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Teks -- Psalms 58:1-11 (NET)

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Psalm 58
58:1 For the music director; according to the al-tashcheth style; a prayer of David. Do you rulers really pronounce just decisions? Do you judge people fairly? 58:2 No! You plan how to do what is unjust; you deal out violence in the earth. 58:3 The wicked turn aside from birth; liars go astray as soon as they are born. 58:4 Their venom is like that of a snake, like a deaf serpent that does not hear, 58:5 that does not respond to the magicians, or to a skilled snake-charmer. 58:6 O God, break the teeth in their mouths! Smash the jawbones of the lions, O Lord! 58:7 Let them disappear like water that flows away! Let them wither like grass! 58:8 Let them be like a snail that melts away as it moves along! Let them be like stillborn babies that never see the sun! 58:9 Before the kindling is even placed under your pots, he will sweep it away along with both the raw and cooked meat. 58:10 The godly will rejoice when they see vengeance carried out; they will bathe their feet in the blood of the wicked. 58:11 Then observers will say, “Yes indeed, the godly are rewarded! Yes indeed, there is a God who judges in the earth!”
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel
 · Miktam a literary or musical term (NIV margin)


Topik/Tema Kamus: Altaschith | Music | Michtam | David | Wicked | Serpent | Depravity of Mankind | Snail | Impenitence | Adder | ENCHANTMENT | ASP | Charmers and Charming | EAR | Judge | FUEL | Rulers | POISON | Blood | Thorn | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 58:1 - O congregation The word seems to point at Saul's judges and counsellors; who met together to consult what they should do against David.

The word seems to point at Saul's judges and counsellors; who met together to consult what they should do against David.

Wesley: Psa 58:1 - Sons of men So he calls them; to mind them that they were men, and must give an account to God for all their hard speeches.

So he calls them; to mind them that they were men, and must give an account to God for all their hard speeches.

Wesley: Psa 58:2 - Heart With free choice and consent.

With free choice and consent.

Wesley: Psa 58:2 - Hands He intimates that they did great wrong under the pretence of justice, and while they seemed exactly to weigh the true proportion between the actions a...

He intimates that they did great wrong under the pretence of justice, and while they seemed exactly to weigh the true proportion between the actions and the recompenses allotted to them, they turned the scale; and pronounced an unjust sentence.

Wesley: Psa 58:2 - Land Or, in this land, where God is present, and where you have righteous laws to govern you.

Or, in this land, where God is present, and where you have righteous laws to govern you.

Wesley: Psa 58:3 - Estranged From God, and from all goodness. Their very natures are corrupt, even from their birth: they are the wicked offspring of sinful parents.

From God, and from all goodness. Their very natures are corrupt, even from their birth: they are the wicked offspring of sinful parents.

Wesley: Psa 58:3 - Astray By actual sins, from their childhood, as soon as ever they were capable of the exercise of reason.

By actual sins, from their childhood, as soon as ever they were capable of the exercise of reason.

Wesley: Psa 58:4 - Poison Their malicious disposition.

Their malicious disposition.

Wesley: Psa 58:5 - Not hearken As they commonly say of the adders, such really are these men: deaf to all my counsels, to their own consciences, and to God's law. Of the charming or...

As they commonly say of the adders, such really are these men: deaf to all my counsels, to their own consciences, and to God's law. Of the charming or enchanting of serpents, mention is made both in other places of scripture, and in all sorts of authors, ancient and modern, Hebrew and Arabick, and Greek and Latin. And particularly the Arabick writers (to whom these creatures were best known) name some sorts of serpents, among which the adder is one, which they call deaf, not because they are dull of hearing, but, as one of them expressly faith, because they will not be charmed.

Wesley: Psa 58:6 - Their teeth Their powerful instruments of doing mischief.

Their powerful instruments of doing mischief.

Wesley: Psa 58:7 - Melt away As waters arising from melted snow, which at first run with great force, but are suddenly gone.

As waters arising from melted snow, which at first run with great force, but are suddenly gone.

Wesley: Psa 58:8 - Melteth Which is quickly dissolved.

Which is quickly dissolved.

Wesley: Psa 58:9 - Before Before your pots can be heated.

Before your pots can be heated.

Wesley: Psa 58:9 - Take them Violently and irresistibly.

Violently and irresistibly.

Wesley: Psa 58:9 - Living Alive, as he did Korah.

Alive, as he did Korah.

Wesley: Psa 58:10 - Rejoice For the blessed effects of it; the vindication of God's honour, and the deliverance of himself and of all good men.

For the blessed effects of it; the vindication of God's honour, and the deliverance of himself and of all good men.

Wesley: Psa 58:10 - Wash There shall be so great a slaughter of his enemies that he might, if he pleased, wash his feet in their blood.

There shall be so great a slaughter of his enemies that he might, if he pleased, wash his feet in their blood.

JFB: Psa 58:1 - -- David's critical condition in some period of the Sauline persecution probably occasioned this Psalm, in which the Psalmist teaches that the innate and...

David's critical condition in some period of the Sauline persecution probably occasioned this Psalm, in which the Psalmist teaches that the innate and actual sinfulness of men deserves, and shall receive, God's righteous vengeance, while the pious may be consoled by the evidence of His wise and holy government of men. (Psa 58:1-11)

JFB: Psa 58:1 - O congregation Literally, "Oh, dumb"; the word used is never translated "congregation." "Are ye dumb? ye should speak righteousness," may be the translation. In any ...

Literally, "Oh, dumb"; the word used is never translated "congregation." "Are ye dumb? ye should speak righteousness," may be the translation. In any case, the writer remonstrates with them, perhaps a council, who were assembled to try his cause, and bound to give a right decision.

JFB: Psa 58:2 - -- This they did not design; but

This they did not design; but

JFB: Psa 58:2 - weigh . . . violence Or give decisions of violence. Weigh is a figure to express the acts of judges.

Or give decisions of violence. Weigh is a figure to express the acts of judges.

JFB: Psa 58:2 - in the earth Publicly.

Publicly.

JFB: Psa 58:3-5 - -- Describe the wicked generally, who sin naturally, easily, malignantly, and stubbornly.

Describe the wicked generally, who sin naturally, easily, malignantly, and stubbornly.

JFB: Psa 58:4 - stoppeth her Literally, "his."

Literally, "his."

JFB: Psa 58:4 - ear That is, the wicked man (the singular used collectively), who thus becomes like the deaf adder which has no ear.

That is, the wicked man (the singular used collectively), who thus becomes like the deaf adder which has no ear.

JFB: Psa 58:6 - -- He prays for their destruction, under the figure of ravenous beasts (Psa 3:7; Psa 7:2).

He prays for their destruction, under the figure of ravenous beasts (Psa 3:7; Psa 7:2).

JFB: Psa 58:7 - which run continually Literally, "they shall go to themselves," utterly depart, as rapid mountain torrents.

Literally, "they shall go to themselves," utterly depart, as rapid mountain torrents.

JFB: Psa 58:7 - he bendeth . . . his arrows Prepares it. The term for preparing a bow applied to arrows (Psa 64:3).

Prepares it. The term for preparing a bow applied to arrows (Psa 64:3).

JFB: Psa 58:7 - let them . . . pieces Literally, "as if they cut themselves off"--that is, become blunted and of no avail.

Literally, "as if they cut themselves off"--that is, become blunted and of no avail.

JFB: Psa 58:8-9 - Other figures of this utter ruin; the last denoting rapidity. In a shorter time than pots feel the heat of thorns on fire

JFB: Psa 58:9 - he shall take them away as with a whirlwind Literally, "blow him (them) away."

Literally, "blow him (them) away."

JFB: Psa 58:9 - both living . . . wrath Literally, "as the living" or fresh as the heated or burning--that is, thorns--all easily blown away, so easily and quickly the wicked. The figure of ...

Literally, "as the living" or fresh as the heated or burning--that is, thorns--all easily blown away, so easily and quickly the wicked. The figure of the "snail" perhaps alludes to its loss of saliva when moving. Though obscure in its clauses, the general sense of the passage is clear.

JFB: Psa 58:10-11 - wash . . . wicked Denoting great slaughter. The joy of triumph over the destruction of the wicked is because they are God's enemies, and their overthrow shows that He r...

Denoting great slaughter. The joy of triumph over the destruction of the wicked is because they are God's enemies, and their overthrow shows that He reigneth (compare Psa 52:5-7; Psa 54:7). In this assurance let heaven and earth rejoice (Psa 96:10; Psa 97:1, &c.).

Clarke: Psa 58:1 - Do ye indeed speak righteousness Do ye indeed speak righteousness - Or, O cabinet seeing ye profess to act according to the principles of justice, why do ye not give righteous couns...

Do ye indeed speak righteousness - Or, O cabinet seeing ye profess to act according to the principles of justice, why do ye not give righteous counsels and just decisions, ye sons of men? Or, it may be an irony: What excellent judges you are! well do ye judge according to law and justice, when ye give decisions not founded on any law, nor supported by any principle of justice! To please your master, ye pervert judgment; and take part against the innocent, in order to retain your places and their emoluments. Saul’ s counsellors appear to have done so, though in their consciences they must have been satisfied of David’ s innocence.

Clarke: Psa 58:2 - Yea, in heart ye work wickedness Yea, in heart ye work wickedness - With their tongues they had spoken maliciously, and given evil counsel. In their hearts they meditated nothing bu...

Yea, in heart ye work wickedness - With their tongues they had spoken maliciously, and given evil counsel. In their hearts they meditated nothing but wickedness. And though in their hands they held the scales of justice, yet in their use of them they were balances of injustice and violence. This is the fact to which the psalmist alludes, and the figure which he uses is that of justice with her scales or balances, which, though it might be the emblem of the court, yet it did not prevail in the practice of these magistrates and counsellors.

Clarke: Psa 58:3 - The wicked are estranged from the womb The wicked are estranged from the womb - " This,"says Dr. Kennicott, "and the next two verses, I take to be the answer of Jehovah to the question in...

The wicked are estranged from the womb - " This,"says Dr. Kennicott, "and the next two verses, I take to be the answer of Jehovah to the question in the two first verses, as the Psa 58:6, Psa 58:7, and Psa 58:8, are the answer of the psalmist, and the remainder contains the decree of Jehovah."He calls these wicked men, men who had been always wicked, originally and naturally bad, and brought up in falsehood, flattery, and lying. The part they acted now was quite in character.

