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Teks -- Isaiah 26:1-21 (NET)

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Konteks
Judah Will Celebrate
26:1 At that time this song will be sung in the land of Judah: “We have a strong city! The Lord’s deliverance, like walls and a rampart, makes it secure. 26:2 Open the gates so a righteous nation can enter– one that remains trustworthy. 26:3 You keep completely safe the people who maintain their faith, for they trust in you. 26:4 Trust in the Lord from this time forward, even in Yah, the Lord, an enduring protector! 26:5 Indeed, the Lord knocks down those who live in a high place, he brings down an elevated town; he brings it down to the ground, he throws it down to the dust. 26:6 It is trampled underfoot by the feet of the oppressed, by the soles of the poor.”
God’s People Anticipate Vindication
26:7 The way of the righteous is level, the path of the righteous that you make is straight. 26:8 Yes, as your judgments unfold, O Lord, we wait for you. We desire your fame and reputation to grow. 26:9 I look for you during the night, my spirit within me seeks you at dawn, for when your judgments come upon the earth, those who live in the world learn about justice. 26:10 If the wicked are shown mercy, they do not learn about justice. Even in a land where right is rewarded, they act unjustly; they do not see the Lord’s majesty revealed. 26:11 O Lord, you are ready to act, but they don’t even notice. They will see and be put to shame by your angry judgment against humankind, yes, fire will consume your enemies. 26:12 O Lord, you make us secure, for even all we have accomplished, you have done for us. 26:13 O Lord, our God, masters other than you have ruled us, but we praise your name alone. 26:14 The dead do not come back to life, the spirits of the dead do not rise. That is because you came in judgment and destroyed them, you wiped out all memory of them. 26:15 You have made the nation larger, O Lord, you have made the nation larger and revealed your splendor, you have extended all the borders of the land. 26:16 O Lord, in distress they looked for you; they uttered incantations because of your discipline. 26:17 As when a pregnant woman gets ready to deliver and strains and cries out because of her labor pains, so were we because of you, O Lord. 26:18 We were pregnant, we strained, we gave birth, as it were, to wind. We cannot produce deliverance on the earth; people to populate the world are not born. 26:19 Your dead will come back to life; your corpses will rise up. Wake up and shout joyfully, you who live in the ground! For you will grow like plants drenched with the morning dew, and the earth will bring forth its dead spirits. 26:20 Go, my people! Enter your inner rooms! Close your doors behind you! Hide for a little while, until his angry judgment is over! 26:21 For look, the Lord is coming out of the place where he lives, to punish the sin of those who live on the earth. The earth will display the blood shed on it; it will no longer cover up its slain.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Judah the son of Jacob and Leah; founder of the tribe of Judah,a tribe, the land/country,a son of Joseph; the father of Simeon; an ancestor of Jesus,son of Jacob/Israel and Leah; founder of the tribe of Judah,the tribe of Judah,citizens of the southern kingdom of Judah,citizens of the Persian Province of Judah; the Jews who had returned from Babylonian exile,"house of Judah", a phrase which highlights the political leadership of the tribe of Judah,"king of Judah", a phrase which relates to the southern kingdom of Judah,"kings of Judah", a phrase relating to the southern kingdom of Judah,"princes of Judah", a phrase relating to the kingdom of Judah,the territory allocated to the tribe of Judah, and also the extended territory of the southern kingdom of Judah,the Province of Judah under Persian rule,"hill country of Judah", the relatively cool and green central highlands of the territory of Judah,"the cities of Judah",the language of the Jews; Hebrew,head of a family of Levites who returned from Exile,a Levite who put away his heathen wife,a man who was second in command of Jerusalem; son of Hassenuah of Benjamin,a Levite in charge of the songs of thanksgiving in Nehemiah's time,a leader who helped dedicate Nehemiah's wall,a Levite musician who helped Zechariah of Asaph dedicate Nehemiah's wall


Topik/Tema Kamus: Psalms | Isaiah, The Book of | Isaiah | ISAIAH, 1-7 | Israel | Faith | Peace | God | Afflictions and Adversities | DANIEL, BOOK OF | Salvation | Holiness | Wicked | Envy | Desire | MEMORIAL; MEMORY | WAY | Death | Resurrection | Dew | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable , Guzik

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Isa 26:1 - In that day When God shall do such glorious works, as are described in the foregoing chapter.

When God shall do such glorious works, as are described in the foregoing chapter.

Wesley: Isa 26:1 - Sung In the church of God.

In the church of God.

Wesley: Isa 26:1 - A city Jerusalem, or the church, which is often compared to a city.

Jerusalem, or the church, which is often compared to a city.

Wesley: Isa 26:1 - For walls God's immediate and saving protection shall be to his church instead of walls.

God's immediate and saving protection shall be to his church instead of walls.

Wesley: Isa 26:2 - The gates Of the city, mentioned Isa 26:1.

Of the city, mentioned Isa 26:1.

Wesley: Isa 26:2 - The nation The whole body of righteous men, whether Jews or Gentiles. For he seems to speak here, as he apparently did in the foregoing chapter, of the times of ...

The whole body of righteous men, whether Jews or Gentiles. For he seems to speak here, as he apparently did in the foregoing chapter, of the times of the gospel.

Wesley: Isa 26:2 - Keepeth truth Which is sincere in the true religion.

Which is sincere in the true religion.

Wesley: Isa 26:4 - For ever In all times and conditions.

In all times and conditions.

Wesley: Isa 26:5 - On high He speaks not so much of height of place, as of dignity and power, in which sense also he mentions the lofty city in the next clause.

He speaks not so much of height of place, as of dignity and power, in which sense also he mentions the lofty city in the next clause.

Wesley: Isa 26:5 - Lofty city Which may be understood either of proud Babylon, or of all the strong and stately cities of God's enemies.

Which may be understood either of proud Babylon, or of all the strong and stately cities of God's enemies.

Wesley: Isa 26:6 - The needy God will bring it under the feet of his poor, and weak, and despised people.

God will bring it under the feet of his poor, and weak, and despised people.

Wesley: Isa 26:7 - Thou O God, who art upright in all thy ways, and therefore a lover of uprightness, and of all upright men, dost weigh (examine) the path of the just, the c...

O God, who art upright in all thy ways, and therefore a lover of uprightness, and of all upright men, dost weigh (examine) the path of the just, the course of his actions, and, which is implied, dost approve of them, and therefore direct them to an happy issue.

Wesley: Isa 26:9 - In the night When others are sleeping, my thoughts and desires are working towards God.

When others are sleeping, my thoughts and desires are working towards God.

Wesley: Isa 26:9 - Early Betimes in the morning.

Betimes in the morning.

Wesley: Isa 26:9 - For And good reason it is that we should thus desire and seek thee in the way of thy judgments, because this is the very design of thy judgments, that men...

And good reason it is that we should thus desire and seek thee in the way of thy judgments, because this is the very design of thy judgments, that men should thereby be awakened to learn and return to their duty; and this is a common effect, that those who have been careless in prosperity, are made wiser and better by afflictions.

Wesley: Isa 26:10 - Will not learn This is the carriage of thy people; but the course of wicked men is directly contrary in all conditions: for if thou dost spare them, they will not ac...

This is the carriage of thy people; but the course of wicked men is directly contrary in all conditions: for if thou dost spare them, they will not accept of that gracious invitation to repentance.

Wesley: Isa 26:10 - In the land Even in God's church, and among his people, where righteousness is taught and practised.

Even in God's church, and among his people, where righteousness is taught and practised.

Wesley: Isa 26:10 - Will not behold Tho' God gives such plain discoveries of his majesty and glory, not only in his word, but also in works, and especially in this glorious work of his p...

Tho' God gives such plain discoveries of his majesty and glory, not only in his word, but also in works, and especially in this glorious work of his patience and mercy to wicked men, yet they will not acknowledge it.

Wesley: Isa 26:11 - Will not see And they are guilty of the same obstinate blindness when thou dost smite and punish them, which is commonly signified by lifting up the hand.

And they are guilty of the same obstinate blindness when thou dost smite and punish them, which is commonly signified by lifting up the hand.

Wesley: Isa 26:11 - They shall see They shall know that by sad experience, which they would not learn by easier ways.

They shall know that by sad experience, which they would not learn by easier ways.

Wesley: Isa 26:11 - These Such fire or wrath as thou usest to pour forth upon thine implacable enemies.

Such fire or wrath as thou usest to pour forth upon thine implacable enemies.

Wesley: Isa 26:12 - Our works All the good works done by us, are the effects of thy grace.

All the good works done by us, are the effects of thy grace.

Wesley: Isa 26:13 - Other lords Others besides thee, and besides those governors who have been set up by thee, even foreign and heathen lords.

Others besides thee, and besides those governors who have been set up by thee, even foreign and heathen lords.

Wesley: Isa 26:13 - By thee By thy favour and help.

By thy favour and help.

Wesley: Isa 26:13 - Will we Celebrate thy praise.

Celebrate thy praise.

Wesley: Isa 26:14 - Rise Those tyrants are destroyed; they shall never live or rise again to molest us.

Those tyrants are destroyed; they shall never live or rise again to molest us.

Wesley: Isa 26:15 - The nation This nation seems to be the people of Israel.

This nation seems to be the people of Israel.

Wesley: Isa 26:15 - Removed Thou hast removed thy people out of their own land, and suffered them to be carried captive to the ends of the earth.

Thou hast removed thy people out of their own land, and suffered them to be carried captive to the ends of the earth.

Wesley: Isa 26:16 - They Thy people.

Thy people.

Wesley: Isa 26:16 - Visited Come into thy presence, with their prayers and supplications.

Come into thy presence, with their prayers and supplications.

Wesley: Isa 26:17 - Like Such was our anguish and danger.

Such was our anguish and danger.

Wesley: Isa 26:18 - We We have had the torment of a woman in child - bearing, but not the comfort of a living child, for we have brought forth nothing but wind; all our labo...

We have had the torment of a woman in child - bearing, but not the comfort of a living child, for we have brought forth nothing but wind; all our labours and hopes were unsuccessful.

Wesley: Isa 26:18 - The world The Assyrians, or our other enemies.

The Assyrians, or our other enemies.

Wesley: Isa 26:19 - Thy The prophet here turns his speech to God's people, and gives them a cordial in their distress. Thy dead men are not like those, Isa 26:14, for they sh...

The prophet here turns his speech to God's people, and gives them a cordial in their distress. Thy dead men are not like those, Isa 26:14, for they shall not live; but thine shall live. You shall be delivered from all your fears and dangers.

Wesley: Isa 26:19 - My dead body As I myself, who am one of these dead men, shall live again; you shall be delivered together with me.

As I myself, who am one of these dead men, shall live again; you shall be delivered together with me.

Wesley: Isa 26:19 - Awake Out of your sleep, even the sleep of death, you that are dead and buried in the dust.

Out of your sleep, even the sleep of death, you that are dead and buried in the dust.

Wesley: Isa 26:19 - Thy dew The favour and blessing of God upon thee.

The favour and blessing of God upon thee.

Wesley: Isa 26:19 - The dew Which makes them grow and flourish.

Which makes them grow and flourish.

Wesley: Isa 26:20 - Shut thy doors Withdraw thyself from the world, and pour out thy prayers to God in thy closet.

Withdraw thyself from the world, and pour out thy prayers to God in thy closet.

Wesley: Isa 26:20 - Indignation The dreadful effects of God's anger, mentioned in the following verse.

The dreadful effects of God's anger, mentioned in the following verse.

Wesley: Isa 26:21 - Cometh Cometh down from heaven.

Cometh down from heaven.

Wesley: Isa 26:21 - To punish All the enemies of God, and of his people.

All the enemies of God, and of his people.

Wesley: Isa 26:21 - Her slain The innocent blood which hath been spilled upon the earth shall be brought to light, and severely revenged upon the murderers.

The innocent blood which hath been spilled upon the earth shall be brought to light, and severely revenged upon the murderers.

JFB: Isa 26:1 - strong city Jerusalem, strong in Jehovah's protection: type of the new Jerusalem (Psa 48:1-3), contrasted with the overthrow of the ungodly foe (Isa 26:4-7, Isa 2...

Jerusalem, strong in Jehovah's protection: type of the new Jerusalem (Psa 48:1-3), contrasted with the overthrow of the ungodly foe (Isa 26:4-7, Isa 26:12-14; Rev 22:2, Rev 22:10-12, &c.).

JFB: Isa 26:1 - salvation . . . walls (Isa 60:18; Jer 3:23; Zec 2:5). MAURER translates, "Jehovah makes His help serve as walls" (Isa 33:20-21, &c.).

(Isa 60:18; Jer 3:23; Zec 2:5). MAURER translates, "Jehovah makes His help serve as walls" (Isa 33:20-21, &c.).

JFB: Isa 26:1 - bulwarks The trench with the antemural earthworks exterior to the wall.

The trench with the antemural earthworks exterior to the wall.

JFB: Isa 26:2 - -- Address of the returning people to the gates of Jerusalem (type of the heavenly city, Heb 12:22); (Psa 24:7, Psa 24:9; Psa 118:19). Antitypically (Rev...

Address of the returning people to the gates of Jerusalem (type of the heavenly city, Heb 12:22); (Psa 24:7, Psa 24:9; Psa 118:19). Antitypically (Rev 22:14; Rev 21:25, Rev 21:27).

JFB: Isa 26:2 - righteous nation That had not apostatized during the captivity. HORSLEY translates, "The nation of the Just One," namely, the Jews.

That had not apostatized during the captivity. HORSLEY translates, "The nation of the Just One," namely, the Jews.

JFB: Isa 26:3 - mind . . . stayed (Psa 112:7-8). Jesus can create "perfect peace" within thy mind, though storms of trial rage without (Isa 57:19; Mar 4:39); as a city kept securely b...

(Psa 112:7-8). Jesus can create "perfect peace" within thy mind, though storms of trial rage without (Isa 57:19; Mar 4:39); as a city kept securely by a strong garrison within, though besieged without (so Phi 4:7). "Keep," literally, "guard as with a garrison." HORSLEY translates, (God's) workmanship (the Hebrew does not probably mean "mind," but "a thing formed," Eph 2:10), so constantly "supported"; or else "formed and supported (by Thee) Thou shalt preserve (it, namely, the righteous nation) in perpetual peace."

JFB: Isa 26:4 - Lord JEHOVAH Hebrew, Jah, Jehovah. The union of the two names expresses in the highest degree God's unchanging love and power (compare Psa 68:4). This passage, and...

Hebrew, Jah, Jehovah. The union of the two names expresses in the highest degree God's unchanging love and power (compare Psa 68:4). This passage, and Isa 12:2; Exo 6:3; Psa 83:18, are the four in which the English Version retains the JEHOVAH of the original. MAURER translates, "For JAH (the eternal unchangeable One, Exo 3:14) is JEHOVAH, the rock of ages" (compare Isa 45:17; Deu 32:15; 1Sa 2:2).

JFB: Isa 26:5 - lofty city Babylon; representative of the stronghold of the foes of God's people in all ages (Isa 25:2, Isa 25:12; Isa 13:14).

Babylon; representative of the stronghold of the foes of God's people in all ages (Isa 25:2, Isa 25:12; Isa 13:14).

JFB: Isa 26:6 - poor (Isa 25:4), the once afflicted Jewish captives. "Foot shall tread," is figurative for exulting in the fall of God's enemies (Rev 18:20).

(Isa 25:4), the once afflicted Jewish captives. "Foot shall tread," is figurative for exulting in the fall of God's enemies (Rev 18:20).

JFB: Isa 26:7 - uprightness Rather, "is direct," that is, is directed by God to a prosperous issue, however many be their afflictions in the meantime (as in the case of the Jewis...

Rather, "is direct," that is, is directed by God to a prosperous issue, however many be their afflictions in the meantime (as in the case of the Jewish exiles); the context requires this sense (Psa 34:19; Pro 3:6; Pro 11:5), [MAURER]: thus "way" means God's dealings with the righteous (Psa 37:23).

JFB: Isa 26:7 - most upright (Deu 32:4).

JFB: Isa 26:7 - dost weigh (1Sa 2:3; Pro 5:21). Rather, "thou dost make plain and level" [MAURER], removing all obstacles (Isa 40:3-4).

(1Sa 2:3; Pro 5:21). Rather, "thou dost make plain and level" [MAURER], removing all obstacles (Isa 40:3-4).

JFB: Isa 26:8 - way of thy judgments We have waited for Thy proceeding to punish the enemy (Isa 26:9-10) [MAURER]. HORSLEY translates Isa 26:7-8, "The path of the Just One is perfectly ev...

We have waited for Thy proceeding to punish the enemy (Isa 26:9-10) [MAURER]. HORSLEY translates Isa 26:7-8, "The path of the Just One is perfectly even; an even road Thou wilt level for the Just One, even the path of Thy laws, O Jehovah. We have expected Thee."

JFB: Isa 26:8 - name . . . remembrance The manifested character of God by which He would be remembered (Isa 64:5; Exo 3:15).

The manifested character of God by which He would be remembered (Isa 64:5; Exo 3:15).

JFB: Isa 26:9 - With, . . . soul . . . I Literally, "I . . . my soul," in apposition; the faithful Jews here speak individually. The overthrow of the foe and the restoration of the Jews are t...

Literally, "I . . . my soul," in apposition; the faithful Jews here speak individually. The overthrow of the foe and the restoration of the Jews are to follow upon prayer on the part of the latter and of all God's people (Isa 62:1-4, Isa 62:6-7; Psa 102:13-17).

JFB: Isa 26:9 - in the night (Psa 63:6; Son 3:1).

JFB: Isa 26:9 - world . . . learn . . . righteousness The remnant left after judgments (Psa 58:10-11; Zec 14:16).

The remnant left after judgments (Psa 58:10-11; Zec 14:16).

JFB: Isa 26:10 - uprightness Rather, as in Isa 26:7, "prosperity," answering to "favor" in the parallelism, and in antithesis to "judgments in the earth" (Isa 26:9); where prosper...

Rather, as in Isa 26:7, "prosperity," answering to "favor" in the parallelism, and in antithesis to "judgments in the earth" (Isa 26:9); where prosperity attends the wicked as well as the just, "he will not learn righteousness," therefore judgments must be sent that he may "learn" it [MAURER].

JFB: Isa 26:11 - lifted up To punish the foes of God's people. They who will not see shall be made to "see" to their cost (Isa 5:12).

To punish the foes of God's people. They who will not see shall be made to "see" to their cost (Isa 5:12).

JFB: Isa 26:11 - their envy at the people That is, "Thy people." LOWTH translates, "They shall see with confusion Thy zeal for Thy people."

That is, "Thy people." LOWTH translates, "They shall see with confusion Thy zeal for Thy people."

JFB: Isa 26:11 - fire of . . . enemies That is, the fire to which Thine enemies are doomed (Isa 9:18).

That is, the fire to which Thine enemies are doomed (Isa 9:18).

JFB: Isa 26:12 - peace God's favor, including all blessings, temporal and spiritual, opposed to their previous trials (Psa 138:8).

God's favor, including all blessings, temporal and spiritual, opposed to their previous trials (Psa 138:8).

JFB: Isa 26:13 - other lords Temporal; heathen kings (2Ch 12:8; 2Ch 28:5-6), Nebuchadnezzar, &c. Spiritual also, idols and lusts (Rom 6:16-18).

Temporal; heathen kings (2Ch 12:8; 2Ch 28:5-6), Nebuchadnezzar, &c. Spiritual also, idols and lusts (Rom 6:16-18).

JFB: Isa 26:13 - by thee only It is due to Thee alone, that we again worship Thee as our Lord [MAURER]. "(We are) Thine only, we will celebrate Thy name" [HORSLEY]. The sanctifying...

It is due to Thee alone, that we again worship Thee as our Lord [MAURER]. "(We are) Thine only, we will celebrate Thy name" [HORSLEY]. The sanctifying effect of affliction (Psa 71:16; Psa 119:67, Psa 119:71).

JFB: Isa 26:14 - They The "other lords" or tyrants (Isa 26:13).

The "other lords" or tyrants (Isa 26:13).

JFB: Isa 26:14 - shall not live Namely, again.

Namely, again.

JFB: Isa 26:14 - deceased Hebrew, "Rephaim"; powerless, in the land of shades (Isa 14:9-10).

Hebrew, "Rephaim"; powerless, in the land of shades (Isa 14:9-10).

JFB: Isa 26:14 - therefore That is, inasmuch as. Compare "therefore" (Gen 18:5; Gen 19:8).

That is, inasmuch as. Compare "therefore" (Gen 18:5; Gen 19:8).

JFB: Isa 26:15 - hast Prophetical preterite (Isa 9:3).

Prophetical preterite (Isa 9:3).

JFB: Isa 26:15 - hast removed . . . far . . . ends of . . . earth Rather, "Thou hast extended far all the borders of the land" [VITRINGA].

Rather, "Thou hast extended far all the borders of the land" [VITRINGA].

JFB: Isa 26:16 - visited Sought.

Sought.

JFB: Isa 26:16 - poured out (Psa 62:8), as a vessel emptying out all its contents.

(Psa 62:8), as a vessel emptying out all its contents.

JFB: Isa 26:16 - prayer Literally, "a whispered prayer," Margin, "a secret sighing" to God for help (compare Jer 13:17; Deu 8:16).

Literally, "a whispered prayer," Margin, "a secret sighing" to God for help (compare Jer 13:17; Deu 8:16).

JFB: Isa 26:17 - -- An image of anguish accompanied with expectation, to be followed by joy that will cause the anguish utterly to be forgotten. Zion, looking for deliver...

An image of anguish accompanied with expectation, to be followed by joy that will cause the anguish utterly to be forgotten. Zion, looking for deliverance, seemingly in vain, but really about to be gloriously saved (Mic 4:9-13; Mic 5:1-3; Joh 16:21-22).

JFB: Isa 26:18 - brought forth wind MICHAELIS explains this of the disease empneumatosis. Rather, "wind" is a figure for that which proves an abortive effort. The "we" is in antithesis t...

MICHAELIS explains this of the disease empneumatosis. Rather, "wind" is a figure for that which proves an abortive effort. The "we" is in antithesis to "Thy," "my" (Isa 26:19), what we vainly attempt, God will accomplish.

JFB: Isa 26:18 - not wrought . . . deliverance in . . . earth Literally, "the land (Judea) is not made security," that is, is not become a place of security from our enemies.

Literally, "the land (Judea) is not made security," that is, is not become a place of security from our enemies.

JFB: Isa 26:18 - neither . . . world fallen The "world" at large, is in antithesis to "the earth," that is, Judea. The world at enmity with the city of God has not been subdued. But MAURER expla...

The "world" at large, is in antithesis to "the earth," that is, Judea. The world at enmity with the city of God has not been subdued. But MAURER explains "fallen," according to Arabic idiom, of the birth of a child, which is said to fall when being born; "inhabitants of the world (Israel, Isa 24:4; not the world in general) are not yet born"; that is, the country as yet lies desolate, and is not yet populated.

JFB: Isa 26:19 - -- In antithesis to Isa 26:14, "They (Israel's foes) shall not live"; "Thy (Jehovah's) dead men (the Jews) shall live," that is, primarily, be restored, ...

In antithesis to Isa 26:14, "They (Israel's foes) shall not live"; "Thy (Jehovah's) dead men (the Jews) shall live," that is, primarily, be restored, spiritually (Isa 54:1-3), civilly and nationally (Isa 26:15); whereas Thy foes shall not; ultimately, and in the fullest scope of the prophecy, restored to life literally (Eze 37:1-14; Dan 12:2).

