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Teks -- Psalms 107:1-43 (NET)

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Konteks

Book 5
(Psalms 107-150)

Psalm 107
107:1 Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good, and his loyal love endures! 107:2 Let those delivered by the Lord speak out, those whom he delivered from the power of the enemy, 107:3 and gathered from foreign lands, from east and west, from north and south. 107:4 They wandered through the wilderness on a desert road; they found no city in which to live. 107:5 They were hungry and thirsty; they fainted from exhaustion. 107:6 They cried out to the Lord in their distress; he delivered them from their troubles. 107:7 He led them on a level road, that they might find a city in which to live. 107:8 Let them give thanks to the Lord for his loyal love, and for the amazing things he has done for people! 107:9 For he has satisfied those who thirst, and those who hunger he has filled with food. 107:10 They sat in utter darkness, darkness, bound in painful iron chains, 107:11 because they had rebelled against God’s commands, and rejected the instructions of the sovereign king. 107:12 So he used suffering to humble them; they stumbled and no one helped them up. 107:13 They cried out to the Lord in their distress; he delivered them from their troubles. 107:14 He brought them out of the utter darkness, and tore off their shackles. 107:15 Let them give thanks to the Lord for his loyal love, and for the amazing things he has done for people! 107:16 For he shattered the bronze gates, and hacked through the iron bars. 107:17 They acted like fools in their rebellious ways, and suffered because of their sins. 107:18 They lost their appetite for all food, and they drew near the gates of death. 107:19 They cried out to the Lord in their distress; he delivered them from their troubles. 107:20 He sent them an assuring word and healed them; he rescued them from the pits where they were trapped. 107:21 Let them give thanks to the Lord for his loyal love, and for the amazing things he has done for people! 107:22 Let them present thank offerings, and loudly proclaim what he has done! 107:23 Some traveled on the sea in ships, and carried cargo over the vast waters. 107:24 They witnessed the acts of the Lord, his amazing feats on the deep water. 107:25 He gave the order for a windstorm, and it stirred up the waves of the sea. 107:26 They reached up to the sky, then dropped into the depths. The sailors’ strength left them because the danger was so great. 107:27 They swayed and staggered like a drunk, and all their skill proved ineffective. 107:28 They cried out to the Lord in their distress; he delivered them from their troubles. 107:29 He calmed the storm, and the waves grew silent. 107:30 The sailors rejoiced because the waves grew quiet, and he led them to the harbor they desired. 107:31 Let them give thanks to the Lord for his loyal love, and for the amazing things he has done for people! 107:32 Let them exalt him in the assembly of the people! Let them praise him in the place where the leaders preside! 107:33 He turned streams into a desert, springs of water into arid land, 107:34 and a fruitful land into a barren place, because of the sin of its inhabitants. 107:35 As for his people, he turned a desert into a pool of water, and a dry land into springs of water. 107:36 He allowed the hungry to settle there, and they established a city in which to live. 107:37 They cultivated fields, and planted vineyards, which yielded a harvest of fruit. 107:38 He blessed them so that they became very numerous. He would not allow their cattle to decrease in number. 107:39 As for their enemies, they decreased in number and were beaten down, because of painful distress and suffering. 107:40 He would pour contempt upon princes, and he made them wander in a wasteland with no road. 107:41 Yet he protected the needy from oppression, and cared for his families like a flock of sheep. 107:42 When the godly see this, they rejoice, and every sinner shuts his mouth. 107:43 Whoever is wise, let him take note of these things! Let them consider the Lord’s acts of loyal love!
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Wesley: Psa 107:3 - Gathered Into their own land.

Into their own land.

Wesley: Psa 107:4 - No city Or rather, no town inhabited, where they might refresh themselves.

Or rather, no town inhabited, where they might refresh themselves.

Wesley: Psa 107:6 - The Lord Heb. Unto Jehovah, to the true God. For the Heathens had, many of them, some knowledge of the true God.

Heb. Unto Jehovah, to the true God. For the Heathens had, many of them, some knowledge of the true God.

Wesley: Psa 107:7 - Forth Out of the wilderness.

Out of the wilderness.

Wesley: Psa 107:10 - Darkness In dark prisons or dungeons.

In dark prisons or dungeons.

Wesley: Psa 107:12 - Heart The pride and obstinacy of their hearts.

The pride and obstinacy of their hearts.

Wesley: Psa 107:12 - Fell They fell into hopeless miseries.

They fell into hopeless miseries.

Wesley: Psa 107:17 - Afflicted With sickness.

With sickness.

Wesley: Psa 107:20 - Word His command, or blessing.

His command, or blessing.

Wesley: Psa 107:32 - Exalt him In public assemblies, and before all persons, as they have opportunity.

In public assemblies, and before all persons, as they have opportunity.

Wesley: Psa 107:32 - Elders The magistrates or rulers; let them not be ashamed nor afraid to speak of God's wonderful works, before the greatest of men.

The magistrates or rulers; let them not be ashamed nor afraid to speak of God's wonderful works, before the greatest of men.

Wesley: Psa 107:33 - Rivers Those grounds which are well watered, and therefore fruitful.

Those grounds which are well watered, and therefore fruitful.

Wesley: Psa 107:33 - And so the water springs, here, and the standing water, Psa 107:35 are taken.

springs, here, and the standing water, Psa 107:35 are taken.

Wesley: Psa 107:33 - Into Into a dry ground, which is like a parched and barren wilderness.

Into a dry ground, which is like a parched and barren wilderness.

Wesley: Psa 107:34 - For He doth not inflict these judgments without cause, but for the punishment of sin in some, and the prevention of it in others.

He doth not inflict these judgments without cause, but for the punishment of sin in some, and the prevention of it in others.

Wesley: Psa 107:35 - Water Into a well - watered and fruitful land.

Into a well - watered and fruitful land.

Wesley: Psa 107:36 - Hungry Poor people who could not provide for themselves.

Poor people who could not provide for themselves.

Wesley: Psa 107:39 - They These men, who when they are exalted by God, grow insolent and secure.

These men, who when they are exalted by God, grow insolent and secure.

Wesley: Psa 107:39 - Low By God's just judgment.

By God's just judgment.

Wesley: Psa 107:40 - Contempt Renders them despicable.

Renders them despicable.

Wesley: Psa 107:40 - Wander Banishes them from their own courts and kingdoms, and forces them to flee into desolate wildernesses for shelter.

Banishes them from their own courts and kingdoms, and forces them to flee into desolate wildernesses for shelter.

JFB: Psa 107:1-2 - -- Although the general theme of this Psalm may have been suggested by God's special favor to the Israelites in their restoration from captivity, it must...

Although the general theme of this Psalm may have been suggested by God's special favor to the Israelites in their restoration from captivity, it must be regarded as an instructive celebration of God's praise for His merciful providence to all men in their various emergencies. Of these several are given--captivity and bondage, wanderings by land and sea, and famine; some as evidences of God's displeasure, and all the deliverances as evidence of His goodness and mercy to them who humbly seek Him. (Psa. 107:1-43)

This call for thankful praise is the burden or chorus (compare Psa 107:8, Psa 107:15, &c.).

JFB: Psa 107:2 - redeemed of the Lord (compare Isa 35:9-10).

(compare Isa 35:9-10).

JFB: Psa 107:2 - say That is, that His mercy, &c.

That is, that His mercy, &c.

JFB: Psa 107:2 - hand of Or, "power of enemy."

Or, "power of enemy."

JFB: Psa 107:3 - gathered Alluding to the dispersion of captives throughout the Babylonian empire.

Alluding to the dispersion of captives throughout the Babylonian empire.

JFB: Psa 107:3 - from the south Literally, "the sea," or, Red Sea (Psa 114:3), which was on the south.

Literally, "the sea," or, Red Sea (Psa 114:3), which was on the south.

JFB: Psa 107:4-7 - -- A graphic picture is given of the sufferings of those who from distant lands returned to Jerusalem; or,

A graphic picture is given of the sufferings of those who from distant lands returned to Jerusalem; or,

JFB: Psa 107:4-7 - city of habitation May mean the land of Palestine.

May mean the land of Palestine.

JFB: Psa 107:5 - fainted Was overwhelmed (Psa 61:3; Psa 77:3).

Was overwhelmed (Psa 61:3; Psa 77:3).

JFB: Psa 107:8-9 - To the chorus is added, as a reason for praise, an example of the extreme distress from which they had been delivered Extreme hunger, the severest privation of a journey in the desert.

Extreme hunger, the severest privation of a journey in the desert.

JFB: Psa 107:10-16 - Their sufferings were for their rebellion against (Psa 105:28) the words, or purposes, or promises, of God for their benefit. When humbled they cry to God, who delivers them from bondage, described as a dark dungeon with doors and bars of metal, in which they are bound in iron That is, chains and fetters.

That is, chains and fetters.

JFB: Psa 107:10-16 - shadow of death Darkness with danger (Psa 23:4).

Darkness with danger (Psa 23:4).

JFB: Psa 107:16 - broken Literally, "shivered" (Isa 45:2).

Literally, "shivered" (Isa 45:2).

JFB: Psa 107:17-22 - -- Whether the same or not, this exigency illustrates that dispensation of God according to which sin brings its own punishment.

Whether the same or not, this exigency illustrates that dispensation of God according to which sin brings its own punishment.

JFB: Psa 107:17-22 - are afflicted Literally, "afflict themselves," that is, bring on disease, denoted by loathing of food, and drawing

Literally, "afflict themselves," that is, bring on disease, denoted by loathing of food, and drawing

JFB: Psa 107:18 - near unto Literally, "even to"

Literally, "even to"

JFB: Psa 107:18 - gates Or, "domains" (Psa 9:13).

Or, "domains" (Psa 9:13).

JFB: Psa 107:20 - sent his word That is, put forth His power.

That is, put forth His power.

JFB: Psa 107:20 - their destructions That is, that which threatened them. To the chorus is added the mode of giving thanks, by a sacrifice and joyful singing (Psa 50:14).|| 15723||1||10||...

That is, that which threatened them. To the chorus is added the mode of giving thanks, by a sacrifice and joyful singing (Psa 50:14).|| 15723||1||10||0||Here are set forth the perils of seafaring, futility of man's, and efficiency of God's, help.

JFB: Psa 107:20 - go . . . sea Alluding to the elevation of the land at the coast.

Alluding to the elevation of the land at the coast.

JFB: Psa 107:24 - These see . . . deep Illustrated both by the storm He raises and the calm He makes with a word (Psa 33:9).

Illustrated both by the storm He raises and the calm He makes with a word (Psa 33:9).

JFB: Psa 107:25 - waves thereof Literally, "His waves" (God's, Psa 42:7).

Literally, "His waves" (God's, Psa 42:7).

JFB: Psa 107:27 - are . . . end Literally, "all their wisdom swallows up itself," destroys itself by vain and contradictory devices, such as despair induces.

Literally, "all their wisdom swallows up itself," destroys itself by vain and contradictory devices, such as despair induces.

JFB: Psa 107:29-32 - He maketh . . . calm Or, "to stand to stillness," or "in quiet." Instead of acts of temple-worship, those of the synagogue are here described, where the people with the

Or, "to stand to stillness," or "in quiet." Instead of acts of temple-worship, those of the synagogue are here described, where the people with the

JFB: Psa 107:29-32 - assembly Or session of elders, convened for reading, singing, prayer, and teaching.

Or session of elders, convened for reading, singing, prayer, and teaching.

JFB: Psa 107:33-41 - He turneth rivers into a wilderness, &c. God's providence is illustriously displayed in His influence on two great elements of human prosperity, the earth's productiveness and the powers of g...

God's providence is illustriously displayed in His influence on two great elements of human prosperity, the earth's productiveness and the powers of government. He punishes the wicked by destroying the sources of fertility, or, in mercy, gives fruitfulness to deserts, which become the homes of a busy and successful agricultural population. By a permitted misrule and tyranny, this scene of prosperity is changed to one of adversity. He rules rulers, setting up one and putting down another.

JFB: Psa 107:40 - wander . . . wilderness Reduced to misery (Job 12:24).

Reduced to misery (Job 12:24).

JFB: Psa 107:42-43 - -- In this providential government, good men will rejoice, and the cavils of the wicked will be stopped (Job 5:16; Isa 52:15), and all who take right vie...

In this providential government, good men will rejoice, and the cavils of the wicked will be stopped (Job 5:16; Isa 52:15), and all who take right views will appreciate God's unfailing mercy and unbounded love.

Clarke: Psa 107:1 - O give thanks O give thanks - Here is a duty prescribed; and the reasons of it are immediately laid down 1.    He is good. This is his nature 2.&nb...

O give thanks - Here is a duty prescribed; and the reasons of it are immediately laid down

1.    He is good. This is his nature

2.    His mercy endureth for ever

This is the stream that flows from the fountain of his goodness.

Clarke: Psa 107:2 - Let the redeemed of the Lord say so Let the redeemed of the Lord say so - For they have had the fullest proof of this goodness, in being saved by the continuing stream of his mercy.

Let the redeemed of the Lord say so - For they have had the fullest proof of this goodness, in being saved by the continuing stream of his mercy.

Clarke: Psa 107:3 - And gathered them out of the lands And gathered them out of the lands - Though many Jews returned into Jerusalem from various parts of the world, under the reigns of Darius Hystaspes,...

And gathered them out of the lands - Though many Jews returned into Jerusalem from various parts of the world, under the reigns of Darius Hystaspes, Artaxerxes, and Alexander the Great; yet this prophecy has its completion only under the Gospel, when all the ends of the earth hear the salvation of God.

Clarke: Psa 107:4 - They wandered in the wilderness They wandered in the wilderness - Here begins the Finest comparison: the Israelites in captivity are compared to a traveler in a dreary, uninhabited...

They wandered in the wilderness - Here begins the Finest comparison: the Israelites in captivity are compared to a traveler in a dreary, uninhabited, and barren desert, spent with hunger and thirst, as well as by the fatigues of the journey, Psa 107:5.

Clarke: Psa 107:6 - Then they cried unto the Lord Then they cried unto the Lord - When the Israelites began to pray heartily, and the eyes of all the tribes were as the eyes of one man turned unto t...

Then they cried unto the Lord - When the Israelites began to pray heartily, and the eyes of all the tribes were as the eyes of one man turned unto the Lord, then he delivered them out of their distresses.

Clarke: Psa 107:7 - That they might go to a city of habitation That they might go to a city of habitation - God stirred up the heart of Cyrus to give them liberty to return to their own land: and Zerubbabel, Ezr...

That they might go to a city of habitation - God stirred up the heart of Cyrus to give them liberty to return to their own land: and Zerubbabel, Ezra, and Nehemiah, at different times, brought many of them back to Judea.

Clarke: Psa 107:8 - O that men would praise the Lord O that men would praise the Lord - This is what is called the intercalary verse, or burden of each part of this responsive song: see the introductio...

O that men would praise the Lord - This is what is called the intercalary verse, or burden of each part of this responsive song: see the introduction. God should be praised because he is good. We naturally speak highly of those who are eminent. God is infinitely excellent, and should be celebrated for his perfections. But he does wonders for the children of men; and, therefore, men should praise the Lord. And he is the more to be praised, because these wonders, נפלאות niphlaoth , miracles of mercy and grace, are done for the undeserving. They are done לבני אדם libney adam , for the children of Adam, the corrupt descendants of a rebel father.

Clarke: Psa 107:9 - For he satisfieth the longing soul For he satisfieth the longing soul - This is the reason which the psalmist gives for the duty of thankfulness which he prescribes. The longing soul,...

For he satisfieth the longing soul - This is the reason which the psalmist gives for the duty of thankfulness which he prescribes. The longing soul, נפש שוקקה nephesh shokekah , the soul that pushes forward in eager desire after salvation.

Clarke: Psa 107:10 - Such as sit in darkness Such as sit in darkness - Here begins the Second similitude, which he uses to illustrate the state of the captives in Babylon viz., that of a prison...

Such as sit in darkness - Here begins the Second similitude, which he uses to illustrate the state of the captives in Babylon viz., that of a prisoner in a dreary dungeon

1.    They sit in or inhabit darkness. They have no light, no peace, no prosperity

2.    "In the shadow of death."The place where death reigns, over which he has projected his shadow; those against whom the sentence of death has been pronounced

3.    They are bound in this darkness, have no liberty to revisit the light, and cannot escape from their executioners

4.    They are afflicted, not only by want and privation in general, but they are tortured in the prison, עני oni , afflicted, humbled, distressed

5.    Their fetters are such as they cannot break; they are iron. The reason of their being in this wretched state is given.

Clarke: Psa 107:10 - Then they cry Then they cry - The effect produced by affliction as before.

Then they cry - The effect produced by affliction as before.

Clarke: Psa 107:11 - Because they rebelled against the words of God Because they rebelled against the words of God - 1.    God showed them their duty and their interest, and commanded them to obey his ...

Because they rebelled against the words of God -

1.    God showed them their duty and their interest, and commanded them to obey his word; but they cast off all subjection to his authority, acted as if they were independent of heaven and earth, and broke out into open rebellion against him

2.    He counsealed and exhorted them to return to him: but they contemned his advice, and turned his counsel into ridicule

3.    As lenient means were ineffectual, he visited them in judgment: hence it is added,

Clarke: Psa 107:12 - He brought down their heart with labor He brought down their heart with labor - He delivered them into the hands of their enemies. and, as they would not be under subjection to God, he de...

He brought down their heart with labor - He delivered them into the hands of their enemies. and, as they would not be under subjection to God, he delivered them into slavery to wicked men: "So they fell down, and there was none to help;"God had forsaken them because they had forsaken him.

Clarke: Psa 107:13 - Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble - This was the salutary effect which their afflictions produced: they began to cry to God for mercy a...

Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble - This was the salutary effect which their afflictions produced: they began to cry to God for mercy and help; and God mercifully heard their prayer, and reversed their state; for,

Clarke: Psa 107:14 - He brought then out of darkness He brought then out of darkness - 1.    Gave them again peace and prosperity 2.    Repealed the sentence of death 3.&n...

He brought then out of darkness -

1.    Gave them again peace and prosperity

2.    Repealed the sentence of death

3.    "Unbound the poor prisoners.

4.    Broke their iron bonds in sunder.

Clarke: Psa 107:15 - O that men, etc. O that men, etc. - This is the intercalary verse, or burden, of the second part, as it was of the first. See Psa 107:8.

O that men, etc. - This is the intercalary verse, or burden, of the second part, as it was of the first. See Psa 107:8.

Clarke: Psa 107:16 - For he hath broken For he hath broken - This is the reason given for thanks to God for his deliverance of the captives. It was not a simple deliverance; it was done so...

For he hath broken - This is the reason given for thanks to God for his deliverance of the captives. It was not a simple deliverance; it was done so as to manifest the irresistible power of God. He tore the prison in pieces, and cut the bars of iron asunder.

Clarke: Psa 107:17 - Fools because of their transgression Fools because of their transgression - This is the Third comparison; the captivity being compared to a person in a dangerous malady. Our Version doe...