Clarke: Psa 58:4 - Their poison is like the poison of a serpent Their poison is like the poison of a serpent - When they bite, they convey poison into the wound, as the serpent does. They not only injure you by o...

Their poison is like the poison of a serpent - When they bite, they convey poison into the wound, as the serpent does. They not only injure you by outward acts, but by their malevolence they poison your reputation. They do you as much evil as they can, and propagate the worst reports that others may have you in abhorrence, treat you as a bad and dangerous man; and thus, as the poison from the bite of the serpent is conveyed into the whole mass of blood, and circulates with it through all the system, carrying death every where; so they injurious speeches and vile insinuations circulate through society, and poison and blast your reputation in every place. Such is the slanderer, and such his influence in society. From such no reputation is safe; with such no character is sacred; and against such there is no defense. God alone can shield the innocent from the envenomed tongue and lying lips of such inward monsters in the shape of men

Clarke: Psa 58:4 - Like the deaf adder that stoppeth her ear Like the deaf adder that stoppeth her ear - It is a fact that cannot be disputed with any show of reason, that in ancient times there were persons t...

Like the deaf adder that stoppeth her ear - It is a fact that cannot be disputed with any show of reason, that in ancient times there were persons that charmed, lulled to inactivity, or professed to charm, serpents, so as to prevent them from biting. See Ecc 10:11; Jer 8:17. The prince of Roman poets states the fact, Virg. Ecl. viii., ver. 71

Frigidus in prati cantando rumpitur anguis

"In the meadows the cold snake is burst by incantation.

The same author, Aen. vii., ver. 750, gives us the following account of the skill of Umbro, a priest of the Marrubians: -

Quin et Marru bia venit de gente sacerdos

Fronde super galeam, et felici comptus oliva

Archippi regis missu, fortissimus Umbro

Vipereo generi et graviter spirantibus hydris

Spargere qui somnos cantuque manuque solebat

Mulcebatque iras, et morsus arte levabat

"Umbro, the brave Marubian priest, was there

Sent by the Marsian monarch to the war

The smiling olive with her verdant bough

Shades his bright helmet, and adorns his brows

His charms in peace the furious serpent keep

And lull the envenomed viper’ s race to sleep

His healing hand allayed the raging pain

And at his touch the poisons fled again.

Pitt

There is a particular sect of the Hindoos who profess to bring serpents into subjection, and deprive them of their poison, by incantation. See at the end of this Psalm.

Clarke: Psa 58:5 - Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers - The old Psalter translates and paraphrases these two verses curiously: - Vulg. Furor illis secundu...

Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers - The old Psalter translates and paraphrases these two verses curiously: -

Vulg. Furor illis secundum similitudinem serpentis; sicut aspidis surdae et obturantis aures suas: Quae non exaudiet vocem incantantium et venefici in cantantis sapienter.

Trans. Wodes (madness) til thaim aftir the liking of the neddir, as of the snake doumb and stoppand her eres.

Paraph. Right calles he tham wod, (mad), for that hafe na witte to se whider that ga: for that louke thair eghen, and rennys till the are thaire wodness til clumsthed that wil noght be turned as of the snake that festis (fastens) the ta ere til the erth, and the tother ere stoppis with hir taile: Sua do thai that thai here not Godis word; that stope thair eris with luf of erthli thing that thai delite thaim in; and with thair taile, that es with all synnes, that that will noght amend

Trans. The whith salle noght here the voyce of charmand, and of the venim in akare of charmand wisli.

Paraph. This snake stopis hir eres that she be noght broth to light; for if she herd it, she come forth sone, he charmes swa wysli in his craft. Swa the wikkid men wit noght here the voyce of Crist and his lufers that are wys charmes; for thi wild (would) bring them till light of heven. Wyt ye well (know) that he (i.e., Christ) lufes noght charmars and venim makers but be (by) vices of bestes, he takes lickening of vices of men

It seems as if there were a species of snake or adder that is nearly deaf; and as their instinct informs them that if they listen to the sounds which charmers use they shall become a prey; therefore they stop their ears to prevent the little hearing they have from being the means of their destruction. To this the Old Psalter refers. We have also an account of a species of snake, which, if it cast its eye on the charmer, feels itself obliged to come out of its hole; it therefore keeps close, and takes care neither to see nor be seen. To this also the Old Psalter alludes; and of this fact, if it be one, he makes a good use.

Clarke: Psa 58:6 - Break their teeth Break their teeth - He still compares Saul, his captains, and his courtiers, to lions; and as a lion’ s power of doing mischief is greatly less...

Break their teeth - He still compares Saul, his captains, and his courtiers, to lions; and as a lion’ s power of doing mischief is greatly lessened if all his teeth be broken, so he prays that God may take away their power and means of pursuing their bloody purpose. But he may probably have the serpents in view of which he speaks in the preceding verse; break their teeth - destroy the fangs of these serpents, in which their poison is contained. This will amount to the same meaning as above. Save me from the adders - the sly and poisonous slanderers: save me also from the lions - the tyrannical and blood-thirsty men.

Clarke: Psa 58:7 - Let them melt away as waters Let them melt away as waters - Let them be minished away like the waters which sometimes run in the desert, but are soon evaporated by the sun, or a...

Let them melt away as waters - Let them be minished away like the waters which sometimes run in the desert, but are soon evaporated by the sun, or absorbed by the sand

Clarke: Psa 58:7 - When he bendeth his bow When he bendeth his bow - When my adversaries aim their envenomed shafts against me, let their arrows not only fall short of the mark, but he broken...

When he bendeth his bow - When my adversaries aim their envenomed shafts against me, let their arrows not only fall short of the mark, but he broken to pieces in the flight. Some apply this to God. When he bends his bow against them, they shall all be exterminated.

Clarke: Psa 58:8 - As a snail which melteth As a snail which melteth - The Chaldee reads the verse thus: "They shall melt away in their sins as water flows off; as the creeping snail that smea...

As a snail which melteth - The Chaldee reads the verse thus: "They shall melt away in their sins as water flows off; as the creeping snail that smears its track; as the untimely birth and the blind mole, which do not see the sun.

The original word שבלול shablul , a snail, is either from שביל shebil , a path, because it leaves a shining path after it by emitting a portion of slime, and thus glaring the ground; and therefore might be emphatically called the pathmaker; or from ישב yashab to dwell, ב be , in, לול lul , a winding or spiral shell, which is well known to be its house, and which it always inhabits; for when it is not coiled up within this shell, it carries it with it wheresoever it goes. See Bochart. These figures need no farther explanation.

Clarke: Psa 58:9 - Before your pots can feel the thorns Before your pots can feel the thorns - Ye shall be destroyed with a sudden destruction. From the time that the fire of God’ s wrath is kindled ...

Before your pots can feel the thorns - Ye shall be destroyed with a sudden destruction. From the time that the fire of God’ s wrath is kindled about you, it will be but as a moment before ye be entirely consumed by it: so very short will be the time, that it may be likened to the heat of the first blaze of dry thorns under a pot, that has not as yet been able to penetrate the metal, and warm what is contained in it

Clarke: Psa 58:9 - A whirlwind A whirlwind - Or the suffocating simoon that destroys life in an instant, without previous warning: so, without pining sickness - while ye are livin...

A whirlwind - Or the suffocating simoon that destroys life in an instant, without previous warning: so, without pining sickness - while ye are living - lively and active, the whirlwind of God’ s wrath shall sweep you away.

Clarke: Psa 58:10 - The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance - He shall have a strong proof of the Divine providence, of God’ s hatred against sinne...

The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance - He shall have a strong proof of the Divine providence, of God’ s hatred against sinners, and his continual care of his followers

Clarke: Psa 58:10 - He shall wash his feet in the blood of the wicked He shall wash his feet in the blood of the wicked - This can only mean that the slaughter would be so great, and at the same time so very nigh to th...

He shall wash his feet in the blood of the wicked - This can only mean that the slaughter would be so great, and at the same time so very nigh to the dwelling of the righteous, that he could not go out without dipping his feet in the blood of the wicked. The Syriac, Vulgate, Septuagint, Ethiopic, Arabic, and Anglo-Saxon, read hands instead of feet. Every thing that is vindictive in the Psalms must be considered as totally alien from the spirit of the Gospel, and not at all, under our dispensation, to be imitated. If the passage above be really vindictive, and it certainly will admit of the interpretation given above, it is to be considered as not belonging to that state in which the Son of man is come, not to destroy men’ s lives, but to save.

Clarke: Psa 58:11 - So that a man shall say So that a man shall say - That is, people, seeing these just judgments of God, shall say, There is a reward ( פרי peri , fruit) to the righteous ...

So that a man shall say - That is, people, seeing these just judgments of God, shall say, There is a reward ( פרי peri , fruit) to the righteous man. He has not sown his seed in vain; he has not planted and watered in vain: he has the fruit of his labors, he eats the fruit of his doings. But wo to the wicked, it is ill with him; for the reward of his hands has been given him

Clarke: Psa 58:11 - He is a God that judgeth in the earth He is a God that judgeth in the earth - There is a God who does not entirely defer judgment till the judgment-day; but executes judgment now, even i...

He is a God that judgeth in the earth - There is a God who does not entirely defer judgment till the judgment-day; but executes judgment now, even in this earth; and thus continues to give such a proof of his hatred to sin and love to his followers that every considerate mind is convinced of it. And hence arise the indisputable maxims: "There is, even here, a reward for the righteous;""There is a God who, even now, judgeth in the earth.