JFB: Isa 26:19 - together with my dead body Rather, "my dead body," or "bodies" (the Jewish nation personified, which had been spiritually and civilly dead; or the nation, as a parent, speaking ...

Rather, "my dead body," or "bodies" (the Jewish nation personified, which had been spiritually and civilly dead; or the nation, as a parent, speaking of the bodies of her children individually, see on Isa 26:9, "I," "My"): Jehovah's "dead" and "my dead" are one and the same [HORSLEY]. However, as Jesus is the antitype to Israel (Mat 2:15), English Version gives a true sense, and one ultimately contemplated in the prophecy: Christ's dead body being raised again is the source of Jehovah's people (all, and especially believers, the spiritual Israelites) also being raised (1Co 15:20-22).

JFB: Isa 26:19 - Awake (Eph 5:14), spiritually.

(Eph 5:14), spiritually.

JFB: Isa 26:19 - in dust Prostate and dead, spiritually and nationally; also literally (Isa 25:12; Isa 47:1).

Prostate and dead, spiritually and nationally; also literally (Isa 25:12; Isa 47:1).

JFB: Isa 26:19 - dew Which falls copiously in the East and supplies somewhat the lack of rain (Hos 14:5).

Which falls copiously in the East and supplies somewhat the lack of rain (Hos 14:5).

JFB: Isa 26:19 - cast out . . . dead That is, shall bring them forth to life again.

That is, shall bring them forth to life again.

JFB: Isa 26:20 - enter . . . chambers When God is about to take vengeance on the ungodly, the saints shall be shut in by Him in a place of safety, as Noah and his family were in the days o...

When God is about to take vengeance on the ungodly, the saints shall be shut in by Him in a place of safety, as Noah and his family were in the days of the flood (Gen 7:16), and as Israel was commanded not to go out of doors on the night of the slaying of the Egyptian first-born (Exo 12:22-23; Psa 31:20; Psa 83:3). The saints are calmly and confidently to await the issue (Exo 14:13-14).

JFB: Isa 26:21 - -- (Mic 1:3; Jud 1:14).

JFB: Isa 26:21 - disclose . . . blood (Gen 4:10-11; Job 16:18; Eze 24:7-8). All the innocent blood shed, and all other wrongs done, so long seemingly with impunity, shall then be avenged ...

(Gen 4:10-11; Job 16:18; Eze 24:7-8). All the innocent blood shed, and all other wrongs done, so long seemingly with impunity, shall then be avenged (Rev 16:6).

At the time when Israel shall be delivered, and the ungodly nations punished, God shall punish also the great enemy of the Church.

Clarke: Isa 26:1 - We have a strong city We have a strong city - In opposition to the city of the enemy, which God hath destroyed, Isa 25:1-12 (note). See the note there

We have a strong city - In opposition to the city of the enemy, which God hath destroyed, Isa 25:1-12 (note). See the note there

Clarke: Isa 26:1 - Salvation - for walls and bulwarks Salvation - for walls and bulwarks - חומת וחל chomsoth vachel , walls and redoubts, or the walls and the ditch. חל chel properly signif...

Salvation - for walls and bulwarks - חומת וחל chomsoth vachel , walls and redoubts, or the walls and the ditch. חל chel properly signifies the ditch or trench without the wall; see Kimchi. The same rabbin says, This song refers to the time of salvation, i.e., the days of the Messiah.

Clarke: Isa 26:2 - The righteous nation The righteous nation - The converted Gentiles shall have the gates opened - a full entrance into all the glories and privileges of the Gospel; being...

The righteous nation - The converted Gentiles shall have the gates opened - a full entrance into all the glories and privileges of the Gospel; being fellow heirs with the converted Jews. The Jewish peculiarity is destroyed, for the middle wall of partition is broken down

Clarke: Isa 26:2 - The truth The truth - The Gospel itself - as the fulfillment of all the ancient types, shadows, and ceremonies; and therefore termed the truth, in opposition ...

The truth - The Gospel itself - as the fulfillment of all the ancient types, shadows, and ceremonies; and therefore termed the truth, in opposition to all those shadowy rites and ceremonies. "The law was given by Moses; but grace and Truth came by Jesus Christ; "Joh 1:17, and see the note there.

Clarke: Isa 26:3 - In perfect peace In perfect peace - שלום שלום shalom, shalom , "peace, peace, "i.e., peace upon peace - all kinds of prosperity - happiness in this world an...

In perfect peace - שלום שלום shalom, shalom , "peace, peace, "i.e., peace upon peace - all kinds of prosperity - happiness in this world and in the world to come

Because he trusteth in thee "Because they have trusted in thee"- So the Chaldee, בטחו betacho . The Syriac and Vulgate read בטוח batachnu , "we have trusted. "Schroeder, Gram. Hebrews p. 360, explains the present reading בטוח batuach , impersonally, confisum est .

Clarke: Isa 26:4 - In the Lord Jehovah "In Jehovah"- In Jah Jehovah, Heb.; but see Houbigant, and the note on Isa 12:2 (note)

Everlasting strength In the Lord Jehovah "In Jehovah"- In Jah Jehovah, Heb.; but see Houbigant, and the note on Isa 12:2 (note) Everlasting strength - צור עולמ...

In the Lord Jehovah "In Jehovah"- In Jah Jehovah, Heb.; but see Houbigant, and the note on Isa 12:2 (note)

Everlasting strength - צור עולמים tsur olamim , "the rock of ages; "or, according to Rab. Maimon, - the eternal Fountain, Source, or Spring. Does not this refer to the lasting streams from the rock in the desert? And that rock was Christ. ge han hoped in the Lord fro the everlastinge worldis. - Old Ms. Bible.

Clarke: Isa 26:8 - -- Have we waited for thee "We have placed our confidence in thy name"- The Septuagint, Syriac, and Chaldee read קוינו kavinu , without the prono...

Have we waited for thee "We have placed our confidence in thy name"- The Septuagint, Syriac, and Chaldee read קוינו kavinu , without the pronoun annexed.

Clarke: Isa 26:9 - Have I desired thee Have I desired thee - Forty-one MSS. of Dr. Kennicott’ s and many of De Rossi’ s, (nine ancient), and five editions read אויתיך inv...

Have I desired thee - Forty-one MSS. of Dr. Kennicott’ s and many of De Rossi’ s, (nine ancient), and five editions read אויתיך invithicha . It is proper to note this; because the second י yod being omitted in the text, the Vulgate and many others have rendered it in the third person

Clarke: Isa 26:9 - When thy judgments, etc. When thy judgments, etc. - It would be better to read, When thy judgments were in the earth, the inhabitants of the world have learned ( למדו la...

When thy judgments, etc. - It would be better to read, When thy judgments were in the earth, the inhabitants of the world have learned ( למדו lamedu ) righteousness. Men seldom seek God in prosperity; they are apt to rest in an earthly portion: but God in mercy embitters this by adversity; then there is a general cry after himself as our chief, solid, and only permanent good.

Clarke: Isa 26:16 - -- Lord, in trouble have they visited thee "O Jehovah, in affliction we have sought thee"- So the Septuagint and two MSS. have פקדנוך pekadnucha...

Lord, in trouble have they visited thee "O Jehovah, in affliction we have sought thee"- So the Septuagint and two MSS. have פקדנוך pekadnucha , in the first person plural. And so perhaps it should be צקנו tsaknu , in the first person; but how the Septuagint read this word is not clear; and this last member of the verse is extremely obscure

For למו lamo , "on them,"the Septuagint read לנו lanu , "on us,"in the first person likewise; a frequent mistake; see note on Isa 10:29.

Clarke: Isa 26:18 - We have - brought forth wind We have - brought forth wind - The learned Professor Michaelis explains this image in the following manner: " Rariorem morbum describi, empneumatosi...

We have - brought forth wind - The learned Professor Michaelis explains this image in the following manner: " Rariorem morbum describi, empneumatosin, aut ventosam molam, dictum; quo quae laborant diu et sibi et peritis medicis gravidae videntur,tandemque post omnes verae graviditatis molestias et labored ventum ex utero emittunt: quem morbum passim describunt medici . "Syntagma Comment., vol. ii., p. 165. The empneumatosis, or windy inflation of the womb, is a disorder to which females are liable. Some have had this in such wise, for a long time together, that they have appeared to themselves, and even to very skillful medical men, to be pregnant; and after having endured much pain, and even the throes of apparent childbearing, they have been eased and restored to health by the emission of a great quantity of wind from the uterus. This disorder is well known to medical men. "The Syriac translator seems to have understood it in this manner: Enixi sumus, ut illae quae ventos pariunt . "We have brought forth as they who bring forth wind.

In the earth "In the land"- בארץ bearets ; so a MS., the Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate.

Clarke: Isa 26:19 - My dead body "My deceased"- All the ancient Versions render it in the plural; they read נבלותי niblothai , my dead bodies. The Syriac and Chaldee read נבלותיהם niblotheyhem , their dead bodies. No MS. yet found confirms this reading

The dew of herbs "The dew of the dawn"- Lucis, according to the Vulgate; so also the Syriac and Chaldee

The deliverance of the people of God from a state of the lowest depression is explained by images plainly taken from the resurrection of the dead. In the same manner the Prophet Ezekiel represents the restoration of the Jewish nation from a state of utter dissolution by the restoring of the dry bones to life, exhibited to him in a vision, chap. 37, which is directly thus applied and explained, Eze 37:11-13. And this deliverance is expressed with a manifest opposition to what is here said above, Eze 37:14, of the great lords and tyrants, under whom they had groaned: -

"They are dead, they shall not live

They are deceased tyrants, they shall not rise:

that they should be destroyed utterly, and should never be restored to their former power and glory. It appears from hence, that the doctrine of the resurrection of the dead was at that time a popular and common doctrine; for an image which is assumed in order to express or represent any thing in the way of allegory or metaphor, whether poetical or prophetical, must be an image commonly known and understood; otherwise it will not answer the purpose for which it is assumed. - L

Kimchi refers these words to the days of the Messiah, and says, "Then many of the saints shall rise from the dead. "And quotes Dan 12:2. Do not these words speak of the resurrection of our blessed Lord; and of that resurrection of the bodies of men, which shall be the consequence of his body being raised from the dead

Thy dead men shall live, - with my dead body shall they arise My dead body "My deceased"- All the ancient Versions render it in the plural; they read נבלותי niblothai , my dead bodies. The Syriac and Cha...

My dead body "My deceased"- All the ancient Versions render it in the plural; they read נבלותי niblothai , my dead bodies. The Syriac and Chaldee read נבלותיהם niblotheyhem , their dead bodies. No MS. yet found confirms this reading

The dew of herbs "The dew of the dawn"- Lucis, according to the Vulgate; so also the Syriac and Chaldee

The deliverance of the people of God from a state of the lowest depression is explained by images plainly taken from the resurrection of the dead. In the same manner the Prophet Ezekiel represents the restoration of the Jewish nation from a state of utter dissolution by the restoring of the dry bones to life, exhibited to him in a vision, chap. 37, which is directly thus applied and explained, Eze 37:11-13. And this deliverance is expressed with a manifest opposition to what is here said above, Eze 37:14, of the great lords and tyrants, under whom they had groaned: -

"They are dead, they shall not live

They are deceased tyrants, they shall not rise:

that they should be destroyed utterly, and should never be restored to their former power and glory. It appears from hence, that the doctrine of the resurrection of the dead was at that time a popular and common doctrine; for an image which is assumed in order to express or represent any thing in the way of allegory or metaphor, whether poetical or prophetical, must be an image commonly known and understood; otherwise it will not answer the purpose for which it is assumed. - L

Kimchi refers these words to the days of the Messiah, and says, "Then many of the saints shall rise from the dead. "And quotes Dan 12:2. Do not these words speak of the resurrection of our blessed Lord; and of that resurrection of the bodies of men, which shall be the consequence of his body being raised from the dead

Thy dead men shall live, - with my dead body shall they arise - This seems very express.

Clarke: Isa 26:20 - Comes my people, enter thou into thy chambers Comes my people, enter thou into thy chambers - An exhortation to patience and resignation under oppression, with a confident expectation of deliver...

Comes my people, enter thou into thy chambers - An exhortation to patience and resignation under oppression, with a confident expectation of deliverance by the power of God manifestly to be exerted in the destruction of the oppressor. It seems to be an allusion to the command of Moses to the Israelites, when the destroying angel was to go through the land of Egypt, "not to go out at the door of their houses until the morning;"Exo 12:22. And before the passage of the Red Sea: "Fear ye not, stand still, and see the salvation of Jehovah. Jehovah shall fight for you, and ye shall hold your peace, "Exo 14:13, Exo 14:14.

Clarke: Isa 26:21 - The earth also shall disclose her blood The earth also shall disclose her blood - Crimes of cruelty and oppression, which have passed away from the eyes of men, God will bring into judgmen...

The earth also shall disclose her blood - Crimes of cruelty and oppression, which have passed away from the eyes of men, God will bring into judgment, and exact punishment for them. O what a reckoning will the kingdoms of the earth have with God, for the torrents of blood which they have shed for the gratification of the lust of power and ambition! Who shall live when he doeth this?

Calvin: Isa 26:1 - In that day shall a song be sung // We have a city of strength // He hath made salvation to be walls and a bulwark 1.In that day shall a song be sung Here the Prophet begins again to shew that, after the return of the people from captivity, they will be defended b...

1.In that day shall a song be sung Here the Prophet begins again to shew that, after the return of the people from captivity, they will be defended by God’s power and guardianship, and that under his protection Jerusalem will be as safe as if she had been surrounded by bulwarks, ramparts, a ditch, and a double wall, so that no enemy could find entrance.

It is proper to observe the time when “this song was sung.” The Prophet had foretold the calamity that would befall the Church, which was not yet so near at hand, but happened a short time after his death. When the people were led into captivity, they would undoubtedly have despaired, if they had not been encouraged by such promises. That the Jews might cherish a hope that they would be delivered, and might behold life in the midst of death, the Prophet composed for them this song, even before the calamity occurred, that they might be better prepared for enduring it, and might hope for better things. I do not think that it was composed solely that, when they had been delivered, they might give thanks to God, but that even during their captivity, though they were like dead men, (Eze 37:1,) they might strengthen their hearts with this confidence, and might also train up their children in this expectation, and hand down these promises, as it were, to posterity.

We have formerly 154 seen the reason why these and other promises were put by Isaiah into the form of verse. It was, that, having been frequently sung, they might make a deeper impression on their memory. Though they mourned in Babylon, and were almost overwhelmed with sorrow, (hence these sounds, (Psa 137:4,) “How can we sing the Lord’s song in a foreign land?”) yet they must have hoped that at a future period, when they should have returned to Judea, they would give thanks to the Lord and sing his praises; and therefore the Prophet shews to them at a distance the day of deliverance, that they may take courage from the expectation of it.

We have a city of strength By these words a full restoration of Jerusalem and of the people is promised, because God will not only deliver the captives and gather those that are scattered, but will also preserve them safe, after having brought them back to their country. But not long afterwards believers saw that Jerusalem was destroyed, (2Kg 25:9,) and the Temple thrown down, (2Ch 36:19,) and after their return nothing could meet their eye but hideous ruins; and all this Isaiah had previously foretold. It was therefore necessary that they should behold from the lofty watch-tower of faith this restoration of Jerusalem.

He hath made salvation to be walls and a bulwark He now defines what will be “the strength of the city;” for the “salvation” of God will supply the place of a “wall,” towers, ditches, and mounds. As if he had said, “Let other cities rely on their fortifications, God alone will be to us instead of all bulwarks.” Some allege that the words may be read, “He hath set a wall and bulwark for salvation;” and I do not set aside that rendering. But as a more valuable doctrine is contained in the Prophet’s words, when nothing is supplied, it serves no good purpose to go far for a forced interpretation; especially since the true and natural interpretation readily presents itself to the mind, which is, that God’s protection is more valuable than all ditches and walls. In like manner, it is also said in the psalm, “Thy mercy is better than life,” (Psa 63:3;) for as David there boasts of enjoying, under God’s shadow, greater safety and freedom from care than if he had been fortified by every kind of earthly defense, so Isaiah here says, that there will be good reason for laying aside fear, when God shall have undertaken to guard his people. Now, since this promise extends to the whole course of redemption, we ought to believe that at the present day God is still the guardian of his Church, and therefore, that his power is of more avail than if it had been defended by every kind of military force. Accordingly, if we wish to dwell in safety, we must remain in the Church. Though we have no outward defences, yet let us learn to be satisfied with the Lord’s protection, and with his sure salvation, which is better than all bulwarks.

Calvin: Isa 26:2 - Open ye the gates // And a righteous nation, which keepeth the truth, shall enter in // A righteous nation, which keepeth the truth 2.Open ye the gates This “song” was undoubtedly despised by many, when it was published by Isaiah; for during his life, the inhabitants of Jerusa...

2.Open ye the gates This “song” was undoubtedly despised by many, when it was published by Isaiah; for during his life, the inhabitants of Jerusalem were wicked and ungodly, and the number of good men was exceedingly small. But after his death, when they had been punished for their wickedness, it was in some measure perceived that this prediction had not been uttered in vain. So long as wicked men enjoy prosperity, they have no fear, and do not imagine that they can be brought low. Thus the Jews thought that they would never be driven out of Judea, and carried into captivity, and hoped that they would continue to dwell there. It was therefore necessary to take away from them every pretense for being haughty and insolent; and such is the import of the Prophet’s words:

And a righteous nation, which keepeth the truth, shall enter in “The inhabitants of the restored city shall be unlike the former; for they will maintain righteousness and truth. But at that time this promise also might appear to have failed of its accomplishment; for when they had been driven out of the country and led into captivity, no consolation remained. Accordingly, when the Temple had been destroyed, the city sacked, and all order and government overthrown and destroyed, they might have objected, “Where are those ‘gates’ which he bids us ‘open?’ Where are the people who shall ‘enter?’” Yet we see that these things were fulfilled, and that nothing was ever foretold which the Lord did not accomplish. We ought, therefore, to keep before our minds those ancient histories, that we may be fortified by their example, and, amidst the deepest adversity to which the Church is reduced, may hope that the Lord will yet raise her up again.

When the Prophet calls the nation “righteous and truthful,” he not only, as I mentioned a little before, describes the persons to whom this promise relates, but shews the fruit of the chastisement; for when its pollution shall have been washed away, the holiness and righteousness of the Church shall shine more brightly. At that time wicked men were the majority, good men were very few, and were overpowered by the multitude of those who were of an opposite character. It was therefore necessary that that multitude, which had no fear of God, and no religion, should be taken away, that God might gather his remnant. Thus, it was a compensation for the destruction, that Jerusalem, which had been polluted by the wickedness of her citizens, again was actually devoted to God; for it would not have been enough to regain prosperity, if newness of life had not shone forth in holiness and righteousness.

Now, as the Prophet foretells the grace of God, so he also exhorts the redeemed people to maintain uprightness of life. In short, he threatens that these promises will be of no avail to hypocrites, and that the gates of the city will not be opened for them, but only for the righteous and holy. It is certain that the Church was always like a barn, (Mat 3:12,) in which the chaff is mingled with the wheat, or rather, the wheat is overpowered by the chaff; but when the Jews had been brought back into their country, the Church was unquestionably purer than before. Those who returned must have been animated by a good disposition, to undertake a journey so long, and beset by so many annoyances, embarrassments, and dangers; and many others chose rather to remain in captivity than to return, thinking that to dwell in Babylon was a safer and more peaceful condition than to return to Judea. Such persons must have had a seed of piety, which led them to take possession of those promises which were granted to the fathers. Now, though the Church even at that time was stained by many imperfections, still this description was comparatively true; for a large portion of the filth had been swept away, and those who remained had profited in some degree under God’s chastisements.

A righteous nation, which keepeth the truth Some distinguish these terms in this manner, “A nation righteous before God, and upright before men.” But I take the meaning to be more simple; that, after having called the nation “righteous,” he shews in what righteousness consists; that is, where there is uprightness of heart, which has nothing feigned or hypocritical, for nothing is more opposite to righteousness than hypocrisy. And though no man ever existed who advanced so far that he could receive the commendation of being perfectly righteous, yet the children of God, who with their whole heart aim at this “truth,” may be said to be keepers of it. But perhaps it will rather be thought that, by a figure of speech, one part is taken for the whole, to describe what is true righteousness; that is, when all deceit and all wicked practices have been laid aside, and men act towards each other with sincerity and truth.

If any man wish to make use of this passage for upholding the merits of men, the answer is easy; for the Prophet does not here describe the cause of salvation, or what men are by nature, but what God makes them by his grace, and what kind of persons he wishes to be members of his Church. Out of wolves he makes sheep, as we have formerly seen. 155 So long as we live here, we are always at a great distance from perfection, and are in continual progress towards it; but the Lord judges of us according to that which he has begun in us, and, having once led us into the way of righteousness, reckons us to be righteous. As soon as he begins to check and reform our hypocrisy, he at once calls us true and upright.

Calvin: Isa 26:3 - The thought is fixed; thou wilt keep peace, peace // Because he hath trusted in thee // Thou wilt keep peace, peace 3.The thought is fixed; thou wilt keep peace, peace 156 As the Hebrew word יצר ( Yĕtzĕr) signifies both “imagination” or “creature,” a...

3.The thought is fixed; thou wilt keep peace, peace 156 As the Hebrew word יצר ( Yĕtzĕr) signifies both “imagination” or “creature,” and “thought,” some render it, “By a settled foundation thou wilt keep peace;” as if the Prophet meant, that when men, amidst the convulsions of the world, continue to rest firmly on God, they will always be safe. Others render it, “For the fixed thought thou wilt keep peace;” which amounts to nearly the same thing, that they who have fixed their minds on God alone will at length be happy; for in no other way does God promise that he will be the guardian of his people than when they rely on his grace with settled thoughts, and without change or wavering. Since, however, the sign of the dative case is not added, but the Prophet in a concise manner of expression says, “Fixed or steadfast thought,” let my readers judge if it be not more appropriate to view it as referring to God, so as to make the meaning to be, that the peace of the Church is founded on his eternal and unchangeable purpose; for, in order to prevent godly minds from continual wavering, it is of the highest importance to look to the heavenly decree.

It is undoubtedly true that we ought constantly to hope in God, that we may perceive his continual faithfulness in defending us; and believers are always enjoined not to be driven about by any doubt, or uncertainty, or wavering, but firmly to rely on God alone. Yet the meaning which is more easily obtained from this passage, and comes more naturally from the words of the Prophet, is, that it is a fixed and unchangeable decree of God, that all who hope in him shall enjoy eternal peace; for if fixed thought means the certainty and steadfastness of the godly, it would be superfluous to assign the reason, which is —

Because he hath trusted in thee In short, both modes of expression would have been harsh, that “continual peace is prepared for imagination,” or “for thought.” But it is perfectly appropriate to say that, when we trust in God, he never disappoints our hope, because he has determined to guard us for ever. Hence it follows, that, since the safety of the Church does not depend on the state of the world, it is not moved or shaken by the various changes which happen daily; but that, having been founded on the purpose of God, it stands with steady and unshakable firmness, so that it can never fall.

