ethiopic, Arabic, and Anglo-Saxon. This latter reads the sentence thus: which I shall give as nearly as possible in the order of the original. "Quoth the unrightwise, that he do guilt in himself: is not fear God’ s at fore eyes his."That is, The unrighteous man saith in himself that he will sin: God’ s fear is not before his eyes. The old Psalter, in language as well as meaning, comes very near to the Anglo-Saxon: The unrightwis saide that he trespas in hym self: the drede of God es noght before his een. And thus it paraphrases the passage: The unryghtwis, that es the kynde [the whole generation] of wyked men; said in hym self, qwar man sees noght; that he trespas, that es, he synne at his wil, als [as if] God roght noght [did not care] qwat he did; and so it es sene, that the drede of God es noght by forehis een ; for if he dred God, he durst noght so say.

I believe these versions give the true sense of the passage. The psalmist here paints the true state of the Babylonians: they were idolaters of the grossest kind, and worked iniquity with greediness. The account we have in the book of Daniel of this people, exhibits them in the worst light; and profane history confirms the account. Bishop Horsley thinks that the word פשע pesha , which we render transgression, signifies the apostate or devil. The devil says to the wicked, within his heart, There is no fear; i.e., no cause of fear: "God is not before his eyes."Placing the colon after fear takes away all ambiguity in connection with the reading His heart, already contended for. The principle of transgression, sin in the heart, says, or suggests to every sinner, there is no cause for fear: go on, do not fear, for there is no danger. He obeys this suggestion, goes on, and acts wickedly, as "God is not before his eyes."

Clarke: Psa 36:2 - For he flattereth himself For he flattereth himself - He is ruled by the suggestion already mentioned; endeavours to persuade himself that he may safely follow the propensiti...

For he flattereth himself - He is ruled by the suggestion already mentioned; endeavours to persuade himself that he may safely follow the propensities of his own heart, until his iniquity be found to be hateful. He sins so boldly, that at last he becomes detestable. Some think the words should be thus understood: "He smootheth over in his own eyes with respect to the finding out of his iniquity, to hate it. That is, he sets such a false gloss in his own eyes upon his worst actions, that he never finds out the blackness of his iniquity; which were it perceived by him, would be hateful even to himself."- Bishop Horsley.

Clarke: Psa 36:3 - The words of his mouth are iniquity The words of his mouth are iniquity - In the principle; and deceit calculated to pervert others, and lead them astray

The words of his mouth are iniquity - In the principle; and deceit calculated to pervert others, and lead them astray

Clarke: Psa 36:3 - He hath left off to be wise, and to do good He hath left off to be wise, and to do good - His heart is become foolish, and his actions wicked. He has cut off the connection between himself and...

He hath left off to be wise, and to do good - His heart is become foolish, and his actions wicked. He has cut off the connection between himself and all righteousness.

Clarke: Psa 36:4 - He deviseth mischief upon his bed He deviseth mischief upon his bed - He seeks the silent and undisturbed watches of the night, in order to fix his plans of wickedness

He deviseth mischief upon his bed - He seeks the silent and undisturbed watches of the night, in order to fix his plans of wickedness

Clarke: Psa 36:4 - He setteth himself He setteth himself - Having laid his plans he fixes his purpose to do what is bad; and he does it without any checks of conscience or abhorrence of ...

He setteth himself - Having laid his plans he fixes his purpose to do what is bad; and he does it without any checks of conscience or abhorrence of evil. He is bent only on mischief, and lost to all sense of God and goodness. A finished character of a perfect sinner.

Clarke: Psa 36:5 - Thy mercy, O Lord, is in the heavens Thy mercy, O Lord, is in the heavens - That is, thou art abundant, infinite in thy mercy; else such transgressors must be immediately cut off; but t...

Thy mercy, O Lord, is in the heavens - That is, thou art abundant, infinite in thy mercy; else such transgressors must be immediately cut off; but thy long-suffering is intended to lead them to repentance

Clarke: Psa 36:5 - Thy faithfulness reacheth unto the clouds Thy faithfulness reacheth unto the clouds - עד שחקים ad shechakim , to the eternal regions; above all visible space. God’ s faithfulnes...

Thy faithfulness reacheth unto the clouds - עד שחקים ad shechakim , to the eternal regions; above all visible space. God’ s faithfulness binds him to fulfill the promises and covenants made by his mercy. Blessings from the heavens, from the clouds, from the earth, are promised by God to his followers; and his faithfullness is in all those places, to distribute to his followers the mercies he has promised.

Clarke: Psa 36:6 - Thy righteousness is like the great mountains Thy righteousness is like the great mountains - כהררי אל keharerey El , like the mountains of God; exceeding high mountains; what, in the pr...

Thy righteousness is like the great mountains - כהררי אל keharerey El , like the mountains of God; exceeding high mountains; what, in the present language of geology, would be called primitive mountains, those that were formed at the beginning; and are not the effects of earthquakes or inundations, as secondary and alluvial mountains are supposed to be

Clarke: Psa 36:6 - Thy judgments are a great deep Thy judgments are a great deep - תהום רבה tehom rabbah , the great abyss; as incomprehensible as the great chaos, or first matter of all thi...

Thy judgments are a great deep - תהום רבה tehom rabbah , the great abyss; as incomprehensible as the great chaos, or first matter of all things which God created in the beginning, and which is mentioned Gen 1:2, and darkness was on the face, תהום tehom , of the deep, the vast profound, or what is below all conjecturable profundity. How astonishing are the thoughts in these two verses! What an idea do they give us of the mercy, truth, righteousness, and judgments of God

The old Psalter, in paraphrasing mountains of God, says, Thi ryghtwisnes, that es, ryghtwis men, er gastly hilles of God; for that er hee in contemplacioun, and soner resayves the lyght of Crist. Here is a metaphor taken from the tops of mountains and high hills first catching the rays of the rising sun. "Righteous men are spiritual hills of God; for they are high in contemplation, and sooner receive the light of Christ."It is really a very fine thought; and much beyond the rudeness of the times in which this Psalter was written

Clarke: Psa 36:6 - Man and beast Man and beast - Doth God take care of cattle? Yes, he appoints the lions their food, and hears the cry of the young ravens; and will he not provide ...

Man and beast - Doth God take care of cattle? Yes, he appoints the lions their food, and hears the cry of the young ravens; and will he not provide for the poor, especially the poor of his people? He will. So infinitely and intensely good is the nature of God, that it is his delight to make all his creatures happy. He preserves the man, and he preserves the beast; and it is his providence which supplies the man, when his propensities and actions level him with the beasts that perish.

Clarke: Psa 36:7 - How excellent is thy loving-kindness How excellent is thy loving-kindness - He asks the question in the way of admiration; but expects no answer from angels or men. It is indescribably ...

How excellent is thy loving-kindness - He asks the question in the way of admiration; but expects no answer from angels or men. It is indescribably excellent, abundant, and free; and, "therefore, the children of Adam put their trust under the shadow of thy wings."They trust in thy good providence for the supply of their bodies; they trust in thy mercy for the salvation of their souls. These, speaking after the figure, are the two wings of the Divine goodness, under which the children of men take refuge. The allusion may be to the wings of the cherubim, above the mercy-seat.

Clarke: Psa 36:8 - They shall be abundantly satisfied They shall be abundantly satisfied - ירוין yirveyun , they shall be saturated, as a thirsty field is by showers from heaven. Inebriaduntur, th...

They shall be abundantly satisfied - ירוין yirveyun , they shall be saturated, as a thirsty field is by showers from heaven. Inebriaduntur, they shall be inebriated - Vulgate. That sal be drunken of the plenteuoste of thi house. - Old Psalter. This refers to the joyous expectation they had of being restored to their own land, and to the ordinances of the temple

Clarke: Psa 36:8 - Of the river of thy pleasures Of the river of thy pleasures - נחל אדניך nachal adaneycha , (or עדנך edencha , as in four MSS)., the river of thy Eden. They shall be...

Of the river of thy pleasures - נחל אדניך nachal adaneycha , (or עדנך edencha , as in four MSS)., the river of thy Eden. They shall be restored to their paradisaical estate; for here is a reference to the river that ran through the garden of Eden, and watered it; Gen 2:10. Or the temple, and under it the Christian Church, may be compared to this Eden; and the gracious influences of God to be had in his ordinances, to the streams by which that garden was watered, and its fertility promoted.

Clarke: Psa 36:9 - For with thee is the fountain of life For with thee is the fountain of life - This, in Scripture phrase, may signify a spring of water; for such was called among the Jews living water, t...

For with thee is the fountain of life - This, in Scripture phrase, may signify a spring of water; for such was called among the Jews living water, to distinguish it from ponds, tanks, and reservoirs, that were supplied by water either received from the clouds, or conducted into them by pipes and streams from other quarters. But there seems to be a higher allusion in the sacred text. כי עמך מקור חיים ki immecha mekor chaiyim , "For with thee is the vein of lives."Does not this allude to the great aorta, which, receiving the blood from the heart, distributes it by the arteries to every part of the human body, whence it is conducted back to the heart by means of the veins. As the heart, by means of the great aorta, distributes the blood to the remotest parts of the body; so, God, by Christ Jesus, conveys the life-giving streams of his providential goodness to all the worlds and beings he has created, and the influences of his grace and mercy to every soul that has sinned. All spiritual and temporal good comes from Him, the Father, through Him, the Son, to every part of the creation of God

Clarke: Psa 36:9 - In thy light shall we see light In thy light shall we see light - No man can illuminate his own soul; all understanding must come from above. Here the metaphor is changed, and God ...

In thy light shall we see light - No man can illuminate his own soul; all understanding must come from above. Here the metaphor is changed, and God is compared to the sun in the firmament of heaven, that gives light to all the planets and their inhabitants. "God said, Let there be light; and there was light; "by that light the eye of man was enabled to behold the various works of God, and the beauties of creation: so, when God speaks light into the dark heart of man, he not only beholds his own deformity and need of the salvation of God, but he beholds the "light of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ;""God, in Christ, reconciling the world to himself.""In thy light shall we see light."This is literally true, both in a spiritual and philosophical sense.