Fools because of their transgression - This is the Third comparison; the captivity being compared to a person in a dangerous malady. Our Version does not express this clause well: Fools מדרך פשעם midderech pisham , because of the way of their transgressions, are afflicted. Most human maladies are the fruits of sin; misery and sin are married together in bonds that can never be broken.

Clarke: Psa 107:18 - Their soul abhorreth all manner of meat Their soul abhorreth all manner of meat - A natural description of a sick man: appetite is gone, and all desire for food fails; nutriment is no long...

Their soul abhorreth all manner of meat - A natural description of a sick man: appetite is gone, and all desire for food fails; nutriment is no longer necessary, for death has seized upon the whole frame. See a similar image, Job 33:20 (note).

Clarke: Psa 107:20 - He sent his word, and healed them He sent his word, and healed them - He spoke: "Be thou clean, be thou whole;"and immediately the disease departed; and thus they were delivered from...

He sent his word, and healed them - He spoke: "Be thou clean, be thou whole;"and immediately the disease departed; and thus they were delivered from the destructions that awaited them.

Clarke: Psa 107:21 - O that men, etc. O that men, etc. - The intercalary verse, or burden, as before.

O that men, etc. - The intercalary verse, or burden, as before.

Clarke: Psa 107:22 - And let them sacrifice And let them sacrifice - For their healing they should bring a sacrifice; and they should offer the life of the innocent animal unto God, as he has ...

And let them sacrifice - For their healing they should bring a sacrifice; and they should offer the life of the innocent animal unto God, as he has spared their lives; and let them thus confess that God has spared then when they deserved to die; and let them declare also "his works with rejoicing;"for who will not rejoice when he is delivered from death?

Clarke: Psa 107:23 - They that go down to the sea in ships They that go down to the sea in ships - This is the Fourth comparison. Their captivity was as dangerous and alarming as a dreadful tempest at sea to...

They that go down to the sea in ships - This is the Fourth comparison. Their captivity was as dangerous and alarming as a dreadful tempest at sea to a weather-beaten mariner.

Clarke: Psa 107:24 - These see the works of the Lord These see the works of the Lord - Splendid, Divinely impressive, and glorious in fine weather

These see the works of the Lord - Splendid, Divinely impressive, and glorious in fine weather

Clarke: Psa 107:24 - His wonders in the deep His wonders in the deep - Awfully terrible in a tempest.

His wonders in the deep - Awfully terrible in a tempest.

Clarke: Psa 107:25 - For he commandeth For he commandeth - And what less than the command of God can raise up such winds as seem to heave old Ocean from his bed?

For he commandeth - And what less than the command of God can raise up such winds as seem to heave old Ocean from his bed?

Clarke: Psa 107:26 - They mount up to the heaven They mount up to the heaven - This is a most natural and striking description of the state of a ship at sea in a storm: when the sea appears to run ...

They mount up to the heaven - This is a most natural and striking description of the state of a ship at sea in a storm: when the sea appears to run mountains high, and the vessel seems for a moment to stand on the sharp ridge of one most stupendous, with a valley of a frightful depth between it and a similar mountain, which appears to be flying in the midst of heaven, that it may submerge the hapless bark, when she descends into the valley of death below. This is a sight the most terrific that can be imagined: nor can any man conceive or form an adequate idea of it, who has not himself been at sea in such a storm

Clarke: Psa 107:26 - Their soul is melted because of trouble Their soul is melted because of trouble - This is not less expressive than it is descriptive. The action of raising the vessel to the clouds, and pr...

Their soul is melted because of trouble - This is not less expressive than it is descriptive. The action of raising the vessel to the clouds, and precipitating her into the abyss, seems to dissolve the very soul: the whole mind seems to melt away, so that neither feeling, reflection, nor impression remains, nothing but the apprehension of inevitable destruction! When the ship is buffeted between conflicting waves, which threaten either to tear her asunder or crush her together; when she reels to and fro, and staggers like a drunken man, not being able to hold any certain course; when sails and masts are an incumbrance, and the helm of no use; when all hope of safety is taken away; and when the experienced captain, the skillful pilot, and the hardy sailors, cry out, with a voice more terrible than the cry of fire at midnight, We are All lost! we are all Lost! then, indeed, are they at their wit’ s end; or, as the inimitable original expresses it, וחל חכמתם תתבלע vechol chochmatham tithballa , "and all their skill is swallowed up,"- seems to be gulped down by the frightful abyss into which the ship is about to be precipitated. Then, indeed, can the hand of God alone "bring them out of their distresses."Then, a cry to the Almighty (and in such circumstances it is few that can lift up such a cry) is the only means that can be used to save the perishing wreck! Reader, dost thou ask why I paint thus, and from whose authority I describe? I answer: Not from any books describing storms, tempests, and shipwrecks; not from the relations of shipwrecked marines; not from viewing from the shore a tempest at sea, and seeing a vessel beat to pieces, and all its crew, one excepted, perish. Descriptions of this kind I have read, with the shipwrecked mariner I have conversed, the last scene mentioned above I have witnessed: but none of these could give the fearful impressions, the tremendous and soul-melting apprehensions, described above. "Where then have you had them?"I answer, From the great deep. I have been at sea in the storm, and in the circumstances I describe; and, having cried to the Lord in my trouble, I am spared to describe the storm, and recount the tale of his mercy. None but either a man inspired by God, who, in describing, will show things as they are, or one who has been actually in these circumstances, can tell you with what propriety the psalmist speaks, or utter the thousandth part of the dangers and fearful apprehensions of those concerned in a tempest at sea, where all the winds of heaven seem collected to urge an already crazy vessel among the most tremendous rocks upon a lee shore! God save the reader from such circumstances

When, in the visitation of the winds, He takes the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them, With deafening clamours,on the slippery clouds, That with the hurly death itself awakes! Henry IV

Clarke: Psa 107:26 - A storm at sea A storm at sea - the lifting the vessel to the clouds - her sinking into the vast marine valleys - the melting of the soul - and being at their wit&...

A storm at sea - the lifting the vessel to the clouds - her sinking into the vast marine valleys - the melting of the soul - and being at their wit’ s end, are well touched by several of the ancient poets. See particularly Virgil’ s description of the storm that dispersed the fleet of Aeneas, who was himself not unacquainted with the dangers of the sea: -

Tollimur in coelum curvato gurgite, et ide

Subducta ad manes imos descendimus unda

Aen. iii., 364

Now on a towering arch of waves we rise

Heaved on the bounding billows to the skies

Then, as the roaring surge retreating fell

We shoot down headlong to the gates of hell

Pitt

Rector in incerto est, nec quid fugiatve, petatve,

Invenit: ambiguis ars stupet ipsa malis

"The pilot himself is in doubt what danger to shun; or whither to steer for safety he knows not: his skill is nonplussed by the choice of the difficulties before him.

See more in the analysis.

Clarke: Psa 107:29 - He maketh the storm a calm He maketh the storm a calm - He causes the storm to stand dumb, and hushes the waves. See the original, where sense and sound emphatically meet: - ...

He maketh the storm a calm - He causes the storm to stand dumb, and hushes the waves. See the original, where sense and sound emphatically meet: -

גליהם ויחשו לדממה סארה יקם
galleyhem vaiyecheshu lidemamah searah yakem
He shall cause the whirlwind to stand dumb, and he shall hush their billows.

Clarke: Psa 107:30 - Then are they glad because they be quiet Then are they glad because they be quiet - The turbulence of the sea being hushed, and the waves still, they rejoice to see an end to the tempest; a...

Then are they glad because they be quiet - The turbulence of the sea being hushed, and the waves still, they rejoice to see an end to the tempest; and thus, having fine weather, a smooth sea, and fair wind, they are speedily brought to the desired haven.

Clarke: Psa 107:31 - O that men O that men - The intercalary verse, or burden, as before. See Psa 107:8.

O that men - The intercalary verse, or burden, as before. See Psa 107:8.

Clarke: Psa 107:32 - Let them exalt him also in the congregation Let them exalt him also in the congregation - Their deliverance from such imminent danger, and in a way which clearly showed the Divine interpositio...

Let them exalt him also in the congregation - Their deliverance from such imminent danger, and in a way which clearly showed the Divine interposition, demands, not only gratitude of heart and the song of praise at the end of the storm, but when they come to shore that they publicly acknowledge it in the congregation of God’ s people. I have been often pleased, when in sea-port towns, to see and hear notes sent to the minister from pious sailors, returning thanks to the Almighty for preservation from shipwreck, and, in general, from the dangers of the sea; and for bringing them back in safety to their own port. Thus "they exalt the Lord in the congregation, and praise him in the assembly of the elders."And is it not something of this kind that the psalmist requires?

Clarke: Psa 107:33 - He turneth rivers into a wilderness He turneth rivers into a wilderness - After having, as above, illustrated the state of the Jews in their captivity, and the deliverance which God wr...

He turneth rivers into a wilderness - After having, as above, illustrated the state of the Jews in their captivity, and the deliverance which God wrought for them, he now turns to the general conduct of God in reference to the poor and needy; and his gracious Interpositions in their behalf, the providential supply of their wants, and his opposition to their oppressors. On account of the wickedness of men, he sometimes changes a fruitful land into a desert. See the general state of Egypt in the present time: once a fertile land; now an arid, sandy wilderness. Again, by his blessing on honest industry, he has changed deserts into highly fertile ground. And, as for the wickedness of their inhabitants, many lands are cursed and rendered barren; so, when a people acknowledge him in all their ways, he blesses their toil, gives them rain and fruitful seasons, and fills their hearts with joy and gladness.

Clarke: Psa 107:36 - And there he maketh the hungry to dwell And there he maketh the hungry to dwell - All this seems to apply admirably to the first colonists of any place. They flee from a land of want, an i...

And there he maketh the hungry to dwell - All this seems to apply admirably to the first colonists of any place. They flee from a land of want, an ingrata terra that did not repay their toil, and they seek the wilderness where the land wants only cultivation to make it produce all the necessaries of life. He, by his providence, so guides their steps as to lead them to rivers which they can navigate, and from which they can procure plenty of fish, and shows them wells or springs which they have not digged. The hungry dwell there; and jointly agree, for convenience and defense, to build them a city for habitation. They sow the fields which they have cleared; and plant vineyards, and orchards which yield them in creasing fruits, Psa 107:37, and he multiplies their cattle greatly, and does not suffer them to decrease, Psa 107:38. What a fine picture is this of the first peopling and planting of America, and of the multiplication and extension of that people; of the Divine blessing on their industry, and the general and astonishing prosperity of their country! May they never again know what is spoken in the following verse:

Clarke: Psa 107:39 - Again, they are minished Again, they are minished - Sometimes by war, or pestilence, or famine. How minished and brought low was the country already spoken of, by the long a...

Again, they are minished - Sometimes by war, or pestilence, or famine. How minished and brought low was the country already spoken of, by the long and destructive war which began in 1775, and was not ended till 1783! And what desolations, minishings, and ruin have been brought on the fertile empires of Europe by the war which commenced in 1792, and did not end till 1814! And how many millions of lives have been sacrificed in it, and souls sent unprepared into the eternal world! When God makes inquisition for blood, on whose heads will he find the blood of these slaughtered millions? Alas! O, alas!

Clarke: Psa 107:40 - He poureth contempt upon princes He poureth contempt upon princes - How many have lately been raised from nothing, and set upon thrones! And how many have been cast down from throne...

He poureth contempt upon princes - How many have lately been raised from nothing, and set upon thrones! And how many have been cast down from thrones, and reduced to nothing! And where are now those mighty troublers of the earth? On both sides they are in general gone to give an account of themselves to God. And what an account

Clarke: Psa 107:40 - Where there is no way Where there is no way - Who can consider the fate of the late emperor of the French, Napoleon, without seeing the hand of God in his downfall! All t...

Where there is no way - Who can consider the fate of the late emperor of the French, Napoleon, without seeing the hand of God in his downfall! All the powers of Europe were leagued against him in vain, they were as stubble to his bow. "He came, He saw, and He conquered"almost every where, till God, by a Russian Frost, destroyed his tens of thousands of veteran troops. And afterwards his armies of raw conscripts would have over-matched the world had not a particular providence intervened at Waterloo, when all the skill and valor of his opponents had been nearly reduced to nothing. How terrible art thou, O Lord, in thy judgments! Thou art fearful in praises, doing wonders

The dreary rock of St. Helena, where there was no way, saw a period to the mighty conqueror, who had strode over all the countries of Europe!

Clarke: Psa 107:41 - Yet setteth he the poor on high Yet setteth he the poor on high - This probably refers to the case of the Israelites and their restoration from captivity. But these are incidents w...

Yet setteth he the poor on high - This probably refers to the case of the Israelites and their restoration from captivity. But these are incidents which frequently occur, and mark the superintendence of a benign Providence, and the hand of a just God; and are applicable to a multitude of cases.

Clarke: Psa 107:42 - The righteous shall see it The righteous shall see it - The wicked are as inconsiderate as they are obstinate and headstrong

The righteous shall see it - The wicked are as inconsiderate as they are obstinate and headstrong

Clarke: Psa 107:42 - And rejoice And rejoice - To have such ample proofs that God ruleth in the earth, and that none that trust in him shall be desolate

And rejoice - To have such ample proofs that God ruleth in the earth, and that none that trust in him shall be desolate

Clarke: Psa 107:42 - All iniquity shall stop her mouth All iniquity shall stop her mouth - God’ s judgments and mercies are so evident, and so distinctly marked, that atheism, infidelity, and irreli...

All iniquity shall stop her mouth - God’ s judgments and mercies are so evident, and so distinctly marked, that atheism, infidelity, and irreligion are confounded, and the cause of error and falsehood has become hopeless. It was only the mouth that could do any thing; and that only by lies, calumnies, and blasphemies: but God closes this mouth, pours contempt upon the head and judgment upon the heart. This may also be applied to the case of the Israelttes and the Babylonians. The former, when they turned to God, became righteous; the latter were a personification of all iniquity.

Clarke: Psa 107:43 - Whoso is wise Whoso is wise - That is, He that is wise, he that fears God, and regards the operation of his hand will observe - lay up and keep, these things. He ...

Whoso is wise - That is, He that is wise, he that fears God, and regards the operation of his hand will observe - lay up and keep, these things. He will hide them in his heart, that he sin not against Jehovah. He will encourage himself in the Lord, because he finds that he is a never-failing spring of goodness to the righteous

Clarke: Psa 107:43 - They shall understand the lovinq-kindness of the Lord They shall understand the lovinq-kindness of the Lord - חסדי יהוה chasdey Yehovah , the exuberant goodness of Jehovah. This is his peculiar...

They shall understand the lovinq-kindness of the Lord - חסדי יהוה chasdey Yehovah , the exuberant goodness of Jehovah. This is his peculiar and most prominent characteristic among men; for "judgment is his strange work."What a wonderful discourse on Divine Providence, and God’ s management of the world, does this inimitable Psalm contain! The ignorant cannot read it without profit; and by the study of it, the wise man will become yet wiser

Calvin: Psa 107:1 - Praise Jehovah 1.Praise Jehovah We have already explained this verse, for it formed the commencement of the preceding psalm. And it appears that it was not only fre...

1.Praise Jehovah We have already explained this verse, for it formed the commencement of the preceding psalm. And it appears that it was not only frequently used among the Jews, but also so incorporated with other psalms, that when one part of the chorus on the one side was singing a portion of the psalm, the other part of the chorus on the opposite side in its turn, after each succeeding verse, responded, Praise Jehovah, because he is good, etc The penman of this psalm, whoever he was, has, instead of the ordinary preface, inserted this beautiful sentiment, in which praise and thanksgiving to God were so frequently expressed by the Israelitish Church. Immediately he proceeds to speak more particularly. And first, he exhorts those to offer up a tribute of gratitude to God; who, after having been delivered from slavery and imprisonment, and after a long and painful journey, arrived in safety at their place of abode. These he calls the redeemed of God; because, in wandering through the trackless desert, and howling wilderness, they many a time would have been prevented from returning home, had not God, as it were, with his outstretched hand, appeared as their guard and their guide. He does not here refer to travelers indiscriminately, but to such as either by hostile power, or by any other kind of violence, or by stern necessity, having been banished to distant regions, felt themselves to be in the midst of imminent dangers; or it may be, that he refers to those who had been made prisoners by enemies, pirates, or other robbers. He reminds them that it was by no casual occurrence that they had been driven about in that manner, and had been brought back to their native country, but that all their wanderings had been under the superintending providence of God.

But the second verse might be conjoined with the first, as if the prophet were commanding the persons whom he was addressing to sing this celebrated ode. It may with equal propriety be read by itself thus: Let the redeemed of Jehovah, who have returned from captivity to their own land, come forth now, and take part in the celebration of God’s praises, and let them publish his loving-kindness which they have experienced in their deliverance. Among the Jews, who had occasion to undertake extensive journeys, such occurrences as these were very common; because they could hardly leave their own land, without from all quarters encountering ways rugged, and difficult, and perilous; and the same observation is equally applicable to mankind in general. He reminds them how often they wandered and turned aside from the right way, and found no place of shelter; a thing by no means rare in these lonely deserts. Were a person to enter a forest without any knowledge of the proper direction, he would, in the course of his wandering, be in danger of becoming the prey of lions and wolves. He has, however, particularly in his eye those who, finding themselves unexpectedly in desert places, are also in danger of perishing for hunger and thirst. For it is certain that such persons are hourly in hazard of death, unless the Lord come to their rescue.

Calvin: Psa 107:6 - In their straits they called upon Jehovah 6.In their straits they called upon Jehovah The verbs are here in the past tense, and according to grammarians, represent a continued action. The mea...

