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Teks -- Mark 8:1-38 (NET)

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Konteks
The Feeding of the Four Thousand
8:1 In those days there was another large crowd with nothing to eat. So Jesus called his disciples and said to them, 8:2 “I have compassion on the crowd, because they have already been here with me three days, and they have nothing to eat. 8:3 If I send them home hungry, they will faint on the way, and some of them have come from a great distance.” 8:4 His disciples answered him, “Where can someone get enough bread in this desolate place to satisfy these people?” 8:5 He asked them, “How many loaves do you have?” They replied, “Seven.” 8:6 Then he directed the crowd to sit down on the ground. After he took the seven loaves and gave thanks, he broke them and began giving them to the disciples to serve. So they served the crowd. 8:7 They also had a few small fish. After giving thanks for these, he told them to serve these as well. 8:8 Everyone ate and was satisfied, and they picked up the broken pieces left over, seven baskets full. 8:9 There were about four thousand who ate. Then he dismissed them. 8:10 Immediately he got into a boat with his disciples and went to the district of Dalmanutha.
The Demand for a Sign
8:11 Then the Pharisees came and began to argue with Jesus, asking for a sign from heaven to test him. 8:12 Sighing deeply in his spirit he said, “Why does this generation look for a sign? I tell you the truth, no sign will be given to this generation.” 8:13 Then he left them, got back into the boat, and went to the other side.
The Yeast of the Pharisees and Herod
8:14 Now they had forgotten to take bread, except for one loaf they had with them in the boat. 8:15 And Jesus ordered them, “Watch out! Beware of the yeast of the Pharisees and the yeast of Herod!” 8:16 So they began to discuss with one another about having no bread. 8:17 When he learned of this, Jesus said to them, “Why are you arguing about having no bread? Do you still not see or understand? Have your hearts been hardened? 8:18 Though you have eyes, don’t you see? And though you have ears, can’t you hear? Don’t you remember? 8:19 When I broke the five loaves for the five thousand, how many baskets full of pieces did you pick up?” They replied, “Twelve.” 8:20 “When I broke the seven loaves for the four thousand, how many baskets full of pieces did you pick up?” They replied, “Seven.” 8:21 Then he said to them, “Do you still not understand?”
A Two-stage Healing
8:22 Then they came to Bethsaida. They brought a blind man to Jesus and asked him to touch him. 8:23 He took the blind man by the hand and brought him outside of the village. Then he spit on his eyes, placed his hands on his eyes and asked, “Do you see anything?” 8:24 Regaining his sight he said, “I see people, but they look like trees walking.” 8:25 Then Jesus placed his hands on the man’s eyes again. And he opened his eyes, his sight was restored, and he saw everything clearly. 8:26 Jesus sent him home, saying, “Do not even go into the village.”
Peter’s Confession
8:27 Then Jesus and his disciples went to the villages of Caesarea Philippi. On the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” 8:28 They said, “John the Baptist, others say Elijah, and still others, one of the prophets.” 8:29 He asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Christ.” 8:30 Then he warned them not to tell anyone about him.
First Prediction of Jesus’ Death and Resurrection
8:31 Then Jesus began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and experts in the law, and be killed, and after three days rise again. 8:32 He spoke openly about this. So Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. 8:33 But after turning and looking at his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan. You are not setting your mind on God’s interests, but on man’s.”
Following Jesus
8:34 Then Jesus called the crowd, along with his disciples, and said to them, “If anyone wants to become my follower, he must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me. 8:35 For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and for the gospel will save it. 8:36 For what benefit is it for a person to gain the whole world, yet forfeit his life? 8:37 What can a person give in exchange for his life? 8:38 For if anyone is ashamed of me and my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will also be ashamed of him when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Bethsaida a town located on the northeast side of the Sea of Galilee
 · Caesarea a town on the Mediterranean 40 kilometers south of Mt. Carmel and 120 kilometers NW of Jerusalem.
 · Dalmanutha a region / district / town on the west coast of the Sea of Galilee
 · Elijah a prophet from the 9th century B.C.,a prophet from Tishbe in Gilead to Israel in King Ahab's time,son of Jeroham of Benjamin,a priest of the Harim clan who put away his heathen wife,a layman of the Bani Elam clan who put away his heathen wife
 · Herod son of Antipater; king over Judea when Christ was born,a son of Herod the Great,a grandson of Herod the Great and son of Aristobulus and Berenice
 · John a son of Zebedee; younger brother of James; the beloved disciple of Christ,a relative of Annas the high priest,a son of Mary the sister of Barnabas, and surnamed Mark,the father of Simon Peter
 · Peter a man who was a leader among the twelve apostles and wrote the two epistles of Peter
 · Pharisee a religious group or sect of the Jews
 · Philippi a town 40 km north of the Sea of Galilee, frequently called Caesarea Philippi,a town in Macedonia 350 km north of Athens
 · Satan a person, male (evil angelic),an angel that has rebelled against God


Topik/Tema Kamus: Jesus, The Christ | JESUS CHRIST, 4C2 | Miracles | Peter | LORD'S SUPPER; (EUCHARIST) | Blindness | MEDIATION; MEDIATOR | PALESTINE, 3 | Dalmanutha | Worldliness | PERSON OF CHRIST, 4-8 | Reproof | Caesarea Philippi | Apostles | SELF-SURRENDER | HEROD | MAGADAN | MESSIAH | Self-denial | MARK, THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO, 2 | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Robertson , Vincent , Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Lightfoot , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Barclay , Constable , College , McGarvey , Lapide

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Robertson: Mar 8:1 - Had nothing to eat Had nothing to eat ( mē echontōn ti phagōsin ). Genitive absolute and plural because ochlou a collective substantive. Not having what to eat ...

Had nothing to eat ( mē echontōn ti phagōsin ).

Genitive absolute and plural because ochlou a collective substantive. Not having what to eat (deliberative subjunctive retained in indirect question). The repetition of a nature miracle of feeding four thousand in Decapolis disturbs some modern critics who cannot imagine how Jesus could or would perform another miracle elsewhere so similar to the feeding of the five thousand up near Bethsaida Julias. But both Mark and Matthew give both miracles, distinguish the words for baskets (kophinos , sphuris ), and both make Jesus later refer to both incidents and use these two words with the same distinction (Mar 8:19.; Mat 16:9.). Surely it is easier to conceive that Jesus wrought two such miracles than to hold that Mark and Matthew have made such a jumble of the whole business.

Robertson: Mar 8:2 - Now three days Now three days ( ēdē hēmerai treis ). This text preserves a curious parenthetic nominative of time (Robertson, Grammar , p. 460). See note on ...

Now three days ( ēdē hēmerai treis ).

This text preserves a curious parenthetic nominative of time (Robertson, Grammar , p. 460). See note on Mat 15:32.

Robertson: Mar 8:3 - Are come from far Are come from far ( apo makrothen eisin ). This item alone in Mark.

Are come from far ( apo makrothen eisin ).

This item alone in Mark.

Robertson: Mar 8:4 - Here Here ( hōde ). Of all places, in this desert region in the mountains. The disciples feel as helpless as when the five thousand were fed. They do no...

Here ( hōde ).

Of all places, in this desert region in the mountains. The disciples feel as helpless as when the five thousand were fed. They do not rise to faith in the unlimited power of Jesus after all that they have seen.

Robertson: Mar 8:6 - Brake and gave Brake and gave ( eklasen kai edidou ). Constative aorist followed by imperfect. The giving kept on.

Brake and gave ( eklasen kai edidou ).

Constative aorist followed by imperfect. The giving kept on.

Robertson: Mar 8:6 - To set before them To set before them ( hina paratithōsin ). Present subjunctive describing the continuous process.

To set before them ( hina paratithōsin ).

Present subjunctive describing the continuous process.

Robertson: Mar 8:7 - A few small fishes A few small fishes ( ichthudia oliga ). Mark mentions them last as if they were served after the food, but not so Mat 15:34.

A few small fishes ( ichthudia oliga ).

Mark mentions them last as if they were served after the food, but not so Mat 15:34.

Robertson: Mar 8:8 - Broken pieces that remained over Broken pieces that remained over ( perisseumata klasmatōn ). Overplus, abundance, remains of broken pieces not used, not just scraps or crumbs.

Broken pieces that remained over ( perisseumata klasmatōn ).

Overplus, abundance, remains of broken pieces not used, not just scraps or crumbs.

Robertson: Mar 8:10 - Into the parts of Dalmanutha Into the parts of Dalmanutha ( eis ta merē Dalmanoutha ). Mat 15:39 calls it "the borders of Magadan."Both names are unknown elsewhere, but apparen...

Into the parts of Dalmanutha ( eis ta merē Dalmanoutha ).

Mat 15:39 calls it "the borders of Magadan."Both names are unknown elsewhere, but apparently the same region of Galilee on the western side of the lake not far from Tiberias. Mark here uses "parts"(merē ) in the same sense as "borders"(horia ) in Mar 7:24 just as Matthew reverses it with "parts"in Mat 15:21 and "borders"here in Mat 15:39. Mark has here "with his disciples"(meta tōn mathētōn autou ) only implied in Mat 15:39.

Robertson: Mar 8:11 - And the Pharisees came forth And the Pharisees came forth ( kai exēlthon hoi Pharisaioi ). At once they met Jesus and opened a controversy. Mat 16:1 adds "and Sadducees,"the fi...

And the Pharisees came forth ( kai exēlthon hoi Pharisaioi ).

At once they met Jesus and opened a controversy. Mat 16:1 adds "and Sadducees,"the first time these two parties appear together against Jesus. See discussion on Mat 16:1. The Pharisees and Herodians had already joined hands against Jesus in the sabbath controversy (Mar 3:6). They began to question with him (ērxanto sunzētein autōi ). Dispute, not mere inquiry, associative instrumental case of autoi . They began at once and kept it up (present infinitive).

Robertson: Mar 8:12 - He sighed deeply in his spirit He sighed deeply in his spirit ( anastenaxas tōi pneumati ). The only instance of this compound in the N.T. though in the lxx. The uncompounded for...

He sighed deeply in his spirit ( anastenaxas tōi pneumati ).

The only instance of this compound in the N.T. though in the lxx. The uncompounded form occurs in Mar 7:34 and it is common enough. The preposition anȧ intensifies the meaning of the verb (perfective use). "The sigh seemed to come, as we say, from the bottom of his heart, the Lord’ s human spirit was stirred to its depths"(Swete). Jesus resented the settled prejudice of the Pharisees (and now Sadducees also) against him and his work.

Robertson: Mar 8:12 - There shall no sign be given unto this generation There shall no sign be given unto this generation ( ei dothēsetai tēi geneāi tautēi sēmeion ). Mat 16:4 has simply ou dothēsetai , plain ...

There shall no sign be given unto this generation ( ei dothēsetai tēi geneāi tautēi sēmeion ).

Mat 16:4 has simply ou dothēsetai , plain negative with the future passive indicative. Mark has ei instead of ou , which is technically a conditional clause with the conclusion unexpressed (Robertson, Grammar , p. 1024), really aposiopesis in imitation of the Hebrew use of im . This is the only instance in the N.T. except in quotations from the lxx (Heb 3:11; Heb 4:3, Heb 4:5). It is very common in the lxx. The rabbis were splitting hairs over the miracles of Jesus as having a possible natural explanation (as some critics do today) even if by the power of Beelzebub, and those not of the sky (from heaven) which would be manifested from God. So they put up this fantastic test to Jesus which he deeply resents. Mat 16:4 adds "but the sign of Jonah"mentioned already by Jesus on a previous occasion (Mat 12:39-41) at more length and to be mentioned again (Luk 11:32). But the mention of the sign of Jonah was "an absolute refusal of signs in their sense"(Bruce). And when he did rise from the dead on the third day, the Sanhedrin refused to be convinced (see Acts 3 to 5).

Robertson: Mar 8:14 - Bread Bread ( artous ). Loaves , plural. More than one loaf (ei mē hina arton ). Except one loaf. Detail only in Mark. Practically for thirteen men w...