There is also, I think, an implied contrast between God’s fixed thought and our wandering imaginations; for at almost every moment there springs up something new which drives our thoughts hither and thither, and there is no change, however slight, that does not produce some doubt. We ought therefore to hold this principle, that we do wrong if we judge of God’s unshaken purpose by our fickle imaginations; as we shall elsewhere see,

“As far as the heavens are from the earth, so far are my thoughts from your thoughts, O house of Israel.” (Isa 55:9.)

We ought therefore above all to hold it certain, that our salvation is not liable to change; because the purpose of God is unchangeable.

Thou wilt keep peace, peace What has now been stated explains the reason of the repetition of the word peace; for it denotes uninterrupted continuance for ever. By the word peace I understand not only serenity of mind, but every kind of happiness; as if he had said, that the grace of God alone can enable us to live prosperously and happily.

Calvin: Isa 26:4 - Trust ye in Jehovah for ever // For in Jah Jehovah is the strength of ages 4.Trust ye in Jehovah for ever As to the words, some read in the second clause, “Trust in God, the strong Jehovah of ages;” but as צור ( tz...

4.Trust ye in Jehovah for ever As to the words, some read in the second clause, “Trust in God, the strong Jehovah of ages;” but as צור ( tzūr) is not always an adjective, but signifies strength, I reject that meaning as forced, besides that it has little relation to the subject, as will immediately appear. There is also little ground for the ingenuity of those who infer from this passage the divinity of Christ, as if the Prophet said, that “Jehovah is in Jah;” for the twofold name of God is given for the express purpose of magnifying his power.

He now exhorts the people to rest safely on God, and therefore, after the preceding doctrine, there is now room for exhortation. Besides, it would have been vain to say that our peace is in the hand of God, and that he is our faithful guardian, if we had not been taught and instructed on this subject, and at the same time urged by exhortations. Yet he exhorts us not only to earnest hope, but to perseverance; and this discourse applies properly to believers, who have already learned what it is to trust in the Lord, and who need to be strengthened, because they are still weak, and may often fall, in consequence of the various motives to distrust with which they are called to struggle. He therefore does not enjoin them merely to trust in the Lord, but to remain steadfastly in trust and confidence to the end.

For in Jah Jehovah is the strength of ages 157 We ought to attend to the reason which is here assigned, namely, that as the power of God, which is the object of faith, is perpetual, so faith ought to be extended so as to be equally perpetual. When the Prophet speaks of the strength and power of God, he does not mean power which is unemployed, but power active and energetic, which is actually exerted on us, and which conducts to the end what he had begun. And this doctrine has a wider application, for it bids us truly believe that we ought to contemplate the nature of God; for, as soon as we turn aside from beholding it, nothing is seen but what is fleeting, and then we immediately faint. Thus ought faith to rise above the world by continual advances; for neither the truth, nor the justice, nor the goodness of God, is temporary and fading, but God continues always to be like himself.

Calvin: Isa 26:5 - For he will bring down the inhabitants of loftiness 5.For he will bring down the inhabitants of loftiness 158 He now explains more fully what is that power of God of which he spoke. It is that which we...

5.For he will bring down the inhabitants of loftiness 158 He now explains more fully what is that power of God of which he spoke. It is that which we ourselves feel, and which is exerted for our benefit. The two clauses are therefore closely connected, that “the proud are laid low by the power of God,” and that “the lowly and despised are placed in their room;” for it would not have yielded full consolation to tell us, in the first place, that “the proud will be laid low,” if he had not likewise added, that “the lowly will be exalted,” so as to hold dominion over the proud. We therefore acknowledge, that in our own experience God works powerfully for our salvation, and this yields to us a ground of hope.

Under the word loftiness he includes not only bulwarks and fortifications of every kind, (for the ancients were wont to build their cities in lofty places,) but also wealth and magnificence. He therefore means, that no defense can prevent God from casting down the wicked, and laying them low. Towers and bulwarks, indeed, are not displeasing to God; but as it rarely happens that they who are strong and powerful are not proud, so loftiness frequently denotes pride. Unquestionably he speaks of the wicked, who have abundance of arms, forces, and money, and imagine that they are protected against God himself. He likewise comforts the Jews, as we have formerly said, 159 because the invincible power of Babylon might have terrified them and thrown them into despair, if the Lord had not supported them by this promise: “You have no reason for being terrified at the greatness or strength of Babylon; for she will quickly fall, and will not stand before the power of the Lord.”

Calvin: Isa 26:7 - Straightnesses are the way of the righteous man // Thou wilt weigh the straight path of the righteous 7.Straightnesses are the way of the righteous man He does not praise the righteousness of the godly, as some have falsely supposed, but shews that, t...

7.Straightnesses are the way of the righteous man He does not praise the righteousness of the godly, as some have falsely supposed, but shews that, through the blessing of God, they are prosperous and successful during the whole course of their life. Having only stated briefly in the beginning of the verse, that “their ways are plain and smooth,” he explains more fully in the second clause, ascribing it to the grace of God that in an open plain, as it were, the righteous proceed in their course, till they reach the goal.

Thou wilt weigh the straight path of the righteous The word weigh contains a metaphor, that God, by applying a balance, as it were, brings to an equal measure those things which in themselves were unequal. The Hebrew word ישר ( yāshār) is ambiguous, for it may refer either to God or to the path. Accordingly some render it, Thou, who art upright, will direct the path of the righteous; 160 and in other passages God is called upright. (Deu 32:4; Psa 25:8.) There would also be propriety in the allusion, that the straightness of which he spoke proceed from God, for he alone is straight or upright. But the other version appears to be more natural. 161

He promises in general, that God will take care of the righteous, so as to lead them, as it were, by his hand. When the wicked prosper and the righteous are oppressed, everything in this world appears to be moved by chance; and although Scripture frequently declares and affirms that God takes care of them, (Psa 37:5; 1Pe 5:7,) yet we can scarcely remain steadfast, but waver, when everything that happens to them is unfavourable. Yet it is true that the ways of the righteous are made plain by God’s balance, however rough and uneven they may appear to be; and not only so, but he has committed them to the guardianship of his angels, “lest they should be injured, or dash their foot against a stone.” (Psa 91:11.) But for this, they would easily fall or give way through exhaustion, and would hardly ever make way amidst so many thorns and briers, steep roads, intricate windings, and rough places, did not the Lord lead out and deliver them.

Let us therefore learn to commit ourselves to God, and to follow him as our leader, and we shall be guided in safety. Though snares and artifices, the stratagems of the devil and wicked men, and innumerable dangers, may surround us, we shall always be enabled to escape. We shall feel what the Prophet says here, that our ways, even amidst deep chasms, are made plain, so that there is no obstacle to hinder our progress. And, indeed, experience shews, that if we are not led by God’s guidance, we shall not be able to push our way through rugged roads; for so great is our weakness that we shall scarcely advance a single step without stumbling at the smallest stone that comes in our way. Satan and wicked men not only entangle and delay us by many perplexities, and not only present to us slight difficulties, but cause us to encounter sometimes high mounds and sometimes deep pits, which even the whole world would be unable to avoid.

It is therefore proper for us to acknowledge how much we need heavenly direction, and to confess with Jeremiah, “I know, O Lord, that the way of man is not in himself; and it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps.” (Jer 10:23.) Let us not be puffed up with vain confidence, as if the result were placed in our own power. Let us not boast, as James warns us, that “we shall do this or that.” (Jas 4:15.) Such is the manner of rash men, who act as if they could do everything at their own pleasure; while it is not in our power, as Solomon tells us, to direct our tongue so as to give a proper answer. (Pro 16:1.) In vain, therefore, do men form plans, and deliberate, and decide about their ways, if God do not stretch out his hand. But he holds it out to the righteous, and takes peculiar care of them; for, while the providence of God extends to all, and while he supplies the wants of young ravens (Psa 147:9) and sparrows, (Mat 10:29,) and of the smallest animals, yet he has a fatherly kindness towards the godly, and delivers them out of dangers and difficulties.

Calvin: Isa 26:8 - Yea, in the way of thy judgments // To thy name // And to the remembrance of thee 8.Yea, in the way of thy judgments This verse contains a very beautiful doctrine, without which it might have been thought that the former statements...

8.Yea, in the way of thy judgments This verse contains a very beautiful doctrine, without which it might have been thought that the former statements were without foundation. Since he said that God will be our guide during the whole of life, so that we shall neither wander nor stumble, and while, on the other hand, we are pressed by so many straits, we might conclude that those promises have not been actually fulfilled. Accordingly, when he tries our patience, we ought to strive, and yet to trust in him. Here the Prophet gives us this instruction, that, though our eyes are not gratified by an easy and delightful path, and though the road is not made smooth under our feet, but we must toil through many hard passages, still there is room for hope and patience.

By the way of judgments he means adversity, and the word judgment often has this meaning in Scripture. But here is a mark which distinguishes the godly from hypocrites; for in prosperity hypocrites bless God, and speak highly of him; but in adversity they murmur, and curse God himself, and plainly shew that they had no confidence in him, and thus judge of God according as their prosperity lasts. The godly, on the other hand, when they are tried by afflictions and calamities, are more and more excited to place confidence. 162

The particle אף , (ă ph,) Even, is inserted for the sake of emphasis, as if the Prophet had said, that believers are earnest in the worship of God, not only so long as he treats them with gentleness, but that, if he deal harshly with them, still they do not faint, because they are supported by hope. It is therefore the true test of sincere godliness, when not only while God bestows his kindness upon us, but while he withdraws his face, and afflicts us, and gives every sign of severity and displeasure, we place our hope and confidence in him. Let us learn to apply this doctrine to our own use, whenever we are hard pressed by the calamities of the present life; and let us not cease to trust in him, even when our affairs are in the most desperate condition. 163 “Though He slay me,” says Job, “I will trust in Him;” and David says that: “though he walk amidst the shadow of death, he will trust and not be afraid, because he knows that God is with him.” (Job 13:15; Psa 23:4.)

To thy name The Prophet aims at shewing what is the source of that uwearied earnestness which prevents the godly from sinking under the greatest calamities. It is because they are free from wicked desires and from excessive solicitude, and in their aspirations boldly rise to God. For, in consequence of our disorderly passions and cares holding us bound, as it were, to the earth, our hearts either wander astray, or sink into indolence, so that they do not freely rise to God; and as the essence of God is hidden from us, this makes us more sluggish in seeking him. From his hidden and incomprehensible essence, therefore, the Prophet draws our attention to the name of God, as if he enjoined us to rest satisfied with that manifestation of it which is found in the word; because there God declares to us, as far as is necessary, his justice, wisdom, and goodness, that is, himself.

And to the remembrance of thee It is not without good reason also that he has added the word remembrance; for it means that the first perception or thought is not enough, but that continual meditation is enjoined; because without its aid all the light of doctrine would immediately vanish away. And indeed the true and sincere knowledge of God inflames us to desire him, and not only so, but also prompts us to desire to make progress, whenever the “remembrance” of it occurs to our minds. The knowledge of God, therefore, comes first; and next, we must be employed in frequent “remembrance;” for it is not enough that we have once obtained knowledge, if love and desire do not grow through constant meditation. Hence, also, we perceive that the knowledge of God is not a dead imagination.

Calvin: Isa 26:9 - My soul hath desired thee // In the night // In the morning // The inhabitants of the earth will learn righteousness 9.My soul hath desired thee This is a stronger expression of the former statement; for, having previously spoken in the person of believers, he had s...

9.My soul hath desired thee This is a stronger expression of the former statement; for, having previously spoken in the person of believers, he had said that the desire of their soul was towards God. He now adds, with regard to himself, My soul hath desired; as if he had said, “I have all the faculties of my soul directed towards seeking thy name.” The word נפש ( nēphĕsh) frequently denotes the vital Soul; but as the Prophet here employs two words, I distinguish them so as to make נפש ( nephesh) mean the desire or will, and רוח ( rūăch) the intellectual parts; for we know that these are the chief parts of the human soul, namely, the Understanding and the Will, both of which God justly claims for himself. Such is also the import of that passage, “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, with all thy mind, and with all thy strength.” (Deu 6:5; Mat 22:37.) The Prophet therefore shews, that all the faculties of his soul are directed to this point, to seek God and embrace him.

Others take רוח , ( rūăch,) the Spirit, to mean the regenerated part; and so by נפש ( nĕphĕsh) they understand the natural soul, and by רוח , ( rūăch,) the Spirit, they understand the grace of God, which is supernatural. But this cannot be admitted; for the sensual man (ψυχικός) never seeks God; and we perceive how strongly we are opposed by our feelings when we rise to God, and with what difficulty we conquer that aversion. It is unnecessary, therefore, to refute this interpretation, for it is directly contrary to Scripture; and from many similar passages it is sufficiently plain that the Spirit and Soul mean the understanding and the heart.

In the night By the night Scripture often means adversity, which is compared to darkness and gloominess. But I interpret it somewhat differently, as if the Prophet had said, “There is no time so improper or unreasonable that I may not call upon thee or pray to thee.” That interpretation differs little from the former, but is rather more general; for night is supposed to be set apart for rest, and at that time all the desires and labors of men 164 cease; and, in short, there is little difference between a sleeping and a dead man. He says, therefore, that at the time which is devoted to rest and repose he rises to seek God, so that no occasion turns him aside; — not that those who are asleep have any active thought, but that sleep itself, if we turn to God, is a part of our course; and although we slumber and are silent, still we praise him by hope and confidence.

In the morning 165 will I seek thee. By the night the Prophet does not literally mean sleep; and this is perfectly evident from the present clause, in which night is contrasted with morning, which denotes continuance.

The inhabitants of the earth will learn righteousness We must observe the reason assigned, when he says that “the inhabitants of the earth learn righteousness from the judgments of God,” meaning that by chastisements men are taught to fear God. 166 In prosperity they forget him, and their eyes are as it were blinded by fatness; they grow wanton and petulant, and do not submit to be under authority; and therefore the Lord restrains their insolence, and teaches them to obey. In short, the Prophet confesses that he and others were trained, by God’s chastisements, to yield submission to his authority, and to intrust themselves to his guardianship; because if God do not, with uplifted arm, claim his right to rule, no man of his own accord yields obedience.

Calvin: Isa 26:10 - The wicked man will obtain favour // In the land of upright actions he will deal unjustly 10.The wicked man will obtain favour 167 Isaiah contrasts this statement with the former. He had said that the godly, even when they are afflicted, o...

10.The wicked man will obtain favour 167 Isaiah contrasts this statement with the former. He had said that the godly, even when they are afflicted, or see others afflicted, still rely on the love of God, and trust in him. But now he declares, on the other hand, that the wicked cannot be brought in any way to love God, though he endeavor, by every sort of kindness, to draw and gain them over; and that, whatever aspect the Lord assume towards them, they do not become better.

This verse appears, at first view, to contradict the former, in which the Prophet said, that the justice of God is acknowledged in the earth, when he executes his judgments, and shews that he is the Judge, and punishes the transgressions of men; while he says here that the wicked cannot in any way be led or persuaded to worship God, and that they are so far from being made better by the chastisements, that even acts of kindness make them worse. The good effect of chastisements certainly does not appear in all; for wicked men do not at all profit by them, as we see in Pharaoh, whom chastisements and scourges rendered more obstinate. (Exo 7:13.) But although he spoke indiscriminately about “the inhabitants of the earth,” yet he strictly included none but God’s elect, with whom indeed even some hypocrites share the profit that is gained; for sometimes, though reluctantly, they are moved by reverence for God, and are restrained by the dread of punishments. 168 But as the Prophet here describes sincere repentance, by “the inhabitants of the earth” he means only the children of God.

Some view it as a question, “Shall favor be shewn to the wicked?” or, “Why should the wicked man obtain favor?” as if the Prophet insinuated that they do not deserve that God should deal gently with them. But I choose rather to explain it thus, “Whatever may be the acts of kindness by which God draws the wicked, they will never learn to act uprightly.” The Prophet therefore has limited the statement made in the former verse.

In the land of upright actions he will deal unjustly This is added in order to shew more strongly the baseness of this ingratitude. It was a sufficiently heinous offense that they abused the acts of God’s kindness, and by means of them became more rebellious; but it is their crowning wickedness, that “they deal wickedly in the land” which the Lord had consecrated to himself. What he now says relates to Judea, but may be extended also to other countries in which God is now worshipped; but at that time there was no other country on which Isaiah could bestow that title, for in no other was there any knowledge of God. (Psa 76:2.)

Thus he calls Judea “the land of upright actions.” I give this interpretation, because, since the Prophet employs נכחות ( nekōchōth) in the feminine gender, the word upright cannot apply to men. 169 He therefore bestows this title, because the law was there in full force, (Psa 76:1.) and that nation had been peculiarly chosen by God; and it was added, as I have already said, in order to exhibit more strongly the ingratitude of the nation. Some extend it indiscriminately to the whole world, because, wherever we live, God supports us on the condition of our maintaining uprightness. This is too far-fetched; but, since God has now spread abroad his kingdom in every direction, wheresoever men call on his name, that is “the land of upright actions;” 170 so that we are worthy of double condemnation, if, after having been stimulated by benefits so numerous and so great, we do not testify our gratitude by the practice of godliness and by good works.

When he adds, that the reprobate will not behold the majesty of the Lord, this does not in any degree palliate, but rather doubles their criminality; because it is base and shameful indolence not to observe the glory of God which is openly manifested before our eyes. The wicked are thus rendered the more inexcusable, because, how numerous soever may be the methods by which the Lord makes known his name, still they are blind amidst the clearest light. There is never any lack of testimonies by which the Lord openly manifests his majesty and glory, but, as we have formerly seen, 171 few consider them. God manifests his glory not only by the ordinary works of nature, but likewise by some astonishing miracles and demonstrations, by means of which he gives us abundant instruction about his goodness, wisdom, and justice. Wicked men shut their eyes, and do not observe them, though in trifling matters they are very clear-sighted; and the Prophet now censures them severely for this wickedness.

Others think that it is a threatening against the reprobate, they shall not behold the majesty of the Lord, as if they did not deserve to obtain this view of the works of God. Though this is true, yet, as this clause is closely connected with the former, the Prophet continues to censure the indolence of those who do not direct their minds to the works of God, but, on the contrary, become stupid. On this account, we ought to think it the less wonderful that so few repent, though very many demonstrations of the righteousness of God are openly made; for infidelity is always blind to behold the works of God.

Calvin: Isa 26:11 - O Jehovah, though thy hand is lifted up // They shall see and be ashamed // And shall be ashamed // Through their envy of the people // Yea, the fire of thine enemies shall devour them 11.O Jehovah, though thy hand is lifted up This is an explanation of the former statement; for he brings forward nothing that is new, but shews more ...

11.O Jehovah, though thy hand is lifted up This is an explanation of the former statement; for he brings forward nothing that is new, but shews more clearly what he had formerly stated in a few words. He had already said that the wicked “will not behold the majesty of the Lord;” and now he explains that “majesty” to be that which is visible in the works of God. He does not send us to that hidden majesty which is concealed from us, but leads us to the works, which he denotes figuratively (μετωνυμικῶς) 172 by the hand. Here he again censures the wicked, and shews that they cannot be excused on the plea of ignorance; for, though they perceive nothing, still the hand of God is openly visible; and it is nothing but their blind ingratitude, or rather their voluntary indolence, that hinders them from perceiving it. Some might plead ignorance, and allege that they did not see these works; but the Prophet says that God’s hand is “lifted up,” and not merely exerted, so that it is not only visible to a few persons, but shines conspicuously.

They shall see and be ashamed He shews plainly that this “beholding” is different from that of which he formerly spoke, when he said that the wicked “do not see the glory of the Lord;” for they do see, but do not observe or take any notice of it; but at length “they shall see,” but too late, and to their great hurt. After having long abused the patience of God, and proved that they were obstinate and rebellious, they will at length be constrained to acknowledge the judgments of God. Thus Cain, (Gen 4:13,) Esau, (Gen 27:38,) and others like them, who too late repented of their crimes, (Heb 12:17,) though they fled from the face of God, yet were constrained to see that he was their Judge. Thus, in those who despise him, God frequently produces a feeling of remorse, that he may display his power; but such knowledge is of no avail to them.

In this manner, therefore, the Prophet threatens wicked men, after having accused them of blindness, in order to shew that they have no plea of ignorance; and he forewarns them that the time will come when they shall know with whom they have to do, and that they will then feel that they ought not to despise that heavenly name which they now treat as fabulous, and scorn. They shut their eyes, and act without restraint, and make us a laughing-stock, and do not think that God will be their Judge, but rather turn into ridicule our distresses and afflictions. Thus they look down on us as from a lofty place, and grow more and more hardened; but at length they will understand that the true worshippers of God have not lost their labor.

And shall be ashamed In order to shew that this beholding of the glory of God is not only of no advantage, but hurtful to them, he says that they shall behold with shame the blessing of God towards believers, in which they will have no share.

Through their envy of the people This tends to shew more strongly the severity of the punishment, that not only will they burn with “envy,” when they shall see that the children of God have been delivered from those distresses, and have been exalted to glory, but there will likewise be added another evil, that they will be consumed by the fire of the enemy. By “the envy of the people,” therefore, is here meant the indignation which wicked men feel when they compare the lot of godly men with their own.

Yea, the fire of thine enemies shall devour them By the fire of the enemies, he means that “fire” with which God consumes his “enemies.” He employs the word “fire” to denote God’s vengeance; for here it must not be taken for visible “fire” with which we are burned, nor even for the thunderbolt alone, but is a metaphorical expression for dreadful anguish, as we find that in many other passages Scripture denotes by this term, God’s severest vengeance. (Deu 32:22.) No language indeed can sufficiently express this anguish. Yet I do not object to the suggestion, that the Prophet alludes to the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. (Gen 19:24.)

Calvin: Isa 26:12 - O Jehovah, thou wilt ordain peace for us // All our works 12.O Jehovah, thou wilt ordain peace for us This statement tends to the consolation of the godly, as if he had said, “We shall see what will be the...

12.O Jehovah, thou wilt ordain peace for us This statement tends to the consolation of the godly, as if he had said, “We shall see what will be the end of the wicked; for thou wilt prevent them from sharing with thy children, and wilt take them away as enemies by fire, but we shall be happy.” The Hebrew verb שפת , ( shāphăth,) which signifies “to ordain,” has the same import as the word “establish;” as if he had said, “Thou wilt prepare peace for us in uninterrupted succession:” for the wicked also enjoy peace, but not of long duration; but our peace is fixed on the Lord, and has a firm foundation, and never comes to an end. By the word peace he means perfect happiness. Hence infer, that the children of God alone, who rest on him, are happy; for the life of the wicked, to whatever extent it may abound in pleasures and luxuries, when everything proceeds to their wish, is most miserable. There is therefore no solid foundation for peace but in God’s fatherly love.

All our works By works he means all the blessings which the Lord bestows on those who believe in him; as if he had said, “Transactions, business, actions,” and everything included in the French phrase nos affaires , or in the corresponding English phrase our affairs. Accordingly, those who have quoted this passage for the purpose of overturning free-will have not understood the Prophet’s meaning. It is undoubtedly true that God alone does what is good in us, and that all the good actions which men perform are from his Spirit. But here the Prophet merely shews that we have obtained from the hand of God all the good things which we enjoy; and hence he infers that his kindness will not cease till we shall have obtained perfect happiness. Now, since God is the author of all good things, we ought chiefly to consider those which hold the first and highest place; for if we ought to acknowledge that we have received from God those things by which we support this life, much more those which belong to the salvation of the soul. If, therefore, we ought to acknowledge his kindness in small matters, how much more ought we to acknowledge it in matters of the greatest importance and value? But there is no reason why we should bring forward this passage against the Papists; for they might easily evade it, and we have a great number of other passages exceedingly conclusive.