6.In their straits they called upon Jehovah The verbs are here in the past tense, and according to grammarians, represent a continued action. The meaning therefore is, that those who are wandering in desert places are often pinched with hunger and thirst in consequence of finding no place in which to lodge; and who, when all hope of deliverance fails them, then cry unto God. Doubtless, God grants deliverance to many when in straits, even though they do not present their supplications to Him for aid; and hence it was not so much the design of the prophet in this passage to extol the faith of the pious, who call upon God with all their heart, as to describe the common feelings of humanity. There may be not a few whose hope does not center on God, who, nevertheless, are constrained, by some invisible disposition of mind, to come to Him, when under the pressure of dire necessity. And this is the plan which God sometimes pursues, in order to extort from such persons the acknowledgement that deliverance is to be sought for from no other quarter than from Himself alone; and even the ungodly, who, while living voluptuously, scoff at Him, he constrains, in spite of themselves, to invoke his name. It has been customary in all ages for heathens, who look upon religion as a fable, when compelled by stern necessity, to call upon God for help. Did they do so in jest? By no means; it was by a secret natural instinct that they were led to reverence God’s name, which formerly they held in derision. The Spirit of God, therefore, in my opinion, here narrates what frequently takes place, namely, that persons destitute of piety and faith, and who have no desire to have any thing to do with God, if placed in perilous circumstances, are constrained by natural instinct, and without any proper conception of what they are doing, to call on the name of God. Since it is only in dubious and desperate cases that they betake themselves to God, this acknowledgement which they make of their helplessness is a palpable proof of their stupidity, that in the season of peace and tranquillity they neglect him, so much are they then under the intoxicating influence of their own prosperity; and notwithstanding that the germ of piety is planted in their hearts, they nevertheless never dream of learning wisdom, unless when driven by the dint of adversity; I mean, to learn the wisdom of acknowledging that there is a God in heaven who directs every event. It is unnecessary to allude here to the sarcastic retort of the ancient buffoon, who, on entering a temple, and beholding a number of tablets which several merchants had suspended there as memorials of their having escaped shipwreck, through the kind interposition of the gods, smartly and facetiously remarked, “But the deaths of those who have been drowned are not enumerated, the number of which is innumerable.” Perhaps he might have some just cause for scoffing in this manner at such idols. But even if a hundredfold more were drowned in the sea than safely reach the harbour, this does not in the least degree detract from the glory of the goodness of God, who, while he is merciful, is at the same time also just, so that the dispensing of the one does not interfere with the exercise of the other. The same observation applies to travelers that stray from the path, and wander up and down in the desert. If many of them perish for hunger and thirst, if many are devoured by wild animals, if many die from cold, these are nothing else than so many tokens of the judgments of God, which he designs for our consideration. From which we infer that the same thing would happen to all men, were it not the will of God to save a portion of them; and thus interposing as a judge between them, he preserves some for the sake of showing his mercy, and pours out his judgments upon others to declare his justice. The prophet, therefore, very properly adds, that by the hand of God they were led into the right way, where they may find a suitable place for lodging; and consequently he exhorts them to render thanks to God for this manifestation of his goodness. And with the view of enhancing the loving-kindness of God, he connects his wondrous works with his mercy; as if he should say, in this kind interposition, God’s grace is too manifest, either to be unperceived or unacknowledged by all; and for those who have been the subjects of such a remarkable deliverance, to remain silent regarding it, would be nothing less than an impious attempt to suppress the wonderful doings of God, an attempt equally vain with that of endeavoring to trample under their feet the light of the sun. For what else can be said of us, seeing that our natural instinct drives us to God for help, when we are in perplexity and peril; and when, after being rescued, we forthwith forget him, who will deny that his glory is, as it were, obscured by our wickedness and ingratitude?

Calvin: Psa 107:10 - They who dwell in darkness 10.They who dwell in darkness The Spirit of God makes mention here of another species of danger in which God manifestly discovers his power and grace...

10.They who dwell in darkness The Spirit of God makes mention here of another species of danger in which God manifestly discovers his power and grace in the protecting and delivering of men. The world, as I said, calls these vicissitudes the sport of fortune; and hardly one among a hundred can be found who ascribes them to the superintending providence of God. It is a very different kind of practical wisdom which God expects at our hands; namely, that we ought to meditate on his judgments in the time of adversity, and on his goodness in delivering us from it. For surely it is not by mere chance that a person falls into the hands of enemies or robbers; neither is it by chance that he is rescued from them. But this is what we must constantly keep in view, that all afflictions are God’s rod, and that therefore there is no remedy for them elsewhere than in his grace. If a person fall into the hands of robbers or pirates, and be not instantly murdered, but, giving up all hope of life, expects death every moment; surely the deliverance of such a one is a striking proof of the grace of God, which shines the more illustriously in proportion to the fewness of the number who make their escape. Thus, then, should a great number perish, this circumstance ought by no means to diminish the praises of God. On this account the prophet charges all those with ingratitude, who, after they have been wonderfully preserved, very soon lose sight of the deliverance thus vouchsafed to them. And, to strengthen the charge, he brings forward, as a testimony against them, their sighs and cries. For when they are in straits, they confess in good earnest that God is their deliverer; how happens it, then, that this confession disappears when they are enjoying peace and quietness?

Calvin: Psa 107:11 - Because they rebelled 11.Because they rebelled In assigning the cause of their afflictions he corrects the false impressions of those persons who imagine that these happen...

11.Because they rebelled In assigning the cause of their afflictions he corrects the false impressions of those persons who imagine that these happen by chance. Were they to reflect on the judgments of God, they would at once perceive that there was nothing like chance or fortune in the government of the world. Moreover, until men are persuaded that all their troubles come upon them by the appointment of God, it will never come into their minds to supplicate him for deliverance. Farther, when the prophet assigns the reason for their afflictions, he is not to be regarded as speaking of those persons as if they were notoriously wicked, but he is to be considered as calling upon the afflicted carefully to examine some particular parts of their life, and although no one accuse them, to look into their hearts, where they will always discover the true origin of all the miseries which overtake them. Nor does he only charge them with having merely sinned, but with having rebelled against the word of God, thus intimating that the best and only regulation for our lives consists in yielding a prompt obedience to his commandments. When, therefore, sheer necessity compels those who are in this manner convicted to cry unto God, they must be insensate indeed, if they do not acknowledge that the deliverance which, contrary to their expectation, they receive, comes immediately from God. For brazen gates and iron bars are spoken of for the purpose of enhancing the benefit; as if he said, the chains of perpetual slavery have been broken asunder.

Calvin: Psa 107:17 - Fools are afflicted on account of the way of their transgression 17.Fools are afflicted on account of the way of their transgression He comes to another species of chastisement. For as he observed above, that those...

17.Fools are afflicted on account of the way of their transgression He comes to another species of chastisement. For as he observed above, that those were given over to captivity who refused to yield obedience to God, so now he teaches that others have been visited by God with disease, as the fruit of their transgressions. And when the transgressor shall find that it is God who is administering correction to him, this will pave the way for his arriving at the knowledge of his grace.

He denominates those fools, who, thoughtlessly giving themselves up to sensuality, bring destruction upon themselves. The sin which they commit is not the result of ignorance and error only, but of their carnal affections, which depriving them of proper understanding, cause them to devise things detrimental to themselves. The maxim, that the fear of God is wisdom, must never be lost sight of. Hence it plainly follows, that they who shake off the yoke of God, and surrender themselves to Satan and sin, are the victims of their own folly and fury. And as constituting a principal ingredient of this madness, the prophet employs the term deletion or transgression; and subsequently he adds iniquities; because it happens that when once a man departs from God, from that moment he loses all self-control, and falls from one sin into another. But it is not of the distempers which commonly prevail in the world to which a reference is made in this passage, but to those which are deemed fatal, and in which all hope of life is abandoned, so that the grace of God becomes the more conspicuous when deliverance from them is obtained. When a man recovers from a slight indisposition, he does not so plainly discern the effects of God’s power, as when it is put forth in a wonderful and notable manner to bring back some from the gates of death, and restores them to their wonted health and rigour. He says, therefore, that they are preserved from many corruptions, which is equivalent to his saying, that they are delivered from as many deaths. To this purport are the following words of the prophet, in which he says, that they approach the gates of death, and that they loathe all food We have already adverted to their calling upon God, namely, that when men are reduced to the greatest straits, they, by thus calling upon God for aid, acknowledge that they would be undone unless he wonderfully interposed for their deliverance.

Calvin: Psa 107:20 - He sendeth his word 20.He sendeth his word Again, in saying that they are delivered from destruction, the prophet shows that he is here alluding to those diseases which,...

20.He sendeth his word Again, in saying that they are delivered from destruction, the prophet shows that he is here alluding to those diseases which, in the opinion of men, are incurable, and from which few are delivered. Besides, he contrasts God’s assistance with all the remedies which are in the power of man to apply; as if he should say, that their disease having baffled the skill of earthly physicians, their recovery has been entirely owing to the exertion of God’s power. It is proper also to notice the manner in which their recovery is effected; God has but to will it, or to speak the word, and instantly all diseases, and even death itself, are expelled. I do not regard this as exclusively referring to the faithful, as many expositors do. I own, indeed, that it is of comparatively little consequence to us to be the subjects of bodily care, if our souls still remain unsanctified by the word of God; and hence it is the intention of the prophet that we consider the mercy of God as extending to the evil and unthankful. The meaning of the passage, therefore, is, that diseases neither come upon us by chance, nor are to be ascribed to natural causes alone, but are to be viewed as God’s messengers executing his commands; so that we must believe that the same person that sent them can easily remove them, and for this purpose he has only to speak the word. And since we now perceive the drift of the passage, we ought to attend to the very appropriate analogy contained in it. Corporeal maladies are not removed except by the word or command of God, much less are men’s souls restored to the enjoyment of spiritual life, except this word be apprehended by faith.

Calvin: Psa 107:22 - And let them sacrifice And let them sacrifice This clause is subjoined by way of explanation, the more strongly to express how God is robbed of his due, if in the matter of ...

And let them sacrifice This clause is subjoined by way of explanation, the more strongly to express how God is robbed of his due, if in the matter of sacrifice his providence be not recognised. Even nature itself teaches that some kind of homage and reverence is due to God; this is acknowledged by the heathens themselves, who have no other instructor than nature. We know too, that the practice of offering sacrifices has obtained among all nations; and doubtless it was by the observance of this ritual, that God designed to preserve in the human family some sense of piety and religion. To acknowledge the bounty and beneficence of God, is the most acceptable sacrifice which can be presented to him; to this subject, therefore, the prophet intends to recall the attention of the insensate and indifferent portion of men. I do not deny that there may be also an allusion to the ceremonial law; but inasmuch as in the world at large sacrifices formed part of the religious exercises, he charges those with ingratitude, who, after having escaped from some imminent peril, forget to celebrate the praises of their Great Deliverer.

Calvin: Psa 107:23 - They that go down to the sea in ships 23.They that go down to the sea in ships Here we have another instance of God’s superintending care towards mankind pointed out to us by the prophe...

23.They that go down to the sea in ships Here we have another instance of God’s superintending care towards mankind pointed out to us by the prophet, exemplified in the bringing of those who are shipwrecked to the harbour, and this, too, as if he had raised them from the depth and darkness of the tomb, and brought them to live in the light of day. I do not understand what is here said about those who are accustomed to navigate the ocean seeing the wonders of God, as referring generally to the many wonderful things with which it abounds. Such persons are well fitted to bear testimony regarding the works of God, because they there behold more vast and various wonders than are to be seen upon earth. But it appears to me preferable to connect this with the subsequent context, where the prophet is his own interpreter, and where he shows how suddenly God raises and calms the tempest.

The sum of the matter is, that the scope of the passage is to point out that the lives of those who navigate the seas are often in great jeopardy by the storms which they encounter; because, as often as the ocean heaves and is agitated, and the billows rise and rage, so often does death stare them in the face. But he furnishes us with a still more vivid picture of the providence of God; for in telling us, that the sea does not of its own accord rise into a tempest, he makes use of the verb, he speaks, intimating that the word and providence of God make the winds blow, to agitate the sea. True, indeed, the mariners imagine from certain phenomena, that a storm is approaching, but sudden changes proceed only from the secret appointment of God. Therefore, he gives not merely a historical narrative of the manner in which squalls and storms arise, but, assuming the character of a teacher, begins with the cause itself, and then directs to the imminent danger with which the tempest is fraught; or rather, portrays, as in a picture, the image of death, in order that the goodness of God may appear the more conspicuous when the tempest happily ceases without any loss of life. They mount up, says he, to the heavens, they descend into the deeps; as if he should say, they mount up into the air, so that their life may be destroyed, and then they tumble down towards the caverns of the ocean, where they may be drowned. 284 Next, he mentions the fears which torment them, or rather which may deprive them of understanding; intimating by these words, that however skilfully mariners may steer their vessels, they may happen to be deprived of their senses; and being thus paralysed, they could not avail themselves of aid, were it even at hand. For though they collect all their tackling, cast their sounding line into the deep, and unfurl their sails to all points, yet after making every attempt, and all human skill is baffled, they give themselves up to the mercy of wind and wave. All hope of safety being cut off, no farther means are employed by them. And now that all human aid fails, they cry unto God for deliverance, which is a convincing evidence that they had been as it were dead. 285

Calvin: Psa 107:29 - He maketh the storm a calm 29.He maketh the storm a calm A profane author, in narrating the history of such an event, would have said, that the winds were hushed, and the ragin...

29.He maketh the storm a calm A profane author, in narrating the history of such an event, would have said, that the winds were hushed, and the raging billows were calmed; but the Spirit of God, by this change of the storm into a calm, places the providence of God as presiding over all; thereby meaning, that it was not by human agency that this violent commotion of the sea and wind, which threatened to subvert the frame of the world, was so suddenly stilled. When, therefore, the sea is agitated, and boils up in terrific fury, as if wave were contending with wave, whence is it that instantly it is calm and peaceful, but that God restrains the raging of the billows, the contention of which was so awful, and makes the bosom of the deep as smooth as a mirror? 286 Having spoken of their great terror, he proceeds next to mention their joy, so that their ingratitude may appear the more striking, if they forget their remarkable deliverance. For they are not in want of a monitor, having been abundantly instructed by the storm itself, and by the calm which ensued, that their lives were in the hand and under the protection of God. Moreover, he informs them that this is a species of gratitude which deserves not only to be acknowledged privately, or to be mentioned in the family, but that it should be praised and magnified in all places, even in the great assemblies. He makes specific mention of the elders, intimating that the more wisdom and experience a person has, the more capable is he of listening to, and being a witness of, these praises.

Calvin: Psa 107:33 - He turneth rivers into a wilderness 33.He turneth rivers into a wilderness Here then is an account of changes which it would be the height of folly to attribute to chance. Fruitful land...

33.He turneth rivers into a wilderness Here then is an account of changes which it would be the height of folly to attribute to chance. Fruitful lands become unfruitful, and barren lands assume the new aspect of freshness and fruitfulness. And how happens it that one district becomes sterile, and another becomes fat and fertile, contrary to what they were wont to be, but because that God pours out his wrath upon the inhabitants of the one, by taking his blessing from them, and renders the other fruitful to feed the hungry? It may be ascribed to the thinness of the population, that many parts of Asia and Greece, once exceedingly fruitful, now lie uncultivated and unproductive; but we must ascribe to the providence of God, which the prophet praises, the well authenticated fact, that in some places the earth that was fruitful has now become barren and parched, while others are beginning to be fertile.

It is, however, not sufficient merely to observe, that these wonderful revolutions of the surface of the earth are the result of God’s overruling purpose, unless we also observe, in the second place, what the prophet does not omit, that the earth is cursed by him on account of the iniquity of its inhabitants, who prove themselves to be undeserving of being so amply sustained by his bountiful hand. He has put pools and springs of water for fields or countries where there is an abundance of water; because moisture is required to nourish the plants by which fruit is produced. The term saltness is employed metaphorically, inasmuch as there is nothing more sterile than salt; hence that saying of Christ’s,

“If the salt have lost its saltness, what further purpose will it serve?”
Mar 9:50

not even indeed for barrenness. And, consequently, when men designed to doom any place to remain unproductive, they usually sowed it with salt. And probably it is in allusion to this ancient custom, that the prophet says that the land was covered with salt.

Calvin: Psa 107:35 - He turneth the desert into a pool of water 35.He turneth the desert into a pool of water This change, in contrast with the former, places the miraculous power of God in a more luminous positio...

35.He turneth the desert into a pool of water This change, in contrast with the former, places the miraculous power of God in a more luminous position. Because, were the fields ceasing to be so productive as in former times, men of the world, as was common of old, would attribute this to the frequent crops which exhausted their productive power. But whence is it that parched grounds become so fruitful, that one would almost say that the atmosphere, as well as the nature of the soil, had undergone a change, unless it be that God hath there put forth a wonderful display of his power and goodness? Wherefore, the prophet very justly says, that the deserts were turned into pools of water, so that populous cities may rise up in waste and uncultivated places, where once there was not a single cottage. For it is as improbable that the nature of the soil is changed, as that the course of the sun and stars is changed. The clause, the hungry are filled, may mean, either that they themselves, after considerable privations, have got what may supply their need, or that those poor persons, living in a country where they cannot longer find daily bread, being constrained to leave it, and to seek a new place of abode, are there bountifully supplied by God. I am rather disposed to think, that this clause refers to what frequently occurs, namely, that the famishing, whose wants the world refuses to supply, and who are expatriated, are comfortably accommodated in these desert places, where God blesses them with abundance. The passage which I have translated, fruit of the increase, is, by not a few Hebrew expositors, considered as a repetition of two synonymous terms, and are for supplying a copulative conjunction, making it, fruit and increase But it was rather the intention of the prophet to refer to fruit yielded annually; as if he said, the fertility of these regions is not temporary, or only for a few years, it is perennial. For תבואות , tebuaoth, is the term which, in the Hebrew, denotes full-grown fruit annually produced by the earth. And when he says, that the new settlers sow and plant, he gives us to understand, that, prior to their arrival, cultivation was unknown in these places, and, consequently, in becoming so unusually fertile, they assumed a totally different aspect. And, in fine, he adds, that it was entirely owing to the Divine blessing that those who were once oppressed with poverty and want are now daily increasing in the good things of this life.

Calvin: Psa 107:39 - Afterwards they are lessened 39.Afterwards they are lessened Ere I enter upon the consideration of the truths contained in this verse, I must make some brief verbal observations....

39.Afterwards they are lessened Ere I enter upon the consideration of the truths contained in this verse, I must make some brief verbal observations. Some make the word עוצר , otser, to signify tyranny, and certainly עצר , atsar, does signify to bear rule. But since it is used metaphorically for anguish, it appears to me that this is the meaning which is most accordant with the tenor of the passage. The last two words of the verse may be read as in the nominative case, as I have rendered them, or in the genitive, the anguish of misery and sorrow This lection appears to me preferable, through the anguish of misery, 289 and through sorrow.

We come now to notice shortly the main things in the passage. And as we had formerly a description of the changes which these districts underwent in relation to the nature of the soil, so now we are informed that mankind do not for ever continue in the same condition; because they both decrease in number, and lose their place and property by being reduced by wars or by civil commotions, or by other casualties. Therefore, whether they are wasted by the pestilence, or are defeated in battle, or are cut off by intestine broils, it is manifest that both their rank and condition undergo alteration. And what is the occasion of this change, but that God withdraws his grace, which hitherto formed the hidden spring from which all their prosperity issued? And as there are a thousand casualties by which cities may be ruined, the prophet brings forward one species of change of all others the most palpable and remarkable. And since God’s hand is not observed in that which relates to persons living in comparative obscurity, he brings into view princes themselves, whose name and fame will not permit any memorable event which befalls them to remain in obscurity. For it seems that the world is made on their account. When God, therefore, hurls them from their lofty estate, then men, aroused as it were from their slumber, are prepared to regard his judgments. Here, too, the mode of address which is employed must be attended to; in saying, that God poured contempt upon princes, it is as if it was his pleasure, so long as they retained their dignity, that honor and respect should be paid to them. The words of Daniel are well known,

“O king, God hath put the fear of thee in the very fowls of the heaven and the beasts of the earth,” (Dan 2:8)

And assuredly, though princes may clothe themselves with power, yet that inward honor and majesty which God has conferred upon them, is a greater safeguard than any human arm. Nor even would a single village hold out for the space of three days, did not God, by his invisible and invincible agency, put a restraint upon the hearts of men. Hence, whenever God renders princes contemptible, their magnificent power must of necessity be subverted. This is a fact corroborated by history, that mighty potentates, who have been the terror and dread of the whole world, when once denuded of their dignity and power, have become the sport even of their own dependants. And inasmuch as such a striking revolution as this should be regarded as a wonderful display of God’s power, yet such is the obtuseness of our minds, that we will not acknowledge his overruling providence. As a contrast to these reverses, the prophet afterwards shows, that the poor and ignoble are exalted, and their houses increased, and that those who were held in no estimation, suddenly increase in wealth and power. In these things men would assuredly recognize the providence of God, were it not that the perversity of their minds rendered them insensate.