Bread ( artous ).

Loaves , plural. More than one loaf (ei mē hina arton ). Except one loaf. Detail only in Mark. Practically for thirteen men when hungry.||

Robertson: Mar 8:15 - Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and the leaven of Herod Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and the leaven of Herod ( Horāte , blepete apo tēs zumēs tōn Pharisaiōn kai tēs zumēs ...

Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and the leaven of Herod ( Horāte , blepete apo tēs zumēs tōn Pharisaiōn kai tēs zumēs Hērōidou ).

Present imperatives. Note apo and the ablative case. Zumē is from zumoō and occurs already in Mat 13:33 in a good sense. For the bad sense See note on 1Co 5:6. He repeatedly charged (diestelleto , imperfect indicative), showing that the warning was needed. The disciples came out of a Pharisaic atmosphere and they had just met it again at Dalmanutha. It was insidious. Note the combination of Herod here with the Pharisees. This is after the agitation of Herod because of the death of the Baptist and the ministry of Jesus (Mark 6:14-29; Mat 14:1-12; Luk 9:7-9). Jesus definitely warns the disciples against "the leaven of Herod"(bad politics) and the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees (bad theology and also bad politics).

Robertson: Mar 8:16 - They reasoned one with another They reasoned one with another ( dielogizonto pros allēlous ) , implying discussion. Imperfect tense, kept it up. Mat 16:7 has en heautois , in the...

They reasoned one with another ( dielogizonto pros allēlous )

, implying discussion. Imperfect tense, kept it up. Mat 16:7 has en heautois , in themselves or among themselves.

Robertson: Mar 8:17-20 - -- @@Mark here (Mar 8:17-20) gives six keen questions of Jesus while Mat 16:8-11 gives us four that really include the six of Mark running some together....

@@Mark here (Mar 8:17-20) gives six keen questions of Jesus while Mat 16:8-11 gives us four that really include the six of Mark running some together. The questions reveal the disappointment of Jesus at the intellectual dulness of his pupils. The questions concern the intellect (noeite , from nous , suniete , comprehend), the heart in a hardened state (pepōrōmenēn , perfect passive predicate participle as in Mar 6:52, which see), the eyes, the ears, the memory of both the feeding of the five thousand and the four thousand here sharply distinguished even to the two kinds of baskets (kophinous , sphuridōn ). The disciples did recall the number of baskets left over in each instance, twelve and seven. Jesus "administers a sharp rebuke for their preoccupation with mere temporalities, as if there were nothing higher to be thought of than bread "(Bruce). "For the time the Twelve are way-side hearers, with hearts like a beaten path, into which the higher truths cannot sink so as to germinate"(Bruce).

Robertson: Mar 8:21 - Do ye not yet understand? Do ye not yet understand? ( oupō suniete̱ ). After all this rebuke and explanation. The greatest of all teachers had the greatest of all classes, ...

Do ye not yet understand? ( oupō suniete̱ ).

After all this rebuke and explanation. The greatest of all teachers had the greatest of all classes, but he struck a snag here. Mat 16:12 gives the result: "Then they understood how that he bade them not beware of the loaves of bread, but of the teaching of the Pharisees and Sadducees."They had once said that they understood the parables of Jesus (Mat 13:51). But that was a long time ago. The teacher must have patience if his pupils are to understand.

Robertson: Mar 8:22 - Unto Bethsaida Unto Bethsaida ( eis Bēthsaidan ). On the Eastern side not far from the place of the feeding of the five thousand, Bethsaida Julias. Note dramatic ...

Unto Bethsaida ( eis Bēthsaidan ).

On the Eastern side not far from the place of the feeding of the five thousand, Bethsaida Julias. Note dramatic presents they come (erchontai ), they bring (pherousin ). This incident in Mark alone (Mar 8:22-26).

Robertson: Mar 8:23 - Brought him out of the village Brought him out of the village ( exēnegken auton exō tēs kōmēs ). It had been a village, but Philip had enlarged it and made it a town or c...

Brought him out of the village ( exēnegken auton exō tēs kōmēs ).

It had been a village, but Philip had enlarged it and made it a town or city (polis ), though still called a village (Mar 8:23, Mar 8:26). As in the case of the deaf and dumb demoniac given also alone by Mark (Mar 7:31-37), so here Jesus observes the utmost secrecy in performing the miracle for reasons not given by Mark. It was the season of retirement and Jesus is making the fourth withdrawal from Galilee. That fact may explain it. The various touches here are of interest also. Jesus led him out by the hand, put spittle on his eyes (using the poetical and Koiné papyri word ommata instead of the usual opthalmous ), and laid his hands upon him, perhaps all this to help the man’ s faith.

Robertson: Mar 8:24 - I see men, for I behold them as trees walking I see men, for I behold them as trees walking ( Blepō tous anthrōpous hoti hōs dendra horō peripatountas ). A vivid description of dawning si...

I see men, for I behold them as trees walking ( Blepō tous anthrōpous hoti hōs dendra horō peripatountas ).

A vivid description of dawning sight. His vision was incomplete though he could tell that they were men because they were walking. This is the single case of a gradual cure in the healings wrought by Jesus. The reason for this method in this case is not given.

Robertson: Mar 8:25 - He looked steadfastly He looked steadfastly ( dieblepsen ). He saw thoroughly now, effective aorist (dieblepsen ), he was completely restored (apekatestē , second aoris...

He looked steadfastly ( dieblepsen ).

He saw thoroughly now, effective aorist (dieblepsen ), he was completely restored (apekatestē , second aorist, double compound and double augment), and kept on seeing (eneblepen , imperfect, continued action) all things clearly or at a distance (tēlaugōs , common Greek word from tēle , afar, and augē , radiance, far-shining). Some manuscripts (margin in Westcott and Hort) read dēlaugōs , from dēlos , plain, and augē , radiance.

Robertson: Mar 8:26 - To his home To his home ( eis oikon autou ). A joyful homecoming that. He was not allowed to enter the village and create excitement before Jesus moved on to Cae...

To his home ( eis oikon autou ).

A joyful homecoming that. He was not allowed to enter the village and create excitement before Jesus moved on to Caesarea Philippi.

Robertson: Mar 8:27 - Into the villages of Caesarea Philippi Into the villages of Caesarea Philippi ( eis tās kōmas Kaisariās tēs Philippou ). Parts (merē ) Mat 16:13 has, the Caesarea of Philippi in...

Into the villages of Caesarea Philippi ( eis tās kōmas Kaisariās tēs Philippou ).

Parts (merē ) Mat 16:13 has, the Caesarea of Philippi in contrast to the one down on the Mediterranean Sea. Mark means the villages belonging to the district around Caesarea Philippi. This region is on a spur of Mount Hermon in Iturea ruled by Herod Philip so that Jesus is safe from annoyance by Herod Antipas or the Pharisees and Sadducees. Up here on this mountain slope Jesus will have his best opportunity to give the disciples special teaching concerning the crucifixion just a little over six months ahead. So Jesus asked (epērōtā , descriptive imperfect)

Robertson: Mar 8:27 - Who do men say that I am? Who do men say that I am? ( Tina me legousin hoi anthrōpoi einai̱ ). Mat 16:13 has "the Son of Man"in place of "I"here in Mark and in Luk 9:18. He...

Who do men say that I am? ( Tina me legousin hoi anthrōpoi einai̱ ).

Mat 16:13 has "the Son of Man"in place of "I"here in Mark and in Luk 9:18. He often described himself as "the Son of Man."Certainly here the phrase could not mean merely "a man."They knew the various popular opinions about Jesus of which Herod Antipas had heard (Mar 3:21, Mar 3:31). It was time that the disciples reveal how much they had been influenced by their environment as well as by the direct instruction of Jesus.

Robertson: Mar 8:28 - And they told him And they told him ( hoi de eipan ). They knew only too well. See note on Mat 16:14, Mat 16:28 for discussion.

And they told him ( hoi de eipan ).

They knew only too well. See note on Mat 16:14, Mat 16:28 for discussion.

Robertson: Mar 8:29 - Thou art the Christ Thou art the Christ ( Su ei ho Christos ). Mark does not give "the Son of the living God"(Mat 16:16) or "of God"(Luk 9:20). The full confession is th...

Thou art the Christ ( Su ei ho Christos ).

Mark does not give "the Son of the living God"(Mat 16:16) or "of God"(Luk 9:20). The full confession is the form in Matthew. Luke’ s language means practically the same, while Mark’ s is the briefest. But the form in Mark really means the full idea. Mark omits all praise of Peter, probably because Peter had done so in his story of the incident. For criticism of the view that Matthew’ s narrative is due to ecclesiastical development and effort to justify ecclesiastical prerogatives, see discussion on Mat 16:16, Mat 16:18. The disciples had confessed him as Messiah before. Thus Joh 1:41; Joh 4:29; Joh 6:69; Mat 14:33. But Jesus had ceased to use the word Messiah to avoid political complications and a revolutionary movement (Joh 6:14.). But did the disciples still believe in Jesus as Messiah after all the defections and oppositions seen by them? It was a serious test to which Jesus now put them.

Robertson: Mar 8:30 - Of him Of him ( peri autou ). As being the Messiah, that he was the Christ (Mat 16:20). Not yet, for the time was not yet ripe. When that comes, the triumph...

Of him ( peri autou ).

As being the Messiah, that he was the Christ (Mat 16:20). Not yet, for the time was not yet ripe. When that comes, the triumphal entry into Jerusalem, the very stones will cry out, if men will not (Luk 19:40).

Robertson: Mar 8:31 - He began to teach them He began to teach them ( ērxato didaskein autous ). Mark is fond of this idiom, but it is not a mere rhetorical device. Mat 16:21 expressly says "f...

He began to teach them ( ērxato didaskein autous ).

Mark is fond of this idiom, but it is not a mere rhetorical device. Mat 16:21 expressly says "from that time."They had to be told soon about the approaching death of Jesus. The confession of faith in Jesus indicated that it was a good time to begin. Death at the hands of the Sanhedrin (elders, chief priests, and scribes) in which Pharisees and Sadducees had about equal strength. The resurrection on the third day is mentioned, but it made no impression on their minds. This rainbow on the cloud was not seen.

Robertson: Mar 8:31 - After three days After three days ( meta treis hēmeras ). Mat 16:21 has "the third day"(tēi tritēi hēmerāi ) in the locative case of point of time (so also...

After three days ( meta treis hēmeras ).

Mat 16:21 has "the third day"(tēi tritēi hēmerāi ) in the locative case of point of time (so also Luk 9:22). There are some people who stickle for a strict interpretation of "after three days"which would be "on the fourth day,"not "on the third day."Evidently Mark’ s phrase here has the same sense as that in Matthew and Luke else they are hopelessly contradictory. In popular language "after three days"can and often does mean "on the third day,"but the fourth day is impossible.

Robertson: Mar 8:32 - Spake the saying openly Spake the saying openly ( parrēsiāi ton logon elalei ). He held back nothing, told it all (pān , all, rēsia , from eipon , say), without rese...

Spake the saying openly ( parrēsiāi ton logon elalei ).

He held back nothing, told it all (pān , all, rēsia , from eipon , say), without reserve, to all of them. Imperfect tense elalei shows that Jesus did it repeatedly. Mark alone gives this item. Mark does not give the great eulogy of Peter in Mat 16:17, Mat 16:19 after his confession (Mar 8:29; Mat 16:16; Luk 9:20), but he does tell the stinging rebuke given Peter by Jesus on this occasion. See discussion on Mat 16:21, Mat 16:26.

Robertson: Mar 8:33 - He turning about and seeing his disciples He turning about and seeing his disciples ( epistrapheis kai idōn tous mathētās autou ). Peter had called Jesus off to himself (proskalesamenos...

He turning about and seeing his disciples ( epistrapheis kai idōn tous mathētās autou ).