Clarke: Psa 36:10 - O continue thy loving-kindness O continue thy loving-kindness - Literally, "Draw out thy mercy."The allusion to the spring is still kept up

O continue thy loving-kindness - Literally, "Draw out thy mercy."The allusion to the spring is still kept up

Clarke: Psa 36:10 - Unto them that know thee Unto them that know thee - To them who acknowledge thee in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation

Unto them that know thee - To them who acknowledge thee in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation

Clarke: Psa 36:10 - And thy righteousness And thy righteousness - That grace which justifies the ungodly, and sanctifies the unholy

And thy righteousness - That grace which justifies the ungodly, and sanctifies the unholy

Clarke: Psa 36:10 - To the upriabt in heart To the upriabt in heart - לישרי לב levishrey leb , to the straight of heart; to those who have but one end in view, and one aim to that end ...

To the upriabt in heart - לישרי לב levishrey leb , to the straight of heart; to those who have but one end in view, and one aim to that end

This is true of every genuine penitent, and of every true believer.

Clarke: Psa 36:11 - Let not the foot of pride come against me Let not the foot of pride come against me - Let me not be trampled under foot by proud and haughty men

Let not the foot of pride come against me - Let me not be trampled under foot by proud and haughty men

Clarke: Psa 36:11 - Let not the hand of the wicked remove me Let not the hand of the wicked remove me - תנדני tenideni , shake me, or cause me to wander. Both these verses may have immediate respect to t...

Let not the hand of the wicked remove me - תנדני tenideni , shake me, or cause me to wander. Both these verses may have immediate respect to the captives in Babylon. The Jews were, when compared with the Babylonians, the people that knew God; for in Jewry was God known, Psa 76:1; and the psalmist prays against the treatment which the Jews had received from the proud and insolent Babylonians during the seventy years of their captivity: "Restore us to our own land; and let not the proud foot or the violent hand ever remove us from our country and its blessings; the temple, and its ordinances."

Clarke: Psa 36:12 - There are the workers of iniquity fallen There are the workers of iniquity fallen - There, in Babylon, are the workers of iniquity fallen, and so cast down that they shall not be able to ri...

There are the workers of iniquity fallen - There, in Babylon, are the workers of iniquity fallen, and so cast down that they shall not be able to rise. A prophecy of the destruction of the Babylonish empire by Cyrus. That it was destroyed, is an historical fact; that they were never able to recover their liberty, is also a fact; and that Babylon itself is now blotted out of the map of the universe, so that the site of it is no longer known, is confirmed by every traveler who has passed over those regions

The word שם sham , There, has been applied by many of the fathers to the pride spoken of in the preceding verse. There, in or by pride, says Augustine, do all sinners perish. There, in heaven, have the evil angels fallen through pride, says St. Jerome. There, in paradise, have our first parents fallen, through pride and disobedience. There, in hell, have the proud and disobedient angels been precipitated - Eusebius, etc. There, by pride, have the persecutors brought God’ s judgments upon themselves. See Calmet. But the first interpretation is the best

Calvin: Psa 36:1 - Ungodliness saith to the wicked in the midst of my heart // There is no fear of God before his eyes 1.Ungodliness saith to the wicked in the midst of my heart Commentators are not agreed as to the interpretation of the first verse. Literally it is, ...

1.Ungodliness saith to the wicked in the midst of my heart Commentators are not agreed as to the interpretation of the first verse. Literally it is, The saying [or speech ] of transgression, or rather, Transgression saith to the wicked As, however, the letter ל , lamed, is in Hebrew sometimes used for מן , min, some translate it thus, Ungodliness or transgression speaketh of the wicked in my heart; as if the prophet had said, I clearly perceive from the wickedness which the ungodly commit, that they are not influenced by the fear of God. But as there is no need to depart from the proper signification of the words, I rather agree with others in supposing that the language of the prophet is to this effect: The malice of the wicked, though seemingly hidden and unknown, speaks aloud in my heart, and I am a sure witness of what it says or suggests.

And, first, it is to be observed, that the prophet speaks not of outward faults, but penetrates even to the very source; as if he had said, Although the wicked cloak their malice with wily dissimulation, yet I know it so well that I seem to hear it speaking. It is indeed true, that as the ungodly and profane rush headlong into every kind of wickedness, as if they were never to be called to render up an account of it, the judgment which David here expresses may be formed even from their life; but his language is much more emphatic when he says, that the servants of God openly perceive the depravity of such persons hidden within the heart. Now David does not speak of the wicked generally, but of the abandoned despisers of God. There are many who indulge in their vices, who, notwithstanding, are not intoxicated by the wretched infatuation which David here censures. But when a man becomes hardened in committing sin, ungodliness at length reduces him to such a state of insensibility, that, despising the judgment of God, he indulges without fear in the practice of every sin to which his depraved appetite impels him. A reckless assurance, therefore, in the commission of sin, and especially where it is associated with a contempt and scorn of every holy admonition, is, as it were, an enchantment of Satan, which indicates that the condition of such a person is indeed hopeless. And although true religion has the effect of keeping the hearts of the godly in the fear of God, and drives wicked thoughts far from their minds, yet this does not prevent them from perceiving and understanding in their hearts how the ungodly are agitated with horrible fury when they neither regard God nor are afraid of his judgments.

There is no fear of God before his eyes David shows in these few words the end of all evil suggestions; and it is this, that the sense both of good and evil being destroyed or suppressed, men shrink from nothing, as if there were not seated in heaven a God, the Judge of all. The meaning therefore is, Ungodliness speaks in my heart to the wicked man, urging him to the extremity of madness, so that, laying aside all fear of God, he abandons himself to the practice of sin; that is to say, I know as well what the ungodly imagine in their hearts, as if God had set me as a witness or judge to unveil their hypocrisy, under the mask of which they think their detestable malice is hidden and deeply buried. When the wicked, therefore, are not restrained by the fear of God from committing sin, this proceeds from that secret discourse with themselves, to which we have referred, and by which their understanding is so depraved and blinded, that, like brute beasts, they run to every excess in rioting. Since the eyes are, as it were, the guides and conductors of man in this life, and by their influence move the other senses hither and thither, it is therefore said that men have the fear of God before their eyes when it regulates their lives, and by presenting itself to them on every side to which they may turn, serves like a bridle to restrain their appetites and passions. David, by using here a contrary form of expression, means that the ungodly run to every excess in licentiousness, without having any regard to God, because the depravity of their own hearts has completely blinded them.

Calvin: Psa 36:2 - For he flattereth himself in his own eyes 2.For he flattereth himself in his own eyes Here the Psalmist shows by their fruits or the marks of their character, that there is no fear of God amo...

2.For he flattereth himself in his own eyes Here the Psalmist shows by their fruits or the marks of their character, that there is no fear of God among the wicked, seeing they take such pleasure in committing deeds of wickedness, that, although hateful in the sight of all other men, they still cherish the natural obstinacy of their hearts, and wilfully harden themselves in their evil course. First, he says that they nourish their vices by flatteries, 3 that they may not be dissatisfied with themselves in sinning. But when he adds, until their iniquity be found to be hateful, by these words he is to be understood as referring to their determined obstinacy; for the meaning is, that while they falsely flatter themselves, they proceed to such an extent in their evil course, that their iniquity becomes hateful to all men. Some translate the words thus: So that he himself finds his own iniquity to be hateful; and understand them as meaning, that the wicked persist in rushing headlong into sin without restraint, until, satiated or glutted with the indulgence of their depraved desires, they begin to loathe it: for even the most depraved are sometimes dissatisfied with themselves on account of their sinful conduct. The first interpretation is, however, the more natural, namely, that the wicked, though they are hateful to all men on account of their iniquity, which, when once discovered and made manifest, excites a general feeling of displeasure, are not affected by any displeasure against themselves, but, on the contrary, rather applaud themselves, whilst the people despise them, and abhor the wickedness of their lives. The prophet, therefore, condemns them for their infatuation in this, that while all others are offended at their disgraceful conduct, they themselves are not at all affected by it. As far as in them lies, they abolish all distinction between good and evil, and lull their conscience into a state of insensibility, lest it should pain them, and urge them to repentance. Certainly the infatuation here described ought to be the subject of our serious consideration, the infatuation which is manifested in this, that men who are given up to a reprobate mind, while they render themselves hateful in the sight of all other men, are notwithstanding destitute of all sense of their own sins.

Calvin: Psa 36:3 - The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit 3.The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit The two clauses of this verse may be understood as referring to the same thing, namely, that the wic...

3.The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit The two clauses of this verse may be understood as referring to the same thing, namely, that the wicked indulging in deceit and vanity, will not receive or admit the light of understanding. This, I apprehend, is the meaning of David. He reproves the wicked not merely for circumventing others by their wiles and stratagems, but especially because they are altogether destitute of uprightness and sincerity. We have already said that the Psalmist is here speaking not of sinful and wicked men, in whose hearts there still remains some fear of God, but of the profane despisers of his name, who have given themselves up entirely to the practice of sin. He therefore says that they have always in their mouth some frivolous excuses and vain pretexts, by which they encourage themselves in rejecting and scoffing at all sound doctrine. He then adds, that they purposely suppress in themselves all knowledge or understanding of the distinction between good and evil, because they have no desire to become better than they are. We know that God has given understanding to men to direct them to do what is good. Now David says that the wicked shun it, and strive to deprive themselves of it, that they may not be constrained to repent of their wickedness, and to amend their lives. We are taught from this passage, that if at any time we turn aside from the path of rectitude, the only remedy in such a case is to open the eyes of our understanding, that we may rightly distinguish between good and evil, and that thus we may be led back from our wandering. When, instead of doing this, a man refuses instruction, it is an indication that he is in a state of depravity altogether desperate.

Calvin: Psa 36:4 - He meditates iniquity upon his bed 4.He meditates iniquity upon his bed Here the sacred writer shows that the wickedness of the ungodly man is of a secret and very determined character...

