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Yohanes 15:9-17

Konteks

15:9 “Just as the Father has loved me, I have also loved you; remain 1  in my love. 15:10 If you obey 2  my commandments, you will remain 3  in my love, just as I have obeyed 4  my Father’s commandments and remain 5  in his love. 15:11 I have told you these things 6  so that my joy may be in you, and your joy may be complete. 15:12 My commandment is this – to love one another just as I have loved you. 7  15:13 No one has greater love than this – that one lays down his life 8  for his friends. 15:14 You are my friends 9  if you do what I command you. 15:15 I no longer call you slaves, 10  because the slave does not understand 11  what his master is doing. But I have called you friends, because I have revealed to you everything 12  I heard 13  from my Father. 15:16 You did not choose me, but I chose you 14  and appointed you to go and bear 15  fruit, fruit that remains, 16  so that whatever you ask the Father in my name he will give you. 15:17 This 17  I command you – to love one another.

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[15:9]  1 tn Or “reside.”

[15:10]  2 tn Or “keep.”

[15:10]  3 tn Or “reside.”

[15:10]  4 tn Or “kept.”

[15:10]  5 tn Or “reside.”

[15:11]  6 tn Grk “These things I have spoken to you.”

[15:12]  7 sn Now the reference to the commandments (plural) in 15:10 have been reduced to a singular commandment: The disciples are to love one another, just as Jesus has loved them. This is the ‘new commandment’ of John 13:34, and it is repeated in 15:17. The disciples’ love for one another is compared to Jesus’ love for them. How has Jesus shown his love for the disciples? This was illustrated in 13:1-20 in the washing of the disciples’ feet, introduced by the statement in 13:1 that Jesus loved them “to the end.” In context this constitutes a reference to Jesus’ self-sacrificial death on the cross on their behalf; the love they are to have for one another is so great that it must include a self-sacrificial willingness to die for one another if necessary. This is exactly what Jesus is discussing here, because he introduces the theme of his sacrificial death in the following verse. In John 10:18 and 14:31 Jesus spoke of his death on the cross as a commandment he had received from his Father, which also links the idea of commandment and love as they are linked here. One final note: It is not just the degree or intensity of the disciples’ love for one another that Jesus is referring to when he introduces by comparison his own death on the cross (that they must love one another enough to die for one another) but the very means of expressing that love: It is to express itself in self-sacrifice for one another, sacrifice up to the point of death, which is what Jesus himself did on the cross (cf. 1 John 3:16).

[15:13]  8 tn Or “one dies willingly.”

[15:14]  9 sn This verse really explains John 15:10 in another way. Those who keep Jesus’ commandments are called his friends, those friends for whom he lays down his life (v. 13). It is possible to understand this verse as referring to a smaller group within Christianity as a whole, perhaps only the apostles who were present when Jesus spoke these words. Some have supported this by comparing it to the small group of associates and advisers to the Roman Emperor who were called “Friends of the Emperor.” Others would see these words as addressed only to those Christians who as disciples were obedient to Jesus. In either case the result would be to create a sort of “inner circle” of Christians who are more privileged than mere “believers” or average Christians. In context, it seems clear that Jesus’ words must be addressed to all true Christians, not just some narrower category of believers, because Jesus’ sacrificial death, which is his act of love toward his friends (v. 13) applies to all Christians equally (cf. John 13:1).

[15:15]  10 tn See the note on the word “slaves” in 4:51.

[15:15]  11 tn Or “does not know.”

[15:15]  12 tn Grk “all things.”

[15:15]  13 tn Or “learned.”

[15:16]  14 sn You did not choose me, but I chose you. If the disciples are now elevated in status from slaves to friends, they are friends who have been chosen by Jesus, rather than the opposite way round. Again this is true of all Christians, not just the twelve, and the theme that Christians are “chosen” by God appears frequently in other NT texts (e.g., Rom 8:33; Eph 1:4ff.; Col 3:12; and 1 Pet 2:4). Putting this together with the comments on 15:14 one may ask whether the author sees any special significance at all for the twelve. Jesus said in John 6:70 and 13:18 that he chose them, and 15:27 makes clear that Jesus in the immediate context is addressing those who have been with him from the beginning. In the Fourth Gospel the twelve, as the most intimate and most committed followers of Jesus, are presented as the models for all Christians, both in terms of their election and in terms of their mission.

[15:16]  15 tn Or “and yield.”

[15:16]  16 sn The purpose for which the disciples were appointed (“commissioned”) is to go and bear fruit, fruit that remains. The introduction of the idea of “going” at this point suggests that the fruit is something more than just character qualities in the disciples’ own lives, but rather involves fruit in the lives of others, i.e., Christian converts. There is a mission involved (cf. John 4:36). The idea that their fruit is permanent, however, relates back to vv. 7-8, as does the reference to asking the Father in Jesus’ name. It appears that as the imagery of the vine and the branches develops, the “fruit” which the branches produce shifts in emphasis from qualities in the disciples’ own lives in John 15:2, 4, 5 to the idea of a mission which affects the lives of others in John 15:16. The point of transition would be the reference to fruit in 15:8.

[15:17]  17 tn Grk “These things.”



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