In this passage, therefore, the Prophet appears to exhort the godly to testify their gratitude; for he bids them declare the acts of God’s kindness, so as to acknowledge that they are indebted to him for everything which they possess; and this contains a profitable doctrine, namely, that from past events and benefits received, the godly reason even as to God’s future kindness, and infer that he will also take care of them for the future. Having therefore experienced God’s kindness, let us also learn to hope for the future; and since he hath shewn himself to be so kind and bountiful, let us steadfastly fix our hearts in the hope of future assistance.

This example has been followed by all the saints, and in this way they have strengthened their faith. Thus David says, “Thou wilt not despise the work of thy hands.” (Psa 138:8.) Paul says, “He who hath begun in us a good work will perform it.” (Phi 1:6.) Jacob also says, “I am less than the compassions and the truth which thou hast shewn to thy servant; but thou saidst, I will surely do thee good.” (Gen 32:10.) God is not like men, to be capable of being wearied by doing good, or exhausted by giving largely; and therefore the more numerous the benefits with which he has loaded us, so much the more ought our faith to be strengthened and increased.

Calvin: Isa 26:13 - O Lord our God // Other lords besides thee have had dominion over us // In thee only 13.O Lord our God This verse contains a complaint of the saints, that they were oppressed by the tyranny of the wicked. This song was composed in ord...

13.O Lord our God This verse contains a complaint of the saints, that they were oppressed by the tyranny of the wicked. This song was composed in order to refresh the hearts of believers, who were to be cruelly banished from that land which was a figure of eternal happiness, that, having been deprived of sacrifices and holy assemblies, and almost of every consolation, crushed by the heavy yoke of the Babylonians, banished from their country, loaded with reproach and sore afflictions, they might direct their groanings to God, in order to seek relief. He speaks, therefore, in the name of believers, who to outward appearance had been rejected by God, and yet did not cease to testify that they were the people of God, and to put their trust in him.

Other lords besides thee have had dominion over us Not without cause do they complain that they are placed under a different dominion from that of God, for he had received them under his sole guardianship. Hence it follows that, if they had not been estranged from him, they would not have endured so hard a lot as to be exposed to the tyranny and caprice of enemies. It may be thought that the government of all princes is “besides God,” or different from that of God, even though they govern in his name. But the Prophet does not speak of those who govern for our benefit, but of those who are opposed to true worship and to holy doctrine. David was indeed a ruler who exercised dominion separate from that of God, but at the same time he was a genuine servant of God for the general advantage of the whole people; and therefore he maintained the true religion, which those rulers wished altogether to overthrow. Most justly did it befall the Jews, that, in consequence of having refused to obey God, who treated them with the greatest kindness, they were subjected to the tyranny of wicked men.

There is an implied contrast between God and the pious kings who governed the people in his name and by his authority, and the tyrants who oppressed them by governing with most unjust laws. This will be made more evident by a similar passage in Ezekiel, “I gave them,” says God, “good laws, by which they might live; but because they did not execute my judgments, and despised my statutes, and profaned my Sabbaths, and cast their eyes upon the idols of their fathers, for this reason I gave them statutes that were not good, and judgments by which they could not live.” (Eze 20:11.) Since they might formerly, through the blessing of God, have been prosperous and happy, if they had obeyed his word, the prophet Ezekiel threatens that they will be subjected to tyrants who will compel them to obey their cruel enactments, and that without profit or reward. Isaiah now deplores a similar calamity. “When the Lord ruled over us, we could not be satisfied with our lot, and now we are compelled to endure severe tyranny, and suffer the just punishment of our wickedness.” The same complaint may be made by believers who live under the Papacy, or who in any way are compelled, by unjust laws, to observe superstition; for they are subject to a government which is “besides God,” or different from that of God, and endure bondage worse than barbarous, which not only fetters their bodies, but conducts their souls to torture and slaughter.

In thee only This clause appears to be contrasted with the former to this effect, “Although irreligious men wish to withdraw from thy dominion, yet we will continue under it; for we are fully convinced that we are thine.” But we may draw from it more abundant instruction, that, although the feeling of the flesh pronounces that those who are cruelly oppressed by enemies have been forsaken by God, and laid open to be a prey, yet the Jews do not cease to boast in God when they do not perceive that he is near them; for the mere remembrance of his name supports them, and gently cherishes their hope. There is thus a very emphatic contrast between “the remembrance of the name of God” and the immediate experience of his grace; for steadfastly to embrace God, even though he is absent, is a proof of uncommon excellence.

Others render it, In thee and in thy name; but the word and is not in the passage. There is here exhibited to us consolation, which is great and highly necessary in these times, when the base ingratitude of men, by shaking off the yoke of God, has brought down upon itself a most cruel tyranny; and we need not wonder if we already see it abound in many places in which men call on the name of God. Yet the godly ought not to faint on this account, provided that they support themselves by this consolation, that God never entirely forsakes those who find abundant consolation in the remembrance of his name. But at the same time it is necessary to testify this faith, so as to choose to die a thousand times rather than depart from God by profaning his name; for when any one goes astray through the fear of men, it is certain that he never has truly tasted the sweetness of the name of God. So long, therefore, as we freely enjoy the word, let us be diligently employed in it, so that, when necessity shall demand it, we may be armed, and that it may not appear that we have indulged at our ease in idle speculation.

Calvin: Isa 26:14 - The dead shall not live // The slain shall not rise again // Therefore hast thou visited and destroyed them 14.The dead shall not live 173 The Prophet again speaks of the unhappy end of the wicked, whose prosperity often agitates and vexes us, as we read in...

14.The dead shall not live 173 The Prophet again speaks of the unhappy end of the wicked, whose prosperity often agitates and vexes us, as we read in the Psalms of David. (Psa 37:1.) That our eyes may not be dazzled by the present appearances of things, he foretells that their end will be very miserable. Others interpret this passage as relating to believers, who appear to die without any hope of a resurrection; but unquestionably he speaks of the reprobate, and this will be still more evident from an opposite statement which he makes at the nineteenth verse. There is a contrast between the resurrection of good men and wicked men, 174 between whom there would be little difference, were it not evident that the latter are sentenced to eternal death, and that the former will receive a blessed and everlasting life: and not only does eternal death await the wicked, but all the sufferings which they endure in this world are the commencement of everlasting destruction; for they cannot be soothed by any consolation, and they feel that God is their enemy.

The slain shall not rise again 175 The word which we render slain is rendered by others giants; 176 but as in many passages of Scripture רפאים 177 ( rĕphāīm) denotes slain, so also in this passage it will be more appropriate, for otherwise there would be no contrast. (Psa 88:11.)

Therefore hast thou visited and destroyed them This is added for the sake of explanation; for it assigns the reason why the reprobate perish without hope, namely, because it is the purpose of God to destroy them. In the wrath of God they have nothing to look for but death and ruin.

Calvin: Isa 26:15 - Thou hast added to the nation 15.Thou hast added to the nation This verse is explained in various ways. Some think that the Prophet here declares that the godly are not merely opp...

15.Thou hast added to the nation This verse is explained in various ways. Some think that the Prophet here declares that the godly are not merely oppressed by one kind of affliction, but are plunged, as it were, into the lowest misery, and that they see no end of their distresses. Others explain it simply to mean, “O Lord, thou hast bestowed on thy nation various blessings,” and think that the Prophet mentions the blessings which God bestowed on his people in various ways, as if he had said, “The people have experienced, not only in one instance, but in innumerable ways, the Lord’s kindness and bounty.”

But when I attend to what follows, Thou hast enlarged, that is, “Thou hast extended thy kingdom, which formerly was confined within narrow limits,” I choose rather to view the two statements as closely connected; for the latter clause is an interpretation of the former. Besides, it agrees well with what follows, that God is glorified; for we know that in nothing does the glory of God shine more conspicuously than in the increase of the Church. It is as if he had said, “Thou hadst formerly a small people, but thou hast multiplied and increased it;” for the Gentiles were admitted and joined to the Jews on condition that they should be united into one people. Thus the Lord added a vast multitude, for the children of Abraham were called out of all nations.

We must therefore supply, not “Thou hast added blessings,” but “Thou hast added a greater number;” and the meaning is, “O Lord, thou wast not satisfied with that small number, and hast gathered for thyself out of all nations an innumerable people.” This relates to the kingdom of Christ, which has been spread through the whole world by the preaching of the gospel; and in this passage the Prophet speaks highly of this wide extension, and expresses it by the phrase, Thou hast enlarged. This mode of expression is not at variance with the ordinary way of speaking, when an enlargement of a kingdom or of territories is expressed. And yet the Prophet does not mean that the land was enlarged, but that, by spreading the worship of God on all sides, mutual intercourse produced larger space and greater freedom of habitation; for contentions had the effect of narrowing it. 178 We have here a promise of the calling of the Gentiles, which must have greatly comforted godly men during that banishment and miserable dispersion of the Church, so that, although they saw it to be amazingly weakened and diminished, still they were convinced that it would be increased in such a manner that not only would they become innumerable, but foreign and distant nations would be added to them.

Calvin: Isa 26:16 - O Jehovah, in tribulation they have visited thee // They poured out a prayer 16.O Jehovah, in tribulation they have visited thee This might be explained as relating to hypocrites, who never flee to God but when they have been ...

16.O Jehovah, in tribulation they have visited thee This might be explained as relating to hypocrites, who never flee to God but when they have been constrained by distresses and afflictions. But since the Lord instructs believers also by chastisements, as the Prophet formerly shewed, (Isa 26:8,) I choose rather to refer it simply to them, that not only they may know that God has justly punished them, but that the bitterness of the afflictions may likewise be sweetened by the good result of the chastisement, and that they may be better instructed in the fear of the Lord, and may profit more and more every day. Isaiah therefore speaks in the person of the Church, that whenever godly men read this statement, they might acknowledge that amidst their distresses and afflictions they were nearer to God than when they enjoyed prosperity, by means of which almost always (such is the depravity of our nature) we become excessively proud and insolent. On this account we must be curbed and tamed by chastisements; and this thought will soften the harshness of punishments, and make us less ready to shrink from them if we think that they are profitable to us.

They poured out a prayer The Hebrew word לחש ( lăchăsh) 179 signifies a muttering. This word therefore must not be taken for a prayer pronounced in words, 180 but for that which indicates that the heart is wrung with sore pains, as those who are tortured by extreme anguish can hardly speak or express the feelings of their hearts. It therefore denotes, that calling upon God which is sincere and free from all hypocrisy; such as men will aim at when in sore affliction they utter groans as expressive of intense pain. In prosperity men speak with open mouths; but when they are cast down by adversity, they hardly venture to mutter, and express their feelings with the heart rather than with the tongue. Hence arise those unutterable groans of which Paul speaks. (Rom 8:26.) It is in reference to the godly, therefore, that Paul makes this declaration, and to them must this doctrine be limited; for wicked men, although some lamentations are extorted from them by pain, become more hardened and more and more obstinate and rebellious.

Calvin: Isa 26:17 - As a woman with child 17.As a woman with child Here two things ought chiefly to be remarked. First, he compares believers to women in labor, who, we know, endure exquisite...

17.As a woman with child Here two things ought chiefly to be remarked. First, he compares believers to women in labor, who, we know, endure exquisite pain; and, accordingly, he says that their anguish breaks out into loud and violent cries. Hence we infer that the Prophet does not only speak of that sorrow which arises from outward distresses and annoyances, but rather describes that dreadful anguish by which the hearts of the godly are sorely and dreadfully tormented, when they perceive that God is angry with them, and when their consciences reprove them. There is no bodily pain so acute that it can be compared to that anguish, and this is plainly expressed by the phrase in thy sight

Calvin: Isa 26:18 - We have as it were brought forth wind // And the inhabitants of the world have not fallen 18.We have as it were brought forth wind The second thing to be remarked is, that he goes beyond the limit of the metaphor; for when there is no end ...

18.We have as it were brought forth wind The second thing to be remarked is, that he goes beyond the limit of the metaphor; for when there is no end to their distresses, the condition of the godly is worse than that of women in labor, who, as soon as they are free from their pains, break out into joy at the sight of what they have brought forth, (Joh 16:21,) and forget all their sorrows. The godly, on the other hand, he tells us, are continually bringing forth; for new troubles and anxieties constantly await them, and when they think that the birth is at hand, they bring forth nothing but anguish. That is what he means by wind, 181 namely, that there is no removal or abatement of pain; and immediately afterwards he thus explains it, Salvations have not been wrought for the land, 182 that is, we have not beheld any deliverance.

And the inhabitants of the world have not fallen יפלו ובל băl yĭppĕlū,) that is, have not fallen; for נפל ( nāphăl) signifies “to fall.” Others explain it “to dwell.” If we take it in that sense, the meaning will be, “The Jews shall not dwell,” that is, they shall not return to their own land; the inhabitants who possess it shall not perish. But if we follow the ordinary interpretation, we must view it as referring to the wicked. “The inhabitants of the world annoy us and do not fall; everything goes on prosperously with them.”

So long as the wicked flourish, the children of God must be unhappy, and become like women in labor; and this condition must be quietly endured by us, if we wish to have a place in the Church of God. It is, indeed, the common lot of all to endure numerous and endless afflictions; and hence comes the old proverb, “It is happy not to be born, or, when born, immediately to depart out of life.” But we see that the godly are visited with sore anguish and very heavy afflictions beyond others; for in this manner God wishes to try their faith, that, after having laid aside their desires and forsaken the world, they may serve him. Since, therefore, the Lord has a peculiar care of them, he must chastise them, while he permits wicked men to indulge in unbounded licentiousness.

Here we are also reminded that we must endure not merely one or another calamity, and must not imagine that, when we have endured some afflictions, there are none in reserve for us; for we ought always to be prepared to endure new ones. When God begins to chastise his people, he does not immediately cease. We shall “bring forth wind” when we think that the birth is at hand; other calamities will break out, and we shall be continually attacked by additional sorrows. We must therefore maintain this warfare so long as it shall please God to employ us in it. Accordingly, we shall follow the ordinary interpretation, have not fallen; for, as the Lord cheers his people, when he manifests to them his salvation and punishes the wicked, so he gives them occasion to groan, so long as they behold their enemies placed in a lofty position and exercising high authority. And if the Lord in this manner tried his Church in former times, we need not wonder that we experience the same thing in the present day.

By the inhabitants of the world he means heathens and irreligious men; for he contrasts the rest of the world with Judea, which he formerly called, by way of eminence, (κατ ᾿ ἐξοχὴν,) the land, and mentions its inhabitants apart.

Calvin: Isa 26:19 - Thy dead men shall live // My dead body, they shall arise // Awake and sing, ye inhabitants of the dust // For thy dew is the dew of herbs // And the earth shall cast out the dead 19.Thy dead men shall live Isaiah continues the same consolation, and addresses his discourse to God, thus shewing that there is nothing better for u...

19.Thy dead men shall live Isaiah continues the same consolation, and addresses his discourse to God, thus shewing that there is nothing better for us than to bring our thoughts to meet in God, whenever we must struggle with temptations; for there is nothing more dangerous than to wander in our thoughts, and to give way to them, since they can do nothing else than toss us up and down and drive us into error. Nothing therefore is safer for us than to betake ourselves to God, on whom alone our hearts can rest; for otherwise we shall meet with many things that tend to shake our faith. The general meaning is, that as God guards believers, though they are like “dead men,” yet they “shall live” amidst death itself, or shall rise again after their decease.

But it may be asked, of what time does Isaiah speak? For many interpret this passage as relating to the last resurrection. The Jews refer it to Messiah’s kingdom, but they are mistaken in thinking that it is immediately fulfilled by the Messiah’s first coming. Christians are also mistaken in limiting it to the last judgment; for the Prophet includes the whole reign of Christ from the beginning to the end, since the hope of living, as we shall immediately see, goes beyond this world. Now, in order to understand more fully the whole of the Prophet’s meaning, we ought first to consider that life is promised, not indiscriminately, but only to “God’s dead men;” and he speaks of believers who die in the Lord, and whom he protects by his power. We know that “God is the God of the living, and not of the dead.” (Mat 22:32.) Accordingly, if we are God’s people, we shall undoubtedly live; but in the meantime we must differ in no respect from dead men, for “our life is hidden,” (Col 3:3,) and we do not yet see those things for which we hope. (Rom 8:23.)

So then he speaks simply of the dead, that is, of the condition of believers, who lie in the shadow of death on account of various afflictions which they must continually endure. Hence it is evident, that this must not be limited to the last resurrection; for, on the contrary, we say that the reprobate, even while they live, are dead, because they do not taste God’s fatherly kindness, in which life consists, and therefore perish in their brutal stupidity. But believers, by fleeing to God, obtain life in the midst of afflictions, and even in death itself; but because they have in prospect that day of the resurrection, they are not said literally to live till that day when they shall be free from all pain and corruption, and shall obtain perfect life; and, indeed, Paul justly argues, that it would be a subversion of order, were they to enjoy life till the appearance of Christ, who is the source of their life. (Col 3:3.)

Thus we have said that Isaiah includes the whole reign of Christ; for, although we begin to receive the fruit of this consolation when we are admitted into the Church, yet we shall not enjoy it fully till that last day of the resurrection is come, when all things shall be most completely restored; and on this account also it is called “the day of restitution.” (Act 3:21.) The only remedy for soothing the grief of the godly is, to cast their eyes on the result, by which God distinguishes them from the reprobate. As death naturally destroys all the children of Adam, so all the miseries to which they are liable are forerunners of death, and therefore their life is nothing else than mortality. But because the curse of God, through the kindness of Christ, is abolished, both in the beginning and in the end of death, all who are engrafted into Christ are justly said to live in dying; for to them all that is evil is the instrument of good. (Rom 8:28.) Hence it follows, that out of the depths of death they always come forth conquerors till they are perfectly united to their Head; and therefore, in order that we may be reckoned among “God’s dead men,” whose life he faithfully guards, we must rise above nature. This is more fully expressed by the word נבלה , ( nĕbēlāh,) or dead body

My dead body, they shall arise As if he had said, “The long-continued putrefaction, by which they appear to be consumed, will not hinder the power of God from causing them to rise again entire.” So far as relates to the phrase, some render it, “With my dead body.” Others explain it, “Who are my dead body.” Others supply the particle of comparison, “Like as my dead body;” but as the meaning is most fully brought out if, without adding or changing anything, we take up simply what the words mean, I choose to view them as standing in immediate connection. At least, this word is inserted for the express purpose that the Prophet may join himself to the whole Church, and thus may reckon himself in the number of “God’s dead men” in the hope of the resurrection. 183

As to his mentioning himself in particular, he does so for the sake of more fully confirming this doctrine; for thus he testifies his sincerity, and shews that this confession is the result of faith, according to that saying, “I believed, therefore I spake.” (Psa 116:10; 2Co 4:13.) But for this, irreligious men might discourse concerning the mercy of God and eternal life, though they had no sincere belief of them; for even Balaam knew that he spoke what was true, and yet he derived no benefit from his predictions. (Num 23:19.) Very differently does the Prophet speak in this passage; for he professes to belong to the number of those who shall obtain life, and then declares that he willingly endures all the troubles and calamities by which the Lord humbles and slays him, and that he chooses rather to endure them than to flourish along with the wicked. In this manner he testifies, that he does not speak of things unknown, or in which he has no concern, but of those things which he has learned by actual experience; and shews that his confidence is so great that he willingly ranks himself in the number of those “dead bodies” which, he firmly believes, will be restored to life, and therefore chooses to be a dead body, and to be so reckoned, provided that he be accounted a member of the Church, rather than to enjoy life in a state of separation from the Church.

This gives greater force to his doctrine, and he contrasts it with the statement which he formerly made ( verse 14) about wicked men, they shall not live; for the hope of rising again is taken from them. If it be objected, that resurrection will be common not only to believers but also to the reprobate, the answer is easy; for Isaiah does not speak merely of the resurrection, but of the happiness which believers will enjoy. Wicked men will indeed rise again, but it will be to eternal destruction; and therefore the resurrection will bring ruin to them, while it will bring salvation and glory to believers.

Awake and sing, ye inhabitants of the dust He gives the name, inhabitants of the dust, to believers, who are humbled under the cross and afflictions, and who even during their life keep death constantly before their eyes. It is true that they enjoy God’s blessings in this life; 184 but by this metaphor Isaiah declares that their condition is miserable, because they bear the image of death; for “the outward man” must be subdued and weakened, till it utterly decay, “that the inward man may be renewed.” (2Co 4:16.) We must therefore be willing to be humbled, and to lie down in the dust, if we wish to share in this consolation.

Accordingly, he bids the dead men “awake and sing,” which appears to be very inconsistent with their condition; for among them there is nothing but mournful silence. (Psa 6:5.) He thus draws a clear distinction between God’s elect, whom the corruption of the grave and the “habitation in the dust” will not deprive of that heavenly vigor by which they shall rise again, and the reprobate, who, separated from God the source of life, and from Christ, fade away even while they live, till they are wholly swallowed up by death.

For thy dew is the dew of herbs 185 He now promises “the dew of herbs,” and thus illustrates this doctrine by an elegant and appropriate comparison. We know that herbs, and especially those of the meadows, are dried up in winter, so that they appear to be wholly dead, and, to outward appearance, no other judgment could be formed respecting them; yet the roots are concealed beneath, which, when they have imbibed the dew at the return of spring, put forth their vigor, so that herbs which formerly were dry and withered, grow green again. In this manner will the nation regain its former vigor after having been plentifully watered with the dew of the grace of God, though formerly it appeared to be altogether withered and decayed.

Such comparisons, drawn from well-known objects, have great influence in producing conviction. If “herbs” watered by “dew” revive, why shall not we also revive when watered by the grace of God? Why shall not our bodies, though dead and rotten, revive? Does not God take more care of us than of herbs? And is not the power of the Spirit greater than that of “dew?” Paul employs a similar argument in writing to the Corinthians, when he treats of the resurrection; but as he applies his comparison to a different purpose, I think it better to leave it for the present, lest we should confound the two passages. It is enough if we understand the plain meaning of the Prophet.

And the earth shall cast out the dead Others render the clause in the second person, “Thou wilt lay low the land of giants,” 186 or “Thou wilt lay low the giants on the earth.” I do not disapprove of this interpretation, for the words admit of that meaning; but the former appears to agree better with the scope of the passage, though it makes little difference as to the substance of the doctrine. These words must relate to that consolation of which we have formerly spoken.

Calvin: Isa 26:20 - Come, my people // Enter into thy chamber // Shut thy doors behind thee // Hide thyself for a little moment // Till the indignation pass over 20.Come, my people In this verse he exhorts the children of God to exercise patience, to shut themselves up, and to bear with moderation their troubl...

20.Come, my people In this verse he exhorts the children of God to exercise patience, to shut themselves up, and to bear with moderation their troubles and afflictions, and to stand unmoved in opposition to the fierce tempests which seemed likely to overwhelm them. This exhortation was highly necessary; for the lamentable state to which the nation was afterwards reduced was, to outward appearance, very inconsistent with that promise. The Prophet, therefore, when the people are distressed and know not where to go, takes them, as it were, by the hand, and conducts them to some retired spot, where they may hide themselves in safety till the storms and tempests are abated. When he calls them “his own people,” he speaks in the name of God, and not in his own.