4.He meditates iniquity upon his bed Here the sacred writer shows that the wickedness of the ungodly man is of a secret and very determined character. It sometimes happens that many, who otherwise are not disposed to wickedness, err and fall into sin, because occasion presents itself all on a sudden; but David tells us, that the wicked, even when they are withdrawn from the sight of men, and in retirement, form schemes of mischief; and thus, although there is not presented before them any temptation, or the evil example of others to excite them to it, they, of their own accord, devise mischief, and urge themselves to it without being impelled by any thing else. Since he describes the reprobate by this distinguishing mark of character, that they devise mischief upon their beds, true believers should learn from this to exercise themselves when alone in meditations of a different nature, and to make their own life the subject of examination, so that they may exclude all evil thoughts from their minds. The Psalmist next refers to their stubbornness, declaring that they set themselves in a crooked and perverse way; that is to say, they purposely and wilfully harden themselves in doing evil. Finally, he adds the reason of their doing this: They abhor not evil Wilfully shutting their eyes, they rush forward in their headlong course till they spontaneously yield themselves the slaves of wickedness. Let us now shortly state the contrast between the ungodly and the people of God, contained in the preceding verses. The former deceive themselves by flattery; the latter exercise over themselves a strict control, and examine themselves with a rigid scrutiny: the former, throwing loose the reins, rush headlong into evil; the latter are restrained by the fear of God: the former cloak or disguise their offenses by sophistry, and turn light into darkness; the latter willingly acknowledge their guilt, and by a candid confession are brought to repentance: the former reject all sound judgment; the latter always desire to vindicate themselves by coming to the open light of day: the former upon their bed invent various ways of doing evil; the latter are sedulously on their guard that they may not devise or stir up within themselves any sinful desire: the former indulge a deep and fixed contempt of God; the latter willingly cherish a constant displeasure at their sins.

Calvin: Psa 36:5 - O Jehovah! thy mercy is unto the heavens 5.O Jehovah! thy mercy is unto the heavens Commentators think that David, after having described the great corruption and depravity which every where...

5.O Jehovah! thy mercy is unto the heavens Commentators think that David, after having described the great corruption and depravity which every where prevail in the world, takes occasion from thence to extol in rapturous praises the wonderful forbearance of God, in not ceasing to manifest his favor and good-will towards men, even though they are sunk in iniquity and crime. But, as I have already observed, I am of a somewhat different opinion. After having spoken of the very great depravity of men, the prophet, afraid lest he should become infected by it, or be carried away by the example of the wicked, as by a flood, quits the subject, and recovers himself by reflecting on a different theme. It usually happens, that in condemning the wicked, the contagion of their malice insinuates itself into our minds when we are not conscious of it; and there is scarcely one in a hundred who, after having complained of the malice of others, keeps himself in true godliness, pure and unpolluted. The meaning therefore is, Although we may see among men a sad and frightful confusion, which, like a great gulf, would swallow up the minds of the godly, David, nevertheless, maintains that the world is full of the goodness and righteousness of God, and that he governs heaven and earth on the strictest principles of equity. And certainly, whenever the corruption of the world affects our minds, and fills us with amazement, we must take care not to limit our views to the wickedness of men who overturn and confound all things; but in the midst of this strange confusion, it becomes us to elevate our thoughts in admiration and wonder, to the contemplation of the secret providence of God. David here enumerates four cardinal attributes of Deity, which, according to the figure of speech called synecdoche, include all the others, and by which he intimates, in short, that although carnal reason may suggest to us that the world moves at random, and is directed by chance, yet we ought to consider that the infinite power of God is always associated with perfect righteousness. In saying that the goodness of God is unto the heavens, David’s meaning is, that in its greatness it is as high as the heavens. In the same sense he adds, Thy truth is even unto the clouds The term truth in this place may be taken either for the faithfulness which God manifests in accomplishing his promises, or for the just and well regulated character of his government, in which his rectitude is seen to be pure and free from all deception. But there are many other similar passages of Scripture which constrain me to refer it to the promises of God, in the keeping and fulfilling of which he is ever faithful.

Calvin: Psa 36:6 - Thy righteousness is as the mountains of God 6.Thy righteousness is as the mountains of God In this verse there is a commendation of God’s righteousness, which the sacred writer compares to th...

6.Thy righteousness is as the mountains of God In this verse there is a commendation of God’s righteousness, which the sacred writer compares to the high mountains, (this being the manner of the expression — “the mountains of God,” for we know that the Hebrews were accustomed to distinguish by the appellation divine, or of God, whatever is excellent,) because his glory shines forth more clearly there. In the last place, it is said, that his judgments are like a great and bottomless abyss. By these words he teaches us, that to whatever side we turn our eyes, and whether we look upward or downward, all things are disposed and ordered by the just judgment of God. This passage is usually quoted in a sense quite different, namely, that the judgments of God far exceed our limited capacity, and are too mysterious for our being able to comprehend them; and, indeed, in this sense the similitude of an abyss is not inappropriate. It is, however, obvious from the context, that the language of the Psalmist is to be understood in a much more extensive sense, and as meaning, that however great the depth of wickedness which there is among men, and though it seems like a flood which breaks forth and overflows the whole earth, yet still greater is the depth of God’s providence, by which he righteously disposes and governs all things. Whenever, therefore, our faith may be shaken by the confusion and disorder of human affairs, and when we are unable to explain the reasons of this disorder and confusion, let us remember that the judgments of God in the government of the world are with the highest propriety compared to a great depth which fills heaven and earth, that the consideration of its infinite greatness may ravish our minds with admiration, swallow up all our cares, and dispel all our sorrows. When it is added in the end of the verse, O Jehovah! thou preservest man and beast, the meaning is to this effect, that since God vouchsafes to extend his providential care even to the irrational creation, much more does he provide for the wants of men. And, indeed, whenever any doubt may arise in our minds regarding the providence of God, we should fortify and encourage ourselves by setting before us this consideration, that God, who provides food for the beasts of the field, and maintains them in their present state, can never cease to take care of the human race. The explanation which some have given of the term beasts, interpreting it allegorically of beastly men, I regard as too forced, and reject it.

Calvin: Psa 36:7 - O God! how precious is thy loving-kindness! 7.O God! how precious is thy loving-kindness! Some explain these words in this sense: That the mercy of God is precious, and that the children of men...

7.O God! how precious is thy loving-kindness! Some explain these words in this sense: That the mercy of God is precious, and that the children of men who put their trust in it are precious; but this is a sense too far removed from the words of the text. Others understand them as meaning, that the mercy of God is very great to the gods, that is to say, to the angels and the sons of men; but this is too refined. I am also surprised that the Jewish Rabbins have wearied and bewildered themselves, without any occasion, in seeking to find out new and subtile interpretations, since the meaning of the prophet is of itself perfectly evident; namely, that it is because the mercy of God is great and clearly manifested, that the children of men put their trust under the shadow of it. As David has hitherto been speaking in commendation of the goodness of God, which extends to every creature, the opinion of other commentators, who consider that David is here discoursing of the peculiar favor which God manifests towards his children, is in my judgment very correct. The language seems to refer in general to all the sons of men, but what follows is applicable properly to the faithful alone. In order to manifest more clearly the greatness of divine grace, he thus speaks in general terms, telling us, that God condescends to gather together under his wings the mortal offspring of Adam, as it is said in Psa 8:4,

“What is man, that thou art mindful of him?
and the son of man, that thou visitest him?”

The substance of the passage is this: The ungodly may run to every excess in wickedness, but this temptation does not prevent the people of God from trusting in his goodness, and casting themselves upon his fatherly care; while the ungodly, whose minds are degraded, and whose hearts are polluted, never taste the sweetness of his goodness so as to be led by it to the faith, and thus to enjoy repose under the shadow of his wings. The metaphorical expression of wings, as applied to God, is common enough in Scripture. 9 By it God teaches us that we are preserved in safety under his protecting care, even as the hen cherishes her chickens under her wings; and thus he invites us kindly and affectionately to return to him.

Calvin: Psa 36:8 - They shall be abundantly satisfied with the fatness of that house 8.They shall be abundantly satisfied with the fatness of that house I have no doubt that by the fatness of God’s house the prophet means the abun...

8.They shall be abundantly satisfied with the fatness of that house I have no doubt that by the fatness of God’s house the prophet means the abundance of good things which is not designed for all men indiscriminately, but is laid up in store for the children of God who commit themselves wholly to his protection. Some restrict the expression to spiritual graces; but to me it seems more likely, that under it are comprehended all the blessings that are necessary to the happiness and comfort of the present life, as well as those which pertain to eternal and heavenly blessedness. It ought, however, to be observed, that in the style of speaking which the prophet here employs, the use of earthly blessings is connected with the gracious experience of faith, in the exercise of which we can alone enjoy them rightfully and lawfully to our own welfare. When the ungodly glut themselves with the abundance of God’s benefits, their bodies indeed grow fat like the flesh of cattle or swine, but their souls are always empty and famished. It is the faithful alone, as I have said, who are satisfied with the goodness of God towards them, because it is to them a pledge of his fatherly love. The expression meat and drink denotes a complete and perfect fullness, and the term river, 10 denotes an overflowing abundance.

Calvin: Psa 36:9 - For with thee is the fountain of life 9.For with thee is the fountain of life The Psalmist here confirms the doctrine of the preceding verse, the knowledge of which is so profitable that ...

9.For with thee is the fountain of life The Psalmist here confirms the doctrine of the preceding verse, the knowledge of which is so profitable that no words can adequately express it. As the ungodly profane even the best of God’s gifts by their wicked abuse of them, unless we observe the distinction which I have stated, it were better for us to perish a hundred times of hunger, than to be fed abundantly by the goodness of God. The ungodly do not acknowledge that it is in God they live, move, and have their being, but rather imagine that they are sustained by their own power; and, accordingly, David, on the contrary, here affirms from the experience of the godly, and as it were in their name, that the fountain of life is in God. By this he means, that there is not a drop of life to be found without him, or which flows not from his grace. The metaphor of light, in the last clause of the verse, is tacitly most emphatic, denoting that men are altogether destitute of light, except in so far as the Lord shines upon them. If this is true of the light; of this life, how shall we be able to behold the light of the heavenly world, unless the Spirit of God enlighten us? for we must maintain that the measure of understanding with which men are by nature endued is such, that

“the light shineth in darkness,
but the darkness comprehendeth it not,” (Joh 1:5;)

and that men are enlightened only by a supernatural gift. But it is the godly alone who perceive that they derive their light from God, and that, without it, they would continue, as it were, buried and smothered in darkness.

Calvin: Psa 36:10 - Prolong thy mercy to them that know thee 10.Prolong thy mercy to them that know thee David now sets himself to pray. And, first, he asks in general, that God would continue his mercy to all ...