I have seen Indian priests who professed to charm, not only serpents, but the most ferocious wild beasts; even the enraged elephant, and the royal tiger! Two priests of Budhoo, educated under my own care, repeated the Sanscrit incantations to me, and solemnly asserted that they had seen the power of them repeatedly and successfully put to the test. I have mislaid these incantations, else I should insert them as a curiosity; for to charms of the same nature the psalmist most undoubtedly alludes

The term חובר chober , which we translate charmer, comes from חבד to join, or put together; i.e., certain unintelligible words or sentences, which formed the spell

I once met with a man who professed to remove diseases by pronouncing an unintelligible jingling jargon of words oddly tacked together. I met with him one morning proceeding to the cure of a horse affected with the farcin. With a very grave countenance he stood before the diseased animal, and, taking off his hat, devoutly muttered the following words; which, as a matter of peculiar favor, he afterwards taught me, well knowing that I could never use them successfully, because not taught me by a woman; "for,"said he, "to use them with success, a man must be taught them by a woman, and a woman by a man."What the genuine orthography may be I cannot pretend to say, as I am entirely ignorant of the language, if the words belong to any language: but the following words exactly express his sounds: -

Murry fin a liff cre

Murry fin a liss cre

Ard fin deriv dho

Murry fin firey f

Murry fin elph ye

When he had repeated these words nine times, he put on his hat and walked off, but he was to return the next morning, and so on for nine mornings successively, always before he had broken his fast. The mother of the above person, a very old woman, and by many reputed a witch, professed to do miracles by pronouncing, or rather muttering, certain words or sounds, and by measuring with a cord the diseased parts of the sick person. I saw her practice twice: 1st, on a person afflicted with a violent headache, or rather the effects of a coup de soleil; and, 2ndly, on one who had got a dangerous mote or splinter in his eye. In the first case she began to measure the head, round the temples, marking the length; then from the vertex, under the chin, and so up to the vertex again, marking that length. Then, by observing the dimensions, passed judgment on the want of proportion in the two admeasurements, and said the brain was compressed by the sinking down of the skull. She then began her incantations, muttering under her breath a supplication to certain divine and angelic beings, to come and lift up the bones, that they might no longer compress the brain. She then repeated her admeasurements, and showed how much was gained towards a restoration of the proportions from the spell already muttered. The spell was again muttered, the measurements repeated, and at each time a comparison of the first measurement was made with the succeeding, till at last she said she had the due proportions; that the disease, or rather the cause of it, was removed; and that the operations were no longer necessary

In the case of the diseased eye, her manner was different. She took a cup of clean pure water, and washed her mouth well. Having done so, she filled her mouth with the same water, and walked to and fro in the apartment (the patient sitting in the midst of the floor) muttering her spell, of which nothing could be heard but a grumbling noise. She then emptied her mouth into a clean white bason, and showed the motes which had been conveyed out of the patient’ s eye into the water in her mouth, while engaged in muttering the incantation! She proffered to teach me her wonder-working words; but the sounds were so very uncouth, if not barbarous, that I know no combination of letters by which I could convey the pronunciation

Ridiculous as all this may appear, it shows that this incantation work is conducted in the present day, both in Asia and Europe, where it is professed, in precisely the same manner in which it was conducted formerly, by pronouncing, or rather muttering certain words or sounds, to which they attach supernatural power and efficiency. And from this came the term spell: Anglo-Saxon a word, a charm, composed of such supposed powerful words; and wyrkan spell signified among our ancestors to use enchantments

Calvin: Psa 58:1 - Do ye indeed speak righteousness? 1.Do ye indeed speak righteousness? In putting this question to his enemies, by way of challenge, David displays the boldness of conscious rectitude....

1.Do ye indeed speak righteousness? In putting this question to his enemies, by way of challenge, David displays the boldness of conscious rectitude. It argues that the justice of our cause is demonstratively evident when we venture to appeal to the opposite party himself; for were there any ground to question its justice, it would show an absurd degree of confidence to challenge the testimony of an adversary. David comes forward with the openness of one who was supported by a sense of his integrity, and repels, by a declaration forced from their own lips, the base charges with which they blackened his character in the estimation of such as were simple enough to believe them. “Ye yourselves,” as if he had said, “can attest my innocence, and yet persecute me with groundless calumnies. Are you not ashamed of such gross and gratuitous oppression?” It is necessary, however, to determine who they were whom David here accuses. He calls them a congregation, and again, sons of men The Hebrew word אלם , elem, which I have rendered congregation, some consider to be an epithet applied to righteousness, and translate dumb; 346 but this does not express the meaning of the Psalmist. Interpreters differ as to what we should understand by the term congregation. Some think that he adverts, by way of accusation, to the meetings which his enemies held, as is usual with those who entertain wicked designs, for the purpose of concerting their plans. I rather incline to the opinion of those who conceive that he here gives (although only in courtesy) the usual title of honor to the counsellors of Saul, who met professedly to consult for the good of the nation, but in reality with no other intention than to accomplish his destruction. Others read, in the congregation — a translation which gives the same meaning to the passage we have already assigned to it, but is not supported by the natural construction of the words. The congregation which David addresses is that assembly which Saul convened, ostensibly for lawful objects, but really for the oppression of the innocent. The term, sons of men, which he immediately afterwards applies to them — taking back, as it were, the title of courtesy formerly given — would seem to be used in contempt of their character, being, as they were, rather a band of public robbers than a convention of judges. Some, however, may be of opinion, that in employing this expression, David had in his eye the universality of the opposition which confronted him — almost the whole people inclining to this wicked factions and that he here issues a magnanimous defiance to the multitude of his enemies. Meanwhile, the lesson taught us by the passage is apparent. Although the whole world be set against the people of God they need not fear, so long as they are supported by a sense of their integrity, to challenge kings and their counsellors, and the promiscuous mob of the people. Should the whole world refuse to hear us, we must learn, by the example of David, to rest satisfied with the testimony of a good conscience, and with appealing to the tribunal of God. Augustine, who had none but the Greek version in his hands, is led by this verse into a subtle disquisition upon the point, that the judgment of men is usually correct when called to decide upon general principles, but fails egregiously in the application of these principles to particular cases, 347 through the blinding and warping influences of their evil passions. All this may be plausible, and, in its own place, useful, but proceeds upon a complete misapprehension of the meaning of the passage.

Calvin: Psa 58:2 - Yea, rather, in heart ye plot wickedness 2.Yea, rather, in heart ye plot wickedness In the former verse he complained of the gross shamelessness manifested in their conduct. Now he charges t...

2.Yea, rather, in heart ye plot wickedness In the former verse he complained of the gross shamelessness manifested in their conduct. Now he charges them both with entertaining wickedness in their thoughts, and practising it with their hands. I have accordingly translated the Hebrew article אף , aph, yea, rather — it being evident that David proceeds, after first repelling the calumnies of his enemies, to the further step of challenging them with the sins which they had themselves committed. The second clause of the verse may be rendered in two different ways, ye weigh violence with your hands, or, your hands weigh violence; and as the meaning is the same, it is immaterial which the reader may adopt. Some think that he uses the figurative expression, to weigh, in allusion to the pretense of equity under which he was persecuted, as if he were a disturber of the peace, and chargeable with treason and contumacy towards the king. In all probability, his enemies glossed over their oppression with plausible pretences, such as hypocrites are never slow to discover. But the Hebrew word פלס , phalas, admits of a wider signification, to frame or set in order; and nothing more may be meant than that they put into shape the sins which they had first conceived in their thoughts. It is added, upon the earth, to denote the unbridled license of their wickedness, which was done openly, and not in places where concealment might have been practiced.

Calvin: Psa 58:3 - They are estranged, being wicked from the womb 3.They are estranged, being wicked from the womb He adduces, in aggravation of their character, the circumstance, that they were not sinners of recen...

3.They are estranged, being wicked from the womb He adduces, in aggravation of their character, the circumstance, that they were not sinners of recent date, but persons born to commit sin. We see some men, otherwise not so depraved in disposition, who are drawn into evil courses through levity of mind, or bad example, or the solicitation of appetite, or other occasions of a similar kind; but David accuses his enemies of being leavened with wickedness from the womb, alleging that their treachery and cruelty were born with them. We all come into the world stained with sin, possessed, as Adam’s posterity, of a nature essentially depraved, and incapable, in ourselves, of aiming at anything which is good; but there is a secret restraint upon most men which prevents them from proceeding all lengths in iniquity. The stain of original sin cleaves to the whole humanity without exception; but experience proves that some are characterised by modesty and decency of outward deportment; that others are wicked, yet, at the same time, within bounds of moderation; while a third class are so depraved in disposition as to be intolerable members of society. Now, it is this excessive wickedness — too marked to escape detestation even amidst the general corruption of mankind — which David ascribes to his enemies. He stigmatises them as monsters of iniquity.

Calvin: Psa 58:4 - Their poison is like the poison of a serpent: they are like the deaf adder 4.Their poison is like the poison of a serpent: they are like the deaf adder 348 He prosecutes his description; and, though he might have insisted on...

4.Their poison is like the poison of a serpent: they are like the deaf adder 348 He prosecutes his description; and, though he might have insisted on the fierceness which characterised their opposition, he charges them more particularly, here as elsewhere, with the malicious virulence of their disposition. Some read, their fury; 349 but this does not suit the figure, by which they are here compared to serpents. No objection can be drawn to the translation we have adopted from the etymology of the word, which is derived from heat. It is well known, that while some poisons kill by cold, others consume the vital parts by a burning heat. David then asserts of his enemies, in this passage, that they were as full of deadly malice as serpents are full of poison. The more emphatically to express their consummate subtlety, he compares them to deaf serpents, which shut their ears against the voice of the charmer — not the common kind of serpents, but such as are famed for their cunning, and are upon their guard against every artifice of that description. But is there such a thing, it may be asked, as enchantment? If there were not, it might seem absurd and childish to draw a comparison from it, unless we suppose David to speak in mere accommodation to mistaken, though generally received opinion. 350 He would certainly seem, however, to insinuate that serpents can be fascinated by enchantment; and I can see no harm in granting it. The Marsi in Italy were believed by the ancients to excel in the art. Had there been no enchantments practiced, where was the necessity of their being forbidden and condemned under the Law? (Deu 18:11.) I do not mean to say that there is an actual method or art by which fascination can be effected. It was doubtless done by a mere sleight of Satan, 351 whom God has suffered to practice his delusions upon unbelieving and ignorant men, although he prevents him from deceiving those who have been enlightened by his word and Spirit. But we may avoid all occasion for such curious inquiry, by adopting the view already referred to, that David here borrows his comparison from a popular and prevailing error, and is to be merely supposed as saying, that no kind of serpent was imbued with greater craft than his enemies, not even the species (if such there were) which guards itself against enchantment.