Peter had called Jesus off to himself (proskalesamenos ), but Jesus quickly wheeled round on Peter (epistrapheis , only strapheis in Matthew). In doing that the other disciples were in plain view also (this touch only in Mark). Hence Jesus rebukes Peter in the full presence of the whole group. Peter no doubt felt that it was his duty as a leader of the Twelve to remonstrate with the Master for this pessimistic utterance (Swete). It is even possible that the others shared Peter’ s views and were watching the effect of his daring rebuke of Jesus. It was more than mere officiousness on the part of Peter. He had not risen above the level of ordinary men and deserves the name of Satan whose role he was now acting. It was withering, but it was needed. The temptation of the devil on the mountain was here offered by Peter. It was Satan over again. See note on Mat 16:23.

Robertson: Mar 8:34 - And he called unto him the multitude with his disciples And he called unto him the multitude with his disciples ( kai proskalesamenos ton ochlon sun tois mathētais autou ). Mark alone notes the unexpecte...

And he called unto him the multitude with his disciples ( kai proskalesamenos ton ochlon sun tois mathētais autou ).

Mark alone notes the unexpected presence of a crowd up here near Caesarea Philippi in heathen territory. In the presence of this crowd Jesus explains his philosophy of life and death which is in direct contrast with that offered by Peter and evidently shared by the disciples and the people. So Jesus gives this profound view of life and death to them all.

Robertson: Mar 8:34 - Deny himself Deny himself ( aparnēsasthō heauton ). Say no to himself, a difficult thing to do. Note reflexive along with the middle voice. Ingressive first a...

Deny himself ( aparnēsasthō heauton ).

Say no to himself, a difficult thing to do. Note reflexive along with the middle voice. Ingressive first aorist imperative. See note on Mat 16:24 about taking up the Cross. The shadow of Christ’ s Cross was already on him (Mar 8:31) and one faces everyone.

Robertson: Mar 8:35 - And the gospel’ s sake And the gospel’ s sake ( kai tou euaggeliou ). In Mark alone. See note on Mat 16:25. for this paradox. Two senses of "life"and "save."For the la...

And the gospel’ s sake ( kai tou euaggeliou ).

In Mark alone. See note on Mat 16:25. for this paradox. Two senses of "life"and "save."For the last "save"(sōsei ) Mat 16:25 has "find"(heurēsei ). See note on Mat 16:26 for "gain,""profit,"and "exchange."

Robertson: Mar 8:38 - For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and my words For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and my words ( hos gar ean epaischunthēi me kai tous emous logous ). More exactly, whosoever is ashamed (fir...

For whosoever shall be ashamed of me and my words ( hos gar ean epaischunthēi me kai tous emous logous ).

More exactly, whosoever is ashamed (first aorist passive subjunctive with indefinite relative and ean ̂ an . See Robertson, Grammar , pp. 957-9. It is not a statement about the future conduct of one, but about his present attitude toward Jesus. The conduct of men toward Christ now determines Christ’ s conduct then (epaischunthēsetai , first future passive indicative). This passive verb is transitive and uses the accusative (me , auton ).

Robertson: Mar 8:38 - In this adulterous and sinful generation In this adulterous and sinful generation ( en tēi geneāi tautēi tēi moichalidi kai hamartōlōi ). Only in Mark.

In this adulterous and sinful generation ( en tēi geneāi tautēi tēi moichalidi kai hamartōlōi ).

Only in Mark.

Robertson: Mar 8:38 - When he cometh When he cometh ( hotan elthēi ). Aorist active subjunctive with reference to the future second coming of Christ with the glory of the Father with h...

When he cometh ( hotan elthēi ).

Aorist active subjunctive with reference to the future second coming of Christ with the glory of the Father with his holy angels (cf. Mat 16:27). This is a clear prediction of the final eschatological coming of Christ. This verse could not be separated from Mar 9:1 as the chapter division does. These two verses in Mar 8:38; Mar 9:1 form one paragraph and should go together.

Vincent: Mar 8:2 - I have compassion I have compassion ( σπλαγχνίξομαι ) A peculiar verb, from σπλάγχνα , the inward parts, especially the nobler entrails -...

I have compassion ( σπλαγχνίξομαι )

A peculiar verb, from σπλάγχνα , the inward parts, especially the nobler entrails - the heart, lungs, liver, and kidneys. These came gradually to denote the seat of the affections, like our word heart. This explains the frequent use of the word bowels in the A. V. in the sense of tender mercy, affection, compassion. See Luk 1:78; 2Co 7:15; Phi 1:8; Phm 1:7, Phm 1:12, Phm 1:20. The Rev. has properly rejected it in every such case, using it only in its literal sense in the single passage, Act 1:18.

Vincent: Mar 8:2 - They have been with me They have been with me ( προσμένουσιν ) Lit., they continue, as Rev.

They have been with me ( προσμένουσιν )

Lit., they continue, as Rev.

Vincent: Mar 8:3 - Faint Faint See on Mat 15:32. Wyc., fail.

Faint

See on Mat 15:32. Wyc., fail.

Vincent: Mar 8:3 - Some of them came from far Some of them came from far Peculiar to Mark.

Some of them came from far

Peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 8:6 - To sit down To sit down ( ἀναπεσεῖν ) Lit., to recline.

To sit down ( ἀναπεσεῖν )

Lit., to recline.

Vincent: Mar 8:6 - Brake and gave Brake and gave See on Mar 6:41.

Brake and gave

See on Mar 6:41.

Vincent: Mar 8:8 - Were filled Were filled See on Mat 5:6. Wyc., fulfilled . Tynd., sufficed .

Were filled

See on Mat 5:6. Wyc., fulfilled . Tynd., sufficed .

Vincent: Mar 8:9 - Baskets Baskets See on Mat 14:20.

Baskets

See on Mat 14:20.

Vincent: Mar 8:9 - Four thousand Four thousand Matthew (Mat 15:38) here adds a detail which we should rather expect in Mark: beside women and children.

Four thousand

Matthew (Mat 15:38) here adds a detail which we should rather expect in Mark: beside women and children.

Vincent: Mar 8:10 - With his disciples With his disciples Peculiar to Mark.

With his disciples

Peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 8:11 - Began Began The beginnings of things seem to have a peculiar interest for Mark. See Mar 1:1, Mar 1:45; Mar 4:1; Mar 5:17, Mar 5:20; Mar 6:2, Mar 6:7, M...

Began

The beginnings of things seem to have a peculiar interest for Mark. See Mar 1:1, Mar 1:45; Mar 4:1; Mar 5:17, Mar 5:20; Mar 6:2, Mar 6:7, Mar 6:34, Mar 6:55.

Vincent: Mar 8:11 - Sign Sign ( σημεῖον ) See on Mat 11:20. Wyc., token . As applied to the miracles of our Lord, this word emphasizes their ethical purport, as...

Sign ( σημεῖον )

See on Mat 11:20. Wyc., token . As applied to the miracles of our Lord, this word emphasizes their ethical purport, as declaring that the miraculous act points back of itself to the grace and power or divine character or authority of the doer.

Vincent: Mar 8:12 - Sighed deeply in his spirit Sighed deeply in his spirit Peculiar to Mark.

Sighed deeply in his spirit

Peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 8:12 - There shall no sign be given There shall no sign be given ( εἰ δοθήσεται σημεῖον ) Lit., if a sign shall be given. The expression is elliptical. It ...

There shall no sign be given ( εἰ δοθήσεται σημεῖον )

Lit., if a sign shall be given. The expression is elliptical. It is a Hebrew idiom, and is really, at bottom, a form of imprecation. If I do not thus or so, may some judgment overtake me. Compare Heb 3:11.

Vincent: Mar 8:14 - -- The one loaf is a detail given by Mark only.

The one loaf is a detail given by Mark only.

Vincent: Mar 8:23 - Took Took ( ἐπιλαβόμενος ) Tynd., caught.

Took ( ἐπιλαβόμενος )

Tynd., caught.

Vincent: Mar 8:23 - If he saw If he saw ( εἴ τι βλέπεις ) Rev., more accurately, renders the direct question: Seest thou aught ? The change of tenses is gra...

If he saw ( εἴ τι βλέπεις )

Rev., more accurately, renders the direct question: Seest thou aught ? The change of tenses is graphic. Asked (imperfect). Dost thou see (present).

Vincent: Mar 8:24 - I see men as trees walking ( Βλέπω τοὺς ἀνθρώπρους ὡς δένδρα περιπατοῦντας ) I see men as trees walking ( following the reading, Βλέπω τοὺς ἀνθρώπρους ὡς δένδρα περιπατοῦντ...

I see men as trees walking ( following the reading, Βλέπω τοὺς ἀνθρώπρους ὡς δένδρα περιπατοῦντας )

The Rev. reads, following the amended text, I see men, for (ὅτι ) I behold (ὁρῶ ) them as trees, walking. He saw them dimly. They looked like trees, large and misshapen; but he knew they were men, for they were walking about.

Vincent: Mar 8:25 - Made him look up Made him look up The best texts omit, and substitute διέβλεψεν , he looked stedfastly. See on Mat 7:5. Instead of vaguely staring, he...

Made him look up

The best texts omit, and substitute διέβλεψεν , he looked stedfastly. See on Mat 7:5. Instead of vaguely staring, he fixed his eyes on definite objects.

Vincent: Mar 8:25 - He saw He saw ( ἐνέβλεπεν ) Imperfect tense. Continuous action. He saw and continued to see. Compare the aorist tense above: He looked s...

He saw ( ἐνέβλεπεν )

Imperfect tense. Continuous action. He saw and continued to see. Compare the aorist tense above: He looked stedfastly, fastened his eyes, denoting the single act, the first exercise of his restored sight.

Vincent: Mar 8:25 - Every man Every man Following the reading ἕπαντας . But the best texts read ἅπαντα , all things. So Rev.

Every man

Following the reading ἕπαντας . But the best texts read ἅπαντα , all things. So Rev.

Vincent: Mar 8:25 - Clearly Clearly ( τηλαυγῶς ) From τῆλε , far, αὐγή , shining. The farthest things were clearly seen.

Clearly ( τηλαυγῶς )

From τῆλε , far, αὐγή , shining. The farthest things were clearly seen.

Vincent: Mar 8:29 - He saith He saith ( ἐπηρώτα ) More correctly, he questioned or asked. So Rev. Mark omits the commendation of Peter. See Introduction. On Mar...

He saith ( ἐπηρώτα )

More correctly, he questioned or asked. So Rev. Mark omits the commendation of Peter. See Introduction.

On Mar 8:31-33, compare notes on Mat 16:21-28.

Vincent: Mar 8:32 - He spake the saying openly He spake the saying openly Mark only. Not as a secret or mystery, as in his words about being lifted up, or building the temple in three days....

He spake the saying openly

Mark only. Not as a secret or mystery, as in his words about being lifted up, or building the temple in three days. Not ambiguously, but explicitly. Wyc., plainly.

Vincent: Mar 8:34 - Will Jesus now pauses; for what he has to say now is to be said to all who follow him. Hence he calls the multitude with his disciples. Peculiar to Ma...

Jesus now pauses; for what he has to say now is to be said to all who follow him. Hence he calls the multitude with his disciples. Peculiar to Mark.

Will ( θέλει )

Rev., would. See on Mat 1:19. It is more than is wishful.

Vincent: Mar 8:34 - His cross His cross The pronoun αὐτοῦ , his, is in an emphatic position.

His cross

The pronoun αὐτοῦ , his, is in an emphatic position.

Vincent: Mar 8:35 - And the gospel's And the gospel's Peculiar to Mark.

And the gospel's

Peculiar to Mark.

Vincent: Mar 8:36 - Gain - lose Gain - lose See on Mat 16:26.

Gain - lose

See on Mat 16:26.

Vincent: Mar 8:38 - My words My words Bengel remarks that one may confess Christ in general and yet be ashamed of this or that saying.

My words

Bengel remarks that one may confess Christ in general and yet be ashamed of this or that saying.

Vincent: Mar 8:38 - In this adulterous and sinful generation In this adulterous and sinful generation Peculiar to Mark.

In this adulterous and sinful generation

Peculiar to Mark.