10.Prolong thy mercy to them that know thee David now sets himself to pray. And, first, he asks in general, that God would continue his mercy to all the godly, and then he pleads particularly in his own behalf, imploring the help of God against his enemies. Those who affirm that God is here said to prolong or extend his mercy because it is exalted above the heavens, indulge in a style of speaking too puerile. When David spake of it in such terms in a preceding verse, his intention was not, as I have already said, to represent the mercy of God as shut up in heaven, but simply to declare that it was diffused throughout the world; and here what he desires is just this, that God would continue to manifest, even to the end, his mercy towards his people. With the mercy of God he connects his righteousness, combining them as cause and effect. We have already said in another place, that the righteousness of God is manifested in his undertaking the defense of his own people, vindicating their innocence, avenging their wrongs, restraining their enemies, and in proving himself faithful in the preservation of their welfare and happiness against all who assail them. Now, since all this is done for them freely by God, David, with good reason, makes mention particularly of his goodness, and places it first in order, that we may learn to depend entirely upon his favor. We ought also to observe the epithets by which he describes true believers; first, he says, that they know God; and, secondly, that they are upright in heart. We learn from this that true godliness springs from the knowledge of God, and again, that the light of faith must necessarily dispose us to uprightness of heart. At the same time, we ought always to bear in mind, that we only know God aright when we render to him the honor to which he is entitled; that is, when we place entire confidence in him.

Calvin: Psa 36:11 - Let not the foot of pride come upon me 11.Let not the foot of pride come upon me As I have observed a little before, the Psalmist here applies to his own circumstances the prayer which he ...

11.Let not the foot of pride come upon me As I have observed a little before, the Psalmist here applies to his own circumstances the prayer which he had offered. But by including in his prayer in the preceding verse all the children of God, he designed to show that he asked nothing for himself apart from others, but only desired that as one of the godly and upright, who have their eyes directed to God, he might enjoy his favor. He has employed the expressions, the foot of pride, 12 and the hand of the wicked, in the same sense. As the wicked rush boldly to the destruction of good men, lifting up their feet to tread upon them, and having their hands ready to do them wrong, David entreats God to restrain their hands and their feet; and thus he confesses that he is in danger of being exposed to their insolence, abuse, and violence, unless God come speedily to his aid.

Calvin: Psa 36:12 - There the workers of iniquity are fallen 12.There the workers of iniquity are fallen Here he derives confidence from his prayer, not doubting that he has already obtained his request. And th...

12.There the workers of iniquity are fallen Here he derives confidence from his prayer, not doubting that he has already obtained his request. And thus we see how the certainty of faith directs the saints to prayer. Besides, still farther to confirm his confidence and hope in God, he shows, as it were, by pointing to it with the finger, the certain destruction of the wicked, even though it lay as yet concealed in the future. In this respect, the adverb there 13 is not superfluous; for while the ungodly boast of their good fortune, and the world applaud them, David beholds by the eye of faith, as if from a watch-tower, their destruction, and speaks of it with as much confidence as if he had already seen it realised. That we also may attain a similar assurance, let us remember, that those who would hasten prematurely the time of God’s vengeance upon the wicked, according to the ardor of their desires, do indeed err, and that we ought to leave it to the providence of God to fix the period when, in his wisdom, he shall rise up to judgment. When it is said, They are thrust down, the meaning is, that they are agitated with doubt, and totter as in a slippery place, so that in the midst of their prosperity they have no security. Finally, it is added, that they shall fall into utter destruction, so that it can never be expected that they shall rise again.

Defender: Psa 36:9 - fountain of life The origin of life is only found in the living God not in an imaginary primeval soup. There is no geological or meteorological evidence that the compo...

The origin of life is only found in the living God not in an imaginary primeval soup. There is no geological or meteorological evidence that the composition of the original ocean was any different from that of the present ocean.

Defender: Psa 36:9 - thy light True light on the nature and meaning of life can be only found through Christ and His Word."

True light on the nature and meaning of life can be only found through Christ and His Word."

TSK: Psa 36:1 - servant // The transgression // no servant : Psa 18:1, Psa 90:1 *titles Psa 143:12; Deu 34:5; 2Ti 2:24; Tit 1:1; Jam 1:1; 2Pe 1:1; Jud 1:1; Rev 1:1 The transgression : Or, rather, ""The...

servant : Psa 18:1, Psa 90:1 *titles Psa 143:12; Deu 34:5; 2Ti 2:24; Tit 1:1; Jam 1:1; 2Pe 1:1; Jud 1:1; Rev 1:1

The transgression : Or, rather, ""The speech of transgression to the wicked is within his heartcaps1 . tcaps0 here is no fear of God before his eyes;""for instead of libbi , ""my heart,""four manuscripts, have libbo , ""his heart,""which is also the reading of the LXX, Vulgate, Syriac, Arabic, Ethiopic, and Anglo-Saxon. 1Sa 15:13, 1Sa 15:14; Pro 20:11; Mat 7:16-20, Mat 12:33, Mat 12:34; Tit 1:16

no : Psa 112:1; Gen 20:11; Pro 8:13, Pro 16:6; Ecc 12:13; Rom 3:18

TSK: Psa 36:2 - For he // until For he : Psa 10:3, Psa 49:18; Deu 29:19; Jer 2:23, Jer 2:34, Jer 2:35, Jer 17:9; Hos 12:7, Hos 12:8; Luk 10:29; Luk 16:14, Luk 16:15; Rom 7:9, Rom 10:...

TSK: Psa 36:3 - The words // he hath The words : Psa 5:9, Psa 12:2, Psa 12:3, Psa 55:21, Psa 58:3, Psa 140:3; 1Sa 18:21, 1Sa 19:6, 1Sa 19:7, 1Sa 26:21; Mat 22:15-18, Mat 22:35 he hath : P...

TSK: Psa 36:4 - deviseth // mischief // setteth // abhorreth deviseth : Psa 38:12; 1Sa 19:11; Est 5:14, Est 6:4; Pro 4:16; Hos 7:6, Hos 7:7; Mic 2:1; Mat 27:1; Act 23:12 mischief : or, vanity setteth : Pro 24:23...

TSK: Psa 36:5 - mercy // faithfulness mercy : Psa 52:1, Psa 57:10, Psa 103:11, Psa 108:4; Isa 55:7-9 faithfulness : Psa 89:2, Psa 92:2, Psa 100:5; Mat 24:35; Heb 6:18-20

TSK: Psa 36:6 - righteousness // great mountains // judgments // thou righteousness : Psa 71:19, Psa 97:2, Psa 145:17; Gen 18:25; Deu 32:4; Isa 45:19, Isa 45:21-24; Rom 3:25 great mountains : Heb. mountains of God, Exo 9...

TSK: Psa 36:7 - How // excellent // put their How : Psa 31:19, Psa 86:5, Psa 86:15, Psa 145:7, Psa 145:8; Exo 34:6; Joh 3:16; 1Jo 3:1, 1Jo 4:9, 1Jo 4:10 excellent : Heb. precious, Psa 139:17; 1Pe ...

TSK: Psa 36:8 - abundantly // satisfied // and thou // thy pleasures abundantly : Psa 16:11, Psa 17:15, Psa 63:5, Psa 65:4; Son 5:1; Isa 25:6, Isa 55:1, Isa 55:2; Jer 31:12-14; Zec 9:17; Mat 5:6; Joh 7:37 satisfied : He...

abundantly : Psa 16:11, Psa 17:15, Psa 63:5, Psa 65:4; Son 5:1; Isa 25:6, Isa 55:1, Isa 55:2; Jer 31:12-14; Zec 9:17; Mat 5:6; Joh 7:37

satisfied : Heb. watered, Yirweyun , ""they shall be saturated,""as a thirsty field by showers from heaven. Isa 58:11

and thou : Psa 16:11, Psa 46:4; Job 20:17; Isa 43:20, Isa 48:21; Rev. 22:1-17

thy pleasures : Or, adanacha , ""thy pleasure,""as four manuscripts, read; in which there is probably a reference to the garden of Eden, and the river that ran through, and watered it.

TSK: Psa 36:9 - For // in thy For : Isa 12:3; Jer 2:13; Joh 4:10, Joh 4:14, Joh 7:37-39; Rev 21:6, Rev 22:17 in thy : Psa 27:1; Job 29:3; Pro 4:18; Isa 2:5, Isa 60:1, Isa 60:2, Isa...

TSK: Psa 36:10 - continue // that // and thy continue : Heb. draw out at length, Psa 103:17; Jer 31:3; Joh 15:9, Joh 15:10; 1Pe 1:5 that : Psa 9:10; Jer 22:16, Jer 24:7; Joh 17:3; Heb 8:11 and th...

TSK: Psa 36:11 - foot // hand foot : Psa 10:2, Psa 12:3-5, Psa 119:51, Psa 119:69, Psa 119:85, Psa 119:122, Psa 123:3, Psa 123:4; Job 40:11, Job 40:12; Isa 51:23; Dan 4:37 hand : P...

TSK: Psa 36:12 - There // shall There : Psa 9:16, Psa 55:23, Psa 58:10, Psa 58:11, Psa 64:7-9; Jdg 5:31; 2Th 1:8, 2Th 1:9; Rev 15:4, Rev 19:1-6 shall : Psa 1:5, Psa 18:38; Jer 51:64

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Poole: Psa 36:2 - For // He flattereth himself in his own eyes // Until his iniquity be found to be hateful For so this is the proof of that assertion, Psa 36:1 . Or, although ; and so it is an anticipation of an objection against it. He flattereth himsel...

For so this is the proof of that assertion, Psa 36:1 . Or, although ; and so it is an anticipation of an objection against it.

He flattereth himself in his own eyes he deceiveth himself with vain and false persuasions, either,

1. Concerning God, that he doth not see or mind his sins, or that he will not punish them. Or,

2. Concerning himself and his sins; either that they are not sins, which a mind bribed by passion and interest can easily believe; or that they are but small and venial sins; or that they will be excused, if not justified by honest intentions, or by outward professions and exercises of religion, or by some good actions, wherewith he thinks to make some compensation for them, or some other way. Otherwise thus, he flattereth him (i.e. God) in his eyes , i.e. openly and publicly makes a show of religion, as if he designed to deceive or mock God, whilst inwardly and secretly he is projecting wickedness. But it seems better to understand the last word reciprocally of his own eyes , as the same word is used in the end of the foregoing verse.