Calvin: Psa 107:42 - The righteous shall see that, and shall rejoice 42.The righteous shall see that, and shall rejoice The prophet now draws the conclusion, that so many evident tokens of God’s superintending and ov...

42.The righteous shall see that, and shall rejoice The prophet now draws the conclusion, that so many evident tokens of God’s superintending and overruling providence could not transpire before the righteous without attracting their notice, and that their vision being illuminated by faith, these scenes are contemplated by them with unfeigned delight; while the wicked remain perplexed and mute. For he very judiciously makes a distinction between these two classes of persons. In whatever manner the wicked may be constrained to recognize God as the supreme ruler of the universe, nevertheless, in seeing they see not, and derive nothing from the sight, except that their conduct is rendered the more inexcusable. But the righteous are not only able to form a good and sound judgment of these events, they also spontaneously open their eyes to contemplate the equity, goodness, and wisdom of God, the sight and knowledge of which are refreshing to them. For the joy which they experience in this exercise is a pledge that their thus observing these things was the spontaneous effusion of their hearts. With regard to the despisers of God, it is not meant that they are so deeply impressed as truly to acknowledge that the world is under his superintending care, but that they are merely so far kept in check as not to presume to deny the existence of that providence as their natural inclination would lead them to do; or, at least, that they meet with a vigorous repulse whenever they attempt to speak in opposition to it. Although the judgments of God are before their eyes, yet is their understanding so darkened, that they cannot perceive the clear light. And this manner of speaking is more energetic than if it had been said, that the wicked themselves are become mute. In fact, they do not cease from murmuring against God’s dispensations of providence; for we see with what arrogance and contempt they set themselves in opposition to our faith, and have the hardihood to pour forth horrid blasphemies against God. This does not impeach the veracity of the prophet’s statement, that the mouth of wickedness is stopped, because, in fact, the more proudly and violently they assail God, the more notorious does their impiety appear. Besides, the joy here mentioned arises from this, that there is nothing more calculated to increase our faith, than the knowledge of the providence of God; because, without it, we would be harassed with doubts and fears, being uncertain whether or not the world was governed by chance. For this reason, it follows that those who aim at the subversion of this doctrine, depriving the children of God of true comfort, and vexing their minds by unsettling their faith, forge for themselves a hell upon earth. For what can be more awfully tormenting than to be constantly racked with doubt and anxiety? And we will never be able to arrive at a calm state of mind until we are taught to repose with implicit confidence in the providence of God. Moreover, it is declared in this verse, that God manifests his goodness to all men without exception, and yet there are comparatively few of them who benefit by it. Wherefore, when he formerly called upon all to celebrate the goodness of God, it was in order that the ingratitude of the majority of them might the more plainly appear.

Calvin: Psa 107:43 - Whosoever is wise, so as to observe these things 43.Whosoever is wise, so as to observe these things We are now informed that men begin to be wise when they turn their whole attention to the contemp...

43.Whosoever is wise, so as to observe these things We are now informed that men begin to be wise when they turn their whole attention to the contemplation of the works of God, and that all others besides are fools. For however much they may pique themselves upon their superior acuteness and subtilty, all this is of no avail so long as they shut their eyes against the light which is presented to them. In employing this interrogatory form of address, he indirectly adverts to that false persuasion which prevails in the world, at the very time when the most daring heaven-despiser esteems himself to be the wisest of men; as if he should say, that all those who do not properly observe the providence of God, will be found to be nothing but fools. This caution is the more necessary, since we find that some of the greatest of philosophers were so mischievous as to devote their talents to obscure and conceal the providence of God, and, entirely overlooking his agency, ascribed all to secondary causes. At the head of these was Aristotle, a man of genius and learning; but being a heathen, whose heart was perverse and depraved, it was his constant aim to entangle and perplex God’s overruling providence by a variety of wild speculations; so much so, that it may with too much truth be said, that he employed his naturally acute powers of mind to extinguish all light. Besides, the prophet not only condemns the insensate Epicureans, whose insensibility was of the basest character, but he also informs us that a blindness, still greater and more detestable, was to be found among these great philosophers themselves. By the term, observe, he informs us, that the bare apprehension of the works of God is not enough, — they must be carefully considered in order that the knowledge of them may be deliberately and maturely digested. And, therefore, that it may be engraven upon our hearts, we must make these works the theme of our attentive and constant meditation. When the prophet says, Whosoever is wise, even they shall understand, the change of the singular into the plural number is beautifully appropriate. By the one he tacitly complains of the fewness of those who observe the judgments of God; as if he should say, How seldom do we meet with a person who truly and attentively considers the works of God! Then he adverts to the fact of their being so visibly before all, that it is impossible that men could overlook them, were it not that their minds are perverted by their own wickedness. And if any person be disposed to inquire how it comes to pass that the prophet, after treating of the judgments and severity of God, now makes mention of his loving-kindness, I answer, that his loving-kindness shines most conspicuously, and occupies a very prominent place in all that he does; for he is naturally prone to loving-kindness, by which also he draws us to himself.

Defender: Psa 107:2 - say so This psalm as an exhortation to open public testimony to the Lord and His great work of redemption opens Book V of the Psalms. It goes well beyond the...

This psalm as an exhortation to open public testimony to the Lord and His great work of redemption opens Book V of the Psalms. It goes well beyond the direct experiences of Israel at the time it was written. Presumably it could and should be applied to people everywhere."

Defender: Psa 107:3 - from the south This could not refer to the return from exile in Babylon or Assyria. Both were to the east of Israel whereas the psalm envisions believers being gathe...

This could not refer to the return from exile in Babylon or Assyria. Both were to the east of Israel whereas the psalm envisions believers being gathered from all over the world. It may apply to the regathering of Israelites from all nations in the last days as many other prophecies do (Eze 37:21). It may apply in a broader sense, to the calling of people from every nation through the saving gospel of Christ."

Defender: Psa 107:8 - for his goodness This stirring exhortation is repeated in Psa 107:15, Psa 107:21, Psa 107:31. It speaks of all "the children of men" (or literally, "the children of Ad...

This stirring exhortation is repeated in Psa 107:15, Psa 107:21, Psa 107:31. It speaks of all "the children of men" (or literally, "the children of Adam") not just the children of Israel. This indicates that Psalm 107 applies in general to all people."

Defender: Psa 107:11 - they rebelled This indictment surely applies to the whole world beginning at Babel (Rom 1:21-25) and continuing everywhere today."

This indictment surely applies to the whole world beginning at Babel (Rom 1:21-25) and continuing everywhere today."

TSK: Psa 107:1 - Give // good // for his mercy am 3468, bc 536 (Title), The author of this Psalm is unknown; but it was evidently written to commemorate the return of the Jews from the Babylonian c...

am 3468, bc 536 (Title), The author of this Psalm is unknown; but it was evidently written to commemorate the return of the Jews from the Babylonian captivity; and it may easily be perceived that it must have been sung in alternate parts, having a double burden, or two intercalary verses often recurring. Bp. Lowth considers it as written ""after the method of the ancient pastorals, where, be the subject of their verse what it will, each swain endeavours to excel the other; and one may perceive their thoughts and expressions gradually to rise upon each other.""""No doubt,""he adds, ""the composition of this Psalm is admirable throughout; and the descriptive part of it adds at least its share of beauty to the whole; but what is most to be admired is its conciseness, and withal the expressiveness of the diction, which strikes the imagination with illimitable elegance. The weary and bewildered traveller - the miserable captive in the dungeon - the sick and dying man - the seaman foundering in a storm - are described in so affecting a manner, that they far exceed anything of the kind, though never so much laboured."

Give : Psa 106:1, Psa 118:1, 136:1-26; 1Ch 16:34, 1Ch 16:41; 2Ch 5:13, 2Ch 7:3, 2Ch 7:6, 2Ch 20:21

good : Psa 119:68; Mat 19:17

for his mercy : Psa 103:17; Luk 1:50

TSK: Psa 107:2 - Let the // from Let the : Psa 31:5, Psa 130:8; Exo 15:16; Deu 15:15; Isa 35:9, Isa 43:1, Isa 44:22; Luk 1:68; Luk 24:21; Gal 3:13; Tit 2:14; 1Pe 1:18, 1Pe 1:19 from :...

TSK: Psa 107:3 - gathered // south gathered : Psa 106:47; Isa 11:11-16, Isa 43:5, Isa 43:6, Isa 49:12; Jer 29:14, Jer 31:8, Jer 31:10; Eze 36:24; Eze 39:27; Rev 5:9 south : Heb. sea

TSK: Psa 107:4 - wandered // they found wandered : Psa 107:40; Gen 21:14-16; Num 14:33; Deu 8:15, Deu 32:10; Job 12:24; Eze 34:6, Eze 34:12; Heb 11:38; Rev 12:6 they found : This is the firs...

wandered : Psa 107:40; Gen 21:14-16; Num 14:33; Deu 8:15, Deu 32:10; Job 12:24; Eze 34:6, Eze 34:12; Heb 11:38; Rev 12:6

they found : This is the first similitude; in which the Israelites in captivity are compared to travellers in a dreary, uninhabited, and barren desert, spent with hunger and thirst, as well as by the fatigues of the journey.

TSK: Psa 107:5 - -- Jdg 15:18, Jdg 15:19; 1Sa 30:11, 1Sa 30:12; Isa 44:12; Jer 14:18; Lam 2:19; Mar 8:2, Mar 8:3

TSK: Psa 107:6 - Then // he delivered Then : Psa 107:13, Psa 107:19, Psa 107:28, Psa 50:15, Psa 91:15; Isa 41:17, Isa 41:18; Jer 29:12-14; Hos 5:15; Heb 4:15, Heb 4:16 he delivered : 2Co 1...

TSK: Psa 107:7 - he led // that they he led : Psa 77:20, Psa 78:52, Psa 136:16; Ezr 8:21-23; Isa 30:21, Isa 35:8-10, Isa 48:17; Isa 49:8-11, Isa 63:13, Isa 63:14; Jer 6:16, Jer 31:9; 2Pe ...

TSK: Psa 107:8 - Oh that men // praise // his wonderful Oh that men : Psa 107:15, Psa 107:21, Psa 107:31, Psa 81:13-16; Deu 5:29, Deu 32:29; Isa 48:18 praise : Psa 34:3, Psa 92:1, Psa 92:2, Psa 147:1; Isa 6...

TSK: Psa 107:9 - -- Psa 34:10, Psa 132:15, Psa 146:7; Isa 55:1-3; Jer 31:14, Jer 31:25; Mat 5:6; Luk 1:53; Rev 7:16, Rev 7:17

TSK: Psa 107:10 - Such // as sit // bound Such : Here begins the second comparison; in which the state of the captives in Babylon is illustrated by that of prisoners in a dreary dungeon. as si...

Such : Here begins the second comparison; in which the state of the captives in Babylon is illustrated by that of prisoners in a dreary dungeon.

as sit : Job 3:5; Isa 9:2; Mat 4:16, Mat 22:13; Luk 1:79

bound : Psa 105:18; Exo 2:23, Exo 2:24; 2Ch 33:11; Job 36:8, Job 36:9; Lam 3:6, Lam 3:7; Rom 6:20, Rom 6:21

TSK: Psa 107:11 - Because // contemned Because : Psa 68:6, Psa 68:18, Psa 106:43; Isa 63:10, Isa 63:11; Lam 3:39-42, Lam 5:15-17 contemned : Psa 73:24, Psa 113:7-9, Psa 119:24; 2Ch 25:15, 2...

TSK: Psa 107:12 - he brought // and there he brought : Exo 2:23, Exo 5:18, Exo 5:19; Jdg 10:16-18, Jdg 16:21, Jdg 16:30; Neh 9:37; Isa 51:19, Isa 51:20, Isa 51:23; Isa 52:5; Lam 5:5, Lam 5:6; ...

TSK: Psa 107:13 - -- Psa 107:6, Psa 107:19, Psa 107:28, Psa 18:6, Psa 116:3-6; Exo 3:7, Exo 3:8; Jdg 4:3, Jdg 6:6-10, Jdg 10:10-18; 2Ch 33:12, 2Ch 33:13, 2Ch 33:18, 2Ch 33...

TSK: Psa 107:14 - brought // brake brought : Psa 107:10, Psa 68:6; Job 3:5, Job 10:21, Job 10:22, Job 15:22, Job 15:30, Job 19:8, Job 33:30, Job 42:10-12; Isa 42:16, Isa 49:9, Isa 60:1-...

TSK: Psa 107:15 - -- Psa 107:8, Psa 107:21, Psa 107:31, Psa 116:17-19

TSK: Psa 107:16 - -- Jdg 16:3; Isa 45:1, Isa 45:2; Mic 2:13

TSK: Psa 107:17 - Fools // because Fools : This is the third comparison; the captives being compared to persons in a dangerous malady, as the consequences of their own sins. Psa 14:1, P...

Fools : This is the third comparison; the captives being compared to persons in a dangerous malady, as the consequences of their own sins. Psa 14:1, Psa 92:6; Pro 1:22, Pro 7:7, Pro 7:22

because : Psa 38:1-8; Num 11:33, Num 11:34, Num 12:10-13, Num 21:5-9; Isa 57:17, Isa 57:18; Jer 2:19; Lam 3:39

TSK: Psa 107:18 - abhorreth // and they abhorreth : Job 33:19-22 and they : Psa 9:13, Psa 88:3; Isa 38:10

abhorreth : Job 33:19-22

and they : Psa 9:13, Psa 88:3; Isa 38:10

TSK: Psa 107:19 - -- Psa 107:6, Psa 107:13, Psa 107:28, Psa 30:8-12, Psa 34:4-6, Psa 78:34, Psa 78:35, Psa 116:4-8; Jer 33:3

TSK: Psa 107:20 - He sent // healed // delivered He sent : Psa 147:15, Psa 147:19; 2Ki 20:4, 2Ki 20:5; Mat 8:8 healed : Psa 30:2, Psa 30:3, Psa 103:3, Psa 103:4, Psa 147:3; Num 21:8, Num 21:9; Job 33...

TSK: Psa 107:21 - -- Psa 107:8, Psa 107:15, Psa 107:31, Psa 66:5; 2Ch 32:25; Luk 17:18

TSK: Psa 107:22 - sacrifice // declare // rejoicing sacrifice : Psa 50:14, Psa 116:12, Psa 116:17; Lev 7:12; Heb 13:15; 1Pe 2:5, 1Pe 2:9 declare : Psa 9:11, Psa 73:28, Psa 105:1, Psa 105:2, Psa 118:17; ...

TSK: Psa 107:23 - They // go down They : This is the fourth comparison; their captivity was as dangerous and alarming as a dreadful tempest at sea; with a most natural and striking des...

They : This is the fourth comparison; their captivity was as dangerous and alarming as a dreadful tempest at sea; with a most natural and striking description of which we are here presented.

go down : Psa 48:7; Eze 27:26; Acts 27:9-28:31; Rev 18:17

TSK: Psa 107:24 - his wonders his wonders : Psa 95:5, Psa 104:24-27; Job 38:8-11

TSK: Psa 107:25 - he commandeth // raiseth // lifteth he commandeth : Psa 135:7, Psa 148:8; Jon 1:4 raiseth : Heb. maketh to stand lifteth : Psa 93:3; Mat 8:24; Joh 6:18

he commandeth : Psa 135:7, Psa 148:8; Jon 1:4

raiseth : Heb. maketh to stand

lifteth : Psa 93:3; Mat 8:24; Joh 6:18

TSK: Psa 107:26 - their soul their soul : Psa 22:14, Psa 119:28; 2Sa 17:10; Isa 13:7; Nah 2:10

TSK: Psa 107:27 - stagger // are at their wit’ s end stagger : Job 12:25; Isa 19:14, Isa 29:9 are at their wit’ s end : Heb. all their wisdom is swallowed up, Job 37:20; Isa 19:3 *marg. Act 27:15-20

stagger : Job 12:25; Isa 19:14, Isa 29:9

are at their wit’ s end : Heb. all their wisdom is swallowed up, Job 37:20; Isa 19:3 *marg. Act 27:15-20

TSK: Psa 107:28 - -- Psa 107:6, Psa 107:13, Psa 107:19; Jon 1:5, Jon 1:6, Jon 1:14; Mat 8:25; Act 27:23-25

TSK: Psa 107:29 - -- Psa 65:7, Psa 89:9; Jon 1:15; Mat 8:26; Mar 4:39-41; Luk 8:23-25

TSK: Psa 107:30 - he bringeth he bringeth : Joh 6:21

he bringeth : Joh 6:21

TSK: Psa 107:31 - Oh that men // his wonderful Oh that men : Psa 107:8, Psa 107:15, Psa 107:21, Psa 103:2, Psa 105:1; Hos 2:8; Jon 1:16, Jon 2:9; Mic 6:4, Mic 6:5; Rom 1:20, Rom 1:21; 2Ti 3:2; Heb ...

TSK: Psa 107:32 - exalt // in the congregation exalt : Psa 18:46, Psa 46:10, Psa 99:5, Psa 99:9; Exo 15:2; Isa 12:4, Isa 25:1 in the congregation : Psa 22:22, Psa 22:25, Psa 40:9, Psa 40:10, Psa 66...

TSK: Psa 107:33 - turneth // watersprings turneth : 1Ki 17:1-7; Isa 13:19-21, Isa 19:5-10, Isa 34:9, Isa 34:10, Isa 42:15, Isa 44:27, Isa 50:2; Eze 30:12; Joe 1:20; Nah 1:4; Zep 2:9, Zep 2:13 ...

TSK: Psa 107:34 - a fruitful // barrenness a fruitful : Gen 13:10, Gen 13:13, Gen 19:25; Deu 29:23-28; Isa 32:13-15 barrenness : Heb. saltness, Gen 14:3; Eze 47:11

a fruitful : Gen 13:10, Gen 13:13, Gen 19:25; Deu 29:23-28; Isa 32:13-15

barrenness : Heb. saltness, Gen 14:3; Eze 47:11

TSK: Psa 107:35 - turneth turneth : Psa 114:8; Num 21:16-18; 2Ki 3:16-20; Isa 35:6, Isa 35:7, Isa 41:17-19, Isa 44:3-5; Eze 47:6-12

TSK: Psa 107:36 - there he // a city there he : Psa 146:7; Luk 1:53 a city : Psa 107:7; Act 17:26

there he : Psa 146:7; Luk 1:53

a city : Psa 107:7; Act 17:26

TSK: Psa 107:37 - sow // which may sow : Isa 37:30; Jer 29:5, Jer 31:5; Eze 28:26; Amo 9:13-15 which may : Psa 65:9-13; Gen 26:12; Joe 1:10-12; Hag 1:5, Hag 1:6, Hag 1:10, Hag 1:11, Hag...