Wesley: Mar 8:1 - -- Mat 15:32.

Wesley: Mar 8:8 - So they did eat This miracle was intended to demonstrate, that Christ was the true bread which cometh down from heaven; for he who was almighty to create bread withou...

This miracle was intended to demonstrate, that Christ was the true bread which cometh down from heaven; for he who was almighty to create bread without means to support natural life, could not want power to create bread without means to support spiritual life. And this heavenly bread we stand so much in need of every moment, that we ought to be always praying, Lord, evermore give us this bread.

Wesley: Mar 8:11 - Tempting him That is, trying to ensnare him. Mat 16:1.

That is, trying to ensnare him. Mat 16:1.

Wesley: Mar 8:12 - -- Mat 16:4.

Wesley: Mar 8:15 - -- Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of Herod, or of the Sadducees; two opposite extremes.

Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of Herod, or of the Sadducees; two opposite extremes.

Wesley: Mar 8:17-18 - -- Our Lord here affirms of all the apostles, (for the question is equivalent to an affirmation,) That their hearts were hardened; that having eyes they ...

Our Lord here affirms of all the apostles, (for the question is equivalent to an affirmation,) That their hearts were hardened; that having eyes they saw not, having ears they heard not; that they did not consider, neither understand: the very same expressions that occur in the thirteenth of Matthew. And yet it is certain they were not judicially hardened. Therefore all these strong expressions do not necessarily import any thing more than the present want of spiritual understanding.

Wesley: Mar 8:23 - He led him out of the town It was in just displeasure against the inhabitants of Bethsaida for their obstinate infidelity, that our Lord would work no more miracles among them, ...

It was in just displeasure against the inhabitants of Bethsaida for their obstinate infidelity, that our Lord would work no more miracles among them, nor even suffer the person he had cured, either to go into the town, or to tell it to any therein.

Wesley: Mar 8:24 - I see men as trees walking He distinguished men from trees only by their motion.

He distinguished men from trees only by their motion.

Wesley: Mar 8:27 - -- Mat 16:13; Luk 9:18.

Wesley: Mar 8:30 - -- He enjoined them silence for the present, That he might not encourage the people to set him up for a temporal king; That he might not provoke the scri...

He enjoined them silence for the present, That he might not encourage the people to set him up for a temporal king; That he might not provoke the scribes and Pharisees to destroy him before the time and, That he might not forestall the bright evidence which was to be given of his Divine character after his resurrection.

Wesley: Mar 8:31 - -- Mat 16:21; Luk 9:22.

Wesley: Mar 8:32 - He spake that saying openly Or in express terms. Till now he had only intimated it to them.

Or in express terms. Till now he had only intimated it to them.

Wesley: Mar 8:32 - And Peter taking hold of him Perhaps by the arms or clothes.

Perhaps by the arms or clothes.

Wesley: Mar 8:33 - Looking on his disciples That they might the more observe what he said to Peter.

That they might the more observe what he said to Peter.

Wesley: Mar 8:34 - And when he called the people To hear a truth of the last importance, and one that equally concerned them all.

To hear a truth of the last importance, and one that equally concerned them all.

Wesley: Mar 8:34 - Let him deny himself His own will, in all things small and great, however pleasing, and that continually: And take up his cross - Embrace the will of God, however painful,...

His own will, in all things small and great, however pleasing, and that continually: And take up his cross - Embrace the will of God, however painful, daily, hourly, continually. Thus only can he follow me in holiness to glory.

Wesley: Mar 8:35 - -- Mat 16:25; Luk 9:24; Luk 17:33; Joh 12:25.

Wesley: Mar 8:38 - Whosoever shall be ashamed of me and of my words That is, avowing whatever I have said (particularly of self denial and the daily cross) both by word and action. Mat 10:32; Luk 9:26; Luk 12:8.

That is, avowing whatever I have said (particularly of self denial and the daily cross) both by word and action. Mat 10:32; Luk 9:26; Luk 12:8.

JFB: Mar 8:2 - I have compassion on the multitude An expression of that deep emotion in the Redeemer's heart which always preceded some remarkable interposition for relief. (See Mat 14:14; Mat 20:34; ...

An expression of that deep emotion in the Redeemer's heart which always preceded some remarkable interposition for relief. (See Mat 14:14; Mat 20:34; Mar 1:41; Luk 7:13; also Mat 9:36, before the mission of the Twelve; compare Jdg 2:18; Jdg 10:16).

JFB: Mar 8:2 - because they have now been with me In constant attendance. three days, and have nothing to eat:

In constant attendance.

three days, and have nothing to eat:

JFB: Mar 8:3 - And if I send them away fasting to their own houses, they will faint by the way In their eagerness they seem not to have thought of the need of provisions for such a length of time; but the Lord thought of it. In Matthew (Mat 15:3...

In their eagerness they seem not to have thought of the need of provisions for such a length of time; but the Lord thought of it. In Matthew (Mat 15:32) it is, "I will not send them away fasting"--or rather, "To send them away fasting I am unwilling."

JFB: Mar 8:4 - From whence can a man satisfy these men with bread here in the wilderness? Though the question here is the same as when He fed the five thousand, they evidently now meant no more by it than that they had not the means of feed...

Though the question here is the same as when He fed the five thousand, they evidently now meant no more by it than that they had not the means of feeding the multitude; modestly leaving the Lord to decide what was to be done. And this will the more appear from His not now trying them, as before, by saying, "They need not depart, give ye them to eat"; but simply asking what they had, and then giving His directions.

JFB: Mar 8:5 - And he asked them, How many loaves have ye? And they said, Seven It was important in this case, as in the former, that the precise number of the loaves should be brought out. Thus also does the distinctness of the t...

It was important in this case, as in the former, that the precise number of the loaves should be brought out. Thus also does the distinctness of the two miracles appear.

JFB: Mar 8:9 - And they that had eaten were about four thousand: and he sent them away Had not our Lord distinctly referred, in this very chapter and in two successive sentences, to the feeding of the five thousand and of the four thousa...

Had not our Lord distinctly referred, in this very chapter and in two successive sentences, to the feeding of the five thousand and of the four thousand as two distinct miracles, many critics would have insisted that they were but two different representations of one and the same miracle, as they do of the two expulsions of the buyers and sellers from the temple, at the beginning and end of our Lord's ministry. But even in spite of what our Lord says, it is painful to find such men as NEANDER endeavoring to identify the two miracles. The localities, though both on the eastern side of the lake, were different; the time was different; the preceding and following circumstances were different; the period during which the people continued fasting was different--in the one case not even one entire day, in the other three days; the number fed was different--five thousand in the one case, in the other four thousand; the number of the loaves was different--five in the one case, in the other seven; the number of the fishes in the one case is definitely stated by all the four Evangelists--two; in the other case both give them indefinitely--"a few small fishes"; in the one case the multitude were commanded to sit down "upon the green grass"; in the other "on the ground"; in the one case the number of the baskets taken up filled with the fragments was twelve, in the other seven; but more than all, perhaps, because apparently quite incidental, in the one case the name given to the kind of baskets used is the same in all the four narratives--the cophinus (see on Mar 6:43); in the other case the name given to the kind of baskets used, while it is the same in both the narratives, is quite different--the spuris, a basket large enough to hold a man's body, for Paul was let down in one of these from the wall of Damascus (Act 9:25). It might be added, that in the one case the people, in a frenzy of enthusiasm, would have taken Him by force to make Him a king; in the other case no such excitement is recorded. In view of these things, who could have believed that these were one and the same miracle, even if the Lord Himself had not expressly distinguished them?

Sign from Heaven Sought (Mar 8:10-13).

JFB: Mar 8:10 - And straightway he entered into a ship "into the ship," or "embarked."

"into the ship," or "embarked."

JFB: Mar 8:10 - with his disciples, and came into the parts of Dalmanutha In Matthew (Mat 15:39) it is "the coasts of Magdala." Magdala and Dalmanutha were both on the western shore of the lake, and probably not far apart. F...

In Matthew (Mat 15:39) it is "the coasts of Magdala." Magdala and Dalmanutha were both on the western shore of the lake, and probably not far apart. From the former the surname "Magdalene" was probably taken, to denote the residence of Mary Magdalene. Dalmanutha may have been a village, but it cannot now be identified with certainty.

JFB: Mar 8:11 - seeking of him a sign from heaven, tempting him Not in the least desiring evidence for their conviction, but hoping to entrap Him. The first part of the answer is given in Matthew alone (Mat 16:2-3)...

Not in the least desiring evidence for their conviction, but hoping to entrap Him. The first part of the answer is given in Matthew alone (Mat 16:2-3): "He answered and said unto them, When it is evening, ye say, It will be fair weather; for the sky is red. And in the morning, It will be foul weather to-day: for the sky is red and lowering [sullen, gloomy]. Hypocrites! ye can discern the face of the sky; but can ye not discern the signs of the times?" The same simplicity of purpose and careful observation of the symptoms of approaching events which they showed in common things would enable them to "discern the signs of the times"--or rather "seasons," to which the prophets pointed for the manifestation of the Messiah. The scepter had departed from Judah; Daniel's seventy weeks were expiring, &c.; and many other significant indications of the close of the old economy, and preparations for a freer and more comprehensive one, might have been discerned. But all was lost upon them.

JFB: Mar 8:12 - And he sighed deeply in his spirit The language is very strong. These glimpses into the interior of the Redeemer's heart, in which our Evangelist abounds, are more precious than rubies....

The language is very strong. These glimpses into the interior of the Redeemer's heart, in which our Evangelist abounds, are more precious than rubies. The state of the Pharisaic heart, which prompted this desire for a fresh sign, went to His very soul.

JFB: Mar 8:12 - and saith, Why doth this generation "this wicked and adulterous generation" (Mat 16:4).

"this wicked and adulterous generation" (Mat 16:4).

JFB: Mar 8:12 - seek after a sign? When they have had such abundant evidence already.

When they have had such abundant evidence already.

JFB: Mar 8:12 - There shall no sign be given unto this generation Literally, "If there shall be given to this generation a sign"; a Jewish way of expressing a solemn and peremptory determination to the contrary (comp...

Literally, "If there shall be given to this generation a sign"; a Jewish way of expressing a solemn and peremptory determination to the contrary (compare Heb 4:5; Psa 95:11, Margin). "A generation incapable of appreciating such demonstrations shall not be gratified with them." In Mat 16:4 He added, "but the sign of the prophet Jonas." (See on Mat 12:39-40.)

JFB: Mar 8:13 - And he left them No doubt with tokens of displeasure. The Leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees (Mar 8:14-21).

No doubt with tokens of displeasure.

The Leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees (Mar 8:14-21).

JFB: Mar 8:14 - Now the disciples had forgotten to take bread, neither had they in the ship with them more than one loaf This is another example of that graphic circumstantiality which gives such a charm to this briefest of the four Gospels. The circumstance of the "one ...

This is another example of that graphic circumstantiality which gives such a charm to this briefest of the four Gospels. The circumstance of the "one loaf" only remaining, as WEBSTER and WILKINSON remark, was more suggestive of their Master's recent miracles than the entire absence of provisions.

JFB: Mar 8:15 - And he charged them, saying, Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees "and of the Sadducees" (Mat 16:6).

"and of the Sadducees" (Mat 16:6).

JFB: Mar 8:15 - and of the leaven of Herod The teaching or "doctrine" (Mat 16:12) of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees was quite different, but both were equally pernicious; and the Herodians,...

The teaching or "doctrine" (Mat 16:12) of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees was quite different, but both were equally pernicious; and the Herodians, though rather a political party, were equally envenomed against our Lord's spiritual teaching. See on Mat 12:14. The penetrating and diffusive quality of leaven, for good or bad, is the ground of the comparison.

JFB: Mar 8:16 - And they reasoned among themselves, saying, It is because we have no bread But a little while ago He was tried with the obduracy of the Pharisees; now He is tried with the obtuseness of His own disciples. The nine questions f...