Until his iniquity be found to be hateful i.e. until God by some dreadful judgment undeceive him, and find , i.e. discover or make him and others to find and feel by experience, that it is a sin, and a very hateful one too. Or, until his abominable iniquity be found out , i.e. punished, as the same word and phrase is used, Num 32:23 , Your sin shall find you out , i.e. bring you to condign punishment. In the Hebrew it is, to find out his iniquity to hate . But active verbs are oft taken passively, of which there are plain instances, Jos 2:5 Est 6:6 Psa 32:9 51:6 , compared with Rom 3:4 Psa 119:4 ; and so here, to find , is put for to be found ; and to hate , for to be hated , or to be hateful .

Poole: Psa 36:3 - Are iniquity and deceit Are iniquity and deceit i.e. are wicked and deceitful. Once he had some shadows or degrees of wisdom, and sometimes did some things that were good in...

Are iniquity and deceit i.e. are wicked and deceitful. Once he had some shadows or degrees of wisdom, and sometimes did some things that were good in their kind; but new he hath not so much as the appearance of it, and is become an open apostate from that which once he professed.

Poole: Psa 36:4 - He deviseth mischief upon his bed // He setteth himself // That is not good // He abhorreth not evil He deviseth mischief upon his bed which notes that he doth it, 1. Constantly and unweariedly, preferring it before his own rest. 2. Earnestly and s...

He deviseth mischief upon his bed which notes that he doth it,

1. Constantly and unweariedly, preferring it before his own rest.

2. Earnestly and seriously, when his mind is freed from all outward distractions, and wholly at leisure to attend that business about which it is employed: compare Psa 4:4 .

3. Freely, from his own inclination, when none are present to provoke him to it.

He setteth himself he doth not repent of his wicked devices, but resolutely proceeds to execute them, and persists therein.

That is not good i.e. which is very bad, as this phrase is used, 1Sa 2:24 Pro 20:23 24:23 , and elsewhere.

He abhorreth not evil: though he sometimes pretends remorse, and desists from his violent practices against me, as Saul did; yet he doth not truly repent of nor abhor his sin, and therefore is ready to return to it, when any occasion offers itself.

Poole: Psa 36:5 - Is in the heavens // the heavens // Thy faithfulness // Reacheth unto the clouds Though this be the disposition and carriage of mine enemies towards me, and therefore I can expect no good from them, yet thou, O Lord, blessed be t...

Though this be the disposition and carriage of mine enemies towards me, and therefore I can expect no good from them, yet thou, O Lord, blessed be thy name, art of another temper; they are cruel and perfidious and unrighteous, but thou art infinite in mercy , and faithfulness , and righteousness , and loving-kindness , as it here follows; and therefore though I despair of them, yet I trust in thee, as other men do for these reasons, Psa 36:7 .

Is in the heavens or, is unto (as the prefix beth oft signifies, as Gen 11:4 , and elsewhere, and as it is here explained in the following clause)

the heavens As it is on the earth, of which there was no question, so it reacheth thence to the heavens, i.e. it is infinite and incomprehensible.

Thy faithfulness the truth both of thy threatenings against thine and mine enemies, and of thy promises made to me and other good men.

Reacheth unto the clouds i.e. is far above our reach, greater and higher than we can apprehend it.

Poole: Psa 36:6 - Thy righteousness // Thy judgments // are a great deep Thy righteousness in all thy counsels and ways in the government of the world, is like the great mountains; either, 1. Stedfast and unmovable. Or, ...

Thy righteousness in all thy counsels and ways in the government of the world, is like the great mountains; either,

1. Stedfast and unmovable. Or,

2. Eminent and conspicuous to all men. Or rather,

3. Very high and out of our reach; for so it agrees best with the foregoing and following expressions.

Thy judgments i.e. thy executions of thy counsels, or thy administrations of the affairs of the world, and of thy church,

are a great deep i.e. unsearchable. as the ocean is in some parts. The worst of men, yea, lad the brute beasts, have experience of thy care and kindness, and therefore I have no reason to doubt of it.

Poole: Psa 36:7 - Thy loving-kindness // Put their trust under the shadow of thy wings Thy loving-kindness or, thy mercy ; for it is the same word which is used and so rendered, Psa 36:5 . The sense is, Though all thine attributes now ...

Thy loving-kindness or, thy mercy ; for it is the same word which is used and so rendered, Psa 36:5 . The sense is, Though all thine attributes now reckoned, and the rest of them, be excellent and glorious, yet above all thy mercy is most

excellent or precious and amiable, as being most necessary and beneficial unto us, poor sinful, miserable men.

Put their trust under the shadow of thy wings i.e. cheerfully commit themselves to thy care and kindness, notwithstanding their own sinfulness, and the rage and power of their adversaries, against all which thy mercy is a sufficient security.

Poole: Psa 36:8 - They // With the fatness of thy house // Drink // Of the river // Of thy pleasures They i. e. those children of men who trust in thee, as he now said, shall be abundantly satisfied though now they are straitened, oppressed, and pe...

They i. e. those children of men who trust in thee, as he now said,

shall be abundantly satisfied though now they are straitened, oppressed, and persecuted, yet they shall not only be protected and supported for the present, but in due time shall have all their wants and desires fully satisfied. Heb.

shall be made drunk i.e. shall be as it were overwhelmed with the plenty of it, which they shall no more be able to comprehend than a drunken man is able perfectly to understand and judge of things; and shall be free, as drunken men also are, from all cares and fears, either of not obtaining it, or of losing it.

With the fatness of thy house with those rich and delightful provisions which thou hast prepared for them in thy habitation, i.e. either,

1. In the tabernacle, where they used to feast upon the remainders of the sacrifices; to which also he seems here to allude. Or rather,

2. In heaven; which is called God’ s house, both in Scripture, as Joh 14:2 , and in divers ancient heathen authors. For the expressions here used are too magnificent to be bestowed upon those feasts, or indeed upon any of the enjoyments of this life, and do ill become him, who professedly disowns the having of his portion in this life , and declares his expectation of happiness in the next life, Psa 17:14,15 . And seeing it is apparent from Heb 11 , and from many other scriptures, both of the Old and New Testament, that both David, and Job, and Abraham, and the rest of the holy patriarchs and prophets, had a firm belief and hope of the future life, and their felicity therein; it seems most reasonable to understand all those passages of David and the other prophets of it, which naturally, and without any force, may be so understood; of which number certainly this verse and the following is one.

Drink: before they had fatness , i.e. fat meats; and now drink , to note the completeness of their feast.

Of the river which notes both their plenty, and their constancy and perpetuity.

Of thy pleasures which thou preparest, and which thou enjoyest; whence it is called the joy of the Lord, Mat 25:21 . Or this notes their great eminency; for things most excellent in their kinds are entitled to God, as the goodliest cedars, mountains, &c., are called cedars of God , mountains of God , &c.

Poole: Psa 36:9 - With thee // The fountain // Of life // In thy light // See With thee i.e. in thy power to give it, and in thy presence to be enjoyed. The fountain which notes, 1. Causality. It is in God as in a fountain, ...

With thee i.e. in thy power to give it, and in thy presence to be enjoyed.

The fountain which notes,

1. Causality. It is in God as in a fountain, and from him is derived to us.

2. Abundance.

3. Excellency. Water is sweetest in the fountain; and fountains were rare and highly prized in those hot countries.

Of life of that glorious, and blessed, and endless life, which alone is worthy of the name of life; this life being only a passage to death, and a theatre of great and manifold calamities. Although it be true, that God is the fountain both of natural and spiritual life.

In thy light in the light of thy countenance or glorious presence, which then shall be fully manifested unto us, when we shall see thee clearly, and face to face, and not through a glass, and darkly, as we now see, 1Co 13:12 : compare Psa 17:15 .

See i.e. enjoy, as seeing frequently signifies; of which see on Psa 34:12 . Light; the light of life , as it is called, Joh 8:12 . Light in this branch being the same thing with life in the former, i.e. joy, and comfort, and happiness, which is oft signified by light, as the contrary is by darkness . See Job 29:3 Psa 27:1 Isa 9:2 . There we shall have pure light without any mixture of darkness. The word light is elegantly repeated in another signification; in the former clause it is light discovering, in this, light discovered or enjoyed.

Poole: Psa 36:10 - Continue // Thy righteousness Continue as this word signifies, Psa 85:5 Ecc 2:3 Jer 31:3 . As thou hast begun, so continue the manifestation and exhibition of it, both in this lif...

Continue as this word signifies, Psa 85:5 Ecc 2:3 Jer 31:3 . As thou hast begun, so continue the manifestation and exhibition of it, both in this life, and to the next. Or, extend , or draw forth . Let it not be like a fountain sealed, but let it be drawn forth for their comfort. Know thee , i.e. sincerely love thee, as it is explained in the next clause; for knowing implies affection, as Psa 9:10 , and oft elsewhere.

Thy righteousness which will appear in giving them that protection and assistance which thou art by thy nature inclined, and by thy promise engaged, to give them.

Poole: Psa 36:11 - Of pride // Against me Of pride i. e. of my proud and insolent enemies; the abstract being put for the concrete, as Jer 50:31,32 : so also Pro 12:27 13:6 . Against me or,...

Of pride i. e. of my proud and insolent enemies; the abstract being put for the concrete, as Jer 50:31,32 : so also Pro 12:27 13:6 .

Against me or, upon me , to wit, so as to overthrow or remove me, as it is in the next clause. Remove me ; either,

1. From my trust in thee, or obedience to thee. Or,

2. From my place and station; from the land of my nativity, and the place of thy worship. Or, shake me, or cast me down , i.e. subdue and destroy me.

Poole: Psa 36:12 - There // Fallen There where they come against me, and hope to ruin me. He seems as it were to point at the place with his finger, as if it were already done, and he ...

There where they come against me, and hope to ruin me. He seems as it were to point at the place with his finger, as if it were already done, and he could tell all the circumstances of it. Or, then , i.e. when they thought all sure, and me irrecoverably lost.

Fallen i.e. they shall certainly and suddenly fall; which the prophets use to express in the time past.

PBC: Psa 36:1 - there is no fear of God before his eyes " there is no fear of God before his eyes" They have no concern about pleasing God. Except when the Lord restrains them they act as if there were no ...

" there is no fear of God before his eyes"

They have no concern about pleasing God. Except when the Lord restrains them they act as if there were no God and no consequences to their evil deeds. However, there are times when even the devils fear and tremble. {Jas 2:19}

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Haydock: Psa 36:1 - Laugh // Digni sunt ut irrideantur in vindicta An exhortation to despise this world; and the short prosperity of the wicked; and to trust in providence. Laugh. This expression is often used to d...