TSK: Psa 107:38 - He blesseth // suffereth He blesseth : Psa 128:1-6; Gen 1:28, Gen 9:1, Gen 12:2, Gen 17:16, Gen 17:20; Exo 1:7; Deu 28:4, Deu 28:11, Deu 30:9; Jer 30:19; Eze 37:26 suffereth :...

TSK: Psa 107:39 - Again // they are // oppression Again : The incidents detailed in these verses, which frequently occur, and mark the superintendence of a benign Providence, and the hand of a just Go...

Again : The incidents detailed in these verses, which frequently occur, and mark the superintendence of a benign Providence, and the hand of a just God, appear to be brought forward to illustrate the return of the Israelites from captivity, and the punishment of their oppressors the Babylonians. Wherefore, at last, as in a common chorus, they conclude with exhorting each other to a serious consideration of these things, and to make a proper return to the Almighty.

they are : Psa 30:6, Psa 30:7; Gen 45:11; Rth 1:20, Rth 1:21; 1Sa 2:5-7; 2Ki 4:8, 2Ki 8:3; Job 1:10-17

oppression : Exo 1:13, Exo 1:14, Exo 2:23, Exo 2:24; Jdg 6:3-6; 2Ki 10:32, 2Ki 13:7, 2Ki 13:22, 2Ki 14:26; 2Ch 15:5, 2Ch 15:6; Jer 51:33, Jer 51:34

TSK: Psa 107:40 - poureth // contempt // causeth // wilderness poureth : Job 12:21, Job 12:24; Isa 23:8, Isa 23:9 contempt : Psa 78:66; Exo 8:3, Exo 8:17, Exo 8:24; Jos 10:24-26; Jdg 1:6, Jdg 1:7, Jdg 4:21; 1Sa 5:...

TSK: Psa 107:41 - setteth // from // maketh setteth : Psa 113:7, Psa 113:8; Rth 4:14-17; 1Sa 2:8; Est 8:15-17; Job 5:11, Job 8:7, Job 11:15-19; Job 42:10-12; Jer 52:31-34; Jam 5:11 from : or, af...

TSK: Psa 107:42 - righteous // iniquity righteous : Psa 52:6, Psa 58:10, Psa 58:11; Job 22:19; Isa 66:10, Isa 66:11, Isa 66:14 iniquity : Psa 63:11, Psa 112:10; Exo 11:7; Job 5:15, Job 5:16;...

TSK: Psa 107:43 - is wise // they shall understand is wise : Psa 28:5, Psa 64:9; Isa 5:12; Jer 9:12; Dan 10:12; Hos 14:9 they shall understand : Psa 50:23; Jer 9:24; Eph 3:18, Eph 3:19

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Psa 107:2 - The redeemed of the Lord // Say so // Of the enemy The redeemed of the Lord all they whom God hath redeemed, as it is expressed in the next clause, or delivered from all the following calamities. Say...

The redeemed of the Lord all they whom God hath redeemed, as it is expressed in the next clause, or delivered from all the following calamities.

Say so to wit, that the Lord is good , &c., as it is Psa 107:1 .

Of the enemy of such as had taken them captives, either in battle, or in their travels, to which they were led by their own inclinations, or by their necessary occasions.

Poole: Psa 107:3 - From the south // north Bringing them into their own land, out of the several quarters of the world into which they had been carried. From the south Heb. from the sea ; ...

Bringing them into their own land, out of the several quarters of the world into which they had been carried.

From the south Heb. from the sea ; which in Scripture commonly notes the west, because the great midland sea was on the west of Canaan; but here, as it appears from the opposition of this to the

north it notes the south, so called from the Red Sea, which was on the south, and which is sometimes called the sea , simply and without addition, as Psa 72:8 114:3 .

Poole: Psa 107:4 - They wandered in the wilderness // No city to dwell in They wandered in the wilderness mistaking their way, which they might easily do in the vast and sandy deserts of Arabia. No city to dwell in or rat...

They wandered in the wilderness mistaking their way, which they might easily do in the vast and sandy deserts of Arabia.

No city to dwell in or rather, no city or town inhabited , where they might refresh themselves, as travellers used to do; for they did not go into the wilderness to seek for a city or habitation there, but only intended to pass through it, as appears by the context, and by the nature of the thing.

Poole: Psa 107:5 - -- Partly for want of necessary provisions, and partly through anguish of spirit.

Partly for want of necessary provisions, and partly through anguish of spirit.

Poole: Psa 107:6 - Unto the Lord // He delivered them out of their distresses Unto the Lord Heb. unto Jehovah , to the true God. For the heathens, of whom he speaks, had many of them some knowledge of the true God, and did in ...

Unto the Lord Heb. unto Jehovah , to the true God. For the heathens, of whom he speaks, had many of them some knowledge of the true God, and did in their manner worship him with and in their idols; and especially in their distresses, when they discovered the impotency of their idols, they did direct their prayer immediately to the true God, of which there are many instances of heathen writers.

He delivered them out of their distresses in answer to their prayers, which he did not because their prayers were acceptable to him, but partly, out of the benignity and compassionateness of his nature to all his creatures; partly, to encourage and preserve the use of prayer and religion among the Gentiles, and to oblige them to a more diligent search after the knowledge of the true God, and of his worship; and partly, to give his own people assurance of his great readiness to hear and answer all those prayers which with upright hearts they offered to him according to his word.

Poole: Psa 107:7 - Led them forth // A city of habitation Led them forth out of the wilderness, where they had lost their way, Psa 107:4 . A city of habitation: See Poole "Psa 107:4".

Led them forth out of the wilderness, where they had lost their way, Psa 107:4 .

A city of habitation: See Poole "Psa 107:4".

Poole: Psa 107:8 - Oh that men would praise! // To the children of men Oh that men would praise! Heb. Let them praise . Or, They shall praise , i.e. they are highly obliged to praise. To the children of men not only ...

Oh that men would praise! Heb. Let them praise . Or, They shall praise , i.e. they are highly obliged to praise.

To the children of men not only to his peculiar people, but to all mankind, to whom he is very kind and bountiful.

Poole: Psa 107:9 - The longing // With goodness The longing either the thirsty, opposed to the hungry here following; or the hungry, as this general phrase is limited and expounded in the next clau...

The longing either the thirsty, opposed to the hungry here following; or the hungry, as this general phrase is limited and expounded in the next clause.

With goodness with the fruits of his goodness; with good things , Psa 103:5 ; with food and gladness, Act 14:17 ; with that good which they wanted and desired.

Poole: Psa 107:10 - In darkness and in the shadow of death // In affliction and iron In darkness and in the shadow of death in a disconsolate and forlorn condition, in dark prisons or dungeons. In affliction and iron with afflicting...

In darkness and in the shadow of death in a disconsolate and forlorn condition, in dark prisons or dungeons.

In affliction and iron with afflicting or grievous irons. Or, in the cords of affliction , as they are called, Job 36:8 , and particularly in iron fetters.

Poole: Psa 107:11 - Against the words of God Against the words of God against God’ s commands, made known either, 1. By his written word delivered to the Jews, of which the Gentiles were n...

Against the words of God against God’ s commands, made known either,

1. By his written word delivered to the Jews, of which the Gentiles were not ignorant, which therefore they should have diligently inquired after and searched into, as the queen of Sheba came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon, and as divers of the heathens travelled into very remote parts to gain a more perfect knowledge of the arts and sciences; which will justly be laid to their charge, and condemn them for their neglect of that Divine wisdom which was treasured up in the Holy Scriptures. Or,

2. By the prophets, who sometimes were sent to the Gentiles. Or,

3. By the law and light of nature, and by its interpreters, their wise and learned philosophers, who delivered many excellent rules and precepts of piety and virtue, which were sufficient, though not for their salvation without Christ, yet for the conduct of their lives in a great measure, and to leave them without excuse for their gross disobedience thereunto.

Poole: Psa 107:12 - Their heart // With labour Their heart the pride, and rebellion, and obstinacy of their hearts. With labour or, with trouble or troubles . They fell into their enemy’...

Their heart the pride, and rebellion, and obstinacy of their hearts.

With labour or, with trouble or troubles . They fell into their enemy’ s hands, and into hopeless and remediless miseries.

Poole: Psa 107:16 - -- He restored them to liberty in spite of all impediments and oppositions.

He restored them to liberty in spite of all impediments and oppositions.

Poole: Psa 107:17 - Fools // Because of their transgression // Afflicted Fools i.e. wicked men, whom he calls fools , because of the mischiefs which through their own folly they bring upon themselves. Because of their tr...

Fools i.e. wicked men, whom he calls fools , because of the mischiefs which through their own folly they bring upon themselves.

Because of their transgression Heb. because of the way of their transgression , i.e. their custom and course of sinning, as the word way is used, Psa 1:1 Pro 2:12 . They did not fall into sin once or twice, as good men may do, but it was their usual practice, and therefore they are justly punished.

Afflicted with wasting sickness, as appears from Psa 107:18,20 . Compare Job 33:19 , &c.; Psa 39:11 , &c.

Poole: Psa 107:18 - -- Their soul ; either themselves with all their soul; or their appetite, as the soul is taken, Job 33:20 Isa 29:8 . Abhorreth all manner of meat ; w...

Their soul ; either themselves with all their soul; or their appetite, as the soul is taken, Job 33:20 Isa 29:8 . Abhorreth all manner of meat ; which is a Usual effect of great sickness. They draw near unto the gates of death ; they are sick well nigh unto death.

Poole: Psa 107:20 - His word His word his command, or his blessing, which came with power.

His word his command, or his blessing, which came with power.

Poole: Psa 107:22 - Sacrifices of thanksgiving Sacrifices of thanksgiving either properly so called; or praises and thanksgivings to God, which in Scripture are called sacrifices, because they are...

Sacrifices of thanksgiving either properly so called; or praises and thanksgivings to God, which in Scripture are called sacrifices, because they are no less acceptable to God than costly sacrifices.

Poole: Psa 107:23 - Go down to the sea // Do business Go down to the sea he saith go down , either because the sea or the shore of it is commonly lower than their habitations from whence they come, or t...

Go down to the sea he saith go down , either because the sea or the shore of it is commonly lower than their habitations from whence they come, or than the natural or artificial banks which are raised to prevent the inundation of the waters; or because the sea is lower than the earth, as may be gathered from the rivers which run down into it.

Do business whose occupation lies there, either as merchants or as mariners.

Poole: Psa 107:24 - -- His wonderful works, either, 1. Of creation, fishes of various kinds and shapes, and some of prodigious greatness, which are unknown to other men. ...

His wonderful works, either,

1. Of creation, fishes of various kinds and shapes, and some of prodigious greatness, which are unknown to other men. Or,

2. Of providence, in raising and laying storms, of which he speaks in the following verses

Poole: Psa 107:25 - -- The winds and storms come not by chance, but by the disposition of Divine Providence.

The winds and storms come not by chance, but by the disposition of Divine Providence.

Poole: Psa 107:26 - To the depths // Because of trouble To the depths towards the bottom of the sea. Because of trouble through the perplexity of their minds, and fear of sudden and violent death.

To the depths towards the bottom of the sea.

Because of trouble through the perplexity of their minds, and fear of sudden and violent death.

Poole: Psa 107:27 - Stagger like a drunken man Stagger like a drunken man not so much from the giddiness of their heads, which is not usual in persons accustomed to the sea, as through the violent...

Stagger like a drunken man not so much from the giddiness of their heads, which is not usual in persons accustomed to the sea, as through the violent and various motions of the sea and the ship.

Poole: Psa 107:32 - In the congregation of the people // In the assembly of the elders In the congregation of the people not only in their own hearts and families, but even in public assemblies, and before all persons, as they have oppo...

In the congregation of the people not only in their own hearts and families, but even in public assemblies, and before all persons, as they have opportunity.

In the assembly of the elders the magistrates or rulers; who are here opposed to the people. The sense is, Let them not be ashamed nor afraid to speak of God’ s wonderful works and praises before the greatest of men, as mean persons commonly are. Compare Psa 119:46 . Or he mentions the elders particularly, because they were most apt to neglect and forget God, and to exalt themselves above and against him; and therefore it was meet and necessary that they should be acquainted with the almighty power and universal providence and dominion of God, that they themselves might learn subjection and reverence to God, and might promote it among their people.

Poole: Psa 107:33 - Rivers // the water-springs // Into a wilderness Rivers either, 1. Properly so called; which he can divert or dry up when he pleaseth, as sometimes he hath done. Or rather, 2. Those grounds which ...

Rivers either,

1. Properly so called; which he can divert or dry up when he pleaseth, as sometimes he hath done. Or rather,

2. Those grounds which are well watered, and therefore very fruitful, as the next verse explains this. And so

the water-springs here and Psa 107:35 , and the standing water , Ps 107 35 , are taken.

Into a wilderness into a dry ground, as it follows, which is like a parched and barren wilderness.

Poole: Psa 107:34 - Into barrenness // For the wickedness of them that dwell therein Into barrenness Heb. into saltness , which procures barrenness. See Deu 29:23 Jud 9:45 . For the wickedness of them that dwell therein he doth not...

Into barrenness Heb. into saltness , which procures barrenness. See Deu 29:23 Jud 9:45 .

For the wickedness of them that dwell therein he doth not inflict these judgments by choice, or without cause, but for the punishment of sin in some, and the prevention of it in others.

Poole: Psa 107:35 - Into a standing water Into a standing water into a well-watered and fruitful land.

Into a standing water into a well-watered and fruitful land.

Poole: Psa 107:36 - The hungry The hungry poor people; who could not provide for themselves, or were banished from their own land by potent oppressors, and were driven into wildern...

The hungry poor people; who could not provide for themselves, or were banished from their own land by potent oppressors, and were driven into wildernesses, like them Job 30:3 , which God in pity to them made fruitful.

Poole: Psa 107:37 - May yield // Fruits of increase May yield Heb. and they shall make or procure from their fields and vineyards. Fruits of increase such fruits as they use to produce.

May yield Heb. and they shall make or procure from their fields and vineyards.

Fruits of increase such fruits as they use to produce.

Poole: Psa 107:38 - -- Preserves them from abortion and deadly diseases, and on the contrary causeth them to increase, as he said in the former branch, which is here repea...

Preserves them from abortion and deadly diseases, and on the contrary causeth them to increase, as he said in the former branch, which is here repeated in other words, after the sane manner.

Poole: Psa 107:39 - They // are minished and brought low // Through oppression, affliction, and sorrow They these poor men, who, when they are exalted and blessed by God, kick at him, and grow insolent and secure, as the returner of men is, are minish...

They these poor men, who, when they are exalted and blessed by God, kick at him, and grow insolent and secure, as the returner of men is,

are minished and brought low are by God’ s just judgment diminished in their numbers and in their blessings.

Through oppression, affliction, and sorrow or, through wicked oppression , (by the tyranny of others, whom God sends to spoil them of their abused riches,) and by other griefs or grievous calamities which God inflicts.

Poole: Psa 107:40 - He poureth contempt upon princes He poureth contempt upon princes those who were honourable and adored like gods by their people, and terrible to all their enemies, he renders them d...

He poureth contempt upon princes those who were honourable and adored like gods by their people, and terrible to all their enemies, he renders them despicable to their own subjects, and to other nations; and this he doth suddenly, abundantly, and unavoidably, as this phrase of pouring it out upon them seems to imply. To wander in the wilderness, where there is no way ; either,

1. He giveth them up to foolish and pernicious counsels, by which they are exposed to contempt, and brought to their wit’ s end, not knowing what course to take. Or,

2. He banished them from their own courts and kingdoms, and forced them to flee into desolate wildernesses for shelter and subsistence.

Poole: Psa 107:41 - Yet setteth he the poor on high Yet setteth he the poor on high: and whilst he bringeth down great potentates, at the same time he advanceth those who were obscure and contemptible....

Yet setteth he the poor on high: and whilst he bringeth down great potentates, at the same time he advanceth those who were obscure and contemptible. Like a flock, which increase very much in a little time.

Poole: Psa 107:42 - Shall see it // Rejoice Shall see it or rather, these things , as it is expressed in the next verse. They shall diligently observe these wonderful works of God’ s merc...

Shall see it or rather, these things , as it is expressed in the next verse. They shall diligently observe these wonderful works of God’ s mercy and justice.

Rejoice not only in the mercies of God vouchsafed to them and to other persons in want and misery, but also in God’ s judgments upon his implacable enemies, which afford matter of rejoicing to good men, as hath been once and again declared in this book, both for the honour which God hath by them, and for the sins and calamities of others, which by this means are prevented. Iniquity , i.e. unrighteous or ungodly men, the abstract being put for the concrete, as faithfulnesses for the faithful , Psa 12:1 , and pride for the proud, Psa 36:11 . Shall stop her mouth ; shall be put to silence. So this or the like phrase is used, Jud 18:19 Job 5:16 21:5 29:9 . They who used to speak loftily and wickedly , and to set their mouth against the heavens, as they did, Psa 73:8,9 , to reproach God and his providence, as either negligent or unrighteous in the management of the world, shall now be forced to acknowledge his power and justice in those judgments which he hath brought upon them.

Poole: Psa 107:43 - Whoso is wise, and will observe these things // Even they Whoso is wise, and will observe these things or, who (for the Hebrew particle mi is interrogative) is wise ? for (as the conjunctive particle ...

Whoso is wise, and will observe these things or, who (for the Hebrew particle mi is interrogative) is wise ? for (as the conjunctive particle is frequently used) he will observe these things . All who are truly wise will consider all these events, and lay them to heart, as being very useful for their own instruction.

Even they or each of them , all such wise and considering persons,

shall understand the lovingkindness of the Lord will see and acknowledge that God is kind or good to all , and that his tender mercies are over all his works , as it is said, Psa 145:9 , and singularly kind and gracious to all wise and godly men.

PBC: Psa 107:4 - -- See Philpot: THE HOUSELESS WANDERER & See Philpot: THE WILDERNESS WANDERER 

See Philpot: THE HOUSELESS WANDERER

& See Philpot: THE WILDERNESS WANDERER 

Haydock: Psa 107:1 - -- The prophet praiseth God for benefits received.

The prophet praiseth God for benefits received.

Haydock: Psa 107:1 - Himself Himself. By repeating here what occurs in Psalm lvi., and lix. David teaches us to excite our fervour by such sentiments as have formerly made an i...