But a little while ago He was tried with the obduracy of the Pharisees; now He is tried with the obtuseness of His own disciples. The nine questions following each other in rapid succession (Mar 8:17-21) show how deeply He was hurt at this want of spiritual apprehension, and worse still, their low thoughts of Him, as if He would utter so solemn a warning on so petty a subject. It will be seen, however, from the very form of their conjecture, "It is because we have no bread," and our Lord's astonishment that they should not by that time have known better with what He took up His attention--that He ever left the whole care for His own temporal wants to the Twelve: that He did this so entirely, that finding they were reduced to their last loaf they felt as if unworthy of such a trust, and could not think but that the same thought was in their Lord's mind which was pressing upon their own; but that in this they were so far wrong that it hurt His feelings--sharp just in proportion to His love--that such a thought of Him should have entered their minds! Who that, like angels, "desire to look into these things" will not prize such glimpses above gold?

JFB: Mar 8:17 - have ye your heart yet hardened? How strong an expression to use of true-hearted disciples! See on Mar 6:52.

How strong an expression to use of true-hearted disciples! See on Mar 6:52.

JFB: Mar 8:18 - Having eyes, see ye not? and having ears, hear ye not? See on Mat 13:13. and do ye not remember?

See on Mat 13:13.

and do ye not remember?

JFB: Mar 8:19 - When I brake the five loaves among five thousand "the five thousand." how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? &c.

"the five thousand."

how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? &c.

JFB: Mar 8:21 - How is it that ye do not understand? "do not understand that the warning I gave you could not have been prompted by any such petty consideration as the want of loaves in your scrip." Prof...

"do not understand that the warning I gave you could not have been prompted by any such petty consideration as the want of loaves in your scrip." Profuse as were our Lord's miracles, we see from this that they were not wrought at random, but that He carefully noted their minutest details, and desired that this should be done by those who witnessed, as doubtless by all who read the record of them. Even the different kind of baskets used at the two miraculous feedings, so carefully noted in the two narratives, are here also referred to; the one smaller, of which there were twelve, the other much larger, of which there were seven.

Blind Man at Bethsaida Restored to Sight (Mar 8:22-26).

JFB: Mar 8:22 - And he cometh to Bethsaida Bethsaida Julias, on the northeast side of the take, whence after this He proceeded to Cæsarea Philippi (Mar 8:27).

Bethsaida Julias, on the northeast side of the take, whence after this He proceeded to Cæsarea Philippi (Mar 8:27).

JFB: Mar 8:22 - and they bring a blind man unto him, and besought him to touch him See on Mar 7:32.

See on Mar 7:32.

JFB: Mar 8:23 - And he took the blind man by the hand, and led him out of the town Of the deaf and dumb man it is merely said that "He took him aside" (Mar 7:33); but this blind man He led by the hand out of the town, doing it Himsel...

Of the deaf and dumb man it is merely said that "He took him aside" (Mar 7:33); but this blind man He led by the hand out of the town, doing it Himself rather than employing another--great humility, exclaims BENGEL--that He might gain his confidence and raise his expectation.

JFB: Mar 8:23 - and when be had spit on his eyes The organ affected--See on Mar 7:33. and put his hands upon him, he asked him if he saw aught.

The organ affected--See on Mar 7:33.

and put his hands upon him, he asked him if he saw aught.

JFB: Mar 8:24 - And he looked up, and said, I see men as trees, walking This is one of the cases in which one edition of what is called the received text differs from another. That which is decidedly the best supported, an...

This is one of the cases in which one edition of what is called the received text differs from another. That which is decidedly the best supported, and has also internal evidence on its side is this: "I see men; for I see [them] as trees walking"--that is, he could distinguish them from trees only by their motion; a minute mark of truth in the narrative, as ALFORD observes, describing how human objects had appeared to him during that gradual failing of sight which had ended in blindness.

JFB: Mar 8:25 - After that he put his hands again upon his eyes, and made him look up; and he was restored, and saw every man clearly Perhaps the one operation perfectly restored the eyes, while the other imparted immediately the faculty of using them. It is the only recorded example...

Perhaps the one operation perfectly restored the eyes, while the other imparted immediately the faculty of using them. It is the only recorded example of a progressive cure, and it certainly illustrates similar methods in the spiritual kingdom. Of the four recorded cases of sight restored, all the patients save one either came or were brought to the Physician. In the case of the man born blind, the Physician came to the patient. So some seek and find Christ; of others He is found who seek Him not.

JFB: Mar 8:26 - Neither go into the town, nor tell it to any in the town Besides the usual reasons against going about "blazing the matter," retirement in this case would be salutary to himself.

Besides the usual reasons against going about "blazing the matter," retirement in this case would be salutary to himself.

Clarke: Mar 8:1 - The multitude being very great The multitude being very great - Or rather, There was again a great multitude. Instead of παμπολλου, very great, I read παλιν πολ...

The multitude being very great - Or rather, There was again a great multitude. Instead of παμπολλου, very great, I read παλιν πολλου, again a great, which is the reading of BDGLM, fourteen others, all the Arabic, Coptic, Ethiopic, Armenian, Gothic, Vulgate, and Itala, and of many Evangelistaria. Griesbach approves of this reading. There had been such a multitude gathered together once before, who were fed in the same way. See Mar 6:34, etc.

Clarke: Mar 8:2 - Having nothing to eat Having nothing to eat - If they had brought any provisions with them, they were now entirely expended; and they stood in immediate need of a supply.

Having nothing to eat - If they had brought any provisions with them, they were now entirely expended; and they stood in immediate need of a supply.

Clarke: Mar 8:3 - For divers of them came from far For divers of them came from far - And they could not possibly reach their respective homes without perishing, unless they got food.

For divers of them came from far - And they could not possibly reach their respective homes without perishing, unless they got food.

Clarke: Mar 8:4 - etc. etc. - See on Mat 14:14 (note); Mat 15:35.

etc. - See on Mat 14:14 (note); Mat 15:35.

Clarke: Mar 8:7 - And they had a few small fishes And they had a few small fishes - This is not noticed in the parallel place, Mat 15:36.

And they had a few small fishes - This is not noticed in the parallel place, Mat 15:36.

Clarke: Mar 8:10 - Dalmanutha Dalmanutha - See the note on Mat 15:39.

Dalmanutha - See the note on Mat 15:39.

Clarke: Mar 8:12 - And he sighed deeply in his spirit And he sighed deeply in his spirit - Or having deeply groaned - so the word αναστεναξας properly means. He was exceedingly affected at ...

And he sighed deeply in his spirit - Or having deeply groaned - so the word αναστεναξας properly means. He was exceedingly affected at their obstinacy and hardness of heart. See Mat 16:1-4.

Clarke: Mar 8:14 - Now the disciples had forgotten to take bread Now the disciples had forgotten to take bread - See all this, to Mar 8:21, explained at large on Mat 16:4-12 (note). In the above chapter, an accoun...

Now the disciples had forgotten to take bread - See all this, to Mar 8:21, explained at large on Mat 16:4-12 (note). In the above chapter, an account is given of the Pharisees, Sadducees, and Herodians.

Clarke: Mar 8:22 - They bring a blind man unto him They bring a blind man unto him - Christ went about to do good, and wherever he came he found some good to be done; and so should we, if we had a pr...

They bring a blind man unto him - Christ went about to do good, and wherever he came he found some good to be done; and so should we, if we had a proper measure of the same zeal and love for the welfare of the bodies and souls of men.

Clarke: Mar 8:23 - And he took the blind man by the hand And he took the blind man by the hand - Giving him a proof of his readiness to help him, and thus preparing him for the cure which he was about to w...

And he took the blind man by the hand - Giving him a proof of his readiness to help him, and thus preparing him for the cure which he was about to work

Clarke: Mar 8:23 - Led him out of the town Led him out of the town - Thus showing the inhabitants that he considered them unworthy of having another miracle wrought among them. He had already...

Led him out of the town - Thus showing the inhabitants that he considered them unworthy of having another miracle wrought among them. He had already deeply deplored their ingratitude and obstinacy: see on Mat 11:21 (note). When a people do not make a proper improvement of the light and grace which they receive from God, their candlestick is removed - even the visible Church becomes there extinct; and the candle is put out - no more means of spiritual illumination are afforded to the unfaithful inhabitants: Rev 2:5

Clarke: Mar 8:23 - When he had spit on his eyes When he had spit on his eyes - There is a similar transaction to this mentioned by John, Joh 9:6. It is likely this was done merely to separate the ...

When he had spit on his eyes - There is a similar transaction to this mentioned by John, Joh 9:6. It is likely this was done merely to separate the eyelids; as, in certain cases of blindness, they are found always gummed together. It required a miracle to restore the sight, and this was done in consequence of Christ having laid his hands upon the blind man: it required no miracle to separate the eyelids, and, therefore, natural means only were employed - this was done by rubbing them with spittle; but whether by Christ, or by the blind man, is not absolutely certain. See on Mar 7:33 (note). It has always been evident that false miracles have been wrought without reason or necessity, and without any obvious advantage; and they have thereby been detected: on the contrary, true miracles have always vindicated themselves by their obvious utility and importance; nothing ever being effected by them that could be performed by natural means

Clarke: Mar 8:23 - If he saw aught If he saw aught - Ει, if, is wanting in the Syriac, all the Persic and Arabic, and in the Ethiopic; and τι βλεπεις, Dost thou see any t...

If he saw aught - Ει, if, is wanting in the Syriac, all the Persic and Arabic, and in the Ethiopic; and τι βλεπεις, Dost thou see any thing? is the reading of CD, Coptic, Ethiopic, all the Arabic and Persic.

Clarke: Mar 8:24 - I see men as trees, walking I see men as trees, walking - His sight was so imperfect that he could not distinguish between men and trees, only by the motion of the former.

I see men as trees, walking - His sight was so imperfect that he could not distinguish between men and trees, only by the motion of the former.

Clarke: Mar 8:25 - And saw every man clearly And saw every man clearly - But instead of ἁπαντας, all men, several excellent MSS., and the principal versions, have ἁπαντα, all...

And saw every man clearly - But instead of ἁπαντας, all men, several excellent MSS., and the principal versions, have ἁπαντα, all things, every object; for the view he had of them before was indistinct and confused. Our Lord could have restored this man to sight in a moment; but he chose to do it in the way mentioned in the text, to show that he is sovereign of his own graces; and to point out that, however insignificant means may appear in themselves, they are divinely efficacious when he chooses to work by them; and that, however small the first manifestations of mercy may be, they are nevertheless the beginnings of the fullness of the blessings of the Gospel of peace. Reader, art thou in this man’ s state? Art thou blind? Then come to Jesus that he may restore thee. Hast thou a measure of light? Then pray that he may lay his hands again on thee, that thou mayest be enabled to read thy title clear to the heavenly inheritance.

Clarke: Mar 8:26 - He sent him away to his house He sent him away to his house - So it appears that this person did not belong to Bethsaida, for, in going to his house, he was not to enter into the...

He sent him away to his house - So it appears that this person did not belong to Bethsaida, for, in going to his house, he was not to enter into the village

This miracle is not mentioned by any other of the evangelists. It affords another proof that Mark did not abridge Matthew’ s Gospel.

Clarke: Mar 8:27 - And Jesus went out, etc. And Jesus went out, etc. - See on Mat 16:13-20 (note).

And Jesus went out, etc. - See on Mat 16:13-20 (note).

Clarke: Mar 8:29 - Thou art the Christ Thou art the Christ - Three MSS. and some versions add, the Son of the living God.

Thou art the Christ - Three MSS. and some versions add, the Son of the living God.

Clarke: Mar 8:32 - And he spake that saying And he spake that saying - Concerning the certainty and necessity of his sufferings - openly: with great plainness, παρῥησια, confidence,...

And he spake that saying - Concerning the certainty and necessity of his sufferings - openly: with great plainness, παρῥησια, confidence, or emphasis, so that the disciples now began fully to understand him. This is an additional observation of St. Mark. For Peter’ s reproof, see on Mat 16:22 (note), etc.