An exhortation to despise this world; and the short prosperity of the wicked; and to trust in providence.

Laugh. This expression is often used to denote the triumph of divine justice, whose day will set all right: that day (2 Timothy iv. 8.) which ought to be constantly before our eyes. (Berthier) ---

God cannot indeed mock at any one. (Calmet) ---

But the wicked "deserve scorn and vengeance." (Haydock) ---

Digni sunt ut irrideantur in vindicta. (St. Jerome) ---

The day of their judgment or condemnation is at hand, (Ezechiel xxi. 21., and 1 Kings xxvi. 10.; Haydock) when they will be sought for in vain (ver. 10.; Calmet) by their foolish admirers. They will seek to hide themselves from the indignation of the Lamb.

Haydock: Psa 36:1 - Himself // Emulous // Envy Himself. Hebrew has simply, "for David," (Calmet) as well as the Greek of the Vatican. "It is a mistake in Bellanger to say in general that the Gre...

Himself. Hebrew has simply, "for David," (Calmet) as well as the Greek of the Vatican. "It is a mistake in Bellanger to say in general that the Greek adds "a psalm," since this is true only with respect to the edition of Aldus and Complutensian, says Berthier. But he is not quite accurate, as Erasmus inserts "a psalm" in his edition of St. Jerome's Septuagint; and the Alexandrian copy, which is equally famous with that of the Vatican, has [unto the end, a psalm] for David. Grabe has indeed marked all but the last word as a peculiarity, or not to be found in Origen's copy. But he has published his edition with such accuracy, that we may distinguish what his manuscript contained from other interpolations. It were to be wished that the same attention had been paid to the Vatican copy. But hitherto all the editors have taken the liberty to make alterations without specifying where; so that we can have no security that we ever quote the real manuscript of the Vatican. The learned prefect, Zacagni, gives abundant proof of this in his letter to Grabe, which has been published by Kennicott, Diss. 2. Yet any of these editions may be quoted as the Greek or Septuagint, as we have yet no copy perfectly authentic: and the learned are not even agreed which standard ought to be followed. If that which presents the greatest number of Origen's corrections be preferable, the Alexandrians manuscript must bear away the psalm . If the reverse, the glory must be given to its rival in the Vatican, which approaches the nearest to the Greek: koine, or to the edition of St. Lucian. See Kennicott. These remarks may be of service, as Berthier often seems inclined to place the Vatican edition on the same level as the Latin Vulgate. (Haydock) ---

This psalm is alphabetical. The Syriac, Septuagint, &c., read, (ver. 28) the unjust, &c., avilim; a word which seems now to be deficient in the Hebrew, which has no verse beginning with a. (Calmet) ---

Some other derangement has taken place. (Houbigant) ---

The verses might be so divided as to begin every second verse with a fresh letter, and so to retain 42 verses. See ver. 7., and 20. The matter is of no great importance. The prophet has comprised several duties in alphabetical order, to help the memory, (Berthier) and to excite attention. (Worthington) ---

He may predict the death of Saul, (Rabbins) or hint at the rebellion of Absalom in his old age; (ver. 25.; Ferrand) or rather he may comfort the captives at Babylon, promising them liberty, and denouncing the fall of their oppressors, above ten times. He admonishes them not to be scandalized at the distress of the just, and the prosperity of the wicked. (Calmet) ---

Emulous. Hebrew, "Fret not thyself." (Protestants) "Mingle not with;" (Berthier; Pagnin) "contend not." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) ---

Envy. Their splendour is deceitful. (Calmet) ---

Be not, therefore, seduced (Haydock) to imitate the wicked (Menochius) nor offended, that they should prosper here. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 36:2 - Wither // Fall Wither. Hebrew, "be cut down." (Calmet) --- Fall. Hebrew, "wither." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) --- This admirably describes the transient glory o...

Wither. Hebrew, "be cut down." (Calmet) ---

Fall. Hebrew, "wither." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) ---

This admirably describes the transient glory of sinners, Isaias xl. 6., and James i. 10. (Calmet) ---

All life is short. (Worthington) (1 Peter i. 24.) (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 36:3 - Riches Riches. Septuagint and Houbigant read emune, "abundance." Hebrew begins with a. The sense is much the same. (Berthier) --- "Thou shalt feed ...

Riches. Septuagint and Houbigant read emune, "abundance." Hebrew begins with a. The sense is much the same. (Berthier) ---

"Thou shalt feed on faith," (St. Jerome) or "incessantly." (Symmachus) ---

The Jews entertained the greatest desire of the promised land. (Calmet) ---

It may here denote our soul, (Origen) the Church, (St. Augustine) the Scriptures, (St. Athanasius) or heaven. (St. Jerome, &c.) (Calmet) ---

Trust in God and be content. He will give thee what is requisite. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 36:4 - Heart Heart. Provided they be rational. (St. Augustine) --- He will enable thee to repose in peace, and to taste innocent pleasures in the Lord. (Cal...

Heart. Provided they be rational. (St. Augustine) ---

He will enable thee to repose in peace, and to taste innocent pleasures in the Lord. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 36:5 - Commit // Do it Commit. Literally, "lay open." Hebrew, "roll." (Haydock) --- This expresses the most unbounded confidence, Psalm liv. 23., and Proverbs xvi. 3. -...

Commit. Literally, "lay open." Hebrew, "roll." (Haydock) ---

This expresses the most unbounded confidence, Psalm liv. 23., and Proverbs xvi. 3. ---

Do it. Whatever may be proper. He will display thy justice, (ver. 6.) and free the from anxiety, (Calmet) taking care of thee, 1 Peter v. 7. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 36:6 - Day Day. This will appear at the last judgment. (St. Augustine)

Day. This will appear at the last judgment. (St. Augustine)

Haydock: Psa 36:7 - Be Be. Hebrew dom, begins only this verse with d. The other letters occupy two verses, (Berthier) the second of which may commence with any of the...

Be. Hebrew dom, begins only this verse with d. The other letters occupy two verses, (Berthier) the second of which may commence with any of the letters. (Haydock) ---

"Be silent to the Lord; wait upon Him." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) ---

If he should suffer thee to be afflicted, envy not those who are in a more prosperous condition, nor give way to indignation, ver. 8. (Calmet) ---

None can be truly subjected to God, who do not comply with his laws and pray. (Origen) (St. Augustine) ---

We must wait patiently for his aid, Lamentations iii. 26., and Isaias xxx. 15. "Allow the gods to judge what's best for us." (Juvenal, Sat. 13.) (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 36:8 - Evil // Laboras; sed in via Dei Evil. Repining (Menochius) at the ways of Providence, &c. (Calmet) (ver. 1.) --- Reflect on God's will. (Haydock) --- Laboras; sed in via Dei. ...

Evil. Repining (Menochius) at the ways of Providence, &c. (Calmet) (ver. 1.) ---

Reflect on God's will. (Haydock) ---

Laboras; sed in via Dei. (St. Augustine) ---

Hebrew, "be not angry nevertheless ( ac, a word which Houbigant deems useless) to do evil;" (Montanus) or "against the wicked," (Prin. dis.) as lehareah may be perhaps signified; though it is more usually taken for a verb, as the points decide. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 36:9 - Land Land of the living. (Worthington) --- David knew that many truly pious people would never obtain riches in the land of Chanaan, even though they mi...

Land of the living. (Worthington) ---

David knew that many truly pious people would never obtain riches in the land of Chanaan, even though they might have remained there, if the nation had been faithful. He therefore comforts them with the prospect of a better land. If this were not the meaning, the Church would put these canticles in the mouth of her children to little purpose. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 36:10 - While // And shalt While. Till the day of judgment. (Origen; St. Ambrose) --- And shalt. Hebrew, "and it shall not be. " (Protestants) "it, or he shall not s...

While. Till the day of judgment. (Origen; St. Ambrose) ---

And shalt. Hebrew, "and it shall not be. " (Protestants) "it, or he shall not subsist." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) ---

The state of the wicked is not therefore so enviable. The captives witnessed the fall of the great Colossus, the empire of the Babylonians. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 36:11 - Meek Meek. Hebrew hanavim, also means "the afflicted." (Berthier) --- Captives, ye shall be reinstated in your dear country. Our Saviour alludes to ...

Meek. Hebrew hanavim, also means "the afflicted." (Berthier) ---

Captives, ye shall be reinstated in your dear country. Our Saviour alludes to this text, (Matthew v. 4.) and the Fathers beautifully explain it of heaven. (Eusebius; St. Augustine) (Calmet) ---

What is now become of those who have heretofore filled the world with tumult and bloodshed to obtain dominion! They are confined to the land where everlasting horror and on order dwells. They would wish they had never existed, as our Saviour mentions; while those who passed through life unknown, or despised, but always seeking God, are now arrived at the summit of all their wishes. (Haydock) ---

O holy religion! thou explainest all these things. The just have ceased to exist: but their better part has inherited the land of the living. Yet a little while, and all will be in order, and in its proper place; though that of the wicked deserves not the name. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 36:12 - Watch // Teeth Watch. Hebrew, "plot against." (Haydock) --- Teeth. In rage to destroy him, (Calmet) whose virtue is a continual censure of his impiety. (Haydo...

Watch. Hebrew, "plot against." (Haydock) ---

Teeth. In rage to destroy him, (Calmet) whose virtue is a continual censure of his impiety. (Haydock)

Gill: Psa 36:1 - The transgression of the wicked saith within my heart // that there is no fear of God before his eyes The transgression of the wicked saith within my heart,.... Which is represented as a person speaking within him; not that the transgression of the wic...