Himself. By repeating here what occurs in Psalm lvi., and lix. David teaches us to excite our fervour by such sentiments as have formerly made an impression upon us. (Berthier) ---

He spoke before of his own victories: now he considers those of Christ, and of his Church, (Genebrard) as well as the state of the captives. (Theodoret) (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 107:2 - My heart My heart, &c. Is not repeated in Hebrew. But it is, [in] Psalm lvi. 8.

My heart, &c. Is not repeated in Hebrew. But it is, [in] Psalm lvi. 8.

Haydock: Psa 107:3 - Arise, my glory Arise, my glory. Is found also in this psalm, though not here in Hebrew, &c. St. Jerome (ad Sun.) thinks some copyist has inserted it. (Calmet) --...

Arise, my glory. Is found also in this psalm, though not here in Hebrew, &c. St. Jerome (ad Sun.) thinks some copyist has inserted it. (Calmet) ---

But it seems to be here in its proper place. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 107:4 - Nations Nations. David made various conquests, which prefigured those of Christ, to whom the rest of the psalm belongs. (St. Augustine) (Worthington)

Nations. David made various conquests, which prefigured those of Christ, to whom the rest of the psalm belongs. (St. Augustine) (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 107:7 - That That. See Psalm lix. 7. (Worthington)

That. See Psalm lix. 7. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 107:8 - Holiness Holiness. Or holy one, sancto: (Haydock) meaning Jeremias xxv. 11., who foretold the end of the captivity, (Calmet) or David himself, and the Mess...

Holiness. Or holy one, sancto: (Haydock) meaning Jeremias xxv. 11., who foretold the end of the captivity, (Calmet) or David himself, and the Messias, his son, in whom he will rejoice. (Haydock)

Gill: Psa 107:1 - O give thanks unto the Lord // For he is good // For his mercy endureth for ever O give thanks unto the Lord,.... As all men should do, at all times and for all things; the psalm begins as the former does, and gives the same reason...

O give thanks unto the Lord,.... As all men should do, at all times and for all things; the psalm begins as the former does, and gives the same reasons for thanksgiving.

For he is good; and does good, and is the author of all good.

For his mercy endureth for ever; and men in every age are partakers of it.

Gill: Psa 107:2 - Let the redeemed of the Lord say so Let the redeemed of the Lord say so,.... That the Lord is good, and his mercy everlasting; since their redemption is a proof of his goodness, and an i...

Let the redeemed of the Lord say so,.... That the Lord is good, and his mercy everlasting; since their redemption is a proof of his goodness, and an instance of his mercy; this is not to be understood of the Israelites redeemed from Egyptian bondage, or from the Babylonish captivity, though they had abundant reason to say as above; but rather of all such who are delivered from any sort of slavery, bondage, and confinement; whether from the power of a disease, or from a prison, or from wicked and unreasonable men; and from captivity in an enemy's country, where they have been used very severely; and as the providence of God is concerned in all such deliverances, thanks should be given him: it seems best to understand it of those who are spiritually redeemed by Christ, this phrase being frequently used of such, Isa 35:10, who may be said to be so, since Christ is the author of their redemption; they are redeemed, not by themselves, nor by any creature, but by the Lord; who being their God, and near kinsman, had a right to redeem them, and, being God, was able to do it, and who has effected it by his precious blood; so that he has a right unto them and a property in them, which this phrase also suggests; and for all which they have great reason to praise the Lord and his goodness, and sing the new song of redeeming love. Whom he hath redeemed from the hand of the enemy from all their sins which war against their souls; from Satan their implacable adversary, who is stronger than they; from the law, which curses and threatens them with damnation and death; from death itself, the last enemy, and indeed from the hand of all their enemies, be they who they may.

Gill: Psa 107:3 - And gathered them out of the lands // From the east and from the west, and from the north and from the south And gathered them out of the lands,.... This cannot have respect to the bringing of the children of Israel out of Egypt; for they were not then brough...

And gathered them out of the lands,.... This cannot have respect to the bringing of the children of Israel out of Egypt; for they were not then brought out of several countries, but from one land only: nor to the Babylonish captivity; for, though some might be gathered out of different provinces, yet not from east, west, north, and south, as here expressed. It best suits with the gathering of the redeemed in the effectual calling, and particularly the calling of the Gentiles in Gospel times; to which the title of the Syriac version before mentioned has respect. The elect of God are gathered in consequence of being redeemed, Zec 10:8, they are gathered out of the world, and from among the men of it; they are gathered to Christ, and by him; they are gathered into his churches, and to communion with them, and to a participation of all privileges and ordinances: and this is usually done by the ministering of the Gospel, which is sent into all the world for this purpose; and a distinguishing blessing of grace it is to be gathered out from the rest of the world, and favoured with such rich mercies. Such have reason to adore the grace of God, and to show forth his praise, who has called them by his grace, and separated them from others for himself.

From the east and from the west, and from the north and from the south; or, "from the sea" f; the southern sea, as the Targum; or the Red sea, the Arabian or Persian sea. The elect of God, and redeemed of the Lord, lie in all parts of the world; and from thence they are gathered by the ministry of the word unto Christ: this was fulfilled in the first times of the Gospel, and will be more so in the latter day; see Isa 43:5.

Gill: Psa 107:4 - They wandered in the wilderness in a solitary way // They found no city to dwell in They wandered in the wilderness in a solitary way,.... Not the people of Israel, as the Targum. These seem not to be particularly intended, whatever a...

They wandered in the wilderness in a solitary way,.... Not the people of Israel, as the Targum. These seem not to be particularly intended, whatever allusion there may be to their passage through the wilderness to Canaan's land; but rather, in general, travellers through waste places, especially the wild deserts of Arabia; where the wind blowing the sand, covers the roads with it, so that frequently travellers lose their way, and wander about, till directed to it by one providence or another. Some compare this with the case of the Old Testament saints, mentioned in Heb 11:37 others with the church in the wilderness, and the witnesses prophesying in sackcloth, Rev 11:2. But it is certain that the redeemed and gathered are here meant; and this fitly describes their case, before and at effectual calling: they are in the wilderness of the people, Eze 20:35, from whence they are gathered; are in a state of error and ignorance; are like straying sheep, gone out of the right way; and are as lost sheep, they have lost their way; and though there may be many ways that present unto them, and which they think bid fair to be the right way; yet the true way of peace, life, and salvation by Christ, they know not, while in a state of nature and unregeneracy; and when they come to be effectually called, they see themselves to be in a bewildered state and condition.

They found no city to dwell in; nor even to call at or lodge in, for miles together; which is the case of travellers in some parts, particularly in the deserts of Arabia. Spiritual travellers find no settlement, rest, peace, joy, and comfort, but in Christ; nor any indeed in this world, and the things of it; here they have no continuing city, Heb 13:14.

Gill: Psa 107:5 - Hungry and thirsty // Their soul fainted in them Hungry and thirsty,.... As travellers in deserts sometimes are; their provisions being spent they bring with them, and none to be had on the road; the...

Hungry and thirsty,.... As travellers in deserts sometimes are; their provisions being spent they bring with them, and none to be had on the road; there being no inns to stop at, nor any sort of food to eat, nor springs of water to drink of. In such a condition are souls, when, like the prodigal, they come to themselves, and are thoroughly convinced of their state and condition by nature; they find themselves starving and famishing, and no provision to be had from themselves or the creature: they hunger after Christ, the bread of life, and thirst after his grace, the water of life, and the blessings of it; they hunger and thirst after his righteousness, and justification by it; after the pardon of their sins through his blood, and after salvation by him, and an interest in it; after more knowledge of him, and communion with him.

Their soul fainted in them; for want of food and drink; as men do, in a spiritual sense, for want of Christ, the blessings of his grace, particularly salvation; for want of views of interest in it, of the joys and comforts of it; see Psa 119:81. Some refer all this to the apostles and apostolic men, wandering in the Gentile world, hungry, thirsty, and without any certain dwelling place; see 1Co 4:11.

Gill: Psa 107:6 - Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble // And he delivered them out of their distresses Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble,.... To be directed in their way, and for food and drink, as travellers do when in such distress. Natur...

Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble,.... To be directed in their way, and for food and drink, as travellers do when in such distress. Natural men, even the very Heathens, when in distress, will cry unto God for relief, as Jonah's mariners did, Jon 1:5. It is a time of trouble with awakened sinners, when they are convinced of sin by the Spirit of God; when they are pricked to the heart with a sense of it; when the terrors of death and hell get hold of them; when they see themselves lost and undone, and in a wrong way, and know not what to do; when they find themselves starving and ready to perish; and then they cry, that is, pray, unto the Lord, the God of their lives, whose ears are open to their cries.

And he delivered them out of their distresses; by leading them in a right way, and by satisfying and filling their hungry souls with good things, as it is explained, Psa 107:7.

Gill: Psa 107:7 - And he led them forth by the right way // That they might go to a city of habitation And he led them forth by the right way,.... Thus God by his providence directs travellers that have lost their way, and puts them into the right way. ...

And he led them forth by the right way,.... Thus God by his providence directs travellers that have lost their way, and puts them into the right way. There is no doubt a very great concern of Providence in such a case, and which ought to be acknowledged with thankfulness. And thus the Lord leads awakened and inquiring souls to the right way of salvation; to Christ, who is the way, the truth, and the life; and directs and enables them to believe in him, to walk by faith, and to continue to walk in him, as they have received him; and which is a plain and straight way, in which they shall not stumble; yea, in which men, though fools, shall not err, wander, or lose themselves: and though this way is attended with many afflictions and tribulations, and so may be said to be a narrow and a rough way; yet it is a right one, and a safe one, it brings at last to eternal life: the Syriac version renders it, "by the way of truth".

That they might go to a city of habitation; a city to dwell in; the Targum is,

"to Jerusalem, a city to dwell in:''

but any city nearest for travellers is here meant; and in a spiritual sense may be intended, either Christ, the city of refuge, where awakened sinners are directed to flee to, and where they find safety and plenty of provisions; or the church of God, the strong city, about which salvation is as walls and bulwarks; and to which they come when effectually called, and become citizens of it; or the New Jerusalem church state, in which the tabernacle of God will be, and he will dwell with men, and they with him; or the ultimate glory and happiness of the saints in heaven, that city which has foundations, whose builder and maker is God; in which are everlasting habitations, and mansions of peace and rest for the people of God to dwell in, after they have gone through their troublesome passage in this wilderness.

Gill: Psa 107:8 - O that men would praise the Lord for his goodness // And for his wonderful works to the children of men O that men would praise the Lord for his goodness,.... For his providential goodness, in providing food and drink for them, when fainting; in directin...

O that men would praise the Lord for his goodness,.... For his providential goodness, in providing food and drink for them, when fainting; in directing them to their right way, when they had lost it; and in bringing them safe to the place they were bound for: and particularly for his special grace and goodness, in redemption and effectual calling; for bringing out of a wilderness state and condition, and supplying them with all spiritual provisions, and putting them in the right way to eternal glory and happiness.

And for his wonderful works to the children of men! as all the above things are wonderful ones, both in providence and grace. This verse is repeated at the close of each of the instances produced; in which the goodness of God appears to persons in distress, and who being delivered, ought to acknowledge it, and be thankful for it: or "confess": that is, declare to God his goodness, and to the children of men his wonderful works; so the Targum.

Gill: Psa 107:9 - For he satisfieth the longing soul // And filleth the hungry soul with goodness For he satisfieth the longing soul,.... The soul that is hungry and thirsty, and longs for food and drink, when nature in such circumstances craves. A...

For he satisfieth the longing soul,.... The soul that is hungry and thirsty, and longs for food and drink, when nature in such circumstances craves. And so such who long for Christ and his grace, for an interest in him, and fellowship with him, the Lord satisfies with these things, as with marrow and fatness.

And filleth the hungry soul with goodness; with the goodness and fatness of his house; with good things; with the good things laid up in Christ and in the covenant; with the good things of the Gospel; with the grace and goodness of God in Christ; see Psa 65:4.

Gill: Psa 107:10 - Such as sit in darkness, and in the shadow of death Such as sit in darkness, and in the shadow of death,.... This is the second instance of persons in distress calling on the name of the Lord; and who, ...

Such as sit in darkness, and in the shadow of death,.... This is the second instance of persons in distress calling on the name of the Lord; and who, being delivered, are under obligation to praise him, such as are captives and prisoners. The Targum applies it to the Israelites in the Babylonish captivity; but it is much better to interpret it of prisoners in common; whose prisons are generally dark cells or dungeons, and where they are alone, and deprived of the company of the living; and so are not only in darkness, but seem as if they were in the state of the dead; their condition is the shadow of it, and bears some resemblance to it. And it may be applied, in a spiritual sense, to the case and condition of the people of God in a state of unregeneracy, which is described in the same language, Isa 9:2, and which is a state of darkness and ignorance; they are darkness itself, and are ignorant of themselves and their case; of the nature of sin, and the evil of it; of the spirituality of the law; of God in Christ; of Christ, and the way of salvation by him; of the Spirit, and his work; of the Scriptures, and the doctrines of the Gospel contained in them; and, like persons in a dark prison, cannot behold the sun, nor see to read nor work; and are like those that are in the state of the dead; and indeed are dead in Adam, dead in law, dead in trespasses and sins; having no spiritual life, sense, nor motion. And here they sit, continue and remain, during the time of their ignorance, till it pleases the Lord to enlighten, quicken, and convert them. These phrases are used of the people of God after conversion, when in darkness and desertion, and under afflictive providences, Psa 23:4. Being bound in affliction and iron; that is, with fetters of iron, which is very afflicting; see Psa 105:18, and fitly describes the people of God in a state of nature, who are led captive by Satan, at his will; are held with the cords and fetters of their own sins, and are shut up under the law, as a ministering of condemnation and death: or, bound with affliction, as with iron; hence we read of fetters and cords of affliction, Job 36:8, with which good men may be held for their iniquities; or, however, are chastened with them for their good, Some refer all this to the state of the Christian church under the ten persecutions, Rev 2:10.

Gill: Psa 107:11 - Because they rebelled against the words of God // And contemned the counsel of the most High Because they rebelled against the words of God,.... All afflictions, as captivity and imprisonment, are generally for sin; which is a rebellion agains...

Because they rebelled against the words of God,.... All afflictions, as captivity and imprisonment, are generally for sin; which is a rebellion against God, and a transgression of his laws. Adam rebelled against the words of God, not giving credit to them, but believing the words of the devil; and so brought himself and all his posterity into that state of darkness, captivity, and death, before described. Some understand this only of the light of nature, and the dictates of it, against which men rebel; but rather it designs any and every revelation of the will of God, either in the law or in the Gospel; disobedience to which is rebellion against the words of God, and is highly resented by him.

And contemned the counsel of the most High; the advice he gives in his law, and by his prophets, what to do, and what to avoid: and which he gives by the ministers of the word, in his Gospel and in his ordinances; which are both called his counsel, Luk 7:30, the contempt of which is very displeasing to him, Pro 1:25.

Gill: Psa 107:12 - Therefore he brought down their heart with labour // They fell down // And there was none to help Therefore he brought down their heart with labour,.... Humbled them under his mighty hand; brought down their haughty spirits and proud stomachs by on...

Therefore he brought down their heart with labour,.... Humbled them under his mighty hand; brought down their haughty spirits and proud stomachs by one afflictive providence or another; by which the Lord humbles men, as he did the Israelites in the wilderness, and hides pride from them: or with trouble of mind, under a conviction of sin; when pride, which is the cause of rebellion against God, and of contempt of his counsel, is brought down, and the haughtiness of man laid low; and when men, humbled under a sense of sin, are made willing to submit to Christ and his righteousness, to God's way of saving sinners by him, to the law of God, and to the Gospel of Christ.

They fell down; they threw themselves prostrate at his feet for mercy; their heart and strength failed them, as the word signifies, and is used in Psa 31:10, terrified with a sense of divine wrath, they could not stand before the Lord, nor brave it out against him.

And there was none to help; they could not help themselves, nor was there any creature that could. There is salvation in no other than in Christ; when he saw there was none to help him in that work, his own arm brought salvation to him; and when sinners see there is help in no other, they apply to him, as follows.

Gill: Psa 107:13 - Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble // Lord, save us, we perish // And he saved them out of their distresses Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble,.... Their affliction, their hearts being brought down with labour, and they being and finding themselv...

Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble,.... Their affliction, their hearts being brought down with labour, and they being and finding themselves in a state of darkness, in the shadow of death, in affliction and iron; or in soul troubles, under a sense of sin, and in a view of wrath and displeasure; under apprehensions of imminent danger, as the disciples in the storm; and therefore cry to the Lord, as they did,

Lord, save us, we perish, Mat 8:2.

And he saved them out of their distresses; from all their sins; from the curse of the law; from wrath to come; from hell and death; being both able and willing. The following verse further explains this.

Gill: Psa 107:14 - He brought them out of darkness // And the shadow of death // And brake their bands in sunder He brought them out of darkness,.... In which they were by nature, into marvellous light; to see their interest in Christ, and his salvation; and to h...

He brought them out of darkness,.... In which they were by nature, into marvellous light; to see their interest in Christ, and his salvation; and to have the light of joy and comfort in him.

And the shadow of death; quickening them by his Spirit and grace; causing them to live by faith upon him; entitling them to eternal life, and securing them from eternal death.

And brake their bands in sunder; their cords and fetters of affliction; or their bands of sin, and the power of it; and loosed them whom Satan had bound and kept so for many years, and brought them into the glorious liberty of the children of God.

Gill: Psa 107:15 - O that men would praise the Lord for his goodness // And for his wonderful works to the children of men O that men would praise the Lord for his goodness,.... Or, "confess to the Lord his goodness or grace", or "mercy" g; own and acknowledge it, in deliv...

O that men would praise the Lord for his goodness,.... Or, "confess to the Lord his goodness or grace", or "mercy" g; own and acknowledge it, in delivering them from such a state of darkness and death, of thraldom and captivity; see Rom 6:17.

And for his wonderful works to the children of men! or, "confess" them before them; relate and declare them to them, what wonderful things he has done for them; that they may be affected with them, and that they may praise his name together; See Gill on Psa 107:9.

Gill: Psa 107:16 - For he hath broken the gates of brass For he hath broken the gates of brass,.... The prison doors made of brass, as sometimes of iron, for the security of the prisoners; see Act 12:10. And...

For he hath broken the gates of brass,.... The prison doors made of brass, as sometimes of iron, for the security of the prisoners; see Act 12:10. And cut the bars of iron in sunder; with which they were barred and secured. Hyperbolical phrases these, as Kimchi, expressing how exceeding strong the prison doors were, and the impossibility of an escape out of them, unless the Lord had delivered them; but when he works, none can let; all obstructions are easily removed by him; which is the sense of the words, see Isa 45:2. Vitringa, on Rev 12:2, interprets this of the subjection of the Roman emperors to the faith and obedience of Christ.

Gill: Psa 107:17 - Fools, because of their transgression // And because of their iniquities, are afflicted Fools, because of their transgression,.... Or, "because of the way" h "of it"; their sinful course of life; for it is not for a single transgression t...