Clarke: Mar 8:34 - Whosoever will come after me Whosoever will come after me - It seems that Christ formed, on the proselytism of the Jews, the principal qualities which he required in the prosely...

Whosoever will come after me - It seems that Christ formed, on the proselytism of the Jews, the principal qualities which he required in the proselytes of his covenant

The first condition of proselytism among the Jews was, that he that came to embrace their religion should come voluntarily, and that neither force nor influence should be employed in this business. This is also the first condition required by Jesus Christ, and which he considers as the foundation of all the rest: - If a man be willing to come after me

The second condition required in the Jewish proselyte was, that he should perfectly renounce all his prejudices, his errors, his idolatry, and every thing that concerned his false religion; and that he should entirely separate himself from his most intimate friends and acquaintances. It was on this ground that the Jews called proselytism a new birth, and proselytes new-born, and new men; and our Lord requires men to be born again, not only of water, but by the Holy Ghost. See Joh 3:5. All this our Lord includes in this word, Let him renounce himself. To this the following scriptures refer: Mat 10:33; Joh 3:3, Joh 3:5, 2Co 5:17

The third condition on which a person was admitted into the Jewish Church as a proselyte was, that he should submit to the yoke of the Jewish law, and bear patiently the inconveniences and sufferings with which a profession of the Mosaic religion might be accompanied. Christ requires the same condition; but, instead of the yoke of the law, he brings in his own doctrine, which he calls his yoke, Mat 11:29 : and his cross, the taking up of which not only implies a bold profession of Christ crucified, but also a cheerful submitting to all the sufferings and persecutions to which he might be exposed, and even to death itself

The fourth condition was, that they should solemnly engage to continue in the Jewish religion, faithful even unto death. This condition Christ also requires; and it is comprised in this word, Let him Follow me. See the following verses; and see, on the subject of proselytism, Rth 1:16, Rth 1:17 (note).

Clarke: Mar 8:35 - For whosoever will save his life For whosoever will save his life - On this and the following verses, see Mat 16:24, etc.

For whosoever will save his life - On this and the following verses, see Mat 16:24, etc.

Clarke: Mar 8:38 - Whosoever - shall be ashamed of me Whosoever - shall be ashamed of me - Our Lord hints here at one of the principal reasons of the incredulity of the Jews, - they saw nothing in the p...

Whosoever - shall be ashamed of me - Our Lord hints here at one of the principal reasons of the incredulity of the Jews, - they saw nothing in the person of Jesus Christ which corresponded to the pompous notions which they had formed of the Messiah

If Jesus Christ had come into the world as a mighty and opulent man, clothed with earthly glories and honors, he would have had a multitude of partisans, and most of them hypocrites

Clarke: Mar 8:38 - And of my words And of my words - This was another subject of offense to the Jews: the doctrine of the cross must be believed; a suffering Messiah must be acknowled...

And of my words - This was another subject of offense to the Jews: the doctrine of the cross must be believed; a suffering Messiah must be acknowledged; and poverty and affliction must be borne; and death, perhaps, suffered in consequence of becoming his disciples

Of him, and of his words, in this sense, the world is, to this day, ashamed

Clarke: Mar 8:38 - Of him also shall the Son of man be ashamed Of him also shall the Son of man be ashamed - As he refused to acknowledge me before men, so will I refuse to acknowledge him before God and his ang...

Of him also shall the Son of man be ashamed - As he refused to acknowledge me before men, so will I refuse to acknowledge him before God and his angels. Terrible consequence of the rejection of Christ! And who can help him whom the only Savior eternally disowns. Reader! Lay this subject seriously to heart; and see the notes on Mat 16:24, etc., and at the end of that chapter

All the subjects contained in this chapter are very interesting; but particularly

1.    The miraculous feeding of the multitudes, which is a full, unequivocal proof of the supreme Divinity of Jesus Christ: in this miracle he truly appears in his creative energy, with which he has associated the tenderest benevolence and humanity. The subject of such a prince must ever be safe; the servant of such a master must ever have kind usage; the follower of such a teacher can never want nor go astray

2.    The necessity of keeping the doctrine of the Gospel uncorrupt, is strongly inculcated in the caution to avoid the leaven of the Pharisees and of Herod: the doctrine of the cross must not only be observed and held inviolate, but that doctrine must never be mixed with worldly politics

Time-serving is abominable in the sight of God: it shows that the person has either no fixed principle of religion, or that he is not under the influence of any.

Calvin: Mar 8:12 - And groaning in his spirit Mar 8:12.And groaning in his spirit By these words Mark informs us that it occasioned grief and bitter vexation to our Lord, when he saw those ungrate...

Mar 8:12.And groaning in his spirit By these words Mark informs us that it occasioned grief and bitter vexation to our Lord, when he saw those ungrateful men obstinately resist God. And certainly all who are desirous to promote the glory of God, and who feel concern about the salvation of men, ought to have such feelings that nothing would inflict on their hearts a deeper wound than to see unbelievers purposely blocking up against themselves the way of believing, and employing all their ingenuity in obscuring by their clouds the brightness of the word and works of God. The words, in his spirit, appear to me to be added emphatically, to inform us that this groan proceeded from the deepest affection of his heart, and that no sophist might allege that Christ resorted to outward attitudes to express a grief which he did not inwardly feel; for that holy soul, which was guided by the zeal of the Spirit, must have been moved by deep sadness at the sight of such wicked obstinacy.

Calvin: Mar 8:22 - NO PHRASE This miracle, which is omitted by the other two Evangelists, appears to have been related by Mark chiefly on account of this circumstance, that Chris...

This miracle, which is omitted by the other two Evangelists, appears to have been related by Mark chiefly on account of this circumstance, that Christ restored sight to the blind man, not in an instant, as he was generally accustomed to do, but in a gradual manner. He did so most probably for the purpose of proving, in the case of this man, that he had full liberty as to his method of proceeding, and was not restricted to a fixed rule, so as not to resort to a variety of methods in exercising his power. On this account, he does not all at once enlighten the eyes of the blind man, and fit them for performing their office, but communicates to them at first a dark and confused perception, and afterwards, by laying on his hands a second time, enables them to see perfectly. And so the grace of Christ, which had formerly been poured out suddenly on others, flowed by drops, as it were, on this man.

Calvin: Mar 8:24 - I see men Mar 8:24.I see men Our Lord had put the question to the blind man for the sake of his disciples, to inform them that the man had received something,...

Mar 8:24.I see men Our Lord had put the question to the blind man for the sake of his disciples, to inform them that the man had received something, but that hitherto nothing more than a slight commencement of the cure had been effected. The reply is, that he sees men, because he perceives some persons walking who are upright like trees By these words he acknowledges that his sight is not yet so clear as to distinguish men from trees, but that he has already obtained some power of seeing, because he conjectures from the motion that those whom he perceives to be in an erect posture are men; and it is in this respect that he says they are like trees We see then that he speaks only by conjecture when he says that he sees men

Calvin: Mar 8:26 - And he sent him away to his house 26.And he sent him away to his house Christ does not suffer him to return to Bethsaida, where there were many that had beheld the miracle. This is c...

26.And he sent him away to his house Christ does not suffer him to return to Bethsaida, where there were many that had beheld the miracle. This is conjectured by some to have been done, because Christ intended to punish the inhabitants of that place by depriving them of the enjoyment of his favor. Whatever might be the reason, it is certain that no miracle was performed by him in order to remain perpetually buried, but that he intended to have it concealed along with many others, till, after having expiated by his death the sins of the world, 435 he should ascend to the glory of the Father.

Defender: Mar 8:9 - four thousand The feeding of the five thousand is reported in all four gospels; the subsequent similar feeding of four thousand on another occasion is recorded only...

The feeding of the five thousand is reported in all four gospels; the subsequent similar feeding of four thousand on another occasion is recorded only by Matthew and Mark (see Mat 14:20, note; and Mat 15:38, note)."

Defender: Mar 8:25 - again This two-stage miracle is recorded only by Mark. Since all Christ's other miracles were apparently either instantaneous or continuous, this one must h...

This two-stage miracle is recorded only by Mark. Since all Christ's other miracles were apparently either instantaneous or continuous, this one must have had a special pedagogical purpose, perhaps to show that as Creator, He could exercise full control of everything, including the method and timing of all processes and events."

Defender: Mar 8:30 - tell no man Jesus told the unclean spirits (Mar 3:12), those who had seen His miracles (Mar 5:43), and His own disciples here in this verse that they should not m...

Jesus told the unclean spirits (Mar 3:12), those who had seen His miracles (Mar 5:43), and His own disciples here in this verse that they should not make His identity or His miracles known. At least seven times in Mark's gospel alone, He gave such an instruction. Until Jesus was ready, He wanted people to believe His words for their own intrinsic value, as true to God's will."

Defender: Mar 8:32 - rebuke him For a more detailed account of Peter's great confession (Mar 8:29) and Christ's subsequent revelation of His coming death and resurrection (Mar 8:31),...

For a more detailed account of Peter's great confession (Mar 8:29) and Christ's subsequent revelation of His coming death and resurrection (Mar 8:31), followed by Peter's rebuke at Satan's instigation (Mar 8:33), see the notes on Mat 16:13-23."

Defender: Mar 8:35 - lose his life The reference is not to physical martyrdom but to the fact that real life is found only in dying to self and living for Christ. This divine paradox is...

The reference is not to physical martyrdom but to the fact that real life is found only in dying to self and living for Christ. This divine paradox is repeatedly emphasized in the New Testament (see note on Mat 10:39)."

Defender: Mar 8:38 - ashamed of me It is dangerous to distort God's Word for the sake of worldly acceptance. In contrast, Jesus promised that He would confess those before the Father wh...

It is dangerous to distort God's Word for the sake of worldly acceptance. In contrast, Jesus promised that He would confess those before the Father who had confessed Him before men (Mat 10:32)."

TSK: Mar 8:1 - -- Mat 15:32-39

TSK: Mar 8:2 - compassion // and have compassion : Mar 1:41, Mar 5:19, Mar 6:34, Mar 9:22; Psa 103:13, Psa 145:8, Psa 145:15; Mic 7:19; Mat 9:36, Mat 14:14; Mat 20:34; Luk 7:13, Luk 15:20;...

TSK: Mar 8:3 - -- Jdg 8:4-6; 1Sa 14:28-31, 1Sa 30:10-12; Isa 40:31

TSK: Mar 8:4 - From From : Mar 6:36, Mar 6:37, Mar 6:52; Num 11:21-23; 2Ki 4:42-44, 2Ki 7:2; Psa 78:19, Psa 78:20; Mat 15:33; Joh 6:7-9

TSK: Mar 8:5 - How How : Mar 6:38; Mat 14:15-17, Mat 15:34; Luk 9:13

TSK: Mar 8:6 - to sit // gave thanks to sit : Mar 6:39, Mar 6:40; Mat 14:18, Mat 14:19, Mat 15:35, Mat 15:36; Luk 9:14, Luk 9:15, Luk 12:37; Joh 2:5, Joh 6:10 gave thanks : Mar 6:41-44; 1...

TSK: Mar 8:7 - fishes // he blessed fishes : Luk 24:41, Luk 24:42; Joh 21:5, Joh 21:8, Joh 21:9 he blessed : Luk 6:41; Mat 14:19

TSK: Mar 8:8 - and were // they took and were : This was another incontestable miracle - four thousand men, besides women and children (Mat 15:28), fed with seven loaves (or rather cake...

and were : This was another incontestable miracle - four thousand men, besides women and children (Mat 15:28), fed with seven loaves (or rather cakes) and a few small fishes! Here there must have been a manifest creation of substance - for, they all ate, and were filled. Mar 8:19, Mar 8:20; Psa 107:8, Psa 107:9, Psa 145:16; Mat 16:10; Luk 1:53; Joh 6:11-13, Joh 6:27, Joh 6:32-35, Joh 6:47-58; Rev 7:16, Rev 7:17

they took : 1Ki 17:14-16; 2Ki 4:2-7, 2Ki 4:42-44

TSK: Mar 8:10 - straightway // Dalmanutha straightway : Mat 15:39 Dalmanutha : Dalmanutha is supposed to have been a town east of the sea of Gennesaret, in the district of Magdala, and not far...

straightway : Mat 15:39

Dalmanutha : Dalmanutha is supposed to have been a town east of the sea of Gennesaret, in the district of Magdala, and not far from the city of that name.