Calvin: Psa 58:6 - Break their teeth, O God! in their mouth 6.Break their teeth, O God! in their mouth 354 From this part of the psalm he assumes the language of imprecation, and solicits the vengeance of God,...

6.Break their teeth, O God! in their mouth 354 From this part of the psalm he assumes the language of imprecation, and solicits the vengeance of God, whose peculiar prerogative it is to repel oppression and vindicate injured innocence. It is necessary, however, that we attend to the manner in which this is done. He does not claim the judgment or patronage of God to his cause, until he had, in the first place, asserted his integrity, and stated his complaint against the malicious conduct of his enemies; for God can never be expected to undertake a cause which is unworthy of defense. In the verse before us, he prays that God would crush the wicked, and restrain the violence of their rage. By their teeth, he would intimate that they resembled wild beasts in their desire to rend and destroy the victims of their oppression; and this is brought out more clearly in the latter part of the verse, where he likens them to lions The comparison denotes the fury with which they were bent upon his destruction.

In the next verse, and in the several succeeding verses, he prosecutes the same purpose, employing a variety of apt similitudes. He prays that God would make them flow away like waters, that is, swiftly. The expression indicates the greatness of his faith. His enemies were before his eyes in all the array of their numbers and resources; he saw that their power was deeply rooted and firmly established; the whole nation was against him, and seemed to rise up before him like a hopeless and formidable barrier of rocky mountains. To pray that this solid and prodigious opposition should melt down and disappear, evidenced no small degree of courage, and the event could only appear credible to one who had learnt to exalt the power of God above all intervening obstacles. In the comparison which immediately follows, he prays that the attempts of his adversaries might be frustrated, the meaning of the words being, that their arrows might fall powerless, as if broken, when they bent their bow. Actuated as they were by implacable cruelty, he requests that God would confound their enterprises, and in this we are again called to admire his unshaken courage, which could contemplate the formidable preparations of his enemies as completely at the disposal of God, and their whole power as lying at his feet. Let his example in this particular point be considered. Let us not cease to pray, even after the arrows of our enemies have been fitted to the string, and destruction might seem inevitable.

Calvin: Psa 58:8 - Let him vanish like a snail, which melts away 8.Let him vanish like a snail, which melts away The two comparisons in this verse are introduced with the same design as the first, expressing his de...

8.Let him vanish like a snail, which melts away The two comparisons in this verse are introduced with the same design as the first, expressing his desire that his enemies might pass away quietly, and prove as things in their own nature the most evanescent. He likens them to snails, 355 and it might appear ridiculous in David to use such contemptible figures when speaking of men who were formidable for their strength and influence, did we not reflect that he considered God as able in a moment, without the slightest effort, to crush and annihilate the mightiest opposition. Their power might be such as encouraged them, in their vain-confidence, to extend their schemes into a far distant futurity, but he looked upon it with the eye of faith, and saw it doomed in the judgment of God to be of short continuance. He perhaps alluded to the suddenness with which the wicked rise into power, and designed to dash the pride which they are apt to feel from such an easy advance to prosperity, by reminding them that their destruction would be equally rapid and sudden. There is the same force in the figure employed in the end of the verse where they are compared to an abortion. If we consider the length of time to which they contemplate in their vain-confidence that their life shall extend, 356 they may be said to pass out of this world before they have well begun to live, and to be dragged back, as it were, from the very goal of existence.

Calvin: Psa 58:9 - Before your pots can feel the fire of your thorns 9.Before your pots can feel the fire of your thorns Some obscurity attaches to this verse, arising partly from the perplexed construction, and partly...

9.Before your pots can feel the fire of your thorns Some obscurity attaches to this verse, arising partly from the perplexed construction, and partly from the words being susceptible of a double meaning. 357 Thus the Hebrew word סירות , siroth, signifies either a pot or a thorn. If we adopt the first signification, we must read, before your pots feel the fire which has been kindled by thorns; if the second, before your thorns grow to a bush, that is, reach their full height and thickness. What, following the former sense, we have translated flesh yet raw, must be rendered, provided we adopt the other, tender, or not yet grown. But the scope of the Psalmist in the passage is sufficiently obvious. He refers to the swiftness of that judgment which God would execute upon his enemies, and prays that he would carry them away as by a whirlwind, either before they arrived at the full growth of their strength, like the thorn sprung to the vigorous plant, or before they came to maturity and readiness, like flesh which has been boiled in the pot. The latter meaning would seem to be the one of which the passage is most easily susceptible, that God, in the whirlwind of his anger, would carry away the wicked like flesh not yet boiled, which may be said scarcely to have felt the heat of the fire.

Calvin: Psa 58:10 - The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance 10.The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance It might appear at first sight that the feeling here attributed to the righteous is far fr...

10.The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance It might appear at first sight that the feeling here attributed to the righteous is far from being consistent with the mercy which ought to characterise them; but we must remember, as I have often observed elsewhere, that the affection which David means to impute to them is one of a pure and well-regulated kind; and in this case there is nothing absurd in supposing that believers, under the influence and guidance of the Holy Ghost, should rejoice in witnessing the execution of divine judgments. That cruel satisfaction which too many feel when they see their enemies destroyed, is the result of the unholy passions of hatred, anger, or impatience, inducing an inordinate desire of revenge. So far as corruption is suffered to operate in this manner, there can be no right or acceptable exercise. On the other hand, when one is led by a holy zeal to sympathise with the justness of that vengeance which God may have inflicted, his joy will be as pure in beholding the retribution of the wicked, as his desire for their conversion and salvation was strong and unfeigned. God is not prevented by his mercy from manifesting, upon fit occasions, the severity of the judge, when means have been tried in vain to bring the sinner to repentance, nor can such an exercise of severity be considered as impugning his clemency; and, in a similar way, the righteous would anxiously desire the conversion of their enemies, and evince much patience under injury, with a view to reclaim them to the way of salvation: but when wilful obstinacy has at last brought round the hour of retribution, it is only natural that they should rejoice to see it inflicted, as proving the interest which God feels in their personal safety. It grieves them when God at any time seems to connive at the persecutions of their enemies; and how then can they fail to feel satisfaction when he awards deserved punishment to the transgressor?

Calvin: Psa 58:11 - So that a man shall say, Verily there is a reward 11.So that a man shall say, Verily there is a reward We have additional evidence from what is here said of the cause or source of it, that the joy at...

11.So that a man shall say, Verily there is a reward We have additional evidence from what is here said of the cause or source of it, that the joy attributed to the saints has no admixture of bad feeling. It is noticeable from the way in which this verse runs, that David would now seem to ascribe to all, without exception, the sentiment which before he imputed exclusively to the righteous. But the acknowledgement immediately subjoined is one which could only come from the saints who have an eye to observe the divine dispensations; and I am, therefore, of opinion that they are specially alluded to in the expression, And a man shall say, etc At the same time, this mode of speech may imply that many, whose minds had been staggered, would be established in the faith. The righteous only are intended, but the indefinite form of speaking is adopted to denote their numbers. It is well known how many there are whose faith is apt to be shaken by apparent inequalities and perplexities in the divine administration, but who rally courage, and undergo a complete change of views, when the arm of God is bared in the manifestation of his judgments. At such a time the acknowledgement expressed in this verse is widely and extensively adopted, as Isaiah declares,

“When thy judgments are in the earth, the inhabitants of the world will learn righteousness,” (Isa 26:9.)

The Hebrew particle אך , ach, which we have translated verily, occasionally denotes simple affirmation, but is generally intensitive, and here implies the contrast between that unbelief which we are tempted to feel when God has suspended the exercise of his judgments, and the confidence with which we are inspired when he executes them. Thus the particles which are repeated in the verse imply that men would put away that hesitancy which is apt to steal upon their minds when God forbears the infliction of the punishment of sin, and, as it were, correct themselves for the error into which they had been seduced. Nothing tends more to promote godliness than an intimate and assured persuasion that the righteous shall never lose their reward. Hence the language of Isaiah, “Say ye to the righteous, that it shall be well with him; for they shall eat the fruit of their doings,” (Isa 3:10.) When righteousness is not rewarded, we are disposed to cherish unbelieving fears, and to imagine that God has retired from the government of the world, and is indifferent to its concerns. I shall have an opportunity of treating this point more at large upon the seventy-third psalm.

There is subjoined the reason why the righteous cannot fail to reap the reward of their piety, because God is the judge of the world; it being impossible, on the supposition of the world being ruled by the providence of God, that he should not, sooner or later, distinguish between the good and the evil. He is said more particularly to judge in the earth, because men have sometimes profanely alleged that the government of God is confined to heaven, and the affairs of this world abandoned to blind chance.

Defender: Psa 58:6 - in their mouth This is one of the most graphic imprecations in the imprecatory psalms (see note on Psa 5:10)."

This is one of the most graphic imprecations in the imprecatory psalms (see note on Psa 5:10)."

TSK: Psa 58:1 - Do // O congregation // O ye Do : Psa 72:1-4; Deu 16:18, Deu 16:19; 2Sa 23:3; 2Ch 19:6, 2Ch 19:7; Isa 11:3-5, Isa 32:1; Jer 23:5, Jer 23:6 O congregation : Psa 82:1, Psa 82:2; Num...

TSK: Psa 58:2 - in heart // weigh in heart : Psa 21:11; Ecc 3:16; Isa 59:4-6; Jer 22:16, Jer 22:17; Eze 22:12, Eze 22:27; Mic 3:1-3, Mic 3:9-12; Joh 11:47-53 weigh : Psa 94:20; Isa 10:...

TSK: Psa 58:3 - estranged // as soon estranged : etc. Psa 51:5; Job 15:14; Pro 22:15; Isa 48:8; Eph 2:3 as soon : etc. Heb. from the belly, Psa 22:10; Isa 46:3

estranged : etc. Psa 51:5; Job 15:14; Pro 22:15; Isa 48:8; Eph 2:3

as soon : etc. Heb. from the belly, Psa 22:10; Isa 46:3

TSK: Psa 58:4 - poison // like // serpent // the deaf poison : Psa 140:3; Ecc 10:11; Rom 3:13; Jam 3:8 like : Heb. according to the likeness of serpent : Mat 3:7, Mat 23:33 the deaf : Jer 8:17, adder or a...

poison : Psa 140:3; Ecc 10:11; Rom 3:13; Jam 3:8

like : Heb. according to the likeness of

serpent : Mat 3:7, Mat 23:33

the deaf : Jer 8:17, adder or asp, Pethen , is no doubt the boeten of the Arabians, which M. Forskal describes as spotted with black and white, about one foot in length, nearly half an inch thick, oviparous, and its bite almost instant death. It is the aspic of the ancients, and is so called the literati of Cyprus, though the common people call it κουφη , deaf. Job 20:14, Job 20:16; Isa 11:8

TSK: Psa 58:5 - Which // charming never so wisely Which : That serpents might be charmed or rendered harmless was well known to the ancients. Virgil, and many others state the fact - Frigidus in p...