The transgression of the wicked saith within my heart,.... Which is represented as a person speaking within him; not that the transgression of the wicked was really in him; sin was in him, and sin of the same kind and nature with the wicked man's; but he taking notice of and considering the wicked man's sinful course of life, and his daring impieties, conceived in his own mind, and concluded from hence,

that there is no fear of God before his eyes; no reverential affection for him, but enmity to him; no godly filial fear, but at most only a slavish fear, a fear of punishment; no holy and humble fear of him, but pride and wickedness; no fiducial and obediential fear, but all the reverse; true worship of him, either internally or externally: there can be no fear of God in any unregenerate man's, heart, because it is not of nature, but of grace, and is, what is implanted at first conversion; there is in some an appearance of it, where it is not really, whose fear is taught by the precept of men; and in others there may be some awe of the divine Being, and trembling at the thought of a future judgment, arising from the dictates of nature, the light of revelation, and the enjoyment of a religious education; but in some there is no fear of God at all, and they are bold and daring enough to assert it themselves, as the unjust judge did, Luk 18:4. Such as the atheist, the common swearer, the debauchee and epicure, who give up themselves to all manner of wickedness, contemn revelation, despise the word of God, and regard no day nor manner of worship; and this notwithstanding the majesty of God, at whose presence they tremble not, and notwithstanding the goodness of God, which should induce them to fear him, and notwithstanding the judgment of God on others, and even on themselves; see Jer 3:8; and notwithstanding the future awful judgment, which they put far away or disbelieve. The Targum is, "transgression saith to the wicked within my heart"; and Jarchi's note upon the text is this,

"this text is to be transposed thus, it is in my heart, that transgression, which is the evil imagination, says to the wicked man, that there should be no fear of God before his eyes; and the phrase, "in the midst of my heart", is as if a man should say, so it seems to me.''

The Septuagint version, and those that follow it, render the words thus, "the transgressor said, that he might sin in himself, there is no fear of God before his eyes". Gussetius b interprets "before his eyes", before the eyes of God himself, who is so good a Being, that the sinner fears no punishment from him, but will pardon all his sins.

Gill: Psa 36:2 - For he flattereth himself in his own eyes // until his iniquity be found to be hateful For he flattereth himself in his own eyes,.... There are many self-flatterers; some on account of their worldly estate, that they are out of the reach...

For he flattereth himself in his own eyes,.... There are many self-flatterers; some on account of their worldly estate, that they are out of the reach of God and men, and regard neither; and that as they have much goods laid up, they shall enjoy them many years, and so never think of dying, nor of another world: others on account of their eternal state, pleasing themselves with their own purity, goodness, and righteousness: some flatter themselves either that their sins are not sins, or they are small ones; or they are no other than what multitudes commit; or they are not seen and known, and that God himself sees them not, or takes no notice of them; and that they shall go on with impunity, sentence against them being not speedily executed; and others that there is no God, will be no judgment, nor future state;

until his iniquity be found to be hateful, or, "to find his iniquity and to hate" c that which is good, as the word may be rendered; that is, he flatters himself, or speaks smooth things to himself, and endeavours to work himself up into the belief of the above things; that he may find, embrace, and indulge his lusts with a quiet conscience, and hate God, good men, and everything that is good; the Targum is,

"that he may find sins and hate doctrine''

or instruction. Jarchi and Aben Ezra interpret the words another way,

"that the holy and blessed God may find out his iniquity to hate him;''

see Gen 44:16, which God may be said to do, when he charges the guilt of sin upon the conscience, and punishes for it; and exposes both the sinner and his sins to the world; thereby testifying his hatred of him and his sins; and which should have been hateful to him, as they are to all good men.

Gill: Psa 36:3 - The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit // he hath left off to be wise, and to do good The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit,.... Not only sinful, but sin itself; his mouth is full of cursing and bitterness, of filthy and uncha...

The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit,.... Not only sinful, but sin itself; his mouth is full of cursing and bitterness, of filthy and unchaste words, of corrupt communication, lying, deceit, and flattery; out of the abundance of the wickedness of his heart his mouth speaketh; and which shows the badness of it, and proves all that is said before of him;

he hath left off to be wise, and to do good; by which the psalmist seems to intend one that had been a professor of religion, who, besides the light of nature he had acted contrary to, had had the advantage of a divine revelation, and had been enlightened into the knowledge of divine things, and had done many things externally good, particularly acts of beneficence; but now had dropped his profession of religion, denied the truths he had been enlightened into, and ceased from doing good; otherwise a natural man understandeth not; and, though he is wise to do evil, to do good he has no knowledge.

Gill: Psa 36:4 - He deviseth mischief upon his bed // he setteth himself in a way that is not good // he abhorreth not evil He deviseth mischief upon his bed,.... He casts about in his mind on his pillow, when at leisure from all employment; and consults and contrives schem...

He deviseth mischief upon his bed,.... He casts about in his mind on his pillow, when at leisure from all employment; and consults and contrives schemes how to compass his lusts, and to do injury to others, without doing which he cannot sleep;

he setteth himself in a way that is not good, in an evil way, which he chooses and delights in, and determines to continue in, he leaving the paths of righteousness to walk in the ways of darkness:

he abhorreth not evil; which is to be abhorred both because of its nature and effects; see Rom 12:9; but on the contrary he loves it, takes pleasure in doing it, and in them that commit it: thus, by his thoughts, words, and actions, he appears to be devoid of the fear of God.

Gill: Psa 36:5 - Thy mercy, O Lord, is in the heavens // and thy faithfulness reacheth unto the clouds Thy mercy, O Lord, is in the heavens,.... Meaning either the general mercy of God the earth is full of, and extends to all creatures; to which it is ...

Thy mercy, O Lord, is in the heavens,.... Meaning either the general mercy of God the earth is full of, and extends to all creatures; to which it is owing that wicked men before described are not consumed; and which reaches "up to the heavens" d, as the words are by some rendered, as their sins do; see Psa 57:10; or the special mercy of God, and regards not the objects of it, creatures in heaven; for there at, none there proper objects of mercy; but the seat of it, the heart of God, who is in heaven; or the repository of it, the covenant of grace, which is full of the sure mercies of David; and of mercy there was a most glaring instance, when the son of God was sent down from heaven, to obtain salvation for sinful men; or it may denote the original of it, the heaven, being, as Aben Ezra observes some Jewish interpreters say, the fountain of mercy, and the spring of truth; or the greatness and abundance of it, it being as high as heaven, yea, above it; see Psa 103:11;

and thy faithfulness reacheth unto the clouds; which lies in the execution of his purposes, whose counsels of old were faithfulness and truth; and in keeping his covenant and promises; he never changes his mind, nor forgets his word; he is a God of truth, and cannot lie; he knows the end from the beginning; no unforeseen event can turn up to hinder the performance of what he has purposed and promised, and he is able to perform; nor does ever any of the good things he has spoken of fail: though his faithfulness sometimes seems to be not only to the clouds, but in them, and out of sight; providences seem to clash with promises, which make unbelief to say, doth his promise fail for evermore? yet, though we believe not, he abides faithful, Psa 77:8, 2Ti 2:13.

Gill: Psa 36:6 - Thy righteousness is like the great mountains // thy judgments are a great deep // O Lord, thou preservest man and beast Thy righteousness is like the great mountains,.... Or, "the mountains of God"; so called for their excellency, as the cedars of God, Psa 80:10; or, a...

Thy righteousness is like the great mountains,.... Or, "the mountains of God"; so called for their excellency, as the cedars of God, Psa 80:10; or, as Gussetius e observes, the greatest and highest mountains, which are here meant, reaching above the clouds and the region of the air, are the pillars of the palace of God, and a part of it; and therefore called his mountains with great propriety, to which his righteousness is compared: that is, either the righteousness of God in the government of the world, which is sometimes like the high mountains, not to be reached and accounted for in the present state of things, though always is, and is immovable as they are; or the righteousness of God, by which he justifies sinners, which may be said to be as the mountains of God, because of the dignity of his person, who has wrought it out; and because of the clear manifestation of it, the Gospel, and so visible, as high mountains; and because of the immovableness and duration of it;

thy judgments are a great deep; both in a way of providence, many of them being at present not to be traced, though before long they will be made manifest; and in a way of grace, such as the choice of some, and the leaving of others, the rejection of the Jews, and the call of the Gentiles; see Rom 11:33;

O Lord, thou preservest man and beast; in a providential way, upholding each in their being, and supplying them with the necessaries of life: some understand this figuratively, of God's saving Jews and Gentiles, wise and unwise, and particularly those who, through humility and modesty, as Jarchi says, compare themselves to beasts, because of their ignorance and stupidity, Pro 30:2.

Gill: Psa 36:7 - How excellent is thy lovingkindness, O God // therefore the children of men put their trust under the shadow of thy wings How excellent is thy lovingkindness, O God,.... Which has appeared to men and not angels, to some and not others; to the chief of sinners, who are by...

How excellent is thy lovingkindness, O God,.... Which has appeared to men and not angels, to some and not others; to the chief of sinners, who are by nature children of wrath as others; in choosing, redeeming, and calling them, taking them into his family, and making them heirs of eternal glory; and all this of his sovereign good will and pleasure, there being nothing in them that could move him to it; which lovingkindness was in his heart from everlasting, and will never change in him, nor depart from them; and hence it must be most excellent and precious:

therefore the children of men put their trust under the shadow of thy wings; not all men; for all have not faith, only some, to whom it is given to believe, and who know the Lord and his lovingkindness; by which they are induced and encouraged to trust in him, to betake themselves to him for mercy and protection, which they find in him: the allusion is either to the hen that gathers her chickens under her wings, and protects them in time of danger, and so it expresses both the paternal affection of God to his people, and the protection of them; or else to the wings of the cherubim over the mercy seat, between which the Lord sat and communed with his people, and showed mercy and favour to them, which encouraged them to trust in him.

Gill: Psa 36:8 - They shall be abundantly sallied with the fatness of thy house // and thou shall make them drink of the river of thy pleasure They shall be abundantly sallied with the fatness of thy house,.... By his "house" is meant the church of God, of his building, and where he dwells; b...

They shall be abundantly sallied with the fatness of thy house,.... By his "house" is meant the church of God, of his building, and where he dwells; by the fatness of it the provisions there, the word and ordinances, and the blessings of grace which they hold forth; and especially Christ, the fatted calf, the bread of life, whose flesh is meat indeed, and whose blood is drink indeed, and which make a feast of fat things; and these they that trust in the Lord are welcome to eat and drink of abundantly, and to abundant satisfaction; see Mat 5:6, Psa 22:26;

and thou shall make them drink of the river of thy pleasure; the love of God, whose streams make glad the city of God; or the fulness of grace, which is in Christ, out of which believers draw with joy, and drink with pleasure; or eternal glory and happiness, enjoyed in the presence of God, in which is fulness of joy, and at whose right hand are pleasures for evermore; a never ceasing torrent of them.

Gill: Psa 36:9 - For with thee is the fountain of life // in thy light shall we see light For with thee is the fountain of life,.... Or "lives" f: God himself is the fountain of living waters; this is a reason proving the happiness of thos...