TSK: Mar 8:11 - Pharisees // seeking // tempting Pharisees : Mar 2:16, Mar 7:1, Mar 7:2; Mat 12:38, Mat 16:1-4, Mat 19:3, Mat 21:23, Mat 22:15, Mat 22:18, Mat 22:23, Mat 22:34, Mat 22:35; Luk 11:53, ...

TSK: Mar 8:12 - he sighed // Why // There he sighed : Mar 3:5, Mar 7:34, Mar 9:19; Isa 53:3; Luk 19:41; Joh 11:33-38 Why : Mar 6:6; Luk 16:29-31, Luk 22:67-70; Joh 12:37-43 There : Mat 12:39, ...

TSK: Mar 8:13 - -- Psa 81:12; Jer 23:33; Hos 4:17, Hos 9:12; Zec 11:8, Zec 11:9; Mat 7:6, Mat 15:14; Luk 8:37; Joh 8:21, Joh 12:36; Act 13:45, Act 13:46, Act 18:6

TSK: Mar 8:14 - had forgotten had forgotten : Mat 16:5

had forgotten : Mat 16:5

TSK: Mar 8:15 - he charged // Take // the leaven of the // of Herod he charged : Num 27:19-23; 1Ch 28:9, 1Ch 28:10,1Ch 28:20; 1Ti 5:21, 1Ti 6:13; 2Ti 2:14 Take : Pro 19:27; Mat 16:6, Mat 16:11, Mat 16:12; Luk 12:1, Luk...

TSK: Mar 8:16 - -- Mat 16:7, Mat 16:8; Luk 9:46, Luk 20:5

TSK: Mar 8:17 - knew // perceive knew : Mar 2:8; Joh 2:24, Joh 2:25, Joh 16:30, Joh 21:17; Heb 4:12, Heb 4:13; Rev 2:23 perceive : Mar 3:5, Mar 6:52, Mar 16:14; Isa 63:17; Mat 15:17, ...

TSK: Mar 8:18 - see // do see : Mar 4:12; Deu 29:4; Psa 69:23, Psa 115:5-8; Isa 6:9, Isa 6:10, Isa 42:18-20, Isa 44:18; Jer 5:21; Mat 13:14, Mat 13:15; Joh 12:40; Act 28:26, Ac...

TSK: Mar 8:19 - the five the five : Mar 6:38-44; Mat 14:17-21; Luk 9:12-17; Joh 6:5-13

TSK: Mar 8:20 - -- Mar 8:1-9; Mat 15:34-38

TSK: Mar 8:21 - How How : Mar 8:12, Mar 8:17, Mar 6:52, Mar 9:19; Psa 94:8; Mat 16:11, Mat 16:12; Joh 14:9; 1Co 6:5, 1Co 15:34

TSK: Mar 8:22 - Bethsaida // they bring // to touch Bethsaida : Mar 6:45; Mat 11:21; Luk 9:10, Luk 10:13; Joh 1:44, Joh 12:21 they bring : Mar 2:3, Mar 6:55, Mar 6:56 to touch : Mar 5:27-29; Mat 8:3, Ma...

TSK: Mar 8:23 - by the // out // spit by the : Isa 51:18; Jer 31:32; Act 9:8; Heb 8:9 out : Mar 7:33; Isa 44:2 spit : Joh 9:6, Joh 9:7; Rev 3:18

TSK: Mar 8:24 - I see I see : Jdg 9:36; Isa 29:18, Isa 32:3; 1Co 13:9-12

TSK: Mar 8:25 - and saw and saw : Pro 4:18; Mat 13:12; Phi 1:6; 1Pe 2:9; 2Pe 3:18

TSK: Mar 8:26 - Neither Neither : Mar 5:43, Mar 7:36; Mat 8:4, Mat 9:30, Mat 12:16

TSK: Mar 8:27 - the towns // and by the towns : Mat 16:13-20 and by : Luk 9:18, Luk 9:19, Luk 9:20

the towns : Mat 16:13-20

and by : Luk 9:18, Luk 9:19, Luk 9:20

TSK: Mar 8:28 - John // Elias John : Mar 6:14-16; Mat 14:2, Mat 16:14; Luk 9:7-9 Elias : Mar 9:11-13; Mal 4:5, Elijah, Joh 1:21

TSK: Mar 8:29 - But // Thou But : Mar 4:11; Mat 16:15; Luk 9:20; 1Pe 2:7 Thou : Mat 16:16; Joh 1:41-49, Joh 4:42, Joh 6:69, Joh 11:27; Act 8:37, Act 9:20; 1Jo 4:15, 1Jo 5:1

TSK: Mar 8:30 - -- Mar 8:26, Mar 7:36, Mar 9:9; Mat 16:20; Luk 9:21

TSK: Mar 8:31 - he began // rejected // and after he began : Mar 9:31, Mar 9:32, Mar 10:33, Mar 10:34; Mat 16:21, Mat 17:22, Mat 20:17-19; Luk 9:22, Luk 18:31-34; Luk 24:6, Luk 24:7, Luk 24:26, Luk 24...

TSK: Mar 8:32 - openly // Peter openly : Joh 16:25, Joh 16:29 Peter : Mar 4:38; Mat 16:22; Luk 10:40; Joh 13:6-8

TSK: Mar 8:33 - turned // he rebuked // Get // savourest turned : Mar 3:5, Mar 3:34; Luk 22:61 he rebuked : Lev 19:17; 2Sa 19:22; Psa 141:5; Pro 9:8, Pro 9:9; Mat 15:23; Luk 9:55; 1Ti 5:20; Tit 1:13; Rev 3:1...

TSK: Mar 8:34 - called // Whosoever // take // follow called : Mar 7:14; Luk 9:23, Luk 20:45 Whosoever : Mar 9:43-48; Mat 5:29, Mat 5:30, Mat 7:13, Mat 7:14, Mat 16:24; Luk 13:24, Luk 14:27, Luk 14:33; Ro...

TSK: Mar 8:35 - will save // for will save : Est 4:11-16; Jer 26:20-24; Mat 10:39, Mat 16:25; Luk 9:24, Luk 17:33; Joh 12:25, Joh 12:26; Act 20:24, Act 21:13; 2Ti 2:11-13, 2Ti 4:6-8; ...

TSK: Mar 8:36 - what // profit what : Job 2:4; Psa 49:17, Psa 73:18-20; Mat 4:8-10, Mat 16:26; Luk 9:25, Luk 12:19, Luk 12:20; Luk 16:19-23; Phi 3:7-9; Rev 18:7, Rev 18:8 profit : J...

TSK: Mar 8:37 - -- Psa 49:7, Psa 49:8; 1Pe 1:18, 1Pe 1:19

TSK: Mar 8:38 - ashamed // adulterous // the Son // when ashamed : Mat 10:32, Mat 10:33; Luk 19:26, Luk 12:8, Luk 12:9; Act 5:41; Rom 1:16; Gal 6:14; 2Ti 1:8, 2Ti 1:12, 2Ti 1:16, 2Ti 2:12, 2Ti 2:13; Heb 11:2...

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Poole: Mar 8:1 - See Poole on "Mat 15:32" Mar 8:1-9 Christ miraculously feedeth four thousand persons. Mar 8:10-13 He refuseth the Pharisees a sign. Mar 8:14-21 He warns his disciples aga...

Mar 8:1-9 Christ miraculously feedeth four thousand persons.

Mar 8:10-13 He refuseth the Pharisees a sign.

Mar 8:14-21 He warns his disciples against the leaven of the

Pharisees and of Herod, and explains his meaning.

Mar 8:22-26 He giveth a blind man sight.

Mar 8:27-30 The people’ s opinions, and Peter’ s confession, of him.

Mar 8:31-33 He foreshows his own death, and rebukes Peter for

dissuading him from it.

Mar 8:34-38 He shows his followers that they must deny themselves,

and not be ashamed of him and his gospel.

Ver. 1-9. These verses give us an account of another miracle wrought by our Saviour, of the same nature with the one which we had in Mar 6:30-44 ; only there five thousand (besides women and children) were fed with five loaves and two fishes, here four thousand are fed with seven loaves and a few fishes; there twelve baskets full of fragments were taken up, here but seven. We meet with the same history in Mat 15:32-38 ;

See Poole on "Mat 15:32" , and following verses to Mat 15:38 . Both miracles testified Christ to have acted by a Divine power, and were certainly wrought to prove that the doctrine which he delivered to them was from God; both of them show the compassion that he had for the sons of men, showed to them not only with relation to their spiritual, but also to their corporal wants and infirmities. In both of them is commended to us, from his great example, the religious custom of begging a blessing upon our food when we sit down to it, and receiving the good creatures of God with thanksgiving. From both of them we may learn, in the doing of our duty, not to be too solicitous what we shall eat, or what we shall drink. God will some way or other provide for those who neglect themselves to follow him. From both we may also learn our duty to take a provident care to make no waste of the good things which God lends us. These are the chief things this history affords us for our instruction.

Poole: Mar 8:10-13 - -- Ver. 10-13. Matthew saith, he came into the coasts of Magdala; it is probable they were two contiguous tracts of land. We often read of the Pharis...

Ver. 10-13. Matthew saith, he came into the coasts of Magdala; it is probable they were two contiguous tracts of land. We often read of the Pharisees coming to our Saviour to ask a sign. Had they not signs? What were all the miracles he wrought but signs of his Divine power and mission? But they ask for a sign from heaven, such a sign as Moses, Joshua, and Elijah gave them, by this means making a trial of his Divine power. Our Saviour, who never wrought miracles to satisfy men’ s curiosity, but only to confirm their faith, refuseth to show them any such sign as they desired, and leaves these coasts.

Poole: Mar 8:14-21 - See Poole on "Mat 16:5" Ver. 14-21. We met with this whole history, with some additions, in Mat 16:5-12 ; See Poole on "Mat 16:5" , and following verses to Mat 16:12 . It ...

Ver. 14-21. We met with this whole history, with some additions, in Mat 16:5-12 ;

See Poole on "Mat 16:5" , and following verses to Mat 16:12 . It teacheth us both a lesson of human frailty, and what is our Christian duty: of our frailty, in not considering the works of the Lord for us, so as to make any use of them for the time to come. God doth his great works of providence to he had in remembrance, and that not only with respect to himself, that he might be glorified by us upon the remembrance of them, and this not only by our rejoicing in him, but also by our trusting in him, and not desponding under such like difficulties as God by any of them hath delivered us from. And also with respect to our duty, that we might in present exigences relieve ourselves from former experiences: and if we do not thus conceive of God’ s dispensations, we do not perceive, nor understand, the meaning and will of God in them; though we have eyes we see not, though we have ears we hear not, and in remembering we remember not, our remembrance is of no benefit, no advantage at all unto us. Our Saviour, indeed, did not at all speak here of bodily bread; though he did bid them beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and Herod, he spake to them about the doctrine of the Pharisees, and so Matthew tells us they (after this reproof) considered, though he (after his accustomed manner) spake to them under a parabolical expression. Saith he: What though you have forgotten to bring bread, do not you know, have not I, by two miraculous operations, taught you that I am able to furnish you with bread, though you have none, or such a quantity as is very insufficient? God expects of us that we should so keep in mind his former dispensations of providence to us, under straits and difficulties, as to trust in him when his providence brings us again into the like difficulties, yet not declining the use of any reasonable and just means for providing for ourselves. Thus David knew, and understood, that God had delivered him from the lion and the bear, while going against Goliath, 1Sa 17:31-58 ; he made it a ground of his confidence: so also Psa 116:8 : and Paul, when he concluded God would deliver because he had delivered. God, when he brake the heads of leviathan in pieces, gave him to be meat to the people inhabiting the wilderness, Psa 74:14 : he intends former mercies to be food for his people in following straits and exigences.