Which : That serpents might be charmed or rendered harmless was well known to the ancients. Virgil, and many others state the fact - Frigidus in pratis cantando , rumpitur anguis . ""In the meadows the cold snake is burst by incantation."

charming never so wisely : or, be the charmer never so cunning, Deu 18:11; Isa 19:3

TSK: Psa 58:6 - Break their // young Break their : Psa 3:7, Psa 10:15; Job 4:10, Job 4:11, Job 29:17; Eze 30:21-26 young : Psa 17:12, Psa 91:13; Num 23:24; Isa 31:4; Hos 5:14; Mic 5:8

TSK: Psa 58:7 - -- Psa 22:14, Psa 64:7, Psa 64:8, Psa 112:10; Exo 15:15; Jos 2:9-11, Jos 7:5; 2Sa 17:10; Isa 13:7

TSK: Psa 58:8 - a snail // pass // untimely a snail : Shabbelool , in Chaldee tivlala , the snail, is probably so called from the Arabic balla , to wet, moisten, because of the glutinous s...

a snail : Shabbelool , in Chaldee tivlala , the snail, is probably so called from the Arabic balla , to wet, moisten, because of the glutinous slime emitted from its body, by which it appears to waste itself away in its own motion; and in the same manner the wicked prove their own destruction.

pass : Psa 37:35, Psa 37:36; Mat 24:35; Jam 1:10

untimely : Job 3:16; Ecc 6:3

TSK: Psa 58:9 - thorns // as // both living thorns : Psa 118:12; Ecc 7:6 as : Psa 10:2, Psa 10:5, Psa 55:23, Psa 73:18-20; Job 18:18, 20:5-29; Pro 1:27, Pro 10:25, Pro 14:32; Isa 17:13, Isa 40:2...

thorns : Psa 118:12; Ecc 7:6

as : Psa 10:2, Psa 10:5, Psa 55:23, Psa 73:18-20; Job 18:18, 20:5-29; Pro 1:27, Pro 10:25, Pro 14:32; Isa 17:13, Isa 40:24; Jer 23:19

both living : etc. Heb. as living as wrath, Num 16:30

TSK: Psa 58:10 - righteous // wash righteous : Psa 52:6, Psa 64:10, Psa 68:1-3, Psa 107:42; Jdg 5:31; Pro 11:10; Rev 11:17, Rev 11:18, Rev 18:20; Rev 19:1-6 wash : Psa 68:23; Job 29:6; ...

TSK: Psa 58:11 - Verily there is // a reward for // verily he Verily there is : Psa 73:13-15, Psa 92:15; Mal 3:14; Rom 2:5 a reward for : Heb. fruit of the, etc. Isa 3:10; Rom 6:21, Rom 6:22 verily he : Psa 9:16,...

Verily there is : Psa 73:13-15, Psa 92:15; Mal 3:14; Rom 2:5

a reward for : Heb. fruit of the, etc. Isa 3:10; Rom 6:21, Rom 6:22

verily he : Psa 9:16, Psa 64:9, Psa 67:4, Psa 33:18, Psa 96:13, Psa 98:9; Mal 2:17; 2Pe 3:4-10

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Psa 58:2 - In heart // Ye weigh the violence of your hands In heart or, with your heart ; with free choice and consent, and not only by constraint, and out of compliance with Saul. Ye weigh the violence of ...

In heart or, with your heart ; with free choice and consent, and not only by constraint, and out of compliance with Saul.

Ye weigh the violence of your hands or, you weigh violence or injustice with your hands. The phrase of weighing hath respect to their office, which was to administer justice, which is usually expressed by a pair of balances. So he intimates that they did great wrong under the pretence and with the formalities of justice; and whilst they scented exactly to weigh and consider the true and fit proportion between the actions and the recompences allotted to them, they turned the scale; and partly to curry favour with Saul, and partly from their own malice against David, pronounced an unjust sentence against him. In the earth; or, in this land, where God is present, and where you have righteous laws to govern you, and you profess better things.

Poole: Psa 58:3 - Estranged // From the womb // They go astray Estranged to wit, from God, Eph 4:18 , and from all goodness. From the womb either, 1. Hyperbolically; even from their tender years. Or, 2. Stric...

Estranged to wit, from God, Eph 4:18 , and from all goodness.

From the womb either,

1. Hyperbolically; even from their tender years. Or,

2. Strictly and properly. So the sense is, No wonder they act so unrighteously, for their very natures and principles are corrupt, even from their birth; they are the wicked offspring of sinful parents. And this hereditary and native corruption, though too common to all men, he particularly ascribes to these men; either because their immediate parents were such as did not only convey a corrupt nature to them, but greatly improved it by wicked counsel and example; or because they themselves had improved that stock of original corruption, and instead of mortifying it, had made it their great design and constant business to gratify and obey it.

They go astray by actual sins, the fruit of their original sin, as soon as they be born; from their childhood, as soon as ever they were capable of the exercise of reason, and the practice of sinning.

Poole: Psa 58:4 - Their poison Their poison their virulent and malicious disposition, is like the poison of a serpent; partly in itself, being natural, and inveterate, and incurabl...

Their poison their virulent and malicious disposition, is like the poison of a serpent; partly in itself, being natural, and inveterate, and incurable; and partly in its most pernicious effects.

Poole: Psa 58:5 - charming This similitude doth neither justify the practice of charming, which, in the very word here used, is condemned, Deu 18:11 , no more than those which...

This similitude doth neither justify the practice of charming, which, in the very word here used, is condemned, Deu 18:11 , no more than those which are drawn from the unjust steward, Luk 16:1 , &c.; Luk 18:2 , &c., and from a thief , Rev 16:15 ; nor yet affirm the truth of what is reported concerning the asps or adders, which are said to lay one ear close to the ground, and to cover the other with their tail, that so they may avoid the danger of enchantment; but only was taken from the common opinion, which he poetically mentions to this purpose: As they commonly say of the asps or adders, &c., such really are these men; deaf to all my counsels, and to the dictates of their own consciences, and to the voice of God’ s law. And yet of the

charming or enchanting of serpents, mention is made both in other places of Scripture, as Ecc 10:11 Jer 8:17 , and in all sorts of authors, ancient and modern, Hebrew, and Arabic, and Greek, and Latin of which see my Latin Synopsis . And particularly the Arabic writers (to whom these creatures were best known) name some sorts of serpents, among which the adder is one, which they call deaf , not because they are dull of hearing, but, as one of them expressly saith, because they will not be charmed.

Poole: Psa 58:6 - Their teeth // The great teeth Their teeth their power and instruments of doing mischief. He mentions teeth, partly because the adder’ s poison lies in its teeth; and partly t...

Their teeth their power and instruments of doing mischief. He mentions teeth, partly because the adder’ s poison lies in its teeth; and partly to make way for the following metaphor.

The great teeth called the grinders ; which are more sharp and strong than the rest, and more used in breaking and tearing what they are about to eat.

Poole: Psa 58:7 - As waters which run continually // When he bendeth his bow // Is cut in pieces As waters which run continually as waters arising from melted snow, or great showers, or some other extraordinary cause, which at first run with grea...

As waters which run continually as waters arising from melted snow, or great showers, or some other extraordinary cause, which at first run with great force and noise, and throw down all that stands in their way, but are suddenly gone, and run away and vanish, and return no more.

When he bendeth his bow to wit, any or every one of mine enemies, as appears from the foregoing and following words.

Is cut in pieces i.e. like arrows broken asunder whilst a man shoots, which can do no hurt.

Poole: Psa 58:8 - Which melteth // The untimely birth of a woman Which melteth Which thrusts forth, and seems to threaten with its horns, but is quickly dissolved; for when it goes out of its shell, it spends its v...

Which melteth Which thrusts forth, and seems to threaten with its horns, but is quickly dissolved; for when it goes out of its shell, it spends its vital moisture, until by degrees it waste away and perish.

The untimely birth of a woman which endeavouring violently and unseasonably to break forth from the womb, is choked in the attempt, and doth not live to see the light of the sun.

Poole: Psa 58:9 - Feel the thorns // Take them away // As with a whirlwind // Both living, and in his wrath // wrath Feel the thorns i.e. the heat of the fire kindled by the thorns put under them for that purpose; before your pots can be thoroughly heated. Take the...

Feel the thorns i.e. the heat of the fire kindled by the thorns put under them for that purpose; before your pots can be thoroughly heated.

Take them away to wit, mine enemies; whose sudden destruction he describes under this similitude.

As with a whirlwind i.e. violently and irresistibly.

Both living, and in his wrath Heb. as living (i.e. alive, as he did Korah, Nu 16 , the particle as being here not a note of similitude, but of truth or asseveration as it is Joh 1:14 , and oft elsewhere, as hath been noted) as in (which preposition is frequently understood)

wrath i.e. as a man moved with great wrath destroys his enemy without mercy, and is ready to devour him alive, if it were possible; or, both that which is raw , (as the Hebrew word chai signifies, Lev 13:16 1Sa 2:15 , to wit, the raw flesh, which is supposed to be put into the pot that it may be boiled,) and the burning fire . There is indeed great variety of construction and interpretation of these Hebrew words, which is not strange, especially considering the conciseness of the Hebrew language, and that this is a proverbial speech; nor is it of any great importance, because it is not in any great point of faith, and because the sense of it is agreed, the only difference being about the manner and ground of the phrase. The learned reader may see more upon this place in my Latin Synopsis.

Poole: Psa 58:10 - The vengeance // He shall wash his feet in the blood of the wicked The vengeance i.e. the vengeance of God upon his implacable enemies; not simply for himself, but for the blessed effects of it, the vindication of Go...