For with thee is the fountain of life,.... Or "lives" f: God himself is the fountain of living waters; this is a reason proving the happiness of those that trust in the Lord, and that they shall enjoy the above things; because with God the object of their trust is the fountain of life; not only of natural life, from whom they have it, and by whom it is supported, but of spiritual life, being quickened by him when dead in sin, by virtue of which they live by faith on Christ, and also of eternal life; and the phrase denotes, that life is originally in God as in its fountain, and that both the fulness of it is with him, and the freeness of it in the communication of it to others, as well as its continuance and duration;

in thy light shall we see light; God is light itself, the Father of lights, and the former of it in every sense; in the light of his countenance, and the discoveries of his love, they that trust in him see light, or enjoy comfort; and in the light of his Son Jesus Christ, the sun of righteousness and light of the world, they see the face of God, and enjoy his favour, and behold the glory and excellency of Christ himself; and in the light of the divine Spirit, who is a spirit of wisdom and revelation, they see their sins exceeding sinful, their righteousness as nothing, and a preciousness in the blood, righteousness, and sacrifice of Christ; and in the light of the divine word they see the truths of the Gospel in their native simplicity and excellency, and the duties of religion to be performed by them; and in the light of faith, which is the gift of God, they have at least a glimpse of the unseen glories of the other world; and when the beatific vision shall take place, they shall see no more darkly through a glass, but face to face, even God himself, as he is in Christ.

Gill: Psa 36:10 - O continue thy lovingkindness to them that know thee // and thy righteousness unto the upright in heart O continue thy lovingkindness to them that know thee,.... That is, spiritually and experimentally; and such are they that trust in him and love him: a...

O continue thy lovingkindness to them that know thee,.... That is, spiritually and experimentally; and such are they that trust in him and love him: and these are the objects of the love of God; not that their knowledge, faith, or love, are the cause of his love to them; but these things describe and point at manifestly the objects of it; and this request regards the open discovery of it unto them: for the love of God itself always continues, though the manifestations of it are not always the same; and it is for the enlargement and continuance of them the psalmist here prays: for it may be rendered, "draw out thy lovingkindness" g; that is, to a greater length; make a larger and clearer discovery of it, that the height and depth, and length and breadth of it, may be more discerned;

and thy righteousness unto the upright in heart; who are sincere and without guile; who have new hearts created and right spirits renewed in them, and have truth in the inward parts; and unto and upon such is the righteousness of Christ, and where it always continues, for it is an everlasting one; but here it means a clearer and constant revelation of it from faith to faith; unless it should rather intend the righteousness of God in protecting his people from the insults of their enemies, and the continual exertion of it for that purpose.

Gill: Psa 36:11 - Let not the foot of pride come against me // and let not the hand of the wicked remove me Let not the foot of pride come against me,.... Meaning some proud enemy, such an one as Ahithophel, of whom R. Obadiah expounds, it, who lifted up his...

Let not the foot of pride come against me,.... Meaning some proud enemy, such an one as Ahithophel, of whom R. Obadiah expounds, it, who lifted up his heel against him; and is applicable to any haughty enemy of Christ and his people, and particularly to antichrist, the man of sin, that exalts himself above all that is called God;

and let not the hand of the wicked remove me; either from the house of God; or from his throne, that high station and dignity in which he was placed.

Gill: Psa 36:12 - There are the workers, of iniquity fallen // they are cast down, and shall not be able to rise There are the workers, of iniquity fallen,.... Either in the pit they dug for others; or into hell, where they shall be turned at last; See Gill on Ps...

There are the workers, of iniquity fallen,.... Either in the pit they dug for others; or into hell, where they shall be turned at last; See Gill on Psa 5:5 and See Gill on Psa 6:8;

they are cast down, and shall not be able to rise; which will be the case of Babylon when fallen, Rev 18:21, and this distinguishes the falls of the wicked from those of the righteous; for though the righteous fall, whether into sin, or into any calamity, they rise again; not so the wicked; see Psa 37:24; and thus, as the psalm begins with the transgression of the wicked, it ends with their ruin.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 36:1 Heb “there is no dread of God before his eyes.” The phrase “dread of God” refers here to a healthy respect for God which recog...

NET Notes: Psa 36:2 Heb “for it causes to be smooth to him in his eyes to find his sin to hate.” The meaning of the Hebrew text is unclear. Perhaps the point ...

NET Notes: Psa 36:3 Heb “he ceases to exhibit wisdom to do good.” The Hiphil forms are exhibitive, indicating the outward expression of an inner attitude.

NET Notes: Psa 36:4 The three imperfect verbal forms in v. 4 highlight the characteristic behavior of the typical evildoer.

NET Notes: Psa 36:5 The Lord’s loyal love/faithfulness is almost limitless. He is loyal and faithful to his creation and blesses mankind and the animal kingdom with...

NET Notes: Psa 36:6 God’s justice/fairness is firm and reliable like the highest mountains and as abundant as the water in the deepest sea. The psalmist uses a lega...

NET Notes: Psa 36:7 Heb “and the sons of man in the shadow of your wings find shelter.” The preservation of physical life is in view, as the next verse makes ...

NET Notes: Psa 36:9 Heb “for with you is the fountain of life, in your light we see light.” Water (note “fountain”) and light are here metaphors f...

NET Notes: Psa 36:10 Heb “the pure of heart.” The “heart” is here viewed as the seat of one’s moral character and motives. The “pure of...

NET Notes: Psa 36:11 Heb “let not a foot of pride come to me, and let not the hand of the evil ones cause me to wander as a fugitive.”

NET Notes: Psa 36:12 The psalmist uses perfect verbal forms in v. 12 to describe the demise of the wicked as if it has already taken place.

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:1 "To the chief Musician, [A Psalm] of David the servant of the LORD." The transgression of the wicked saith ( a ) within my heart, [that there is] no f...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:2 For he ( b ) flattereth himself in his own eyes, until his iniquity be found to be hateful. ( b ) Though all others detest his vile sin, yet he himse...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:3 The words of his mouth [are] iniquity and ( c ) deceit: he hath left off to be wise, [and] to do good. ( c ) The reprobates mock wholesome doctrine, ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:4 He ( d ) deviseth mischief upon his bed; he setteth himself in a way [that is] not good; he abhorreth not evil. ( d ) By describing at large the natu...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:5 Thy ( e ) mercy, O LORD, [is] in the heavens; [and] thy faithfulness [reacheth] unto the clouds. ( e ) Though wickedness seems to overflow all the wo...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:6 Thy righteousness [is] like the great mountains; thy judgments [are] a great ( f ) deep: O LORD, thou preservest man and beast. ( f ) The depth of yo...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:8 They shall be abundantly ( g ) satisfied with the fatness of thy house; and thou shalt make them drink of the river of thy pleasures. ( g ) Only God'...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:10 O continue thy lovingkindness unto them that ( h ) know thee; and thy righteousness to the upright in heart. ( h ) He shows who God's children are, t...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:11 Let not the ( i ) foot of pride come against me, and let not the hand of the wicked remove me. ( i ) Let not the proud advance himself against me, or...

Geneva Bible: Psa 36:12 ( k ) There are the workers of iniquity fallen: they are cast down, and shall not be able to rise. ( k ) That is, in their pride in which they flatte...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Psa 36:4-6 - A Libation To Jehovah Sky, Earth, And Sea: A Parable Of God Thy mercy, O Lord, is in the heavens; and Thy faithfulness reacheth unto the clouds. 6. Thy righteousness is li...

Maclaren: Psa 36:7-8 - A Libation To Jehovah What Men Find Beneath The Wings Of God They shall be abundantly satisfied with the fatness of Thy house: and Thou shalt make them drink of the river ...

MHCC: Psa 36:1-4 - --From this psalm our hearts should be duly affected with hatred of sin, and seek satisfaction in God's loving-kindness. Here is the root of bitterness,...

MHCC: Psa 36:5-12 - --Men may shut up their compassion, yet, with God we shall find mercy. This is great comfort to all believers, plainly to be seen, and not to be taken a...

Matthew Henry: Psa 36:1-4 - -- David, in the title of this psalm, is styled the servant of the Lord; why in this, and not in any other, except in Ps. 18 ( title ), no reason can...

Matthew Henry: Psa 36:5-12 - -- David, having looked round with grief upon the wickedness of the wicked, here looks up with comfort upon the goodness of God, a subject as delightfu...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 36:1-4 - -- (Heb.: 36:1-4) At the outset the poet discovers to us the wickedness of the children of the world, which has its roots in alienation from God. Supp...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 36:5-9 - -- (Heb.: 36:6-10) The poet now turns from this repulsive prospect to one that is more pleasing. He contemplates, and praises, the infinite, ever sure...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 36:10-12 - -- (Heb.: 36:11-13) Now for the first time, in the concluding hexastich, after complaint and commendation comes the language of prayer. The poet prays...

Constable: Psa 36:1-12 - --Psalm 36 This psalm contains an oracle David received from the Lord concerning the wicked. In contrast t...

Constable: Psa 36:1-3 - --1. Revelation concerning the wicked 36:1-4 36:1 The NIV translation, "An oracle is within my heart concerning the sinfulness of the wicked," is prefer...

Constable: Psa 36:4-8 - --2. Reflection concerning the Lord 36:5-9 36:5-6 David delighted in meditating on God's attributes rather than disregarding Him. Instead of pushing God...

Constable: Psa 36:9-11 - --3. Request concerning the future 36:10-12 David prayed in closing that God's loyal love and righ...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 36:2 " The greatest fault is to be conscious of none." Thomas Carlyle

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 36 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 36:1, The grievous estate of the wicked; Psa 36:8, The excellency of God’s mercy; Psa 36:10, David prays for favour to God’s chil...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

Poole: Psalms 36 (Pendahuluan Pasal) THE ARGUMENT This Psalm seems to have been composed by David when he was persecuted by Saul and his courtiers; upon which occasion he enlargeth his...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 36 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 36:1-4) The bad state of the wicked. (Psa 36:5-12) The goodness of God.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 36 (Pendahuluan Pasal) It is uncertain when, and upon what occasion, David penned this psalm, probably when he was struck at either by Saul or by Absalom; for in it he co...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 36 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 36 To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David, the servant of the Lord. This title, which the psalmist takes to himself, regards...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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