Fools, because of their transgression,.... Or, "because of the way" h "of it"; their sinful course of life; for it is not for a single transgression they are afflicted, but for a continued series of sinning, which is a transgression of the law of God. By "fools" are meant not idiots, men devoid of common sense and natural understanding, but immoral persons; such who have no understanding of divine and spiritual things; are destitute of the fear of God, which is the beginning of wisdom; without the true knowledge of God himself; place their happiness in sensual enjoyments; seek only the gratification of their lust; scoff at religion, make a mock at sin, and have no concern about a future state, and the welfare of their immortal souls.

And because of their iniquities, are afflicted; or "afflict themselves", or "find themselves afflicted" i; rather "bring affliction on themselves" k. Not that these are the only persons that are afflicted; for many truly wise, good, and gracious persons, have a large share of afflictions; though not in a way of punishment for sin, or in wrath and hot displeasure, but in a way of fatherly chastisement, and in love: nor are fools for the most part afflicted, nor so much as others; they are not in trouble and plagued as other men; which has been a stumbling to good men: however, sometimes they are afflicted in this life, and in a way of punishment for sin; and very often are but the more hardened by it; though to some it is an ordinance for good; they are awakened by it to a sense of sin, and acknowledgment of it, and to seek for pardoning grace and mercy. This is the "third" instance of persons in distress calling on the Lord, and finding relief l, and being under obligation to praise him.

Gill: Psa 107:18 - Their soul abhorreth all manner of meat // And they draw near unto the gates of death Their soul abhorreth all manner of meat,.... Not only bread and common food, but dainty meat, the most delicious fare, Job 33:20, in which they most d...

Their soul abhorreth all manner of meat,.... Not only bread and common food, but dainty meat, the most delicious fare, Job 33:20, in which they most delighted in time of health, and too much indulged themselves in; and by that means brought diseases upon them, which caused this loathing in them, as is common. Thus to those who are distempered with sin, whose taste is not changed, nor can it discern perverse things, the word of God, the Gospel of Christ, which is delicious food, is not relished by them; the doctrines of it are insipid things, they loath them as light bread, as the Israelites did the manna.

And they draw near unto the gates of death; that is, the grave; the house appointed for all living; the dwelling place of men till the resurrection; and so is said to have gates and doors; see Job 33:22 and men sometimes are brought so low by affliction as that they seem to be near to death, just upon the brink of eternity, ready to enter into the grave, and lie down among the dead.

Gill: Psa 107:19 - Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble // And he saveth them out of their distresses Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble,.... A time of affliction is a time of trouble, and a proper season for prayer; and by it persons are bro...

Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble,.... A time of affliction is a time of trouble, and a proper season for prayer; and by it persons are brought to the throne of grace, when humbled under the mighty hand of God, to seek for relief. Hezekiah in his affliction prayed to the Lord, though Asa sought to the physicians only, and not to the Lord; this is to be understood of such who are convinced of their folly, brought to a sense of sin and danger, and therefore cry to the Lord for his sparing mercy, and pardoning grace.

And he saveth them out of their distresses: their afflictions, which were distressing to them, by removing their disorders and restoring them to health again; as follows.

Gill: Psa 107:20 - He sent his word, and healed them // And delivered them from their destructions He sent his word, and healed them,.... It was his will and pleasure they should be healed, and accordingly they were; he issued his orders for the rem...

He sent his word, and healed them,.... It was his will and pleasure they should be healed, and accordingly they were; he issued his orders for the removal of the affliction, and it was done; diseases are his servants, which come and go at his command; so Christ, in the days of his flesh, healed by speaking a word, Mat 8:3. This is true of Christ the essential Word, who was sent in the fulness of time, and was made flesh and dwelt among men, and went about healing all manner of diseases among the people; and who is also the physician of souls who came with healing in his wings; that is, with pardon of sin, for which his blood was shed: he is the only physician, the skilful, universal, and infallible one, and does all freely, and in a most marvellous manner, by his stripes, blood and wounds, and by an application of these to diseased persons sensible of their case. It may also be applied to the word of the Gospel; the law is the means of wounding, it is the killing letter; the Gospel is the means of healing, the doctrines of it are the leaves of the tree of life, which are for the healing of the nations; it is the doctrine of remission of sins by the blood of Christ, and by it Christ speaks peace and pardon to wounded consciences.

And delivered them from their destructions; from the destruction of the body, of the beauty and strength of it by diseases; restoring to health is a redeeming of the life from destruction; from the grave, the pit of corruption and destruction, so called because in it bodies corrupt, putrefy, and are destroyed by worms; and such who are savingly convinced of sin, and blessed with pardoning grace and mercy, are delivered from the everlasting destruction of body and soul in hell.

Gill: Psa 107:21 - Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness // And for his wonderful works to the children of men Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness,.... Both in restoring to bodily health, which is an instance of divine goodness; and in healing th...

Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness,.... Both in restoring to bodily health, which is an instance of divine goodness; and in healing the diseases of the soul, or in the pardon of sin, which is according to the multitude of his mercies, and the riches of his grace.

And for his wonderful works to the children of men; bodily health is sometimes restored in a wonderful manner, when all means used are without success, and the prescriptions of doctors fail; and pardon of sin is a wonder of grace now, and will be to all eternity; and for these things praise ought to be given to the Lord, and they should be declared to men for his glory.

Gill: Psa 107:22 - And let them sacrifice the sacrifices of thanksgiving // And declare his works with rejoicing And let them sacrifice the sacrifices of thanksgiving,.... Not legal sacrifices, but spiritual and evangelical ones, the sacrifices of praise and than...

And let them sacrifice the sacrifices of thanksgiving,.... Not legal sacrifices, but spiritual and evangelical ones, the sacrifices of praise and thankfulness which God has enjoined are well pleasing to him through Christ, glorify him, and are but our reasonable service; see Heb 13:15.

And declare his works with rejoicing: tell them to the children of men, what he has done for them, for soul and body; let them come to Zion with joy and everlasting joy on their heads; to the gates thereof, or to the public assemblies of the saints, and there declare what great things the Lord has done for them; and has had compassion upon them in healing their bodily diseases, and curing them of their soul maladies.

Gill: Psa 107:23 - They that go down to the sea in ships // That do business in great waters They that go down to the sea in ships,.... This is the fourth instance of persons in distress crying to the Lord for help, and, having it, are laid un...

They that go down to the sea in ships,.... This is the fourth instance of persons in distress crying to the Lord for help, and, having it, are laid under obligation to praise him; the case of seafaring men: so the Targum introduces it,

"mariners that go down to the sea in ships;''

the same form of expression as here is used in Isa 42:10. Some affirm the sea to be higher than the earth, but by this it should be lower; besides the earth is said to be founded on the seas, which suggests superiority; and all the rivers run into the sea, which supposes a declivity; but, be it so that it is higher than the earth, yet this phrase is to be justified by the shores being higher than the sea, from whence men go down to take shipping, as Kimchi observes; though Kimchi's father is of opinion that it respects persons going down into the ship, which is deep, as Jonah is said to do, Jon 1:3.

That do business in great waters: which refers either to the steering and working of the ship, and everything relating to the management of the ropes and sails, and other affairs; and in a storm much business is done, all hands are employed: or else to the business they go to sea about, as catching fish, curing them, and carrying them to market; or else to traffic and merchandise of goods, they convey from place to place. The phrase is much like that, "as many as trade by sea", Rev 18:17.

Gill: Psa 107:24 - These see the works of the Lord // And his wonders in the deep These see the works of the Lord,.... In creation, the sea itself, its flux and reflux; the creatures in it, fishes of various forms and sizes: and in ...

These see the works of the Lord,.... In creation, the sea itself, its flux and reflux; the creatures in it, fishes of various forms and sizes: and in providence, in preserving ships and men in the most imminent danger, and even to a miracle; sometimes causing the wind to change or to subside in a moment, whereby deliverance is wrought.

And his wonders in the deep; the strange and wonderful creatures that are in the deep waters of the sea, and to be seen nowhere else; and the amazing appearances of divine providence, in delivering when in the greatest distress, and none at hand to help, and all hope of salvation gone.

Gill: Psa 107:25 - For he commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind // Which lifteth up the waves thereof For he commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind,.... Winds are not raised by men, nor by devils, nor by angels, but by the Lord himself; who has create...

For he commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind,.... Winds are not raised by men, nor by devils, nor by angels, but by the Lord himself; who has created them, holds them in his fist, brings them out of his treasures, and sends them forth to do his will; if he speaks the word, gives but the order, a storm arises at once, and executes what he pleases, Psa 148:8.

Which lifteth up the waves thereof; that is, the waves of the sea; it comes down into it, and causes surges; which rise above the ship, and sometimes cover it, and ready to sink it; yea, even they are lifted up to the heavens, as it follows.

Gill: Psa 107:26 - They mount up to the heaven // They go down again to the depths // Their soul is melted because of trouble They mount up to the heaven,.... The waves which are lifted up by the stormy wind, and the ships which are upon them, and the men in them. They go ...

They mount up to the heaven,.... The waves which are lifted up by the stormy wind, and the ships which are upon them, and the men in them.

They go down again to the depths: one while they seem to reach the skies, and presently they are down, as it were, in the bottom of the sea, and are threatened to be buried in the midst of it; distress at sea is described in much the same language by Virgil and Ovid m.

Their soul is melted because of trouble; because of the danger of being cast away; so it was with Jonah's mariner's, and with the disciples in the storm; sea roaring, and men's hearts failing for fear, are joined together in Luk 21:25.

Gill: Psa 107:27 - They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man // And are at their wit's end They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man,.... Through the agitation of the water, and motion of the ship, not being able to stand upon dec...

They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man,.... Through the agitation of the water, and motion of the ship, not being able to stand upon deck.

And are at their wit's end; or, "all their wisdom is swallowed up" n; their wisdom in naval affairs, their art of navigation, their skill in managing ships, all nonplussed and baffled; they know not what method to take to save the vessel and themselves; their knowledge fails them, they are quite confounded and almost distracted. So Apollinarius paraphrases it,

"they forget navigation, and their wise art does not appear;''

so Ovid, describing a storm, uses the same phrase, "deficit ars",

"art fails.''

Gill: Psa 107:28 - Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble // And he bringeth them out of their distresses Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble,.... As in a storm seafaring persons are used to do; so did Jonah's mariners, though Heathens, everyone c...

Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble,.... As in a storm seafaring persons are used to do; so did Jonah's mariners, though Heathens, everyone cried to his god. With the Romans o tempests were reckoned deities, and had temples erected, and sacrifices offered to them; but these persons were such as knew and owned the true Jehovah, and called upon him in their distress: so did the apostles of Christ.

And he bringeth them out of their distresses; by stilling the winds and the waves, causing them to proceed on their voyage with pleasure, and landing them safe on shore, as follows.

Gill: Psa 107:29 - He maketh the storm a calm // So that the waves thereof are still He maketh the storm a calm,.... As Christ did by a word speaking, Mar 4:39. So that the waves thereof are still; and roar and toss no more, but sub...

He maketh the storm a calm,.... As Christ did by a word speaking, Mar 4:39.

So that the waves thereof are still; and roar and toss no more, but subside; and the sea becomes smooth and quiet, its raging ceases: the angry sea, as Horace p calls it, becomes calm and peaceable; see Psa 89:9.

Gill: Psa 107:30 - Then are they glad because they be quiet // So he bringeth them unto their desired haven // whose business in the great waters was fishing Then are they glad because they be quiet,.... The mariners are glad that the waves are quiet, and they free from danger, and at ease and in repose the...

Then are they glad because they be quiet,.... The mariners are glad that the waves are quiet, and they free from danger, and at ease and in repose themselves.

So he bringeth them unto their desired haven; the port, city, border or tract of land q, they are bound to; which they desire to be at, and eagerly look out for, and rejoice when arrived at it. This is all the Lord's work in providence: mariners too often take it to themselves, as if it was owing to their own skill and management that they have brought home the ship safe to the appointed port; but it is owing to the secret guidance and protection of divine Providence, which should be acknowledged. The late Mr. Hussey r thinks, that all this is not to be understood of seamen and naval affairs in common, but is a prophecy of what should befall the disciples of Christ, when on shipboard with him; who are the persons that went "down to the sea of Galilee" in a ship;

whose business in the great waters was fishing; when, by the will of God, there came down a "stormy wind", which "lifted up the waves" of the sea, so that the ship in which they were was filled with them, and in danger of being sunk; when they went up and down, as here described, and reeled as they went along on the deck, to awake their Master their hearts melting, and they at their wit's end through fear, when they saw such wonders, what no common mariner ever did; the Godman and Mediator rising and in a majestic manner rebuked the winds and waves, and caused a calm, and so brought them to the country of the Gadarenes, whither they were bound; see Luk 8:23. But it may be applied, in a more spiritual manner, to the people of God in common who are embarked in the cause of Christ, and in a church state, comparable to a ship, of which Christ is the master, governor, and pilot; and who are sailing through the tempestuous sea of this world, and are tossed with tempests in it; and have business to do here, not only of a civil, but of a spiritual nature and who not only see the wondrous works of creation and providence, but of grace and redemption; the deep things of God, the mysteries of his grace and love: and who sometimes are covered with the billows and waves of affliction, and in the utmost distress; which are all under the direction and at the command of God, to whom they apply for relief; and he commands a calm in their breasts, and causes their afflictions to cease, which produce joy and gladness in them; and at last they are brought safe to heaven, their desired haven, which they are bound unto, are seeking after, and desirous of; and where they are at entire rest, brought hither by the Lord himself.

Gill: Psa 107:31 - Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness // confess to the Lord his goodness // And for his wonderful works to the children of men Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness,.... Seafaring men particularly, before mentioned, as Jonah's mariners did, Jon 1:16, or all the fo...

Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness,.... Seafaring men particularly, before mentioned, as Jonah's mariners did, Jon 1:16, or all the four sorts of persons instanced in, as Kimchi thinks: and even all men whatsoever should do this, high and low, rich and poor, of every age, sex, and condition; since they all receive favours from the Lord, and should return thanks to him; and especially good men, who are blessed with spiritual blessings by him: these should all

confess to the Lord his goodness; as it may be rendered; see Gill on Psa 107:15, they should own the mercy received as the Lord's doing, and acknowledge their unworthiness of it, and give him the glory of it.

And for his wonderful works to the children of men! or, "confess and declare his wonderful works to the children of men": the wonderful works of creation and providence, which those that go to sea, see in the deeps, and everything of the same kind which others observe; and especially the wonderful works of grace, or what God has done in a wonderful manner for the souls of his people; see Psa 66:16.

Gill: Psa 107:32 - Let them exalt him also in the congregation of the people // And praise him in the assembly of the elders Let them exalt him also in the congregation of the people,.... Of the people of God, who are gathered out of the world into a church state; and who ga...

Let them exalt him also in the congregation of the people,.... Of the people of God, who are gathered out of the world into a church state; and who gather themselves together to attend the worship and service of God in some one place; and here the Lord should be praised, and his name exalted, by those who have received favours from him; see Psa 111:1, the Targum explains it,

"in the congregation of the people of the house of Israel.''

And praise him in the assembly of the elders; or, "in the seat", or "chair of the elders s": not of the Scribes and Pharisees, and elders of the people, that sat in Moses's chair; but rather of the four and twenty elders, who are said to have four and twenty seats round the throne, where they worship and praise God; and which are emblems of Gospel churches; the members of which, for their grace, gravity, and prudence, are called elders; and over which elders in office preside, and who rule well, and labour in the word and doctrine; see Rev 4:4. The Targum renders it,

"the sanhedrim of the wise men.''

Gill: Psa 107:33 - He turneth rivers into a wilderness // And the water springs into dry ground He turneth rivers into a wilderness,.... A country abounding with rivers, as the country round about Sodom and the land of Canaan were, Gen 13:10. Suc...

He turneth rivers into a wilderness,.... A country abounding with rivers, as the country round about Sodom and the land of Canaan were, Gen 13:10. Such an one is sometimes, by the just judgment of God, turned into a desert.

And the water springs into dry ground: what was like a well watered garden becomes like dry and barren earth, on which nothing grows.

Gill: Psa 107:34 - A fruitful land into barrenness // For the wickedness of them that dwell therein A fruitful land into barrenness,.... Or, "into saltness" t; as Sodom and the land adjacent became a salt sea; and the land of Canaan was threatened to...

A fruitful land into barrenness,.... Or, "into saltness" t; as Sodom and the land adjacent became a salt sea; and the land of Canaan was threatened to become brimstone, salt and burning, like Sodom; in which nothing was sown, and which bore no grass; see Gen 14:3 and so the Targum,

"the land of Israel, which brought forth fruit, he hath destroyed, as Sodom was overthrown.''

For the wickedness of them that dwell therein; this was the cause of the overthrow of Sodom, and of the destruction of that fine country, as also of Canaan afterwards; see Gen 13:13. The very Heathens had a notion that barrenness and unfruitfulness in countries were owing to the sins of men; hence the sterility and famine at Mycenas were attributed to the wickedness of Atreus u. This may figuratively be understood of the present state and condition of the Jews; who were once a people well watered with the word and ordinances, and had the first preaching of the Gospel among them; but, rejecting and despising it, are now become like a desert, barren and unfruitful in the knowledge of divine things: and it might be illustrated by the case of several Christian churches; the seven churches of Asia, and others, once as well watered gardens, but now are no more; and the places where they stood are destitute of spiritual knowledge, and the means of it.

Gill: Psa 107:35 - He turneth the wilderness into a standing water // And dry ground into water springs He turneth the wilderness into a standing water,.... On the other hand, when it is the pleasure of God, a country uncultivated and like a desert, he m...

He turneth the wilderness into a standing water,.... On the other hand, when it is the pleasure of God, a country uncultivated and like a desert, he makes it fruitful as one that is well watered and tilled; as this country of ours, and the land in America, once waste places, now fruitful ones.

And dry ground into water springs: which is expressive of the same thing, and may he figuratively understood of the Gentile world; which, before the coming of Christ, and the preaching of the Gospel, and the pouring down of the Spirit, was like a wilderness and dry ground; but now watered with the word and ordinances, and the grace of God, and in many places has become fruitful in grace and good works. The Targum prefaces this verse thus,

"when they return unto the law, he turneth, &c.''

Gill: Psa 107:36 - And there he maketh the hungry to dwell // That they may prepare a city for habitation And there he maketh the hungry to dwell,.... In those fruitful places which they find agreeable to them, and so fix upon them as the places of their a...

And there he maketh the hungry to dwell,.... In those fruitful places which they find agreeable to them, and so fix upon them as the places of their abode, and build houses, and dwell there; having all the conveniences of life, which they wanted elsewhere: so such as hunger and thirst after righteousness make to such places where the waters are, the word is preached, and ordinances administered; and here they take up their dwelling, their bread being given them, and their waters sure unto them.

That they may prepare a city for habitation; those poor necessitous persons, as they were when they first came; building houses, and others continually coming to them, by degrees form a well regulated city, which are a large number of inhabitants: which may be considered as an emblem of the church of God, often compared to a city; and is an habitation for God, and where saints desire and delight to dwell.