The vengeance i.e. the vengeance of God upon his implacable enemies; not simply for himself, but for the blessed effects of it, the vindication of God’ s honour, and the deliverance of himself and of all good men.

He shall wash his feet in the blood of the wicked i.e. there shall be so great a slaughter of his enemies, that he might, if he so pleased, wash his feet in their blood. See the same or like expressions, Psa 68:23 Isa 63:3 Rev 14:20 .

Poole: Psa 58:11 - -- And these administrations of God’ s providence shall be so evident and convincing, that not only good men shall be sensible thereof, but any ma...

And these administrations of God’ s providence shall be so evident and convincing, that not only good men shall be sensible thereof, but any man that sees them, yea, even such as were apt to dispute or doubt of God’ s providence, shall upon this eminent occasion break forth into such exclamations as this: Now I see that religion is not a vain and unprofitable thing, and that there is a God who doth now observe and govern, and, when he sees fit, judgeth the inhabitants of the earth, and will hereafter judge the whole world in righteousness, and recompense every man according to his works.

Haydock: Psa 58:1 - Over // Forget A prayer to be delivered from the wicked, with confidence in God's help and protection. It agrees to Christ and his enemies, the Jews. Over. St. J...

A prayer to be delivered from the wicked, with confidence in God's help and protection. It agrees to Christ and his enemies, the Jews.

Over. St. Jerome, "my spies." (Haydock) ---

Forget. Let them suffer a long time, (Menochius) that their punishment may be a greater warning. The ancients read, "thy law," instead of people, and apply this to the Jews, (Calmet) who still preserve the law, and bear witness throughout the world that the prophecies were not a fabrication of Christians. (Haydock) ---

Their exemplary chastisement and continuance, may serve to caution all not to follow their example. Judæi testes iniquitatis suæ et veritatis nostræ. (St. Augustine) (Eusebius) ---

"If all the Jews had been converted, we should have had only suspicious witnesses; and if all had been exterminated, we hould have had none." God permits our spiritual adversaries to remain for our trial, (Tertullian) that we may not forget ourselves in prosperity. (Worthington) ---

We may also translate Al, "O God, (as well as not ) slay them, that they may attack my people no more;" (see 2 Esdras iv. 4.) for what reason could Nehemias have to beg that they might be spared? (Calmet) ---

God might have some. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 58:1 - Watched Watched. Hebrew, "they (the guards) watched." The psalm relates also to the resurrection of Christ, and vocation of the Gentiles, (Berthier) as wel...

Watched. Hebrew, "they (the guards) watched." The psalm relates also to the resurrection of Christ, and vocation of the Gentiles, (Berthier) as well as to the reprobation, and future conversion of the Jews. It seems to be most applicable to the times of Esdras and Nehemias: (2 Esdras iv. 1., and vi. 1.) one of whom may have composed it. (Calmet) ---

But this is only a conjecture, (Berthier) and Saul's emissaries may be styled Gentiles, (Menochius) because they imitated their manners. (Haydock) ---

Saul sent repeatedly, and went himself to attack David. He gave him Michol with the same design. (Worthington) ---

But God turned her heart another way. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 58:4 - Caught Caught. Hebrew, "laid snares for." Septuagint, "hunted." The enemy wished eagerly to take David, or Nehemias, (Haydock; Calmet) and they seemed to...

Caught. Hebrew, "laid snares for." Septuagint, "hunted." The enemy wished eagerly to take David, or Nehemias, (Haydock; Calmet) and they seemed to have so surrounded the former, as to be sure of him. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 58:5 - I ran I ran. Hebrew, "they," &c. But the Septuagint would not have made such a mistake, (Berthier) and the Hebrew appears to be incorrect, though we may ...

I ran. Hebrew, "they," &c. But the Septuagint would not have made such a mistake, (Berthier) and the Hebrew appears to be incorrect, though we may understand "without iniquity in me, they have run." (Calmet) ---

I gave them no offence. (Worthington) ---

All this may be well explained of Jesus Christ, who alone could use these expressions with propriety, being without sin.

Haydock: Psa 58:6 - No mercy No mercy. Nehemias uses the like prophetic threats, 2 Esdras iv. 5. (Calmet) --- "Every sin must be punished, either by the penitent, or by an ave...

No mercy. Nehemias uses the like prophetic threats, 2 Esdras iv. 5. (Calmet) ---

"Every sin must be punished, either by the penitent, or by an avenging God." The prophet supposes that his enemies died impenitent. (St. Augustine) ---

When the gospel was first preached, God visited the world with various afflictions, to make people enter into themselves. (Eusebius) ---

The prophet prays that God would visit all nations with peace, and punish obstinate persecutors of the Catholic Church. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 58:7 - Evening Evening, when they came to take David. But, out of regard for Michol, they providentially waited till he had escaped, 2 Kings xix. (Haydock) --- N...

Evening, when they came to take David. But, out of regard for Michol, they providentially waited till he had escaped, 2 Kings xix. (Haydock) ---

Nehemias was obliged to watch continually, 2 Esdras iv. 11, 23. (Calmet) ---

The Jews will embrace the faith at the end of the world, (St. Augustine) or they will be destroyed (St. Hilary) or banished by Titus and Adrian (A.D. 137); the latter of whom forbade them even to look at Jerusalem from an eminence. They could not enter it in the time of Eusebius, (Psalm xlviii.) and St. Jerome. (Soph. 1.) ---

They have a hunger for God's word, of which they have lost the true sense. (St. Athanasius) ---

Persecutors are never satiated, though they labour to destroy, all their lives. (Worthington) ---

They allow themselves no rest. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 58:8 - Lips // Heard Lips. They seek my ruin, 2 Esdras iv. 2, &c. --- Heard. Thus they deny Providence, Psalm (Hebrew) x. 11. (Calmet) --- This thought and the occa...

Lips. They seek my ruin, 2 Esdras iv. 2, &c. ---

Heard. Thus they deny Providence, Psalm (Hebrew) x. 11. (Calmet) ---

This thought and the occasion of in have produced much wickedness. "Whithersoever thou goest, thou art seen by Jesus Christ, who made, redeemed, and died for thee." (St. Augustine, Ser. 161.) ---

A serious consideration of God's presence is the best preservative. (Berthier) ---

The wicked devise all sorts of cruelty, as if there were no God. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 58:9 - Laugh Laugh. Permitting them to become ridiculous. (Calmet)

Laugh. Permitting them to become ridiculous. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 58:10 - My My. Hebrew, "his," which seems incorrect. Chaldean (Calmet) and St. Jerome agree with the Vulgate. Houbigant would also substitute, "My strength, ...

My. Hebrew, "his," which seems incorrect. Chaldean (Calmet) and St. Jerome agree with the Vulgate. Houbigant would also substitute, "My strength, I will sing to thee," which affords a better sense, ver. 17. (Berthier) ---

Yet our version is very plain; I will make all my powers serve thee, and acknowledge that all comes from thee. (Haydock) ---

Such was the admirable humility of Nehemias, who never assumed any glory to himself. (Calmet) ---

David and all just men entertain the same sentiments. We are here assured (Haydock) that the Church and some virtuous souls will persevere, by God's grace. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 58:11 - His mercy His mercy. Protestants, "the God of my." Yet the text has "his;" i and v are easily confounded. The Keri here allows "my," which Pagnin transl...

His mercy. Protestants, "the God of my." Yet the text has "his;" i and v are easily confounded. The Keri here allows "my," which Pagnin translates. St. Jerome, "the mercy of my God;" (Haydock) or "my God, my mercy." (Ep. ad. Sun.) (Calmet) ---

All comes to the same end. These words are most applicable to Jesus Christ. (Berthier)

Gill: Psa 58:1 - Do ye indeed speak righteousness, O congregation // do ye judge uprightly, O ye sons of men Do ye indeed speak righteousness, O congregation?.... Of the mighty, as in Psa 82:1; the judges of the land, who were many, and therefore called a con...

Do ye indeed speak righteousness, O congregation?.... Of the mighty, as in Psa 82:1; the judges of the land, who were many, and therefore called a congregation, as it is necessary they should; for, being many, they are not so easily bribed; and besides, one may see that in a cause which another does not. The word signifies a "sheaf" t; and so it is by some rendered, to which a bench or assembly of judges may be compared; because consisting of many, and a select body, who should unite together in a sentence or decree, and act uprightly, like a sheaf of wheat standing upright; see Gen 37:7; some think the word has the signification of dumbness, or silence; so Jarchi and R. Moses u; as "elem" in Psa 56:1, title, and render it, "do ye indeed speak dumb justice?" or "the dumbness of justice" w; or are you dumb, or your mouth silent, when ye should speak righteousness? and so the psalmist accuses them for their criminal silence, in not contradicting Saul and his courtiers when they spake against him; and for not advising him to another kind of conduct towards him. All men ought to speak that which is right and truth; but especially judges on the bench, who are to judge the people with just judgment, Deu 16:18; but here this is doubted of, and called in question; at least their sincerity in giving judgment: yea, it is denied; for this interrogation carries in it a strong denial; and the meaning is, that they did not speak righteousness, or that which was just and right in the cause of David, when before them;

do ye judge uprightly, O ye sons of men? no, they did not; they were unjust judges. The psalmist calls them "the sons of men", as in 1Sa 26:19, in distinction from God the Judge of all, and to put them in mind of their frailty and mortality; for though they were gods by office, they were but men, and should die like men, and be accountable to the supreme Judge for all their proceedings in judgment here, Psa 82:1.

Gill: Psa 58:2 - Yea, in heart ye work wickedness // ye weigh the violence of your hands in the earth Yea, in heart ye work wickedness,.... So far were they from speaking righteousness, and judging uprightly. The heart of man is wickedness itself; it i...

Yea, in heart ye work wickedness,.... So far were they from speaking righteousness, and judging uprightly. The heart of man is wickedness itself; it is desperately wicked, and is the shop in which all wickedness is wrought; for sinful acts are committed there as well as by the tongue and hand, as follows. This phrase also denotes their sinning; not with precipitancy, and through surprise; but with premeditation and deliberation; and their doing it heartily, with good will, and with allowance, and their continuance and constant persisting in it;

ye weigh the violence of your hands in the earth; they were guilty of acts of violence and oppression, which, of all men, judges should not be guilty of; whose business it is to plead the cause of the injured and oppressed, to right their wrongs, and to protect and defend them: these they pretended to weigh in the balance of justice and equity, and committed them under a show of righteousness; they decreed unrighteous decrees, and framed mischief by a law; and this they did openly, and everywhere, throughout the whole land.