Enter into thy chamber By chamber he means calmness and composure of mind, by which we encourage and strengthen our hearts with firm belief, and calmly wait for the Lord, as Habakkuk, after having foretold the calamities which were about to fall on the Jews, says that he will go up “to his watch-tower,” that is, to a place of safety, in which he may patiently and silently await the result. (Hab 2:1.) Isaiah gives a similar injunction in this passage, that the godly, when they see that they are attacked by various storms which they are unable to resist, should shut themselves up in a “chamber,” or some place of retirement.

Shut thy doors behind thee As it would not be enough that we should once be fortified against the fierce attacks of tempests, he bids us also “shut the doors.” This relates to steadfastness; as if he enjoined us to take good heed not to leave any chink open for the devil; for he will easily break through and penetrate into our hearts, if the smallest entrance be allowed him.

Hide thyself for a little moment When he bids them “hide” or “conceal” themselves, he means that it will be a very safe refuge for believers, if they are courageous and patiently wait for the Lord; for though we must boldly and valiantly maintain the contest, yet since the power of God is displayed in our weakness, (2Co 12:9,) there is nothing better for us than to take refuge, with all humility, under God’s wings, that they who tremble may be placed by him in perfect safety.

Again, because we are naturally rash, and hurried away by impatience, when we do not see that the Lord’s assistance is immediate, on this account he says that these storms are “momentary.” 187 True, we must continually struggle with afflictions, and, so long as we live, must not hope to see an end of them; and, consequently, the afflictions are, in our opinion, of very long duration. But if we compare them with that eternity, in which we shall possess immortal joys, it will be but “a very little moment.” In like manner, Paul also shews that the light and momentary afflictions which we endure in this life, ought not to be compared to that weight of eternal glory which we expect to receive. (2Co 4:17; Rom 8:18.)

Till the indignation pass over By adding this he intends to remove all doubt from believers, as if he promised that they would quickly be delivered. I interpret “indignation” as meaning simply the affliction which proceeds from the Lord’s anger. Others refer it to enemies; and I do not object to that interpretation, but prefer the former; for we see that the prophets earnestly teach that no evil happens to us that does not come from the hand of God, who does not inflict them on us without good reason, but when he has been provoked by our iniquities and transgressions. (Amo 3:6.) We are thus reminded that God’s wrath against the Church will not last always, but that, like storms and tempests, it will come to an end, and on this account believers endure it more patiently. Hence it is said elsewhere, (Mic 7:9,) “I will bear the Lord’s wrath;” for they know that he chastises them for their salvation. He introduces the Lord speaking, as I mentioned a little before, that his exhortation may have greater authority.

Calvin: Isa 26:21 - For, behold, Jehovah cometh out of his place // To visit the iniquity // The earth also shall disclose her blood 21.For, behold, Jehovah cometh out of his place It is a very grievous temptation to the godly, when they see that the wicked exercise their rage with...

21.For, behold, Jehovah cometh out of his place It is a very grievous temptation to the godly, when they see that the wicked exercise their rage without being punished, and that God does not restrain them; for they look upon themselves as forsaken by him. Isaiah therefore meets this temptation, and shews that the Lord, though he keep himself out of view for a time, will in due season gird himself for yielding assistance, and for revenging the injuries which his people have received.

By the word cometh out, he describes God stretching out his hand to his people in such a manner as if it had formerly been concealed, because the saints did not perceive his aid. For this reason he says, that the Lord “cometh out,” and that he appears in public to yield assistance and exercise judgment, as if he had formerly dwelt like a private person at home. But perhaps there is an allusion to the sanctuary; and this mode of expression occurs frequently in the prophets. (Mic 1:3; Hab 3:13; Zec 14:3.) Though heathen nations despised the ark of the covenant which was laid up in a place little renowned, yet believers knew, by communications of power and grace which they quickly obtained, that it was not in vain or to no purpose that they called on God in that holy place. Yet this principle always holds good, that, though unbelievers ridicule the temple as some mean hut, still God will “come forth” from it at his own time, that the whole world may know that he is the protector of his people

This meaning is more appropriate than if we were to interpret God’s place to mean heaven, from which he “cometh forth;” for Isaiah intended to express something more. When the prophets mention heaven, they exhibit to us the majesty and glory of God; but here he refers to our senses, that is, when we see that God, who formerly appeared to remain concealed and to be at rest, gives us assistance. He employs the demonstrative particle הנה , ( hinnēh,) behold, and the participle of the present tense יצא , ( yōtzē,) coming forth, in order to express certainty, and that believers may not be displeased at bridling their feelings till his coming.

To visit the iniquity This is to the same purport with what goes before; for it would have been inconsistent with the nature of God, who is the judge of the world, to allow the wicked freely to indulge in sin without being punished. The word visit contains a well-known metaphor; because, so long as God delays or suspends his judgments, we think that he sees nothing, or that he has turned away his eyes. There is emphasis, also, in the phrase עליו , ( gnālāiv,) upon him; as it is frequently said that the wicked are taken in “the snares which they have laid,” (Psa 9:16,) or “in the pit which they have digged.” (Psa 57:6.) The meaning therefore is, that all the injuries inflicted will fall on the heads of those who were the authors of them.

The earth also shall disclose her blood 188 This also is highly emphatic. When innocent blood is shed and trodden under foot by wicked men, the earth drinks it up, and as it were receives it into her bosom; and, in the meantime, the death of the godly appears to be forgotten, and to be blotted out for ever from remembrance, so that it shall never come to be beheld even by God himself. Men indeed think so, but God makes a widely different declaration; for he declares, that those murderers will one day be “disclosed” and brought into judgment.

On this account he calls it “the blood, or bloods, of the earth,” which the earth has drunk up; and in like manner it is said, that “the earth opened her mouth” when the blood of Abel was shed. (Gen 4:11.) In that passage the Lord represents in strong terms the aggravation of that guilt, by saying, that the earth was polluted with that blood, and therefore he shews how “precious in his sight is the death of the saints,” (Psa 116:15,) how great is the care which he takes of them, and that at length he will not permit their death to pass unpunished. The earth itself will take up arms to avenge the murders and cruelties which the godly have endured from tyrants and enemies of the truth; and not a drop of blood has been shed of which they will not have to render an account. We ought therefore to call to remembrance this consolation, and to keep it constantly before our eyes, when the wicked slay, mock, and ridicule us, and inflict upon us every kind of outrage and cruelty. God will at length make known that the cry of innocent blood has not been uttered in vain; for he never can forget his own people. (Luk 18:7.)

Defender: Isa 26:3 - perfect peace "Perfect peace" (Hebrew shalom , shalom) is, literally "peace, peace." This is "peace that passeth understanding" (Phi 4:7). The specific application ...

"Perfect peace" (Hebrew shalom , shalom) is, literally "peace, peace." This is "peace that passeth understanding" (Phi 4:7). The specific application is to the faithful in Israel during the great tribulation, but the principle certainly is true for all believers in any age."

Defender: Isa 26:4 - everlasting strength "Everlasting strength" is, literally, "a rock of ages." "Peace, peace" is found only in "YAH, YAHWEH" (literal rendering of "Lord JEHOVAH") who indeed...

"Everlasting strength" is, literally, "a rock of ages." "Peace, peace" is found only in "YAH, YAHWEH" (literal rendering of "Lord JEHOVAH") who indeed is our "Rock of Ages.""

Defender: Isa 26:9 - judgments are in the earth The coming great tribulation will be the time - more than any time since the great Flood - when God's "judgments are in the earth." Out of these wrenc...

The coming great tribulation will be the time - more than any time since the great Flood - when God's "judgments are in the earth." Out of these wrenching experiences, a great multitude of previously indifferent or antagonistic sinners will turn to God and be saved, even though it will lead to martyrdom (Rev 7:9, Rev 7:14)."

Defender: Isa 26:19 - dead men shall live Here is an Old Testament assurance of bodily resurrection of the believing dead. Such assurance is possible because God Himself, in Christ, would conq...

Here is an Old Testament assurance of bodily resurrection of the believing dead. Such assurance is possible because God Himself, in Christ, would conquer death. Believers would arise "together with my dead body." This was literally fulfilled at the time of Christ's resurrection (Mat 27:52, Mat 27:53). It will be completed when Christ returns and "all that are in the graves ... shall come forth" (Joh 5:28, Joh 5:29)."

Defender: Isa 26:20 - the indignation be overpast "The indignation" is the great tribulation, during the height of which the believing Israelites will be preserved supernaturally by God in the wildern...

"The indignation" is the great tribulation, during the height of which the believing Israelites will be preserved supernaturally by God in the wilderness (Rev 12:13-16). In a secondary application, this promise will apply also to all the saints caught up to be with Christ prior to the onset of the tribulation period (1Th 4:17; 1Th 5:3)."

Defender: Isa 26:21 - inhabitants of the earth The tribulation period will be for the purpose of punishing the earth's inhabitants for their iniquity in rejecting God and His Christ (Psa 2:2-5), no...

The tribulation period will be for the purpose of punishing the earth's inhabitants for their iniquity in rejecting God and His Christ (Psa 2:2-5), not for purifying believers."

TSK: Isa 26:1 - that day // this song // in the land // salvation that day : Isa 2:11, Isa 2:20, Isa 12:1, Isa 24:21-23, Isa 25:9 this song : Isa 5:1, Isa 27:1, Isa 27:2; Exod. 15:2-21; Num 21:17; Judg. 5:1-31; 2Sam....

that day : Isa 2:11, Isa 2:20, Isa 12:1, Isa 24:21-23, Isa 25:9

this song : Isa 5:1, Isa 27:1, Isa 27:2; Exod. 15:2-21; Num 21:17; Judg. 5:1-31; 2Sam. 22:1-51; Jer 33:11; Eph 5:19, Eph 5:20; Rev 19:1-7

in the land : Ezr 3:11; Psa 137:3, Psa 137:4

salvation : Isa 60:18, Isa 62:11; Psa 31:21, Psa 48:12; Zec 2:5; Mat 16:18; Rev 21:12-22

TSK: Isa 26:2 - Open // righteous // truth Open : Isa 60:11, Isa 62:10; Psa 118:20; Eze 48:31-34; Zec 8:20; Act 2:47; Rev 21:24 righteous : Isa 60:21; Exo 19:6; Deu 4:6-8; Psa 106:5; 1Pe 2:9; 2...

TSK: Isa 26:3 - wilt // in perfect peace // peace // stayed // because wilt : Isa 9:6, Isa 9:7, Isa 57:19-21; Psa 85:7, Psa 85:8; Mic 5:5; Joh 14:27, Joh 16:33; Rom 5:1; Eph 2:14-16; Phi 4:7 in perfect peace : Heb. peace ...

wilt : Isa 9:6, Isa 9:7, Isa 57:19-21; Psa 85:7, Psa 85:8; Mic 5:5; Joh 14:27, Joh 16:33; Rom 5:1; Eph 2:14-16; Phi 4:7

in perfect peace : Heb. peace

peace : mind, or, thought, or imagination

stayed : Isa 31:1, Isa 48:2, Isa 50:1

because : 1Ch 5:20; 2Ch 13:18, 2Ch 16:8; Psa 9:10; Jer 17:7, Jer 17:8; Rom 4:18-21

TSK: Isa 26:4 - Trust // in the // everlasting strength Trust : Isa 12:2, Isa 50:10; 2Ch 20:20, 2Ch 32:8; Psa 55:22, Psa 62:8; Pro 3:5, Pro 3:6 in the : Isa 45:17, Isa 45:24, Isa 63:1; Job 9:19; Psa 46:1, P...

TSK: Isa 26:5 - bringeth // the lofty bringeth : Isa 2:12, Isa 13:11, Isa 14:13, Isa 25:11; Job 40:11-13 the lofty : Isa 25:12, Isa 32:19, Isa 47:1; Jer 50:31, Jer 50:32, Jer 51:25, Jer 51...

TSK: Isa 26:6 - -- Isa 25:10, Isa 37:25, Isa 60:14; Jos 10:24; Jer 50:45; Dan 7:27; Zep 3:11; Mal 4:3; Luk 1:51-53, Luk 10:19; Rom 16:20; 1Co 1:26; Jam 2:5; Rev 2:26; Re...

TSK: Isa 26:7 - way // most way : Isa 35:8; 1Ch 29:17; Job 27:5, Job 27:6; Psa 18:23-26; Pro 20:7; 2Co 1:12; Eph 2:10; 1Jo 3:7, 1Jo 3:10 most : 1Sa 2:2-4; Job 31:6 *marg. Psa 1:6...

TSK: Isa 26:8 - in // we // desire in : Isa 64:4, Isa 64:5; Num 36:13; Job 23:10-12; Psa 18:23, Psa 44:17, Psa 44:18, Psa 65:6, Psa 106:3; Mal 4:4; Luk 1:6 we : Isa 25:9, Isa 30:18, Isa...

TSK: Isa 26:9 - have I // my spirit // for have I : Psa 63:6, Psa 63:7, Psa 77:2, Psa 77:3, Psa 119:62, Psa 130:6; Son 3:1-4, Son 5:2-8; Luk 6:12 my spirit : Psa 63:1; Pro 8:17; Mat 6:33; Mar 1...

TSK: Isa 26:10 - favour // in the // and will not favour : Isa 63:9, Isa 63:10; Exo 8:15, Exo 8:31, Exo 8:32, Exo 9:34; Deu 32:15; 1Sa 15:17; Psa 106:43; Pro 1:32; Ecc 3:16; Hos 13:6; Rom 2:4, Rom 2:5...

TSK: Isa 26:11 - when // will // they shall // be // at the // fire when : Psa 10:12; Mic 5:9 will : Isa 18:3; 1Sa 6:9; Job 34:27; Jer 5:3; Act 28:27 they shall : Exo 9:14; 1Sa 5:6-11; Jer 44:28; Luk 16:23 be : Isa 11:...

TSK: Isa 26:12 - ordain // for // in us ordain : Isa 57:10; Psa 29:11; Jer 33:6; Joh 14:27 for : Deu 30:6; Eze 36:25; Eph 2:10; Heb 13:20 in us : or, for us, Psa 57:2; Eze 20:9, Eze 20:14, E...

TSK: Isa 26:13 - other // by thee other : Isa 51:22; 2Ch 12:8; Joh 8:32; Rom 6:22 by thee : Isa 12:4; Jos 23:7; Amo 6:10; 1Co 4:7; Heb 13:15

TSK: Isa 26:14 - dead // and made dead : Isa 26:19, Isa 8:19, Isa 51:12, Isa 51:13; Exo 14:30; Psa 106:28; Hab 2:18-20; Mat 2:20; Rev 18:2, Rev 18:3, Rev 19:19-21, Rev 20:5 and made : ...

TSK: Isa 26:15 - increased // thou art // thou hadst increased : Isa 9:3, Isa 10:22; Gen 12:2, Gen 13:16; Num 23:10; Deu 10:22; Neh 9:23; Jer 30:19 thou art : Isa 44:23, Isa 60:21; Psa 86:9, Psa 86:10; J...

TSK: Isa 26:16 - in trouble // prayer in trouble : Deu 4:29, Deu 4:30; Jdg 10:9, Jdg 10:10; 2Ch 6:37, 2Ch 6:38, 2Ch 33:12, 2Ch 33:13; Psa 50:15, Psa 77:1, Psa 77:2; Psa 91:15; Jer 22:23; H...

TSK: Isa 26:17 - -- Isa 13:8, Isa 21:3; Psa 48:6; Jer 4:31, Jer 6:24, Jer 30:6; Joh 16:21; 1Th 5:3

TSK: Isa 26:18 - we have been in // we have not // the inhabitants we have been in : Isa 37:3; 2Ki 19:3; Hos 13:13 we have not : Exo 5:22, Exo 5:23; Jos 7:7-9; 1Sa 11:13, 1Sa 14:45 the inhabitants : Psa 17:14; Joh 7:7...

we have been in : Isa 37:3; 2Ki 19:3; Hos 13:13

we have not : Exo 5:22, Exo 5:23; Jos 7:7-9; 1Sa 11:13, 1Sa 14:45

the inhabitants : Psa 17:14; Joh 7:7; 1Jo 5:19

TSK: Isa 26:19 - dead men // my dead // Awake // thy dew // the earth dead men : Isa 25:8; Eze 37:1-14; Hos 6:2, Hos 13:14; Joh 5:28, Joh 5:29; Act 24:15; 1Co 15:22, 1Co 15:23; 1Th 4:14, 1Th 4:15; Rev 20:5, Rev 20:6, Rev...

TSK: Isa 26:20 - my // enter // shut // hide // for a my : Isa 51:4, Isa 51:16; Jer 7:23, Jer 31:14 enter : Isa 32:18, Isa 32:19; Gen 7:1, Gen 7:16; Exo 12:22, Exo 12:23; Psa 32:7, Psa 91:4; Pro 18:10; Ez...

TSK: Isa 26:21 - Lord // also // blood Lord : Isa 18:4; Psa 50:2, Psa 50:3; Eze 8:6, Eze 9:3-6, Eze 10:3-5, Eze 10:18, Eze 10:19; Hos 5:14, Hos 5:15; Mic 1:3-8; 2Th 1:7-10; Jud 1:14, Jud 1:...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Isa 26:1 - In that day // In the land of Judah // A strong city // Salvation will God appoint for walls and bulwarks In that day when God shall do such glorious works for the comfort of his people, and for the ruin of his and their enemies, as he hath described in ...

In that day when God shall do such glorious works for the comfort of his people, and for the ruin of his and their enemies, as he hath described in the foregoing chapter.

In the land of Judah in the church of God, which in Scripture is oft signified by the titles of Judah, and Jerusalem, and Zion, or the like.

A strong city Jerusalem, or the church, which is oft called or compared to a city, as Psa 87:3 Rev 3:12 11:2 21:2 .

Salvation will God appoint for walls and bulwarks God’ s immediate and saving protection shall be to his church instead of walls, &c. But I conceive, with submission, the words may very fitly be thus rendered, He will send , or put , or make her walls and bulwarks salvation , i.e. as safe as salvation itself; or, in safety, there being only a defect of the preposition, which is very frequent in Scripture.

Poole: Isa 26:2 - Open ye the gates // The righteous nation // Which keepeth the truth Open ye the gates of the city, mentioned Isa 26:1 . The righteous nation either, 1. Those godly Jews who are returning from Babylon; or, 2. The w...

Open ye the gates of the city, mentioned Isa 26:1 .

The righteous nation either,

1. Those godly Jews who are returning from Babylon; or,

2. The whole body of righteous and holy men, whether Jews or Gentiles. For he seems to speak here, as he apparently did in the foregoing chapter, of the times of the gospel.

Which keepeth the truth which is sincere and stedfast in the profession and practice of the true religion.

Poole: Isa 26:3 - -- Heb. The fixed thought or mind (i.e. the man whose mind and thoughts are fixed and settled upon thee by faith as the next clause explains it, the ...

Heb. The fixed thought or mind (i.e. the man whose mind and thoughts are fixed and settled upon thee by faith as the next clause explains it, the qualifications being put for the person so qualified, as folly and wisdom are put for a fool and a wise man, Pro 24:9 Mic 6:9 , and peace for a man of peace, Psa 120:7 ) thou wilt keep in peace, peace , i.e. in all manner of peace, in constant and perfect peace. In the foregoing verse the righteous were admitted into the city, and here they were preserved and defended in it by God’ s almighty power.

Poole: Isa 26:4 - For ever // Everlasting strength For ever in all times and conditions. Everlasting strength Heb. the Rock of ages ; a sure refuge to all those that trust in him, through all gener...

For ever in all times and conditions.

Everlasting strength Heb. the Rock of ages ; a sure refuge to all those that trust in him, through all generations; therefore you may safely trust in him, and that for ever.

Poole: Isa 26:5 - He bringeth down // Them that dwell on high He bringeth down Heb. he hath brought down , which yet may be put for the future, he will bring down, &c. You may trust him; for he can and doth rai...

He bringeth down Heb. he hath brought down , which yet may be put for the future, he will bring down, &c. You may trust him; for he can and doth raise some, and throw down others, according to his own good pleasure.

Them that dwell on high he speaks not so much of height of place as of dignity and power, in which sense also he mentions the lofty city , in the next clause. The lofty city ; which may be understood either of proud Babylon; or collectively, of all the strong and stately cities of God’ s enemies.

Poole: Isa 26:6 - -- God will bring it under the feet of his poor, and weak, and despised people.

God will bring it under the feet of his poor, and weak, and despised people.

Poole: Isa 26:7 - Is uprightness // Thou, most upright, dost weigh the path of the just Is uprightness or, most even or plain . Heb. evenness or plainness . Which is understood either, 1. Of the rectitude or goodness of his actions ...

Is uprightness or, most even or plain . Heb. evenness or plainness . Which is understood either,

1. Of the rectitude or goodness of his actions or course; or rather,

2. Of the good success of his affairs; for this suits best with the coherence. When the way of the wicked is rugged, in which they easily stumble and fall into mischief, of which he spoke, Isa 26:5,6 , the path of just men is plain and smooth, and they walk safely and comfortably in it.

Thou, most upright, dost weigh the path of the just: the sense of the words thus rendered is, Thou , O God, who art most upright in all thy ways, and therefore a lover of uprightness. and of all upright men, dost weigh (i.e. examine) the path of the just , the course of his actions, and, which is implied, dost approve of them, and therefore direct them to a happy issue. But the words are otherwise rendered by some late learned interpreters, to this purpose, Thou dost level or make plain (as this very word signifies, Psa 78:50 ) the path of the just exactly, Heb. with evenness , or evenly, so as to make it very even. Thus the first clause declares that it was even or plain, and this showeth whence or by whom it is made such, even by God.

Poole: Isa 26:8 - Yea, in the way of thy judgments, O Lord, have we waited for thee // To thy name, and to the remembrance of thee Yea, in the way of thy judgments, O Lord, have we waited for thee: and as we thy people have loved and served thee when thou hast made our way plain ...

Yea, in the way of thy judgments, O Lord, have we waited for thee: and as we thy people have loved and served thee when thou hast made our way plain and easy for us; so we have not forsaken thee, but waited upon thee, when thou hast made it rugged and troublesome by thy judgments. He speaks of the same just men Isa 26:7-9 , though it be with a change of the numbers and persons, which is usual in prophetical writings, the just, Isa 26:7 , we , Isa 26:1 26:9 .

To thy name, and to the remembrance of thee Heb. to thy name and thy memory ; which by a known figure called hendinduo may be put for the remembrance of thy name. And the name of God is here, as it is in many other places, put for God himself, as he hath made himself known by his word and works. And so the sense of this clause is, Our affections are not alienated from thee by thy judgments, but we still continue to desire thy presence and favour, and we support and comfort ourselves with the remembrance of what thou art, and what thou hast done, and what thou hast promised to be and do to thy people.

Poole: Isa 26:9 - With my soul // Have I // For when thy judgments are in the earth, the inhabitants of the world will learn righteousness With my soul sincerely and most affectionately, as Psa 63:1 , and elsewhere. Have I: the prophet speaks this in the name of all God’ s people,...

With my soul sincerely and most affectionately, as Psa 63:1 , and elsewhere.