Gill: Psa 107:37 - And sow the fields, and plant vineyards // Which may yield fruits of increase And sow the fields, and plant vineyards,.... And so raise a sufficient supply of corn and wine for the support of themselves and families. In a spirit...

And sow the fields, and plant vineyards,.... And so raise a sufficient supply of corn and wine for the support of themselves and families. In a spiritual sense the "fields" are the world, and the seed which is sown is the word; the persons that sow it are the ministers of the Gospel, which, by a divine blessing, brings forth fruit, in some thirty, some sixty, and some an hundred fold: the "vineyards" are the churches, planted by Christ and by his ministers, as his instruments; believers are the pleasant plants in them, and young converts are the tender grapes

Which may yield fruits of increase; or "fruit" and "increase"; the fields yield all sorts of grain for food, and the vineyards wine for drink. So the seed of the word being sown, and churches planted, they increase with the increase of God, and bring forth fruits of righteousness to the glory of his name.

Gill: Psa 107:38 - He blesseth them also, so that they are multiplied greatly // And suffereth not their cattle to decrease He blesseth them also, so that they are multiplied greatly,.... Not only their fields and vineyards are blessed with an increase, but these husbandmen...

He blesseth them also, so that they are multiplied greatly,.... Not only their fields and vineyards are blessed with an increase, but these husbandmen themselves; as man at his first creation was bid to do, being blessed of God; and as the Israelites were in Egypt, Gen 1:28 and which may spiritually denote the great number of converts to Christian churches, especially in the latter day, Jer 30:19.

And suffereth not their cattle to decrease; their sheep and oxen, which is reckoned a great temporal happiness, Psa 144:13, and may signify that God does and will give a sufficient number of Gospel ministers, comparable to oxen for their laboriousness, that shall in all ages minister to his churches; see 1Co 9:9.

Gill: Psa 107:39 - Again they are minished // and brought low through oppression, affliction and sorrow Again they are minished,.... Or "lessened", in their families, cattle, and substance; either the same persons as before, or others. The Targum paraphr...

Again they are minished,.... Or "lessened", in their families, cattle, and substance; either the same persons as before, or others. The Targum paraphrases it,

"but when they sin, they are lessened:''

for sin is the cause of it, as follows:

and brought low through oppression, affliction and sorrow; either because of their oppression of the poor, the evil they do to them, and the sorrow they bring upon them; or they are brought into a low estate through the tyranny and oppression of others, and by the afflictions and sorrows they are brought into by them. This may be applied to the Jews, at their destruction by the Romans, when they were greatly lessened and brought low by their oppression of them: or rather to the Christians; not under the Heathen persecutions, for then they increased more and more; but under antichristian tyranny, when the beast had power over them, and overcame and slew them; and their numbers were so reduced, that the whole world is said to wonder after the beast, Rev 13:3, and which will be the case again, when the witnesses will be slain: the number of Christians is greatly lessening now; there are but a few names in Sardis; Jacob is small, but will be smaller and fewer still.

Gill: Psa 107:40 - He poureth contempt upon princes // And causeth them to wander in the wilderness; where there is no way He poureth contempt upon princes,.... That is, the Lord does, who is above them; he laughs at them, and has them in derision, when they are raging aga...

He poureth contempt upon princes,.... That is, the Lord does, who is above them; he laughs at them, and has them in derision, when they are raging against his people, cause, and interest; he sets them up and pulls them down at his pleasure; he hurls them from their seats and thrones, and makes them contemptible to their subjects; he sometimes brings them to a shameful end, as Herod, who was eaten with worms; and wicked princes, if they are not brought to disgrace in this world, they will rise to shame and everlasting contempt in the other; and will stand with the meanest and lowest before the Judge of the whole earth; and seek to the rocks and mountains to cover them from his wrath. This particularly will be true of the antichristian princes, when the vials of God's wrath will be poured out upon them, Rev 16:1.

And causeth them to wander in the wilderness; where there is no way; no beaten track or path; whither being driven out of their kingdoms, they flee for shelter, and wander about in untrodden paths; as Nebuchadnezzar, when he was driven from men, and had his dwelling with the beasts of the field: or this may be interpreted, as it is by Aben Ezra and Kimchi, the infatuation of their wisdom, and of their being left without counsel, and erring through it; being at their wits' end, not knowing what step to take, or measures to concert; being in a maze, in a wilderness, at an entire loss what they should do; see Job 12:17.

Gill: Psa 107:41 - Yet setteth he the poor on high from affliction // And maketh him families like a flock Yet setteth he the poor on high from affliction,.... On the other hand, the Lord sometimes exalteth men of low degree, raiseth men of mean extract and...

Yet setteth he the poor on high from affliction,.... On the other hand, the Lord sometimes exalteth men of low degree, raiseth men of mean extract and parentage, who have made a poor figure in life, to high places of honour, free from adversity and distress; as David from the sheepfold, and from following the ewes great with young, to be king of Israel. This may be applied to the saints and people of God, who for the most part are poor in purse, the poor of this world, whom he chooses, calls, and saves; poor knowledge, capacity, and gifts; poor as to their spiritual circumstances, having neither food nor clothing, nor money to buy either; poor in spirit, and sensible of it; and poor by reason of afflictions: these the Lord sets on high, sets them among the princes of his people, makes them kings and priests; sets them on Christ the Rock, who is higher than they, higher than the angels and than the heavens; sets them above the angels, their nature being advanced above theirs in Christ, and they being represented by him in heavenly places; and standing in the relation of sons to God, and of spouse and bride to Christ, and angels being their ministering servants; and ere long they will be set on thrones, and have a crown of glory, life, and righteousness, put upon them, and be possessed of an everlasting kingdom, and be out of the reach of affliction. They are not clear of it in this world; it is needful for them, they are appointed to it, and through it they must enter the kingdom; but then they will come out of all tribulation, and there will be no more pain, sorrow, and death: it may be rendered, "after affliction", after their time of affliction is over, then God will exalt and glorify them; see 1Pe 5:10, this may respect the prosperity of the church in the latter day; see Dan 7:27.

And maketh him families like a flock; that is, the Lord makes the poor families like a flock of sheep, so greatly does he increase them; this is a very apt figure that is here used, since the people of God are often compared to sheep, and to a flock of them; and these are creatures that greatly increase; and here it denotes the large number of the saints, as in the first times of the Gospel, both in Judea and in the Gentile world; and as it will be in the latter day, when they shall be multiplied and not be few, glorified and not be small; and that they should be branched out into families, or particular churches, which, like families, consist of children, young men, and fathers, of which Christ is master, and ministers stewards; so it has been from the beginning of the Gospel dispensation and will be much more so in the latter day, when the earth will be full of these families every where. The Targum introduces this verse thus,

"when they turn to the law he setteth, &c.''

Gill: Psa 107:42 - The righteous shall see it, and rejoice // And all iniquity shall stop her mouth The righteous shall see it, and rejoice,.... Shall see the increase and prosperity of the saints, the glory of the church in the latter day, and rejoi...

The righteous shall see it, and rejoice,.... Shall see the increase and prosperity of the saints, the glory of the church in the latter day, and rejoice at it; the judgments of God upon the wicked, upon antichristian princes and states, and rejoice on that account; see Rev 18:20 and the several deliverances of persons in distress before mentioned, and rejoice with them that rejoice; which is what good men ought to do, Rom 12:15.

And all iniquity shall stop her mouth; men of iniquity, very bad men, the man of sin and his followers, and all profane and atheistical persons, who will be silenced and have nothing to say against the providence of God; will be confounded, and through shame lay their hand on their mouths and be struck with admiration at the wonderful things done by the Lord for his people; nor will they have anything to say against their own condemnation.

Gill: Psa 107:43 - Whoso is wise // And will observe these things // Even they shall understand the lovingkindness of the Lord Whoso is wise,.... Or as it may be read interrogatively, "who is wise?" as in Jer 9:12, that is, spiritually wise, wise unto salvation; who is made to...

Whoso is wise,.... Or as it may be read interrogatively, "who is wise?" as in Jer 9:12, that is, spiritually wise, wise unto salvation; who is made to know wisdom in the hidden part; for not such as are possessed of natural wisdom, or worldly wise men, much less who are wise to do evil, are here meant.

And will observe these things; the remarkable appearances of divine Providence to persons in distress; the various changes and vicissitudes in the world; the several afflictions of God's people, and their deliverances out of them; the wonderful works of God in nature, providence, and grace; these will be observed, taken notice of, laid up in the mind, and kept by such who are truly wise, who know how to make a right use and proper improvement of them.

Even they shall understand the lovingkindness of the Lord; everyone of the wise men; they will perceive the kindness of God unto all men, in the several dispensations of his providence towards them, and his special love and kindness towards his own people, even in all their afflictions; they will perceive this to be at the bottom of every mercy and blessing; they will understand more of the nature and excellency of it, and know more of the love of God and Christ, which passeth knowledge. Or "the kindnesses of the Lord shall be understood": that is, by wise men; so R. Moses in Aben Ezra renders the words.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 107:1 Heb “for forever [is] his loyal love.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:2 Heb “hand.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:3 Heb “from lands.” The word “foreign” is supplied in the translation for clarification.

NET Notes: Psa 107:5 Heb “and their soul in them fainted.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:7 A level road. See Jer 31:9.

NET Notes: Psa 107:8 Heb “and [for] his amazing deeds for the sons of man.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:9 Heb “and [the] hungry throat he has filled [with] good.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:10 Heb “those bound in suffering and iron.” “Suffering and iron” is a hendiadys (like English “good and angry”), wher...

NET Notes: Psa 107:11 Heb “the counsel of the Most High.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:12 Heb “and he subdued with suffering their heart.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:14 Heb “darkness and deep darkness.” See the note on the word “darkness” in v. 10.

NET Notes: Psa 107:15 Heb “and [for] his amazing deeds for the sons of man.” See v. 8.

NET Notes: Psa 107:16 The language of v. 16 recalls Isa 45:2.

NET Notes: Psa 107:17 Heb “fools [they were] because of the way of their rebellion.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:18 Heb “all food their appetite loathed.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:20 Heb “he rescued from their traps.” The Hebrew word שְׁחִית (shekhit, “trap”) occurs ...

NET Notes: Psa 107:21 Heb “and [for] his amazing deeds for the sons of man.” See v. 8.

NET Notes: Psa 107:22 Heb “and let them proclaim his works with a ringing cry.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:23 Heb “doers of work on the mighty waters.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:25 Heb “and it stirred up its [i.e., the sea’s, see v. 23] waves.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:26 Heb “from danger.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:27 The Hitpael of בָלַע (vala’) occurs only here in the OT. Traditionally the form is derived from the verbal root &#...

NET Notes: Psa 107:29 Heb “their waves.” The antecedent of the third masculine plural pronominal suffix is not readily apparent, unless it refers back to “...

NET Notes: Psa 107:30 The Hebrew noun occurs only here in the OT.

NET Notes: Psa 107:31 Heb “and [for] his amazing deeds for the sons of man.” See v. 8.

NET Notes: Psa 107:32 Heb “in the seat of the elders.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:33 The verbal form appears to be a preterite, which is most naturally taken as narrational. (The use of prefixed forms with vav [ו] consecutive in ...

NET Notes: Psa 107:34 Heb “a salty land.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:35 The verbal form appears to be a preterite, which is most naturally taken as narrational. See the note on the word “turned” in v. 33.

NET Notes: Psa 107:37 Heb “fruit [as] produce.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:38 The verbal form in this line appears to be an imperfect, which may be taken as customary (drawing attention to typical action in a past time frame) or...

NET Notes: Psa 107:39 Heb “from the oppression of calamity.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:40 The active participle is understood as past durative here, drawing attention to typical action in a past time frame. However, it could be taken as gen...

NET Notes: Psa 107:41 Heb “set on high.”

NET Notes: Psa 107:42 Heb “all evil,” which stands metonymically for those who do evil.

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:1 O give thanks unto ( a ) the LORD, for [he is] good: for his mercy [endureth] for ever. ( a ) This notable sentence was in the beginning used as the ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:2 Let the ( b ) redeemed of the LORD say [so], whom he hath redeemed from the hand of the enemy; ( b ) As was true in the Jews, so there is not one of ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:5 ( c ) Hungry and thirsty, their soul fainted in them. ( c ) He shows that there is no affliction so grievous out of which God will not deliver us, an...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:11 Because they ( d ) rebelled against the words of God, and contemned the counsel of the most High: ( d ) Then the true way to obey God is to follow hi...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:13 Then they ( e ) cried unto the LORD in their trouble, [and] he saved them out of their distresses. ( e ) He shows that the reason God punishes us ext...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:16 For he hath broken the ( f ) gates of brass, and cut the bars of iron in sunder. ( f ) When there seems to man's judgment no recovery, but all things...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:17 ( g ) Fools because of their transgression, and because of their iniquities, are afflicted. ( g ) They who have no fear of God, by his sharp rods are...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:20 ( h ) He sent his word, and healed them, and delivered [them] from their ( i ) destructions. ( h ) By healing them he declares his good will toward t...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:22 And let them sacrifice the sacrifices of ( k ) thanksgiving, and declare his works with rejoicing. ( k ) Praise and confession of God's benefits are ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:23 They that go down to the ( l ) sea in ships, that do business in great waters; ( l ) He shows by the sea what care God has over man, for when he deli...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:26 They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths: their soul is ( m ) melted because of trouble. ( m ) Their fear and danger is so great...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:27 They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and ( n ) are at their wits' end. ( n ) When their art and means fail them, they are compelled ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:30 Then are they glad because they be ( o ) quiet; so he bringeth them unto their desired haven. ( o ) Though before every drop seemed to fight one agai...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:32 Let them exalt him also in the ( p ) congregation of the people, and praise him in the assembly of the elders. ( p ) This great benefit should not on...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:35 He ( q ) turneth the wilderness into a standing water, and dry ground into watersprings. ( q ) For the love that he bears to his Church, he changes t...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:37 And sow the fields, and plant vineyards, which may yield fruits of ( r ) increase. ( r ) Continual increase and yearly.

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:39 ( s ) Again, they are minished and brought low through oppression, affliction, and sorrow. ( s ) As God by his providence exalts man, so he also humb...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:40 He poureth ( t ) contempt upon princes, and causeth them to wander in the wilderness, [where there is] no way. ( t ) For their wickedness and tyranny...

Geneva Bible: Psa 107:42 The ( u ) righteous shall see [it], and rejoice: and all iniquity shall stop her mouth. ( u ) They whose faith is lightened by God's spirit, will rej...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 107:1-9 - --In these verses there is reference to the deliverance from Egypt, and perhaps that from Babylon: but the circumstances of travellers in those countrie...

MHCC: Psa 107:10-16 - --This description of prisoners and captives intimates that they are desolate and sorrowful. In the eastern prisons the captives were and are treated wi...

MHCC: Psa 107:17-22 - --If we knew no sin, we should know no sickness. Sinners are fools. They hurt their bodily health by intemperance, and endanger their lives by indulging...

MHCC: Psa 107:23-32 - --Let those who go to sea, consider and adore the Lord. Mariners have their business upon the tempestuous ocean, and there witness deliverances of which...

MHCC: Psa 107:33-43 - --What surprising changes are often made in the affairs of men! Let the present desolate state of Judea, and of other countries, explain this. If we loo...

Matthew Henry: Psa 107:1-9 - -- Here is, I. A general call to all to give thanks to God, Psa 107:1. Let all that sing this psalm, or pray over it, set themselves herein to give th...

Matthew Henry: Psa 107:10-16 - -- We are to take notice of the goodness of God towards prisoners and captives. Observe, 1. A description of this affliction. Prisoners are said to si...

Matthew Henry: Psa 107:17-22 - -- Bodily sickness is another of the calamities of this life which gives us an opportunity of experiencing the goodness of God in recovering us, and of...

Matthew Henry: Psa 107:23-32 - -- The psalmist here calls upon those to give glory to God who are delivered from dangers at sea. Though the Israelites dealt not much in merchandise, ...

Matthew Henry: Psa 107:33-43 - -- The psalmist, having given God the glory of the providential reliefs granted to persons in distress, here gives him the glory of the revolutions of ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 107:1-3 - -- The introit, with the call upon them to grateful praise, is addressed to the returned exiles. The Psalm carries the marks of its deutero-Isaianic ch...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 107:4-9 - -- It has actually come to pass, the first strophe tells us, that they wandered in a strange land through deserts and wastes, and seemed likely to have...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 107:10-16 - -- Others suffered imprisonment and bonds; but through Him who had decreed this as punishment for them, they also again reached the light of freedom. J...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 107:17-22 - -- Others were brought to the brink of the grave by severe sickness; but when they draw nigh in earnest prayer to Him who appointed that they should su...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 107:23-32 - -- Others have returned to tell of the perils of the sea. Without any allegory (Hengstenberg) it speaks of those who by reason of their calling travers...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 107:33-38 - -- Since in Psa 107:36 the historical narration is still continued, a meaning relating to the contemporaneous past is also retrospectively given to the...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 107:39-43 - -- But is also came to pass that it went ill with them, inasmuch as their flourishing prosperous condition drew down upon them the envy of the powerful...

Constable: Psa 107:1--150:6 - --V. Book 5: chs. 107--150 There are 44 psalms in this section of the Psalter. David composed 15 of these (108-110...

Constable: Psa 107:1-43 - --Psalm 107 An unknown writer sought to motivate the Lord's redeemed people to praise Him by reviewing som...

Constable: Psa 107:1-3 - --1. A call to thanksgiving and testimony 107:1-3 God's people should thank Him because He is good...

Constable: Psa 107:4-32 - --2. Specific instances of deliverance 107:4-32 The writer cited four times when the Israelites cried out to God for deliverance and He saved them (vv. ...

Constable: Psa 107:33-43 - --3. The providence of God 107:33-43 The following verses contain a second major reason for praising God, namely His providential governing of the world...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 107:2 How can the redeemed not " say so" ? We have been redeemed from the cold hand of death. See Psa 107:14 .

Evidence: Psa 107:17 Self-inflicted misery . So much of the world’s misery is self-inflicted: AIDS, alcoholism, obesity, guilt, drug addiction, nicotine addiction and it...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 107 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 107:1, The psalmist exhorts the redeemed, in praising God, to observe his manifold providence, Psa 107:4, over travellers; Psa 107:10...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

Poole: Psalms 107 (Pendahuluan Pasal) THE ARGUMENT The most of the Psalms have a peculiar respect unto the church or people of God, or to some eminent members thereof; but there are som...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 107 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 107:1-9) God's providential care of the children of men in distresses, in banishment, and dispersion. (Psa 107:10-16) In captivity. (Psa 107:17...

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 107 (Pendahuluan Pasal) The psalmist, having in the two foregoing psalms celebrated the wisdom, power, and goodness of God, in his dealings with his church in particular, ...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 107 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 107 This psalm, from its style, and from its connection with the preceding psalms, seems to have been written by David. The t...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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