Gill: Psa 58:3 - The wicked are estranged from the womb // they go astray as soon as they be born, speaking lies The wicked are estranged from the womb,.... Which original corruption of nature accounts for all the wickedness done by men: they are conceived in sin...

The wicked are estranged from the womb,.... Which original corruption of nature accounts for all the wickedness done by men: they are conceived in sin, shapen in iniquity, and are transgressors from the womb; they are alienated from God, and from that godly life which is agreeable to him, and he requires; and from the knowledge and fear of him, and love to him; and they desire not the knowledge of him nor his ways; they are far from his law, and averse to it; and still more so to the Gospel of Christ; the doctrines of which, as well as the great things written in the law, are strange things to them; and they are aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, estranged from the people of God, know nothing of them, neither of their joys, nor of their sorrows;

they go astray as soon as they be born, speaking lies; they are wicked from their infancy, from their youth upward; and sin, which is meant by "going astray", as soon as they are capable of it, and which is very early. Sin soon appears in the temper and actions of then; they go out of God's way, and turn everyone to their own way, and walk in the broad road which leads to destruction: and particularly they are very early guilty of lying; as soon as they can speak, and before they can speak plain, they lisp out lies, which they learn from their father the devil, who is the father of lies; and so they continue all their days strangers to divine things, going astray from God, the God of truth, continually doing abominations and speaking lies; which continuance in these things makes the difference between reprobate men and God's elect; for though the latter are the same by nature as the former, yet their natures are restrained, before conversion, from going into all the sins they are inclined to; and if not, yet at conversion a stop is put to their progress in iniquity.

Gill: Psa 58:4 - Their poison is like the poison of a serpent // they are like the deaf adder that stoppeth her ear Their poison is like the poison of a serpent,.... Either their "wrath" and fury, as the word x may be rendered, against God, his people, and even one...

Their poison is like the poison of a serpent,.... Either their "wrath" and fury, as the word x may be rendered, against God, his people, and even one another, is like that of a serpent when irritated and provoked; or their mischievous and devouring words are like the poison of asps under their lips, Rom 3:13; or the malignity of sin in them is here meant, which, like the poison of a serpent, is latent, hid, and lurking in them; is very infectious to all the powers and faculties of the soul, and members of the body; and is deadly and incurable, without the grace of God and blood of Christ;

they are like the deaf adder that stoppeth her ear; the adder is a kind of serpent, in Hebrew called "pethen"; hence the serpent "Python". This is not, deaf naturally, otherwise it would have no need to stop its ear, but of choice; and naturalists y observe, that it is quicker of hearing than of sight. Jarchi indeed says, when it grows old it becomes deaf in one of its ears, and it stops its other ear with dust, that it may not hear the voice of the charmer; though others say z it stops one ear with its tail, and lays the other to the ground; but these seem fabulous. David speaks of it figuratively, that it acts as if it was deaf, regarding no enchantments, but bites notwithstanding; these having no influence on it, which, if they had any, could not be hindered by its deafness; and he compares wicked men to it, who are wilfully deaf to all good counsel and advice given them a.

Gill: Psa 58:5 - Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers // charming never so wisely Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers,.... Or "that use enchantments", to enchant serpents, by muttering certain words, or by magical songs;...

Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers,.... Or "that use enchantments", to enchant serpents, by muttering certain words, or by magical songs; by which means it is said that they have been drawn out of their holes, or caused to fly, or have become stupefied, and have lost their poison, and even burst asunder; as Bochart b relates from Pliny, Aelianus, Lucan, Isidore, Virgil, Ovid, Horace, and others: but an "asp" is unmoved by enchantments, and they are of no avail against its bites and poison c. Nor do these words suppose that the psalmist approved of enchantments, or affirms the virtue of them to be real, but rather suggests the contrary; he only takes his similitude from the seeming deafness and disregard of serpents to enchantments, to set forth the obstinacy of wicked men: and their resolution to continue in their wicked ways; like the serpent that disregards men:

charming never so wisely; being "wise, skilful" d, or made wise in enchanting enchantments; one very learned and expert in the art; or in "associating associations, skilful" e: who makes a consort of magical words to obtain his point, as some think; or because by his enchantments he associates and gathers many serpents together, and tames them; or because he does this by society and fellowship with the devil; methods no ways approved of by the psalmist, only alluded to. It may perhaps better be rendered, "which will not hearken to the voice of the eloquent, putting things together ever so wisely": the word is used for an eloquent orator, Isa 3:3. Such Gospel ministers are, who are mighty in the Scriptures. The voice of the Gospel is a charming voice; it publishes good news and glad tidings; it is a voice of love, grace, and mercy, of peace, pardon, righteousness, and salvation by Christ; and is wisely charmed when it gives no uncertain sound, is all of a piece, and is faithfully preached, as it was by the apostles of Christ; who, as wise men, laid him as the foundation of eternal life and salvation; and especially as it was preached by Christ himself, who spake as never man did: and yet, such were the hardness and obstinacy of the wicked Jews, that they stopped their ears to his ministry, nor would they suffer others to attend upon it; and so it is now: which shows the insufficiency of the best means of themselves, and the necessity of powerful and efficacious grace, to work upon the hearts of men.

Gill: Psa 58:6 - Break their teeth, O God, in their mouth // break out the great teeth of the young lions, O Lord Break their teeth, O God, in their mouth,.... From the description of the wicked, the psalmist passes to imprecations on his enemies; whom he represen...

Break their teeth, O God, in their mouth,.... From the description of the wicked, the psalmist passes to imprecations on his enemies; whom he represents as cruel and bloodthirsty, and as being stronger than he; and therefore he applies to God, who could, as he sometimes did, smite his enemies on the cheekbone, and break the teeth of the ungodly; which is done by taking the power and instruments of hurting from them: and it may be by "their teeth in their mouth" may be meant their malicious words, calumnies, and detractions; teeth being the instrument of speech; and by "breaking" them, preventing the mischief designed by them;

break out the great teeth of the young lions, O Lord: Saul was the old lion; his princes, nobles, and courtiers, the young ones; whose jaw teeth were as knives to devour David and his men, unless plucked out; or God in his providence should interpose, and hinder the performance of their mischievous and cruel designs; and who could easily destroy them by his blast, and by the breath of his nostrils, Job 4:9.

Gill: Psa 58:7 - Let them melt away as waters which run continually // when he bendeth his bow to shoot his arrows, let them be as cut in pieces Let them melt away as waters which run continually,.... Let them be disheartened, and their courage fail them, and let there be no spirit left in the...

Let them melt away as waters which run continually,.... Let them be disheartened, and their courage fail them, and let there be no spirit left in them, Jos 7:5; or let them be unstable as water that is continually running, ever upon the flux and motion; let them never be settled, but always changing in their state and circumstances, Gen 49:4; or let them "come to nought", as the Septuagint and Vulgate Latin versions; which is the case of water that runs over or runs away: or "let them be despised", as Jarchi, and the Arabic, Syriac, and Ethiopic versions; being useless and unprofitable, as water is when passed and gone: or let their ruin and destruction be as swift as the gliding water; let them be brought to desolation in a moment; Job 24:18; and let it be irrecoverable, as water running over the cup, and scattering itself, is spilled upon the ground, and cannot be gathered up, 2Sa 14:14. The Targum is,

"let them melt in their sins as water;''

when he bendeth his bow to shoot his arrows, let them be as cut in pieces; either when the wicked man bends his bow to shoot his arrows against the righteous; when he devises, his chief against him, shoots out bitter words, and attempts to do hurt unto him; let it be as if the string of his bow and his arrows were all cut to pieces; let all his designs, words, and actions, be without effect, and let not his hand perform his enterprise: or when God bends his bow against the wicked, so Jarchi; and prepares the instruments of death for them, and ordains his arrows against the persecutors, Psa 7:12; let then his and his people's enemies be cut off, as the tops of the ears of corn; as the word used signifies, Job 24:24. The words may be rendered, "let him (God) direct his arrows; as the tops of the ears of corn are cut off" f; so let them be.

Gill: Psa 58:8 - As a snail which melteth, let everyone of them pass away // like the untimely birth of a woman, that they may not see the sun As a snail which melteth, let everyone of them pass away,.... As a snail when it comes out of its shell liquefies, drops its moisture, and with it m...

As a snail which melteth, let everyone of them pass away,.... As a snail when it comes out of its shell liquefies, drops its moisture, and with it makes a "path", from whence it has its name שבלול, in the Hebrew language; and so the Targum here,

"as the snail moistens its way;''

which moistness it gradually exhausts, and melts away, and dies: so the psalmist prays that everyone of his enemies might die in like manner. Some think reference is had to the snail's putting out its horns to no purpose when in danger, and apply it to the vain threatenings of the wicked; a strange difference this, between a roaring young lion, Psa 58:6, and a melting snail. The Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and all the Oriental versions, render it, "as wax which melteth": see Psa 68:2;

like the untimely birth of a woman, that they may not see the sun; see Job 3:16. The Targum is,

"as an abortive and a mole, which are blind and see not the sun.''

So Jarchi renders it a "mole", agreeably to the Talmud g. Or, "let them not see the sun" h; let them die, and never see the sun in the firmament any more; Christ, the sun of righteousness; nor enjoy the favour of God, and the light of his countenance; nor have the light of life, or eternal glory and happiness; see Psa 49:19.

Gill: Psa 58:9 - Before your pots can feel the thorns // he // shall take them away as with a whirlwind // both living, and in his wrath Before your pots can feel the thorns,.... Which is soon done; for as dry thorns make a great blaze, so they give a quick heat; the pots soon feel them...