Have I: the prophet speaks this in the name of all God’ s people, by comparing this with the foregoing verse. In the night; either,

1. Figuratively, in the time of affliction, which is often called night or darkness; or rather,

2. Properly, as appears from the next clause, wherein early or in the morning is opposed to it. When others are sleeping, my thoughts and desires are working towards God. Will I seek thee , by fervent prayer for thy loving-kindness. Early ; betimes in the morning, as the word signifies.

For when thy judgments are in the earth, the inhabitants of the world will learn righteousness: and good reason it is that we should thus desire and seek thee in the way of thy judgments, because this is the very design of thy judgments, that men should thereby be awakened to learn and return to their duty; and this is a common effect of them, that those who have been careless in prosperity, are made wiser and better by afflictions. The inhabitants of the world seem to be here taken not in opposition to God’ s people, as if not they only, but even the wicked world, would do thus; but in a general notion, so as to include, yea principally to design, God’ s people, as may be gathered both from the former part of this, and the foregoing verse, in which he describes their pious carriage under affliction; as also from the two following verses, in which he speaks of the wicked , whom he seems to oppose to these inhabitants of the world, because these learn righteousness, whilst those wicked men remain incorrigible both under mercies and judgments, Isa 26:10,11 .

Poole: Isa 26:10 - Let favour be showed to the wicked, yet will he not learn righteousness // In the land of uprightness // Will not behold the majesty of the Lord Let favour be showed to the wicked, yet will he not learn righteousness this is the carriage of thy people; but the course of wicked men is directly ...

Let favour be showed to the wicked, yet will he not learn righteousness this is the carriage of thy people; but the course of wicked men is directly contrary in all conditions; for if thou dost spare them, when thou punishest thine own people, they will not accept of that gracious invitation to repentance, nor walk worthy of so great a mercy.

In the land of uprightness even in God’ s church, and among his people, where righteousness is professed and taught, and by many practised; and where unrighteousness is discountenanced and punished; all which things are aggravations of his sin.

Will not behold the majesty of the Lord although God gives such plain and clear discoveries of his majesty and glory, not only in his word, but also in his works, and especially in this glorious work of his patience and mercy to wicked men, yet they wilfully shut their eyes at it, and will not acknowledge it.

Poole: Isa 26:11 - When thy hand is lifted up, they will not see // They shall see // The fire of thine enemies When thy hand is lifted up, they will not see and they are guilty of the same obstinate blindness when thou dost smite and punish them, which is comm...

When thy hand is lifted up, they will not see and they are guilty of the same obstinate blindness when thou dost smite and punish them, which is commonly signified by lifting up the hand, as Eze 44:12 Mic 5:9 . Compare also 2Sa 20:21 1Ki 11:26 . Or, as others render it, when thine hand is high or exalted , i.e. when thy works are most evident and most glorious, when thou appearest most gloriously for the defence of thy people, and for the punishment of thine and their enemies, they will not see.

They shall see: the same word is repeated in another sense. They shall feel and know that by sad and costly experience, which they would not learn by other and easier ways. Seeing is oft put for feeling ; in which sense men are said to see affliction, Lam 3:1 , and to see death, Psa 89:48 , and the like. At the people ; or, at or towards thy people, the pronoun thy being repeated out of the following clause, as it is in many other places of Scripture, as hath been before noted. Their envy and hatred against God’ s people blinded their minds, that they neither could nor would see that God was on their side, though the tokens of it were most manifest and undeniable; which was the case of Pharaoh and the Egyptians, who were not sensible that the Lord fought for Israel against the Egyptians, as they said, Exo 14:25 , till it was too late.

The fire of thine enemies not efficiently, but objectively; such fire or wrath as thou usest to pour forth upon thine implacable enemies. As my wrong , Gen 16:5 , is not the wrong done by me, but to me; and my violence, Jer 2:35 , is the violence done to me , as we translate it, not by me.

Poole: Isa 26:12 - Thou wilt ordain peace for us // All our works Thou wilt ordain peace for us as thou wilt destroy thine and our enemies, so thou wilt bless us thy people with peace and prosperity. All our works ...

Thou wilt ordain peace for us as thou wilt destroy thine and our enemies, so thou wilt bless us thy people with peace and prosperity.

All our works either,

1. All the good works done by us, which are the effects of thy grace; or rather,

2. All the good and great works which have been wrought for us, all our wonderful deliverances and singular blessings, come from thee. And so the argument is this, God hath delivered us formerly upon all occasions, and therefore he will still deliver us, and give us peace; which inference is frequently made by holy men in Scripture. In us , Heb. to or for us .

Poole: Isa 26:13 - Other lords beside thee // Have had dominion over us // By thee only // Will we make mention of thy name Other lords beside thee others besides thee, who art our only Judge, and King, and Lawgiver , Isa 33:22 , and besides those governors who have been ...

Other lords beside thee others besides thee, who art our only Judge, and King, and Lawgiver , Isa 33:22 , and besides those governors who have been set up by thee, and have ruled us for thee, and in subordination to thee, even foreign and heathenish lords, such as the Philistines, and lately the Assyrians.

Have had dominion over us have exercised a tyrannical power over us.

By thee only by thy favour and help, by which alone (and not by our strength or merits) we have been rescued from their tyranny.

Will we make mention of thy name we will celebrate thy praise, and trust in thee for the future. Thou only hast given us both ability and occasion to magnify thy name, whereas without thy succour we had gone into the place of silence, where there is no remembrance of thee, as is said, Psa 6:5 .

Poole: Isa 26:14 - They shall not rise // Therefore // thou hast // Destroyed them, and made all their memory to perish They shall not rise those tyrants and enemies are utterly and irrecoverably destroyed, so as they shall never live or rise again to molest us. Possib...

They shall not rise those tyrants and enemies are utterly and irrecoverably destroyed, so as they shall never live or rise again to molest us. Possibly he speaks of the miraculous destruction of Sennacherib’ s army before Jerusalem.

Therefore that they might be so effectually destroyed, thou didst undertake the work. Or rather, because (as this particle is used, Num 14:43 Psa 42:6 )

thou hast & c., as it follows.

Destroyed them, and made all their memory to perish thou hast destroyed both them and theirs, and all the monuments or memorials of their greatness and glory.

Poole: Isa 26:15 - Thou hast increased the nation // nation // Thou art glorified Thou hast increased the nation Heb. Thou hast added to the nation ; which may be understood either, 1. In way of mercy, of adding to their numbers,...

Thou hast increased the nation Heb. Thou hast added to the nation ; which may be understood either,

1. In way of mercy, of adding to their numbers, as our translation takes it; and so we have in effect the same phrase 2Sa 24:3 , The Lord add to the people , &c., and Psa 115:14 , in the Hebrew text, The Lord shall add upon or to you . Or,

2. In way of judgment, of adding to their plagues or miseries, of which we read Rev 22:18 , in which sense the phrase is found in the Hebrew text, Psa 120:3 , What shall be added to thee ? and in that usual form of imprecation, The Lord do so to me, and more , Rth 1:17 1Sa 3:17 , &c., where it is in the Hebrew, The Lord do so to me, and add . And this sense seems to be favoured by the context, as also by the ancient Greek translators, who render the words, add to them evil or punishments . And so the word adding may be used emphatically and sarcastically. God indeed will add to them; but what? Not numbers, and power, and glory, as they expected, but plagues and judgments one after another. This

nation is supposed by the current of interpreters to be the people of Israel, emphatically called the nation . Possibly it may be the Assyrians, of whom he spoke in the last verse. But this I propose with submission.

Thou art glorified thy justice is glorified in their punishment or destruction. Thou hadst removed it far unto all the ends of the earth; which may be understood either,

1. Of Israel, and that either in a way of mercy, Thou hast by destroying the Assyrians enlarged thy people, who were shut up in Jerusalem, so that now they may go to the remotest parts of the land; or in way of judgment, Thou hast removed thy people out of their own land, and suffered them to be carried captive to the ends of the earth. Or,

2. Of the Assyrians; Thou hast removed them from Jerusalem, which they had besieged, and caused them to flee into their own country, which in Scripture phrase was in the ends of the earth; of which see Isa 5:26 13:5 .

Poole: Isa 26:16 - They // Visited thee // They poured out // A prayer They to wit, thy people, as appears both from the matter of this verse, and from the following verses. Visited thee come into thy presence, with th...

They to wit, thy people, as appears both from the matter of this verse, and from the following verses.

Visited thee come into thy presence, with their prayers and supplications, as the next clause explains it.

They poured out which notes the plenty or rather the earnestness of their prayers, as Psa 42:4 142:2 .

A prayer Heb. a muttering or lowly speech , such as charmers use, and such as Hezekiah used when he was in great distress, Isa 38:14 , Like a crane or swallow, so did I chatter: I did mourn as a dove ; and such as is usual in case of great humiliation and dejection of mind. When thy chastening was upon them; when thou wast punishing them for their sins.

Poole: Isa 26:17 - So have we been So have we been such was our anguish and danger, in thy sight; whilst thou didst only look upon us like a mere spectator, without affording us the le...

So have we been such was our anguish and danger, in thy sight; whilst thou didst only look upon us like a mere spectator, without affording us the least degree of pity or help. Or this phrase notes only the reality of the thing; God was witness of this our misery, and knoweth the truth of what I say.

Poole: Isa 26:18 - We have been with child, we have been in pain, we have as it were brought forth wind // We have not wrought any deliverance // In the earth // The inhabitants of the world We have been with child, we have been in pain, we have as it were brought forth wind we have had the torment of a woman in child-bearing, but not the...

We have been with child, we have been in pain, we have as it were brought forth wind we have had the torment of a woman in child-bearing, but not the comfort of a living child, Joh 16:21 , for we have brought forth nothing but wind; all our labours and hopes were vain and unsuccessful. The prophet here represents their deplorable and desperate condition before God appeared so eminently to deliver them.

We have not wrought any deliverance we found that we were utterly unable to deliver ourselves.

In the earth or, in the land , in our own country, where yet we had far greater advantages than we could have had elsewhere.

The inhabitants of the world the Assyrians, or our other enemies; for they are here opposed to God’ s people.

Poole: Isa 26:19 - Thy dead men shall live // Together with my dead body // Shall they arise // Awake // Ye that dwell in the dust // Thy dew // Is as the dew of herbs // The earth shall cast out the dead Thy dead men shall live The prophet here turneth his speech to God’ s people, and gives them a cordial to support them in their deep distress, e...

Thy dead men shall live The prophet here turneth his speech to God’ s people, and gives them a cordial to support them in their deep distress, expressed in the foregoing verse. Thy dead men are not like those Isa 26:14 , for they shall not live, as I there said; but thine shall live. You shall certainly be delivered from all your fears and dangers. Nothing is more frequent, both in Scripture and other authors, than for great calamities to be compared to death , and deliverance from them to life , and reviving, and resurrection; and particularly the captivity of the Jews in Babylon, and their deliverance out of it, is largely expressed by this very similitude, Eze 37:11 , &c.

Together with my dead body as I myself, who am one of your number, and of these dead men, shall live again. You shall be delivered together with me. Which he might add, to meet with an objection; for they might think that God would take some special care of this holy prophet, and would preserve him when they should he destroyed. No, saith he, as I am at present like a dead carcass no less than you, so you shall be restored to life no less than I. If the supplement of our translation seems to be too literal, it may be rendered to the same purpose, as my body , the particle as being oft understood, as I have divers times observed: As my dead body shall rise, so shall theirs also; we are equally dead, and shall equally live again.

Shall they arise unto life, as appears from the former clause.

Awake out of your sleep, even the sleep of death , as it is called, Psa 13:3 ; death being oft compared to a sleep, as Joh 11:11 Act 7:60 , and restoration to life unto awaking, as 2Ki 4:31 .

Ye that dwell in the dust you that are dead and buried in the dust, as the dead are said to deep in the dust, Dan 12:2 .

Thy dew the favour and blessing of God upon thee, which is oft compared to the dew, as Hos 14:5 Mic 5:7 . The pronoun thy is here taken not efficiently, but objectively, as thy curse , Gen 27:13 , is the curse coming upon thee.

Is as the dew of herbs which gently refresheth and reviveth them, and maketh them to grow and flourish.

The earth shall cast out the dead as an abortive birth is cast out of the womb, to which the grave is compared. Job 1:21 . But because the verb here used doth not signify to cast out , but to cast down , which seems not proper here, these words may be, and are, both by ancient and later interpreters, rendered otherwise, and thou wilt cast down the land of the giants , or of the violent ones , of the proud and potent tyrants of the world. For the word here rendered dead is elsewhere rendered giants, as 2Sa 21:16,18 . See also Job 26:5 Pro 9:18 21:16 . But then the words seem to be better rendered, and thou wilt cast the giants down to the ground : either,

1. Thou , O God, who is oft understood in such cases; or rather,

2. Thou , O my people, to whom he speaks in the foregoing clauses of the verse, thy dead body, and thy dew and here continueth his speech, thou wilt or shalt cast , &c., thou shalt subdue even the most giant-like and mighty enemies; which though it be properly God’ s work, the church is oft said to do, because she by her prayers engageth God to do it. And so as the former clauses of the verse speak of the deliverance and prosperity of God’ s church and people, so this clause speaks of the destruction of their enemies, which usually accompanieth it.

Poole: Isa 26:20 - Enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee // For a little moment // The indignation Having foretold the wonderful deliverance and great happiness of God’ s people, and the utter destruction of their enemies, lest they should th...

Having foretold the wonderful deliverance and great happiness of God’ s people, and the utter destruction of their enemies, lest they should think they were now entering into the possession of this felicity, he adds what here follows, and intimates, that for the present they were to expect storms, and to prepare for them, and patiently to wait God’ s time for the accomplishment of so great a mercy.

Enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee withdraw thyself from the company and conversation of the wicked world, lest partaking with them in their sins thou dost also partake of their plagues; pour out thy prayers to God in thy closet, as this may be explained by comparing Mat 6:6 ; put thyself under the protection of my providence and grace by faith and prayer. He alludes to the common practice of men, who when there are storms or dangers abroad, betake themselves into their own houses or chambers for safety; or, as some think, to that history, Exo 9:19,20 , or to that command of not going out of their houses , Exo 12:22 , or to the like charge given to Rahab, as the condition of her preservation, Jos 2 .

For a little moment whereby he intimates that all their afflictions, how long and tedious soever they may seem, are but short and momentary, in comparison of that happiness which is reserved for them.

The indignation the dreadful effects of God’ s anger, those sore judgments of God mentioned in the following verse.

Poole: Isa 26:21 - Cometh out of his place // The inhabitants of the earth // The earth also shall disclose her blood, and shall no more cover her slain Cometh out of his place cometh down from heaven; which God in Scripture is frequently said to do, when he undertaketh any great and glorious work, ei...

Cometh out of his place cometh down from heaven; which God in Scripture is frequently said to do, when he undertaketh any great and glorious work, either of delivering his people, or of destroying their enemies. The speech is borrowed from the manner of princes, who come out of their palaces either to sit in judgment, or to fight against their enemies, which is the case here.

The inhabitants of the earth all the enemies of God and of his people; for these are here opposed to God’ s people. Therefore take heed you be not found in the number of them.

The earth also shall disclose her blood, and shall no more cover her slain the innocent blood which hath been spilled upon the earth shall be brought to light, and shall be severely revenged upon the murderers. For the phrase, see on Gen 4:10 Job 16:18 Eze 24:7 .

PBC: Isa 26:8 - -- See Philpot: ISAIAH 26:8

See Philpot: ISAIAH 26:8

Haydock: Isa 26:1 - Not see Not see. Let them perish, or live to witness the glory of the Jews.

Not see. Let them perish, or live to witness the glory of the Jews.

Haydock: Isa 26:1 - Day // Sion // Bulwark Day. Under the law of grace, Christians sing this and such like canticles. (Worthington) --- Sion. This word is not in Hebrew, &c., though it be...

Day. Under the law of grace, Christians sing this and such like canticles. (Worthington) ---

Sion. This word is not in Hebrew, &c., though it be understood. (Calmet) ---

Other nations have their respective cities. All Christians admit this one. (Worthington) ---

The captives continue to return thanks. Yet the Holy Ghost speaks chiefly of the Church, and of the general resurrection. (Calmet) ---

Bulwark. Faith and good works. (Worthington)

Haydock: Isa 26:2 - Truth Truth. The Jews who returned from Babylon, were more virtuous than their ancestors, as the prophets intimate; though they have Christians principall...

Truth. The Jews who returned from Babylon, were more virtuous than their ancestors, as the prophets intimate; though they have Christians principally in view.

Haydock: Isa 26:3 - Away Away: condemning the virtuous, as if they were fools. (Menochius) --- Symmachus, "our work, or fiction, is taken away." Hebrew may have other mean...

Away: condemning the virtuous, as if they were fools. (Menochius) ---

Symmachus, "our work, or fiction, is taken away." Hebrew may have other meanings. (Haydock)

Haydock: Isa 26:4 - You You, people of Juda.

You, people of Juda.

Haydock: Isa 26:5 - High High: Nabuchodonosor and his empire.

High: Nabuchodonosor and his empire.

Haydock: Isa 26:6 - Needy Needy. The Jews shall behold the ruin of the city by Cyrus, (Calmet) who was of a contemptible nation. (Haydock)

Needy. The Jews shall behold the ruin of the city by Cyrus, (Calmet) who was of a contemptible nation. (Haydock)

Haydock: Isa 26:7 - In In. God will remove every obstacle, at their return.

In. God will remove every obstacle, at their return.

Haydock: Isa 26:9 - Night Night of distress.

Night of distress.

Haydock: Isa 26:10 - Justice Justice. Clemency would therefore be ill placed. If the Israelites had not been led away captives, would they ever have been reformed?

Justice. Clemency would therefore be ill placed. If the Israelites had not been led away captives, would they ever have been reformed?

Haydock: Isa 26:12 - Works Works, both in punishing and rewarding. (Calmet) --- God crowns his own gifts. (Estius)

Works, both in punishing and rewarding. (Calmet) ---

God crowns his own gifts. (Estius)

Haydock: Isa 26:13 - Lords Lords of Babylon, (Calmet) and our own passions. (Haydock)

Lords of Babylon, (Calmet) and our own passions. (Haydock)

Haydock: Isa 26:14 - Giants Giants; the proud emperors of Babylon, whom thou wilt destroy. Septuagint, "physicians;" as Rephaim has also this meaning.

Giants; the proud emperors of Babylon, whom thou wilt destroy. Septuagint, "physicians;" as Rephaim has also this meaning.

Haydock: Isa 26:15 - Nation // Ends Nation of the Jews. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "add evils to them, O Lord; add evils to the nobles of the land." (Haydock) --- Hebrew may have the ...

Nation of the Jews. (Calmet) ---

Septuagint, "add evils to them, O Lord; add evils to the nobles of the land." (Haydock) ---

Hebrew may have the same sense. ---

Ends: princes, or the Chaldeans, sending them also into captivity; or thou hast propagated thy Church over the world.

Haydock: Isa 26:16 - They They. Septuagint, "We," &c. (Calmet) --- Affliction is a wholesome medicine. (Haydock)

They. Septuagint, "We," &c. (Calmet) ---

Affliction is a wholesome medicine. (Haydock)

Haydock: Isa 26:18 - Wind // Fallen Wind. Our expectation of aid from others has been disappointed. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "the spirit of thy salvation, which thou hast wrought on ...

Wind. Our expectation of aid from others has been disappointed. (Calmet) ---

Septuagint, "the spirit of thy salvation, which thou hast wrought on the earth. We shall not fall, but the inhabitants of the earth shall fall." (Haydock) ---

Their copies must have been different from ours. ---

Fallen. The Chanaanites are left for our trial and punishment. (Calmet)

Haydock: Isa 26:19 - Dead // Ruin Dead: a civil death, shall regain their liberty; and those who have left this world in a state of virtue, shall be happy. --- Ruin. Cyrus liberate...

Dead: a civil death, shall regain their liberty; and those who have left this world in a state of virtue, shall be happy. ---

Ruin. Cyrus liberated the Jews, having conquered Babylon.

Haydock: Isa 26:20 - Away Away, and Cambyses be destroyed, Ezechiel xxxviii. 11. (Calmet)

Away, and Cambyses be destroyed, Ezechiel xxxviii. 11. (Calmet)

Haydock: Isa 26:21 - Shall cover her stain no more Shall cover her stain no more. This is said with relation to the martyrs, and their happy resurrection. (Challoner) --- The blood of the saints sh...

Shall cover her stain no more. This is said with relation to the martyrs, and their happy resurrection. (Challoner) ---

The blood of the saints shall demand vengeance. (Calmet)

Gill: Isa 26:1 - In that day shall this song be sung in the land of Judah // we have a strong city // salvation will God appoint for walls and bulwarks In that day shall this song be sung in the land of Judah,.... When great things shall be done: for the church and people of God; and when antichrist a...

In that day shall this song be sung in the land of Judah,.... When great things shall be done: for the church and people of God; and when antichrist and all their enemies are destroyed, as mentioned in the preceding chapter Isa 25:1; then this song shall be sung expressed in this throughout; which the Targum calls a "new" song, an excellent one, as the matter of it shows; and which will be sung in the land of Judah, the land of praise in the congregation of the saints, the professors and confessors of the name of Jesus: in Mount Zion, the church of God below, Psa 149:1,

we have a strong city; not an earthly one, as Jerusalem; so the Jewish writers, Jarchi, Aben Ezra, and Kimchi, interpret it; nor the heavenly city, which God has prepared and built, and saints are looking for, and are citizens of: but rather the holy city, the New Jerusalem, described in Rev 21:2 or however, the church of Christ, as in the latter day; which will be a "strong" one, being of the Lord's founding, establishing, keeping, and defending; and whose strength will greatly lie in the presence of God, and his protection of it; in the number of its citizens, which will be many, when Jews and Gentiles are converted; and in their union one with another, and the steadfastness of their faith in Christ; when a "small one", as the church is now, shall become a "strong nation", Isa 60:22,

salvation will God appoint for walls and bulwarks; instead of walls, ditches, parapets, counterscarps, and such like fortifications; what they are to cities, that is salvation to the church and people of God; it is their safety and security: as God the Father is concerned in it, it flows from his love, which is unchangeable; it is by an appointment of his, which is unalterable; is secured by election grace, which stands not upon the works of men, but the will of God; and by the covenant of grace, ordered in all things, and sure; and by his power the saints are kept unto it: as Christ is concerned in it, it is as walls and bulwarks; he is the author of it, has completely finished it, and has overcome and destroyed all enemies; his righteousness is a security from all charges and condemnation; his satisfaction a bulwark against the damning power of sin, the curses of the law, and the wrath of God; his mediation and intercession are a protection of saints; and his almighty power a guard about them. As the Spirit is concerned in it, who is the applier of it, and evidences interest in it; it is a bulwark against sin, against Satan's temptations, against a spirit of bondage to fear, against error, and a final and total falling away; particularly the church's "walls" will be "salvation", and her "gates" praise, of which in the next verse Isa 26:2, in the latter day glory; to which this song refers; see Isa 60:18.

Gill: Isa 26:2 - Open ye the gates // that the righteous nation which keepeth the truth may enter in Open ye the gates,.... Not of Jerusalem, literally understood, nor of heaven; rather of the New Jerusalem, whose gates are described, Rev 21:12 at lea...