Before your pots can feel the thorns,.... Which is soon done; for as dry thorns make a great blaze, so they give a quick heat; the pots soon feel them, or the water in them soon receives heat from them. From imprecations the psalmist proceeds to prophesy, and foretells the sudden destruction of wicked men, which would be before a pot could be heated with a blaze of thorns. The Targum is,

"before the wicked become tender, they harden as the thorn:''

that is, they never become tender, or have any tender consciences, but are hardened in sin from their infancy. Some render the words, "before your thorns grow up to a brier" or "bramble" i; little thorns become great ones, tender thorns hard ones, as Jarchi; that is, as he interprets it, before the children of the wicked are grown up, they are destroyed; those sons of Belial, who are like to thorns thrust away, 2Sa 23:6. Others, as Aben Ezra, "before they understand"; that is, wise and knowing men; "that your thorns are a bramble"; or from lesser ones are become greater; and so denotes, as before, the suddenness and quickness of their destruction, as follows:

he, that is, God,

shall take them away as with a whirlwind: not to himself, as Enoch; nor to heaven, whither Elijah went up by a whirlwind; but out of the land of the living, and as with a tempest, to hell, where snares, fire, and brimstone, are rained upon them; see Job 27:20;

both living, and in his wrath: when in health and full strength, and so go quick to hell; as Korah and his company alive into the earth; and all in wrath and sore displeasure: for the righteous are also taken away; but then it is from the evil to come, and to everlasting happiness; and through many tempestuous providences, which are in love, and for their good, do they enter the kingdom: and those that are alive at Christ's coming will be caught up to meet him in the air; but the wicked are taken away as in a whirlwind, alive, and in wrath.

Gill: Psa 58:10 - The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance // he shall wash his feet in the blood of the wicked The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance,.... Before imprecated and foretold; the punishment inflicted by the Lord, to whom vengeance b...

The righteous shall rejoice when he seeth the vengeance,.... Before imprecated and foretold; the punishment inflicted by the Lord, to whom vengeance belongs, in a way of vindictive wrath; for what befalls the wicked in an afflictive way is in wrath, and as a vengeance upon them: and as the judgments of God are sometimes manifest, are to be seen, they are observed by the righteous, who rejoice at them; not as evils and miseries simply considered, nor from a private affection; but as the glory of divine justice is displayed therein, and the goodness of God is shown to them, by delivering them out of their hands; see Rev 18:20;

he shall wash his feet in the blood of the wicked; which denotes the great destruction of the wicked, and the abundance of blood that shall be shed; see Rev 14:20; and the entire victory the saints shall have over them, and their security from them, Psa 68:21; as well as the satisfaction, and pleasure and refreshment, as it were, they shall have in their destruction; signified by their feet being washed in their blood, instead of being washed in water, usual in the eastern countries; because of the glory of the divine perfections appearing therein. The Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and all the Oriental versions, read, "his hands".

Gill: Psa 58:11 - So that a man shall say // verily, there is a reward for the righteous // verily, he is a God that judgeth in the earth So that a man shall say,.... Any man, and every man, especially, that is observing, wise, and knowing; he shall conclude, from such a dispensation of ...

So that a man shall say,.... Any man, and every man, especially, that is observing, wise, and knowing; he shall conclude, from such a dispensation of things, from God's dealing with the wicked after this manner:

verily, there is a reward for the righteous; or "fruit" k for them: they have the fruits of divine love, the blessings of an everlasting covenant; and the fruit of Christ, the tree of life, which is sweet unto their taste, as are the benefits of his death, his word and ordinances; and the fruits of the Spirit, his several graces wrought in their souls; and the fruits of righteousness, the effect of which is peace; and is a reward they receive in, though not for keeping the commands of God; and they gather fruit unto eternal life, which is the recompence of reward, the reward of the inheritance, the great reward in heaven, which remains for them; and which they shall have, not for their own righteousness's sake, but for the sake of Christ's righteousness; from which they are denominated righteous persons, and which gives them a right and title to it: so that this is a reward, not of debt as due to them, and to be claimed by them on account of any thing they have done; but of grace, streaming through the blood and righteousness of Christ;

verily, he is a God that judgeth in the earth; that there is a God is known by the judgments that he executeth; and that he judgeth in the earth, and is the Judge of all the earth, who will do right, may be concluded from the vengeance inflicted on wicked men; and he will one day judge the world in righteousness, by him whom he has ordained to be Judge of quick and dead. The words in the Hebrew text are in the plural number, אלהים שפטים, "gods that judge": which Kimchi and Ben Melech say is on account of honour; or as they, with Aben Ezra, interpret it, of the angels: but these are not judges in the earth; rather it is expressive of a trinity of Persons in the Godhead, Father, Son, and Spirit. The Father is the Judge of all, though he does not execute judgment; but has committed it to the Son, who is Judge of quick and dead; and the Spirit judges, reproves, and convinces the world of sin, righteousness, and judgment.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 58:1 Heb “the sons of mankind.” The translation assumes the phrase is the object of the verb “to judge.” Some take it as a vocative...

NET Notes: Psa 58:2 Heb “in the earth the violence of your hands you weigh out.” The imagery is from the economic realm. The addressees measure out violence, ...

NET Notes: Psa 58:3 Heb “speakers of a lie go astray from the womb.”

NET Notes: Psa 58:4 Heb “[that] stops up its ear.” The apparent Hiphil jussive verbal form should be understood as a Qal imperfect with “i” theme ...

NET Notes: Psa 58:5 Heb “does not listen to the voice of.”

NET Notes: Psa 58:7 The syntax of the Hebrew text is difficult and the meaning uncertain. The text reads literally, “he treads his arrows (following the Qere; Kethi...

NET Notes: Psa 58:8 This rare word also appears in Job 3:16 and Eccles 6:3.

NET Notes: Psa 58:9 Heb “like living, like burning anger he will sweep it away.” The meaning of the text is unclear. The translation assumes that within the c...

NET Notes: Psa 58:10 The singular is representative here, as is the singular from “wicked” in the next line.

NET Notes: Psa 58:11 The plural participle is unusual here if the preceding אֱלֹהִים (’elohim) is here a plural of ma...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:1 "To the chief Musician, Altaschith, Michtam of David." Do ye indeed speak righteousness, O ( a ) congregation? do ye judge uprightly, O ye sons of men...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:2 Yea, in heart ye work wickedness; ye weigh the violence of ( b ) your hands in the earth. ( b ) You are not ashamed to execute that cruelty publicly,...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:3 The wicked ( c ) are estranged from the womb: they go astray as soon as they be born, speaking lies. ( c ) That is, enemies to the people of God even...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:4 Their poison [is] like the poison of a serpent: [they are] like the deaf ( d ) adder [that] stoppeth her ear; ( d ) They pass in malice and subtilty ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:6 Break their ( e ) teeth, O God, in their mouth: break out the great teeth of the young lions, O LORD. ( e ) Take away all opportunity and means by wh...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:7 Let them ( f ) melt away as waters [which] run continually: [when] he bendeth [his bow to shoot] his arrows, let them be as cut in pieces. ( f ) Cons...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:9 ( g ) Before your pots can feel the thorns, he shall take them away as with a whirlwind, both living, and in [his] wrath. ( g ) As flesh is taken raw...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:10 The righteous shall ( h ) rejoice when he seeth the vengeance: he shall wash his feet in the ( i ) blood of the wicked. ( h ) With a pure affection. ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 58:11 So that a man shall say, ( k ) Verily [there is] a reward for the righteous: verily he is a God that judgeth in the earth. ( k ) Seeing God governs a...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 58:1-5 - --When wrong is done under the form of law, it is worse than any other; especially it is grievous to behold those who profess to be children of God, joi...

MHCC: Psa 58:6-11 - --David prayed that the enemies of God's church and people might be disabled to do further mischief. We may, in faith, pray against the designs of the e...

Matthew Henry: Psa 58:1-5 - -- We have reason to think that this psalm refers to the malice of Saul and his janizaries against David, because it bears the same inscription ( Al-ta...

Matthew Henry: Psa 58:6-11 - -- In these verses we have, I. David's prayers against his enemies, and all the enemies of God's church and people; for it is as such that he looks upo...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 58:1-2 - -- The text of Psa 58:2 runs: Do ye really dictate the silence of righteousness? i.e., that before which righteousness must become silent, as the col...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 58:3-5 - -- After this bold beginning the boldest figures follow one another rapidly; and the first of these is that of the serpent, which is kept up longer tha...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 58:6-9 - -- The verb הרס is used much in the same way in Psa 58:7 as ἀράσσειν (e.g., Iliad , xiii. 577, ἀπὸ δὲ τρυφάλε...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 58:10-11 - -- Finally, we have a view of the results of the judicial interposition of God. The expression made use of to describe the satisfaction which this give...

Constable: Psa 42:1--72:20 - --II. Book 2: chs. 42--72 In Book 1 we saw that all the psalms except 1, 2, 10, and 33 claimed David as their writ...

Constable: Psa 58:1-11 - --Psalm 58 In this psalm David called on God to judge corrupt judges so the righteous would continue to tr...

Constable: Psa 58:1-4 - --1. The marks of crooked judges 58:1-5 58:1 The psalmist introduced his condemnation of certain unjust judges with two questions. He questioned the int...

Constable: Psa 58:5-8 - --2. The punishment of crooked judges 58:6-9 58:6-8 David called on God to deal with these unjust men. Breaking the teeth symbolizes painfully removing ...

Constable: Psa 58:9-10 - --3. The rejoicing of the just 58:10-11 58:10 When God judges crooked rulers by cutting them off, the upright will rejoice. David described their rejoic...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 58:6 Some have wondered how David could possibly be " a man after [God’s] own heart" ( Act 13:22 ) when he exhibited such a vindictive attitude. However...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 58 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 58:1, David reproves wicked judges; Psa 58:3, describes the nature of the wicked; Psa 58:6, devotes them to God’s judgments; Psa 58...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

Poole: Psalms 58 (Pendahuluan Pasal) THE ARGUMENT This Psalm was composed, as very many others were, upon the occasion of those wicked calumnies, and unjust censures and sentences, whi...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 58 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 58:1-5) Wicked judges described and reproved. (Psa 58:6-11) A prayer that they may be disabled, and their ruin predicted.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 58 (Pendahuluan Pasal) It is the probable conjecture of some (Amyraldus particularly) that before Saul began to persecute David by force of arms, and raised the militia t...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 58 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 58 To the chief Musician, Altaschith, Michtam of David. According to the Syriac version, this psalm was written when Saul thr...

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