Open ye the gates,.... Not of Jerusalem, literally understood, nor of heaven; rather of the New Jerusalem, whose gates are described, Rev 21:12 at least of the church in the latter day; the gates or door into which now should be, and then will be, open; Christ the door, and faith in him, and a profession of it, without which none ought to be admitted, and whoever climbs up another way is a thief and a robber, Joh 10:1 these words are the words of the prophet, or of God, or of Christ by him, directed not to the keepers of the gates of Jerusalem, or of the doors of the temple, though, they may be alluded to; nor to any supposed doorkeeper of heaven, angels, or men, there being none such; rather to the twelve angels, at the twelve gates of the New Jerusalem, Rev 21:12 or to the ministers of the Gospel, who have the key of knowledge to open the door of faith, and let persons into the knowledge of divine things; to admit them to ordinances, and receive them into the church by the joint suffrage of the members of it. The phrase denotes a large increase of members, and a free, open, and public reception of them, who are after described; see Isa 60:11,

that the righteous nation which keepeth the truth may enter in; not all the world, for there is none righteous, not one of them naturally, or of themselves; nor the Jewish nation, for though they sought after righteousness, did not attain it, unless when they will be converted in the latter day, and then they, and all the Lord's people, will be righteous, and appear to be a holy nation, and a peculiar people, Isa 60:21 and being made righteous by the righteousness of Christ imputed to them, and sanctified by the Spirit, will be fit persons to be admitted through the gates into the city; see Psa 118:19 and because there will be great numbers of such, especially when a nation shall be born at once, hence they are so called: and these will be a set of men that "will keep the truth"; not, as the Targum renders it,

"who keep the law with a perfect heart;''

for no man can do that; but rather the ordinances of the Gospel, as they were first delivered by Christ and his apostles, and especially the truths of it; and the word here used is in the plural number, and may be rendered "truths"; the several truths of the Gospel, which will be kept by the righteous, not in memory only, but in their hearts and affections, and in their purity, and with a pure conscience; and they will not part with them at any rate, but hold them fast, that no man take their crown, Rev 3:11.

Gill: Isa 26:3 - Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace // whose mind is stayed on thee // because he trusteth in thee Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace,.... Peace with God in Christ through his blood, in a way of believing, and as the fruit and effect of his righte...

Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace,.... Peace with God in Christ through his blood, in a way of believing, and as the fruit and effect of his righteousness being received by faith; this is not always felt, received, and enjoyed in the soul; yet the foundation of it always is, and is perfect; and besides, this peace is true, real, and solid; in which sense the word "perfect" is used, in opposition to a false and imaginary one; and it will end in perfect peace in heaven: moreover, the word "perfect" is not in the Hebrew text, it is there "peace, peace"; which is doubled to denote the certainty of it, the enjoyment of it, and the constancy and continuance of it; and as expressive of all sorts of peace, which God grants unto his people, and keeps for them, and them in; as peace with God and peace with men, peace outward and peace inward, peace here and peace hereafter; and particularly it denotes the abundance of peace that believers will have in the kingdom of Christ in the latter day; see Psa 72:7,

whose mind is stayed on thee; or "fixed" on the love of God, rooted and grounded in that, and firmly persuaded of interest in it, and that nothing can separate from it; on the covenant and promises of God, which are firm and sure; and on the faithfulness and power of God to make them good, and perform them; and on Christ the Son of God, and Saviour of men; upon him as a Saviour, laying the whole stress of their salvation on him; upon his righteousness, for their justification; upon his blood and sacrifice, for atonement, pardon, and cleansing; on his fulness, for the supply of their wants; on his person, for their acceptance with God; and on his power, for their protection and preservation; see Isa 10:20,

because he trusteth in thee; not in the creature, nor in any creature enjoyment, nor in their riches, nor in their righteousness, nor in their own hearts, nor in any carnal privileges: only in the Lord, as exhorted to in the next verse Isa 26:4; in the Word of the Lord, as the Targum, that is, in Christ.

Gill: Isa 26:4 - Trust ye in the Lord for ever // for in the Lord JEHOVAH is everlasting strength Trust ye in the Lord for ever,.... In the Word of the Lord for ever and ever, as the Targum again; that is, at all times, in every state and condition...

Trust ye in the Lord for ever,.... In the Word of the Lord for ever and ever, as the Targum again; that is, at all times, in every state and condition, in times of affliction, temptation, and darkness; for he will support under, and in his own time deliver out of every trouble, and cause all things to work to gether for good; and trust in him always, for everything, for all temporal blessings, and for all spiritual ones, and for eternal life and happiness; for he has them, has promised them, and will give them:

for in the Lord JEHOVAH is everlasting strength; Christ is the Lord JEHOVAH, which is, and was, and is to come, self-existent, eternal, and immutable; and in him is strength, as well as righteousness for his people; and that for everything it is wanted for, to bear up under temptations and afflictions, to withstand every spiritual enemy, to exercise every grace, and discharge every duty: and this strength is everlasting; it always continues in him, and is always to be had from him; he is the "eternal" God, who is the refuge of his people, and his "arms" of power and might "underneath" them are "everlasting": the words may be rendered, "for in Jah" is "Jehovah, the Rock of ages" q; Jehovah the Son is in Jehovah the Father, according to Joh 10:38 or "Jah Jehovah" is "the Rock of ages", so Vitringa; he is the "Rock" on which the church and every believer is built, against which "the gates of hell cannot prevail"; and he has been the Rock of his people in ages past, and will be in ages to come: or "of worlds"; this world, and that to come; and so it is explained in the Talmud r, he that trusts in the Lord has a refuge in this world, and in the world to come.

Gill: Isa 26:5 - For he bringeth down them that dwell on high, the lofty city // he layeth it low: he layeth it low, even to the ground; he bringeth it even to the dust For he bringeth down them that dwell on high, the lofty city,.... That dwell on high in the high city, so the accents require the words to be rendered...

For he bringeth down them that dwell on high, the lofty city,.... That dwell on high in the high city, so the accents require the words to be rendered; and accordingly the Targum is,

"for he will bring low the inhabitants of the high and strong city;''

such that dwell in a city built on high, and in the high towers and palaces of it; or that sit on high thrones, are spiritual wickednesses in high places, and are of proud and haughty dispositions and conduct; as the pope of Rome and his cardinals, &c.; for not the city of Jerusalem is here meant, as Jerom thinks, whose destruction he supposes is foretold, as both by the Babylonians and Romans; and therefore, he observes, the word is doubled in the next clause; nor the city of Nineveh; nor Babylon, literally taken; but mystical Babylon is here meant. Jarchi interprets them that dwell on high of Tyre and Greece; but Jerom says, the Jews understand by the lofty city the city of Rome; and this seems to be the true sense; a city built upon seven hills or mountains; a city that has ruled over the kings of the earth, and whose present inhabitants are proud and haughty:

he layeth it low: he layeth it low, even to the ground; he bringeth it even to the dust; all which expressions denote the utter destruction of it; see Isa 25:12.

Gill: Isa 26:6 - The foot shall tread it down // even the feet of the poor, and the steps of the needy The foot shall tread it down,.... Trample upon it when brought down, laid low, and level with the ground, as mire is trodden in the streets, and straw...

The foot shall tread it down,.... Trample upon it when brought down, laid low, and level with the ground, as mire is trodden in the streets, and straw for the dunghill; as grapes in the winepress, or grass by the feet of cattle: not the foot of a prince, as Aben Ezra observes, or of mighty men; but, as follows,

even the feet of the poor, and the steps of the needy; these are not the Israelites in a literal sense, as Kimchi explains it; but the spiritual Israel of God; the righteous, as the Targum paraphrases it; the saints of the most High, to whom the kingdom and dominion under the whole heaven will now be given, and who will be just come out of great tribulation; for the words suggest, that the people of God will be a poor and afflicted people, and very feeble, and sore distressed, a little before the destruction of antichrist; but as God has been always used to do his work by the poor and weak things of this world, by mean and feeble instruments, so he will now, and raise his poor and needy ones to a very high and exalted estate; all their enemies shall be subdued and crushed under their feet; see Mal 4:3 Jarchi interprets the feet of the poor of the feet of the King Messiah, according to Zec 9:9.

Gill: Isa 26:7 - The way of the just is uprightness // thou most upright // dost weigh the path of the just The way of the just is uprightness,.... Or, "the way for the just is uprightnesses" s, most upright; the way which is appointed for him, and which he...

The way of the just is uprightness,.... Or, "the way for the just is uprightnesses" s, most upright; the way which is appointed for him, and which he is directed to walk in, is a way of righteousness and holiness, and in which he does walk; he walks uprightly, according to the rules of the word, becoming the Gospel of Christ, and worthy of his calling: or, it is "evennesses"; a most plain and even way, in which men, though fools, shall not err, Isa 35:8 or, "the way" of the Lord "to the just is uprightnesses", or "evennesses"; most upright, or most even; there is no inequality in it, though sometimes so charged, Eze 18:25 it is entirely agreeable to justice, equity, and truth; regular and even, and suited to all his perfections of wisdom, goodness, &c. t:

thou most upright; these words are addressed to God, and contain an appellation and description of him, who is upright, just, and true, and loves upright and righteous persons; so Kimchi and Ben Melech take the word to be in the vocative case, and as an address to God; though some render them, "he is upright" u; that is, the just man is upright, whose way is uprightness; but the former sense best agrees with what follows:

dost weigh the path of the just; observe, consider, and approve of it, as being according to rule, and agreeable to his mind and will, Psa 1:6 or, "thou dost level" or "make even the path of the just" w; remove all impediments and obstructions out of it, direct his goings, order his steps, and cause him to walk in a straight way, wherein he shall not stumble, Jer 31:9 and so this is a reason given why the way of the just is even, because it is made so by the Lord himself.

Gill: Isa 26:8 - Yea, in the way of thy judgments, O Lord, have we waited for thee // the desire of our soul is to thy name, and to the remembrance of thee Yea, in the way of thy judgments, O Lord, have we waited for thee,.... Meaning by "judgments" either the ministration of the word and ordinances, call...

Yea, in the way of thy judgments, O Lord, have we waited for thee,.... Meaning by "judgments" either the ministration of the word and ordinances, called statutes and judgments, Psa 147:19 an attendance on which is the right way of waiting upon God, and where it may be expected he will be found and manifest himself, and favour with his gracious presence; or else the corrections and chastisements, which are done in wisdom and with judgment, in measure and in mercy, and in a fatherly way, and for good; and so the sense is, that they had not only followed the Lord in a plain and even way, but even in the more rugged paths of afflictive dispensations; nor did these things at all move them from their duty to him, and worship of him:

the desire of our soul is to thy name, and to the remembrance of thee; to God himself, and to a remembrance of his nature, perfections, and works; to Christ, whose name is as ointment poured forth, and whose person is desirable, because of his glory, beauty, and fulness, because of his offices, and blessings of grace; and to his Gospel, which publishes and proclaims him, his grace, and salvation; and to his ordinances, which refresh the memory of his people concerning him, and his love to them shown in what he has done and suffered for them.

Gill: Isa 26:9 - With my soul have I desired thee in the night // yea, with my spirit within me will I seek thee early // for when thy judgments are in the earth // the inhabitants of the world will learn righteousness With my soul have I desired thee in the night,.... Either literally, when others were asleep: or figuratively, in the captivity; which, as Jarchi says...

With my soul have I desired thee in the night,.... Either literally, when others were asleep: or figuratively, in the captivity; which, as Jarchi says, was like unto the night; or in the time of Jewish and Gentile darkness, preceding the coming of Christ; or rather in the time of latter day darkness, when the church is represented as heartily desirous of, and importunately praying for, the latter day glory, the rising of the sun of righteousness, the spiritual reign of Christ, the spread of his Gospel, and the setting up of his kingdom and glory in the world; so the Targum,

"my soul desireth to pray before thee in the night;''

her desires were expressed by prayer:

yea, with my spirit within me will I seek thee early; she determines to continue seeking the Lord night and day, with the greatest intenseness of spirit, and eagerness of soul, until she obtained and enjoyed what she sought for; namely, the presence of Christ, communion with him, the discoveries of his love, and larger measures of his grace, light, and knowledge;

for when thy judgments are in the earth; such as pestilence, famine, sword, and the like; especially the judgments of God on antichrist, and the antichristian states, which will be just and righteous; see Rev 19:2,

the inhabitants of the world will learn righteousness; not the wicked inhabitants of the world, for the contrary is suggested in the following verses; but the saints that are in the world, the upright ones, the righteous before mentioned, the church and her members; these, by the judgments of God in the world, learn what a righteous Being he is, how unrighteous men are, on whose account these judgments come, and themselves too, as in his sight; and they learn the insufficiency of their own righteousness to justify them before him, and their need, the worth and value, of the righteousness of Christ: and also learn hereby to live soberly, righteously, and godly, Psa 119:67 they learn to ascribe righteousness to God, and to fear and worship him, Rev 15:3.

Gill: Isa 26:10 - Let favour be showed to the wicked // yet will ye not learn righteousness // in the land of uprightness will he deal unjustly // and will not behold the majesty of the Lord Let favour be showed to the wicked,.... As it often is in a providential way; they have the good things of this life, and sometimes more than heart co...

Let favour be showed to the wicked,.... As it often is in a providential way; they have the good things of this life, and sometimes more than heart could wish for; nor are they in trouble as other men; they have many mercies, and many deliverances; they have their portion here, and are filled with hidden treasure, and are spared when others are cut off; and, besides sparing mercy and providential goodness, sometimes enjoy the means of grace, have the word and ordinances:

yet will ye not learn righteousness; neither repent of sin, nor reform from it; though "the goodness of God" should, yet it does not, "lead" him "to repentance"; he neither learns the righteousness of God, nor of Christ, nor the insufficiency of his own righteousness, nor to live a truly righteous and godly life; all means and mercies will not do, without the efficacious grace of God:

in the land of uprightness will he deal unjustly; in the land of Judea, where were the laws and statutes of God, which were just and equitable, the word and worship of God, and many good men, who lived uprightly, and set good examples; and yet wicked men went on in their sinful courses. Jarchi interprets it of Jerusalem, and the temple, and of men's spoiling, plundering, and destroying there; and the Talmud x of wicked Esau, by whom the Romans are meant, that should destroy Jerusalem, and the land of Israel. It seems best to understand it of any land or country in later times, or present ones, where there is a good polity, good and wholesome laws are enacted, vice is corrected and punished, and virtue encouraged, and where also the Gospel is preached, and the ordinances of it administered; and yet, notwithstanding all laws, instructions, precepts, and precedents, such men will go on to live unrighteous and ungodly lives and conversations:

and will not behold the majesty of the Lord; visible in the government of the world; in the dispensations of his providence, in protecting and defending his own people, and in punishing of the wicked; in the Gospel, and in the success of it: in the effusion of the Spirit; and in the setting up of the kingdom of Christ in greater glory in the latter day.

Gill: Isa 26:11 - Lord, when thy hand is lifted up, they will not see // but they shall see // and be ashamed for their envy at the people // yea, the fire of thine enemies shall devour them Lord, when thy hand is lifted up, they will not see,.... Or, "thy high hand they will not see" y; when it is exalted, and become glorious in power, i...

Lord, when thy hand is lifted up, they will not see,.... Or, "thy high hand they will not see" y; when it is exalted, and become glorious in power, in punishing wicked men; though the punishment is visible, yet they will not consider that it comes from the hand of God, but attribute it to chance, misfortune, or second causes, Psa 28:5 or when the hand the Lord is manifest in doing good to his own people, in delivering them out of their oppressions, and the hands of their oppressors; in reviving his cause and interest, and enlarging the kingdom of his Son; they will not see, own, and acknowledge the power and glory of it. The Targum favours this latter sense,

"Lord, when thou shall be revealed in thy power to do good to them that fear thee, there will be no light to the enemies of thy people:''

but they shall see; whether they will or not; the judgments of God will be manifest, both in his vengeance on antichrist, and in glorifying his own people:

and be ashamed for their envy at the people; their envy at the happiness and prosperity of the Lord's people; their malice towards them, and persecution of them: or, "for the zeal of thy people" z; not for the zeal of the people to God, but for the zeal of the Lord to them; when they shall see him zealously affected to them, and concerned for them; as they shall see it, whether they will or not; they will then be confounded and ashamed, when he will vindicate his own people, and right their wrongs, and avenge their enemies; so the Targum,

"the revenge of thy people shall cover them:''

yea, the fire of thine enemies shall devour them: or, "fire shall devour them, thine enemies" a; the wrath of God, which is like unto fire; or, fire out of the mouth of the witnesses, Rev 11:5.

Gill: Isa 26:12 - Lord, thou wilt ordain peace for us // for thou also hast wrought all our works in us Lord, thou wilt ordain peace for us,.... Dispose, order, give it to us, outward and inward, spiritual and eternal: chiefly respect is had to that peac...

Lord, thou wilt ordain peace for us,.... Dispose, order, give it to us, outward and inward, spiritual and eternal: chiefly respect is had to that peace and prosperity the church will have in the latter day, which the zeal of the Lord of hosts, before mentioned, will perform for her, Psa 72:8 and which she expresses her faith in, when it goes ill with the wicked, and that for the following reason:

for thou also hast wrought all our works in us; or "to us", or "for us" b; all that had been done for them before were done by the Lord, came of his hands, were owing to his goodness, grace, and power and not to be ascribed unto themselves; all their mercies and deliverances, all that had been done for them in nature, providence, and grace; all that had been done for the church and people of God in all ages and periods of time, the glory of all was due to him; and since he had done so many and such great things for them, they had reason to believe he would grant them that peace and prosperity promised and expected in the latter day. The work of grace upon the heart is peculiarly the work which God works in his people, and is thought by some to be here meant; this is God's work, and not man's; and it is an internal one, something wrought in the heart, and which, being begun, will be performed; and may be expressed in the plural number, because of the excellency of it, it is the work of works; it includes others, and from whence all good works done by good men spring; and, besides, it consists of various parts, each of which is a work; as the work of faith, the labour of love, and perfect work of patience; and the fruit of this is peace here, and men on account of it may expect eternal peace hereafter; for this is the saints' meetness for glory, and which is inseparably connected with it. Abarbinel c interprets this "peace" of the times of the Messiah, and of the redemption wrought out by him; and "our works", of the troubles that came upon the Jews in captivity, which were all from the Lord, as well as their mercies and deliverance.

Gill: Isa 26:13 - O Lord our God, other lords besides thee have had dominion over us // but by thee only will we make mention of thy name O Lord our God, other lords besides thee have had dominion over us,.... Sin and Satan have the dominion over the Lord's people, in a state of unregen...

O Lord our God, other lords besides thee have had dominion over us,.... Sin and Satan have the dominion over the Lord's people, in a state of unregeneracy; before the good work of grace is wrought in them, every lust is a lord, and is served and obeyed: and Satan is the god of this world by usurpation, and leads men captive at his will. Some think that the idols the Jews had served and worshipped, called "Baalim" or lords, are meant, and that this is a confession of their sin; but that word is not here used. The Targum interprets it of the Jewish governors ruling over them, without the Lord; rather the Assyrians and Babylonians are designed; but it is best of all to understand it of persecuting tyrants, of antichristian kings and states that have exercised a tyrannical power over the people of God:

but by thee only will we make mention of thy name; that is, by thy strength, and through grace received from thee, we will be only subject to thee, our King and Lawgiver, and obey thy commands, serve and worship thee, knowing that it is right to obey God rather than man; or through the influence of thy grace, and by the assistance of thy Spirit, we will celebrate thy name, give thee thanks for our deliverance from the servitude, bondage, and oppression of other lords.

Gill: Isa 26:14 - They are dead, they shall not live; they are deceased, they shall not rise // therefore hast thou visited and destroyed them, and made all their memory to perish They are dead, they shall not live; they are deceased, they shall not rise,.... The above tyrannical lords, the kings of the earth and their mighty ...

They are dead, they shall not live; they are deceased, they shall not rise,.... The above tyrannical lords, the kings of the earth and their mighty men, associates of the Romish antichrist, who shall be gathered together, and slain at the battle at Armageddon; these shall not live again in this world, nor rise from their graves, and return to their former state, power, and authority; or tyrannise over, molest, disturb, oppress, and persecute the people of God any more; though they shall live again at the end of the thousand years, and shall awake to everlasting shame and contempt, and come forth to the resurrection of damnation. The Targum is,

"they worship the dead, who do not live; and their mighty men, who shall not rise;''

and are opposed to the worshippers of the only Lord God:

therefore hast thou visited and destroyed them, and made all their memory to perish; or, "because thou hast visited", &c. d; for these words are a reason why they are irrecoverably lost, and shall not live in eternal life, or rise in the resurrection of the just; because God has visited them in wrath, destroyed them in and for their sins, with such an utter destruction, that they shall be remembered no more. This visitation will be at Armageddon, when the kings, and captains and great men will be slain; the beast and false prophet taken, and cast alive into the furnace of fire; and the rest will be killed by the sword, proceeding out of the mouth of Christ, Rev 19:18. The Targum interprets it of God's casting the wicked into hell.

Gill: Isa 26:15 - Thou hast increased the nation, O Lord, thou hast increased the nation // thou art glorified // thou hadst removed it far unto all the ends of the earth Thou hast increased the nation, O Lord, thou hast increased the nation,.... The righteous nation, Isa 26:2 the church of God, by the numerous conversi...

Thou hast increased the nation, O Lord, thou hast increased the nation,.... The righteous nation, Isa 26:2 the church of God, by the numerous conversions of Jews and Gentiles; when the nation of the Jews shall be born at once, and the fulness and forces of the Gentiles are brought in; when the kingdoms of this world will become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ: this increase is repeated, to denote the certainty of it, and because a matter of great moment and importance:

thou art glorified; as by the destruction of the antichristian powers, so by the enlargement of the church and kingdom of Christ; for now will the voices be heard in heaven, giving praise and glory to God: even those that are frightened with his judgments, as well as those that are affected with his goodness, will give glory to the God of heaven, Rev 11:13,

thou hadst removed it far unto all the ends of the earth: not the Jewish people now scattered throughout the world, but the righteous nation increased and enlarged, which now will be spread to the ends of the world; for Christ's kingdom will be from sea to sea, and from the river to the ends of the earth, Psa 72:8 it may be rendered, "thou hast removed afar off all the ends of the earth": so De Dieu, who interprets it of the great men of the earth, the excellent in it, the cornerstones of it; but perhaps it may be better to understand hereby every island and mountain fleeing away at the destruction of antichrist, and the enlargement of Christ's kingdom, Rev 16:20.

Gill: Isa 26:16 - Lord, in trouble have they visited thee // they poured out a prayer // when thy chastening was upon them Lord, in trouble have they visited thee,.... This, and the two following verses Isa 26:17, represent the troubles and disappointments of the church an...

Lord, in trouble have they visited thee,.... This, and the two following verses Isa 26:17, represent the troubles and disappointments of the church and people of God, before the destruction of antichrist; in which time of trouble they will visit the Lord, frequent the throne of grace, as saints in afflictions are wont to do; and sometimes this is the end to be answered by afflictions, Hos 5:15,

they poured out a prayer; or "muttering" e; they will pray with a low voice, in an humble and submissive way, as persons in dejected circumstances; not a few words, but many, will they use; their petitions will be numerous; they will continue praying, and be constant at it, and out of the abundance of their hearts their mouth will speak; and they will pour out their souls and their complaints to the Lord, though privately, and with a low voice, and with groans unutterable:

when thy chastening was upon them; the afflicting hand of God, not as a punishment, but as a fatherly chastisement upon them; so all their persecutions from men are considered as permitted by the Lord for their instruction and correction; and these will not drive them from God, but bring them to him to seek him by prayer and supplication.

Gill: Isa 26:17 - Like as a woman with child // that draweth near the time of her delivery // is in pain, and crieth out in her pangs // so have we been in thy sight, O Lord Like as a woman with child,.... By this simile are set forth the great distresses and afflictions the church of Christ will be in, before redemption a...

Like as a woman with child,.... By this simile are set forth the great distresses and afflictions the church of Christ will be in, before redemption and deliverance from the antichristian yoke comes:

that draweth near the time of her delivery; when her burden is great and very troublesome:

is in pain, and crieth out in her pangs; for her friends to come about her, and give her all the help and assistance they can:

so have we been in thy sight, O Lord; in great distress and trouble, and crying to him for salvation and deliverance, all which were well known unto him.

Gill: Isa 26:18 - We have been with child // we have been in pain // we have as it were brought forth wind // we have not wrought any deliverance in the earth // neither have the inhabitants of the world fallen We have been with child,.... Like women with child; we have been full of hopes and expectations of great things, of deliverance from our enemies, and ...

We have been with child,.... Like women with child; we have been full of hopes and expectations of great things, of deliverance from our enemies, and of the kingdom of Christ being at hand:

we have been in pain; in great distress and anxiety, and in fervent and frequent prayer, travailing in birth, which we looked upon as forerunners of a happy issue of things:

we have as it were brought forth wind; all our hopes have proved abortive, and we have been disappointed in our expectations:

we have not wrought any deliverance in the earth: or, "salvations" have "not been wrought in the earth" f; this explains what is meant by bringing forth wind; salvation and deliverance out of the hand of the enemy not being wrought, as was expected:

neither have the inhabitants of the world fallen; worldly men, the great men, the kings of the earth; particularly such as commit fornication with the whore of Rome, Popish persecuting princes; these as yet are not fallen, though they shall in the battle of Armageddon.

Gill: Isa 26:19 - Thy dead men shall live // together with my dead body shall they arise // Awake and sing, ye that dwell in the dust // for thy dew is as the dew of herbs // and the earth shall cast out the dead Thy dead men shall live,.... These are the words of Christ to his church and people, promising great and good things to them after their troubles are...

Thy dead men shall live,.... These are the words of Christ to his church and people, promising great and good things to them after their troubles are over, thereby comforting them under all their trials and disappointments; as that such things should come to pass, which would be as life from the dead; as the conversion of the Jews, and of great numbers of the Gentiles, dead in trespasses and sins; and a great reviving of the interest of religion, and of professors of it, grown cold, and dead, and lifeless; and a living again of the witnesses, which had been slain. And, moreover, this may refer to the first resurrection, upon the second coming of Christ, when the church's dead, and Christ's dead, the dead in him, will live again, and rise first, and come forth to the resurrection of life, and live and reign with Christ a thousand years:

together with my dead body shall they arise; or, "arise my dead body"; the church, the mystical body of Christ, and every member of it, though they have been dead, shall arise, everyone of them, and make up that body, which is the fulness of him that filleth all in all, and that by virtue of their union to him: there was a pledge and presage of this, when Christ rose from the dead, upon which the graves were opened, and many of the saints arose, Mat 27:51 see Hos 6:2, or, "as my dead body shall they arise" g; so Kimchi and Ben Melech; as sure as Christ's dead body was raised, so sure shall everyone of his people be raised; Christ's resurrection is the pledge and earnest of theirs; because he lives, they shall live also; he is the first fruits of them that slept: or as in like manner he was raised, so shall they; as he was raised incorruptible, powerful, spiritual, and glorious, and in the same body, so shall they; their vile bodies shall be fashioned like unto his glorious body. This is one of the places in Scripture from whence the Jews h prove the resurrection of the dead; and which they apply to the times of the Messiah, and to the resurrection in his days.

Awake and sing, ye that dwell in the dust; this is a periphrasis of the dead, of such as are brought to the dust of death, and sleep there; as death is expressed by sleeping, so the resurrection by awaking out of sleep; which will be brought about by the voice of Christ, which will be so loud and powerful, that the dead will hear it, and come out of their graves; and then will they "sing", and have reason for it, since they will awake in the likeness of Christ, and bear the image of him the heavenly One:

for thy dew is as the dew of herbs; the power of Christ will have as great effect upon, and as easily raise the dead, as the dew has upon the herbs, to refresh, raise, and revive them; so that their "bones", as the prophet says, "shall flourish like an herb", Isa 66:14,

and the earth shall cast out the dead; deliver up the dead that are in it, at the all powerful voice of Christ; see Rev 20:13. The Targum is,

"but the wicked to whom thou hast given power, and they have transgressed thy word, thou wilt deliver into hell;''

see Rev 20:14.

Gill: Isa 26:20 - Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers // enter thou into thy chambers // and shut thy doors about thee // hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers,.... These words are either to be connected with the preceding verse Isa 26:19, and considered as a part...

Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers,.... These words are either to be connected with the preceding verse Isa 26:19, and considered as a part of the song; and then the design of them is, to let the people of God know that there would be times of great trouble and distress, previous to that glorious one before mentioned; whether it is to be understood of a spiritual resurrection, the conversion of Jews and Gentiles in the latter day, which the judgments on antichrist will antecede, Rev 19:2 or of the first resurrection, upon the coming of Christ, Dan 12:1 and therefore should expect such a time of trouble, and concern themselves for shelter and security: or else, the song being finished, as is generally thought; in the last verse Isa 26:19, these words begin a new subject, and should a new chapter, in which it is foretold what punishment would be inflicted on a wicked world; and therefore, to comfort the Lord's people that should dwell among them, and to let them know what provision was made for their retreat and safety, and where they might be secure during the storm, these words are delivered out; in which the Lord addresses his people in a very kind and tender manner, claiming an interest in them, and expressing great affection for them, and concern for their welfare: "my people", whom I have loved with an everlasting love, chosen to be a special people above all people, made a covenant with them in my Son, and redeemed them by his blood, and called them by my Spirit and grace; "come", away from the wicked, be separate from them, have no fellowship with them; much the same with that in Rev 18:4 and referring to the same time, "come out of her, my people", &c. or "come" to me, who have been the dwelling place of my people in all generations, a strong habitation, to which they may continually resort, Psa 90:1 or "come" along with me, I will lead you to a place where you may be safe; as he did Noah and his family into the ark, to which there may be an allusion, Gen 7:1,

enter thou into thy chambers; alluding to persons abroad in the fields, who, when they perceive a storm coming, make haste home, and get into their houses, and into the more retired and safer parts of them, till it is over; or to the Israelites, who kept within the doors, while the destroying angel passed through the land of Egypt; or to Rahab and her family being within her house, when Jericho was destroyed: these "chambers" may be taken literally for places of prayer and devotion; prayer being very proper to have recourse unto in times of trouble, and which as it should be performed by single persons privately, Mat 6:6 which text is a comment on this; and perhaps respect may be had to the manner of the performance of it by societies, in times of great persecution; so it is the safety of God's people; and there is nothing better for them, in times of trouble, than to commit themselves to God in prayer, and to his divine protection: and it may be that God himself, and the perfections of his nature, are here meant by "chambers"; his name is a strong tower, whither the righteous run and are safe, Pro 18:10 and every perfection in him is as a chamber in this tower, where the saints betaking themselves may securely lodge, till the trouble is over; as the everlasting love of God, which changes not, and therefore the sons of Jacob are not consumed; the faithfulness of God, in his covenant and promises, which never fails; and his power, in which they are kept, as in a garrison, 1Pe 1:5 and these chambers may not be unfitly applied to Christ and to his blood and righteousness, who is a hiding place from the wind, and a covert from the storm, a strong hold for prisoners of hope; in whose person are rest, peace, and safety in the midst of trouble; whose righteousness secures from condemnation and wrath; and not good works, as the Targum, which it says will protect in a time of distress; but the righteousness of Christ will, as also his precious blood; which was typified by the blood of the passover lamb, sprinkled on the door posts of the Israelites, whereby they were preserved by the destroying angel; and was signified by the scarlet thread in Rahab's window, the token by which her house was known, and so all in it saved. The general design of the words is to exhort the people of God to a composed and tranquil state of mind; to calmness, quietness, and rest, while the judgments of God were upon the earth; to be still and easy, whatever hurly burleys there were in the world; to commit themselves to God, and look upon themselves safe and secure, under his providence and protection. Some of the ancients, by "chambers", understand the graves, and not amiss; especially if the words are to be considered in connection with the preceding, thus, since the dead saints will arise as sure as Christ is risen, and in like manner as he, and those that sleep in the dust of the earth will awake and sing, then do not be afraid of death and the grave; enter here, as into your bedchambers; where, being taken away from the evil to come, you will enter into peace, lie down and rest on your beds, in the utmost secrecy and safety, until the resurrection morn; while storms of divine wrath fall upon a wicked and ungodly world; see Isa 57:1,

and shut thy doors about thee; a phrase expressive of safety and secrecy, and may be applied to the several things above mentioned:

hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast; not the indignation of Satan, or of wicked persecutors against the saints, but the indignation of God; and that not upon his own people, or on the Jewish nation, but on a wicked world; not in hell, for that will be everlasting, and never over, and much less be only for a little moment; but as it will be in time, and fall upon all the nations of the world, and especially the Romish antichrist, and the antichristian states; and refers chiefly to the seven vials of God's wrath, which will be poured forth upon them; which, when they begin, will soon be over; see Isa 34:2 and so will be the burning of the world, the last instance of God's indignation on earth, it will soon be at an end; and, in the meanwhile, the saints will be with Christ in the air; and those troubles, in which the people will be involved before happy times come, will be very short; as indeed all their afflictions are but for a moment, a little moment; the temptation that will come upon all the earth, to try the inhabitants of it, will be but an hour; and the slaying of the witnesses, and their lying slain, will be but three days and a half; this time of trouble will be shortened for the elect's sake, Mat 24:21 compare with this Psa 57:1.

Gill: Isa 26:21 - For, behold, the Lord cometh out of his place // to punish the inhabitants of the earth for their iniquity // the earth also shall disclose her blood, and shall no more cover her slain For, behold, the Lord cometh out of his place,.... God, as omnipresent, is everywhere, and cannot be properly said to quit one place, and go to anothe...

For, behold, the Lord cometh out of his place,.... God, as omnipresent, is everywhere, and cannot be properly said to quit one place, and go to another; but as heaven is the seat of his majesty, and where he more manifestly displays his glory, when he is said to do anything remarkable on earth, he is said to come out of his place, and come down thither, Mic 1:3 especially in the exertion of his power and justice, in a way of punishment of sin; which is his act, his strange act; and comes off from his throne of grace and mercy, in which he delights: the allusion is to a king leaving his throne and palace, to go forth against an enemy abroad, or to quell and punish rebellious subjects: some reference may be had to the Lord's dwelling in the temple secretly, in the inward part of it, and coming out from thence in the display of his perfections, as Calvin thinks; with which may be compared Rev 14:15,

to punish the inhabitants of the earth for their iniquity; not the same as in Isa 26:10 for those are distinguished from the Lord's people; but carnal, worldly, and earthly men, particularly the followers of antichrist, called the inhabiters of the earth, who have committed fornication with the whore of Rome, Rev 17:2 these the Lord will punish for their iniquity; for he punishes none but for sin, even for their idolatries, adulteries, sorceries, thefts, and murders, particularly their shedding of innocent blood, as follows; and therefore their punishment will be just, God will remember their iniquities, and retaliate; see Rev 9:20,

the earth also shall disclose her blood, and shall no more cover her slain; when God shall make inquisition for blood, the blood of all his saints and prophets will be found in mystical Babylon, and what was hid and covered, or thought to be so, will now be discerned, and brought to light, and just punishment inflicted for it, Rev 18:24 unless this should rather denote the great effusion of blood and carnage that will be made, so that the earth will not be able to drink it in, and the slain will lie unburied on it; see Rev 11:13. The Targum favours the former sense,

"and the earth shall reveal the innocent blood that is shed on it, and shall no more cover her slain.''

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Isa 26:1 Heb “deliverance he makes walls and a rampart.”

NET Notes: Isa 26:3 Heb “[one of] firm purpose you will keep [in] peace, peace, for in you he possesses trust.” The Hebrew term יֵצֶ&#...

NET Notes: Isa 26:4 The Hebrew text has “for in Yah, the Lord, an everlasting rock.” Some have suggested that the phrase בְּיָ&#...

NET Notes: Isa 26:5 The translation assumes that יַשְׁפִּילֶנָּה (yashpilennah) ...

NET Notes: Isa 26:7 The metaphor of a level/smooth road/path may refer to their morally upright manner of life (see v. 8a), but verse 7b, which attributes the smooth path...

NET Notes: Isa 26:8 Heb “your name and your remembrance [is] the desire of [our?] being.”

NET Notes: Isa 26:9 The translation understands צֶדֶק (tsedeq) in the sense of “justice,” but it is possible that it carries the...

NET Notes: Isa 26:10 Heb “in a land of uprightness they act unjustly”; NRSV “they deal perversely.”

NET Notes: Isa 26:11 Heb “yes, fire, your enemies, will consume them.” Many understand the prefixed verb form to be jussive and translate, “let [fire] co...

NET Notes: Isa 26:12 Some suggest emending גַּם כָּל (gam kol, “even all”) to כִּג‘...

NET Notes: Isa 26:14 Heb “visited [for harm]” (cf. KJV, ASV); NAB, NRSV “you have punished.”

NET Notes: Isa 26:15 Or “brought honor to yourself.”

NET Notes: Isa 26:16 The meaning of this verse is unclear. It appears to read literally, “O Lord, in distress they visit you, they pour out [?] an incantation, your ...

NET Notes: Isa 26:18 Heb “and the inhabitants of the world do not fall.” The term נָפַל (nafal) apparently means here, “be ...

NET Notes: Isa 26:19 It is not certain whether the resurrection envisioned here is intended to be literal or figurative. A comparison with 25:8 and Dan 12:2 suggests a lit...

NET Notes: Isa 26:20 Heb “until anger passes by.”

NET Notes: Isa 26:21 This implies that rampant bloodshed is one of the reasons for divine judgment. See the note at 24:5.

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:1 In that day shall ( a ) this song be sung in the land of Judah; We have a strong city; ( b ) salvation will [God] appoint [for] walls and bulwarks. (...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:2 ( c ) Open ye the gates, that the righteous nation which keepeth the truth may enter in. ( c ) He assures the godly to return after the captivity to ...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:3 Thou wilt keep [him] in perfect peace, [whose] ( d ) mind [is] stayed [on thee]: because he trusteth in thee. ( d ) You have decreed so, and your pur...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:5 For he bringeth down them that dwell on high; ( e ) the lofty city, he layeth it low; he layeth it low, [even] to the ground; he bringeth it [even] to...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:6 The foot shall tread it down, [even] the feet of the ( f ) poor, [and] the steps of the needy. ( f ) God will set the poor afflicted over the power o...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:8 Yea, in the way of thy ( g ) judgments, O LORD, have we waited for thee; the desire of [our] soul [is] to thy name, and to the remembrance of thee. (...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:9 With my soul have I desired thee in the night; yea, with my spirit within me will I seek thee early: for when thy judgments [are] in the earth, the in...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:10 Let favour ( i ) be shown to the wicked, [yet] he will not learn righteousness: in the land of uprightness he will deal unjustly, and will not behold ...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:11 LORD, [when] thy hand is lifted up, they will not see: [but] they shall see, and be ashamed for [their] ( k ) envy at the people; yea, the fire of thy...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:13 O LORD our God, [other] ( m ) lords beside thee have had dominion over us: [but] by thee only will we make mention of thy name. ( m ) The Babylonians...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:14 [They are] ( n ) dead, they shall not live; [they are] deceased, they shall not rise: therefore hast thou visited and destroyed them, and made all the...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:15 Thou hast increased ( o ) the nation, O LORD, thou hast increased the nation: thou art glorified: thou hadst removed [it] far [to] all the ends of the...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:16 LORD, in trouble have they ( p ) visited thee, they poured out a prayer [when] thy chastening [was] upon them. ( p ) That is, the faithful by the rod...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:17 As a woman with child, [that] draweth near the time of her delivery, is in pain, [and] crieth out in her pangs; so have we been in thy ( q ) sight, O ...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:18 We have been with child, we have been in pain, we have as it were brought forth ( r ) wind; we have not wrought any deliverance on the earth; neither ...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:19 ( t ) Thy dead [men] shall live, [together with] my dead body shall they arise. Awake and sing, ye that dwell in dust: for thy ( u ) dew [is as] the d...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:20 Come, my people, ( x ) enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee: hide thyself as it were for a little moment, until the indignation...

Geneva Bible: Isa 26:21 For, behold, the LORD cometh out of his place to punish the inhabitants of the earth for their iniquity: the earth also shall disclose her ( y ) blood...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Isa 26:1-10 - A Libation To Jehovah The Song Of Two Cities In that day shall this song be sung in the land of Judah; We have a strong city; salvation will God appoint for walls and bulw...

Maclaren: Isa 26:3-4 - A Libation To Jehovah The Inhabitant Of The Rock Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on Thee: because he trusteth in Thee. Trust ye in the Lord for e...

MHCC: Isa 26:1-4 - --" That day," seems to mean when the New Testament Babylon shall be levelled with the ground. The unchangeable promise and covenant of the Lord are th...

MHCC: Isa 26:5-11 - --The way of the just is evenness, a steady course of obedience and holy conversation. And it is their happiness that God makes their way plain and easy...

MHCC: Isa 26:12-19 - --Every creature, every business, any way serviceable to our comfort, God makes to be so; he makes that work for us which seemed to make against us. The...

MHCC: Isa 26:20-21 - --When dangers threaten, it is good to retire and lie hid; when we commend ourselves to God to hide us, he will hide us either under heaven or in heaven...

Matthew Henry: Isa 26:1-4 - -- To the prophecies of gospel grace very fitly is a song annexed, in which we may give God the glory and take to ourselves the comfort of that grace: ...

Matthew Henry: Isa 26:5-11 - -- Here the prophet further encourages us to trust in the Lord for ever, and to continue waiting on him; for, I. He will make humble souls that trust i...

Matthew Henry: Isa 26:12-19 - -- The prophet in these verses looks back upon what God had done with them, both in mercy and judgment, and sings unto God of both, and then looks forw...

Matthew Henry: Isa 26:20-21 - -- These two verses are supposed not to belong to the song which takes up the rest of the chapter, but to begin a new matter, and to be rather an intro...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:1 - -- Thus the second hymnic echo has its confirmation in a prophecy against Moab, on the basis of which a third hymnic echo now arises. Whilst on the oth...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:2 - -- In Isa 26:1 this city is thought of as still empty: for, like paradise, in which man was placed, it is first of all a creation of God; and hence the...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:3 - -- The relation of Israel and Jehovah to one another is now a permanent one. "Thou keepest the firmly-established mind in peace, peace; for his confid...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:4 - -- A cry goes forth again, as if from heaven, exhorting Israel to continue in this mind. "Hang confidently on Jehovah for ever: for in Jah, Jehovah, i...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:5-6 - -- He has already proved Himself to be such a rock, on which everything breaks that would attack the faithful whom He surrounds. "For He hath bent dow...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:7 - -- The righteous, who go astray according to the judgment of the world, thus arrive at a goal from which their way appears in a very different light. ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:8-9 - -- It then commences again in a lyrical tone in Isa 26:8 and Isa 26:9 : "We have also waited for Thee, that Thou shouldest come in the path of Thy jud...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:10 - -- Here again the shiir has struck the note of a m âshâl . And proceeding in this tone, it pauses here once more to reflect as at the close of a ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:11-13 - -- The situation still remains essentially the same as in Isa 26:11-13 : "Jehovah, Thy hand has been exalted, but they did not see: they will see the ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:14 - -- The tyrants who usurped the rule over Israel have now utterly disappeared. "Dead men live not again, shades do not rise again: so hast Thou visited...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:15 - -- Israel, when it has such cause as this for praising Jehovah, will have become a numerous people once more. "Thou hast added to the nation, O Jehova...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:16-18 - -- The tephillâh now returns to the retrospective glance already cast in Isa 26:8, Isa 26:9 into that night of affliction, which preceded the redempt...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:19 - -- But now all this had taken place. Instead of singing what has occurred, the tephillah places itself in the midst of the occurrence itself. "Thy dea...

Keil-Delitzsch: Isa 26:20-21 - -- The judgment upon them is not mentioned, indeed, till after the completion of the church through those of its members that have died, although it mu...

Constable: Isa 7:1--39:8 - --III. Israel's crisis of faith chs. 7--39 This long section of the book deals with Israel's major decision in Isa...

Constable: Isa 13:1--35:10 - --B. God's sovereignty over the nations chs. 13-35 This major section of the book emphasizes the folly of ...

Constable: Isa 24:1--27:13 - --2. Divine victory over the nations chs. 24-27 This section of the text has similarities to the p...

Constable: Isa 26:1-21 - --The future rejoicing of God's people ch. 26 This section focuses on the remnant of Israe...

Constable: Isa 26:1-6 - --A song 26:1-6 26:1 The prophet revealed another song that will be sung "in that day" (the Millennium, cf. ch. 25) by those in Zion. The New Jerusalem ...

Constable: Isa 26:7-19 - --A prayer 26:7-19 Isaiah moved from a hymn of praise to a prayer that has two parts: present waiting for God (vv. 7-10) and future expectation from God...

Constable: Isa 26:20-21 - --A warning 26:20-21 The prophet now addressed his people rather than God. 26:20 Before the restoration of Israel, however, God's people would experienc...

Guzik: Isa 26:1-21 - Judah's Kingdom of God Song Isaiah 26 - Judah's Kingdom of God Song A. The city of God and the city of Man. 1. (1-2) The strength of God's city. In that day this song will be...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) ISAIAH, son of Amoz (not Amos); contemporary of Jonah, Amos, Hosea, in Israel, but younger than they; and of Micah, in Judah. His call to a higher deg...

JFB: Isaiah (Garis Besar) PARABLE OF JEHOVAH'S VINEYARD. (Isa. 5:1-30) SIX DISTINCT WOES AGAINST CRIMES. (Isa. 5:8-23) (Lev 25:13; Mic 2:2). The jubilee restoration of posses...

TSK: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) Isaiah has, with singular propriety, been denominated the Evangelical Prophet, on account of the number and variety of his prophecies concerning the a...

TSK: Isaiah 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview

Poole: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE ARGUMENT THE teachers of the ancient church were of two sorts: 1. Ordinary, the priests and Levites. 2. Extraordinary, the prophets. These we...

Poole: Isaiah 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 26 A song of praise and confidence in God, for the blessings of righteousness, judgments on their enemies, and favour to his people: their ...

MHCC: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) Isaiah prophesied in the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah. He has been well called the evangelical prophet, on account of his numerous and...

MHCC: Isaiah 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Isa 26:1-4) The Divine mercies encourage to confidence in God. (Isa 26:5-11) His judgments. (Isa 26:12-19) His people exhorted to wait upon Him. (...

Matthew Henry: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, With Practical Observations, of The Book of the Prophet Isaiah Prophet is a title that sounds very great to those that understand it, t...

Matthew Henry: Isaiah 26 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This chapter is a song of holy joy and praise, in which the great things God had engaged, in the foregoing chapter, to do for his people against hi...

Constable: Isaiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title and writer The title of this book of the Bible, as is true of the o...