Poole: Mar 8:22-26 - -- Ver. 22-26. This miracle is only mentioned by Mark particularly, possibly because of two singularities in it: 1. With reference to the signs he used...

Ver. 22-26. This miracle is only mentioned by Mark particularly, possibly because of two singularities in it:

1. With reference to the signs he used.

2. With reference to the gradual cure.

Our Saviour sometimes used some signs in his miraculous operations, sometimes he used none, but by the word of his power alone healed them; in the signs he used, to let the people understand there was nothing in them, he often varied; sometimes he laid his hands upon them, sometimes he took them by the hand, sometimes he used one sign, sometimes another. Here:

1. He takes the blind man by the hand.

2. He leads him out of the town, the inhabitants being not worthy to see a miracle: it was one of the cities upbraided by our Saviour for their impenitency and unbelief; Mat 11:21 .

3. He spit on his eyes: so Mar 7:33 .

4. Then he twice put his hands on him.

Christ was wont to heal at once; here he healeth by degrees; so as the healing of this blind man was a true pattern of his healing spiritual blindness, which usually is done gradually, but perfected at last as this bodily cure was.

Poole: Mar 8:27-28 - -- Ver. 27,28. Herod, and those that followed him, judged Christ to be John the Baptist raised from the dead, or to have the soul of John the Baptist cl...

Ver. 27,28. Herod, and those that followed him, judged Christ to be John the Baptist raised from the dead, or to have the soul of John the Baptist clothed with other flesh. Others conceived him to be Elias, of whom they were in expectation that he should come before the Messias. Others thought he was Jeremias, as Matthew saith, or one of the old prophets; they could not tell what to determine of one who appeared to them in the shape of a man, but did such things as none could do, but the Divine power either immediately, or mediately, putting forth itself in a human body.

Poole: Mar 8:29-30 - -- Ver. 29,30. Luke reports no more of this than Mark, but Matthew reports it much larger, giving us a further reply of Christ to Peter; See Poole on "...

Ver. 29,30. Luke reports no more of this than Mark, but Matthew reports it much larger, giving us a further reply of Christ to Peter; See Poole on "Mat 16:15" , and following verses to Mat 16:20 , which we have there discoursed largely upon. I shall only say here; That if so great a point as Peter’ s primacy had been understood by Christ’ s disciples of that age to have been settled by that answer of our Saviour, it is likely two of the evangelists would not have omitted an account of it. If they had forgotten it, there is no doubt but some or other of Christ’ s disciples would have put them in mind of it. Our Saviour’ s charge that they should tell no man of him, seemeth to him, that although our Saviour was willing to be taken notice of as a prophet, yet he was not willing as yet to be taken notice of as the Messiah, or Son of God, which latter Matthew reports as added to his confession; and perhaps both Mark and Luke, in their following words, give us the reason, for if we observe it, he immediately falls into a discourse of his suffering, and he might possibly think, that a weak faith of his Divine nature would be overthrown by the sight of his subsequent sufferings. So that he reserved the publication of himself to be the Son of God, until such time when (as the apostle said, Rom 1:4 ) he was declared so with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by his resurrection from the dead.

Poole: Mar 8:31 - -- Our Lord is elsewhere said to have taught his disciples, according as they were able to bear, or to hear, what he spake unto them. He did not at the...

Our Lord is elsewhere said to have taught his disciples, according as they were able to bear, or to hear, what he spake unto them. He did not at the first teach them that he must suffer death: the doctrine of the cross of Christ was like new wine not fit to be put into old bottles; yet necessary to be taught them, lest when they saw it soon after they should have been offended, as indeed they were to some degree, notwithstanding the premonition they had of it. With the doctrine of his suffering, he joins also the doctrine of his resurrection the third day: so saith Matthew. Mark saith, after three days, meta , which seemeth to be a difference between the two evangelists, and also a difficulty, when it is certain that our Saviour did not lie three entire days in the grave. But either Mark reckons the time from his first being betrayed and apprehended, so it was after three days; and Matthew speaketh only of the time which he lay in the grave, that was but part of three days; or else it was the fault of our translators to translate m after, because indeed it often so signifies, whereas it sometimes signifies in, which had better fitted this text, to make it agree with Matthew. This is Grotius’ s and Beza’ s observation, (see his notes on the text), and is abundantly justified by Mat 27:64 , where his adversaries desired of Pilate that the sepulchre might be made fast ewv thv trithv hmeras until the third day, because he had said while he was alive, Meta treiv hmerav egeiromai , After three days I will arise, which if they had understood of after the third day fully spent, they would not have petitioned that the sepulchre should have been made fast only until the third day, but it is plain they understood it the third day he would rise. So after three days here is, after the third day is come, not after the third day is past, which neither agrees with Matthew nor yet with the truth. If any desire further to make out this notion, he may read the learned Beza’ s larger notes on this verse.

Poole: Mar 8:32-33 - -- Ver. 32,33. It is from hence manifest, that notwithstanding the confession of Peter, that he was the Christ, yet they had a very imperfect knowledge ...

Ver. 32,33. It is from hence manifest, that notwithstanding the confession of Peter, that he was the Christ, yet they had a very imperfect knowledge of the business of the redemption of man by the blood of Christ, and a very imperfect faith as to the hypostatical union of the Divine and human nature in the one person of the Redeemer; for had Peter known these things he would have seen a necessity of Christ’ s dying and resurrection from the dead, in order to the redemption and salvation of man, and would neither have dissuaded our Saviour from it, nor doubted of the truth of what was spoken by him, who was the Truth, and could not lie. Our Saviour’ s telling him ou froneiv , thou savourest not, might have been more favourably translated, thou understandest not, or thou mindest not, and must not be understood of a total ignorance, or regardlessness, or not relishing, but of a partial knowledge, the want of a due regard to or saviour of the things of God. Thou preferrest thy carnal affection to me, and indulgest thine own desires, to the hinderance of the honour and glory of God, and the salvation of souls, which I came to purchase by these my sufferings, and so art a Satan; an adversary, to me, who came to fulfil the will of my Father, and must not therefore give the least ear to thee, who, in what thou sayest, dost but seek and take care to please thyself. This leadeth him to the following discourse.

Poole: Mar 8:34 - See Poole on "Mat 10:38" Our Saviour hearing Peter so stumble at the news, he told him, and the rest, of the cross which himself was to endure; and taking notice of his exce...

Our Saviour hearing Peter so stumble at the news, he told him, and the rest, of the cross which himself was to endure; and taking notice of his exceeding fondness to gratify himself, to the prejudice of a far greater good, he now tells them the law of his discipleship, that as he was not to please himself, nor to decline afflictions for the gospel, so neither must any who would be his followers; they must all deny themselves, take up the cross, and follow him. And because this was a hard saying to flesh and blood, and what was to be their certain lot, he presseth it upon them by several arguments to the end of this chapter.

See Poole on "Mat 10:38" . See Poole on "Mat 16:24" .

Poole: Mar 8:35 - See Poole on "Mat 10:39" // and the gospel’ s We met with this argument twice in Matthew, to the notes upon which I refer the reader. See Poole on "Mat 10:39" . Mark adds those words, and the...

We met with this argument twice in Matthew, to the notes upon which I refer the reader.

See Poole on "Mat 10:39" . Mark adds those words,

and the gospel’ s thereby teaching us that a suffering for the sake of the gospel, with therefore owning the propositions of it, or living up to the precepts, is by Christ accounted a suffering for Christ’ s sake. quchn here must signify life, ( as it is translated), for a man cannot lose his soul for Christ’ s sake and the gospel’ s. The meaning is, He that will deny and abandon me and my gospel, out of a desire to save his temporal life, shall lose it, or at least shall lose his soul’ s portion in a better life. But he that is willing to lose his life, or will run the hazard of it, for my sake, for his owning and professing me, and the faith of my gospel, or living up to the rules, shall either save it in specie, by the special workings of my providence for him, delivering him out of his persecutors’ hands, or shall be recompensed with an eternal life, of much more value.

Poole: Mar 8:36-37 - -- Ver. 36,37. Luke saith, if he lose himself and be cast away. Though quchn was rightly translated life in the former verse, the sense justifying th...

Ver. 36,37. Luke saith, if he lose himself and be cast away. Though quchn was rightly translated life in the former verse, the sense justifying that translation of it there, yet here it is as truly translated soul; for there are many things which men value in proportion with their lives, their honour, estates, nay, many value their lusts above their lives; and Christ himself here teacheth us that his disciples ought to value his honour and glory, and their steady profession of faith and holiness, above their life, because he that will lose his life shall save it. See the notes on these words, See Poole on "Mat 16:26" .

Poole: Mar 8:38 - See Poole on "Mat 10:33" These words occurring twice in Matthew, Mat 10:33 16:27 , have been before spoken to: See Poole on "Mat 10:33" . See Poole on "Mat 16:27" . Luke ...

These words occurring twice in Matthew, Mat 10:33 16:27 , have been before spoken to:

See Poole on "Mat 10:33" . See Poole on "Mat 16:27" . Luke repeats them most perfectly, as here they are recorded. Mark expounds Luke’ s words, where he saith that Christ shall come in his own glory, and in his Father’ s, and of the holy angels. By the glory of the holy angels is meant no more than attended by the holy angels, according to Mat 13:41 , and 1Th 4:16 , and other scriptures. Matthew saith, Mat 16:27 , For the Son of man shall come in the glory of his Father with his angels; and then he shall reward every man according to his works: and Mat 10:33 , Whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven. There are two passions which prevail upon men to make them apostatize in a day of temptation, fear and shame. The first prevailed upon Peter, in the high priest’ s hall. The second we find no instance of any good man guilty of in holy writ, and it most certainly argues a rotten and a corrupt heart. When men think it beneath their honour and quality to own the despised and maligned truth and ways of God, this is not only a denial of Christ, but the most inexcusable denial of him. Nor can any such persons look for any thing less at the hands of Christ, than that he should think it much more beneath his honour and dignity in the day of judgment to own them.

Lightfoot: Mar 8:12 - Why doth this generation seek after a sign And he sighed deeply in his spirit, and saith, Why doth this generation seek after a sign: verily I say unto you, There shall no sign be given un...

And he sighed deeply in his spirit, and saith, Why doth this generation seek after a sign: verily I say unto you, There shall no sign be given unto this generation.   

[Why doth this generation seek after a sign?] instead of a comment, take a story: "On that day, R. Eliezer answered to all the questions in the whole world, but they hearkened not to him. He said therefore to them, 'If the tradition be according to what I say, let this siliqua [a kind of tree] bear witness.' The siliqua was rooted up, and removed a hundred cubits from its place: there are some who say four hundred. They say to him, 'A proof is not to be fetched from a siliqua.' He saith to them again, 'If the tradition be with me, let the rivers of waters testify': the rivers of waters are turned backward. They say to him, 'A proof is not to be fetched from the rivers of waters.' He said to them again, 'If the tradition be with me, let the walls of the school testify': the walls bowed, as if they were falling. R. Josua chid them, saying, 'If there be a controversy between the disciples of the wise men about tradition, what is that to you?' Therefore the walls fell not in honour of R. Josua. Yet they stood not upright again in honour of R. Eliezer. He said to them, moreover, 'If the tradition be with me, let the heavens bear witness.' The Bath Kol went forth and said, 'Why do ye contend with R. Eliezer, with whom the tradition always is?' R. Jonah rose up upon his feet, and said, 'It is not in heaven' (Deu 30:12). What do these words, 'It is not in heaven,' mean? R. Jeremiah saith, When the law is given from mount Sinai, we do not care for the Bath Kol."  

Shall we laugh at the fable, or shall we suspect some truth in the story? For my part, when I recollect with myself, how addicted to and skillful that nation was in art-magic; which is abundantly asserted not only by the Talmudists, but by the Holy Scriptures; I am ready to give some credit to this story, and many others of the same nature: namely, that the thing was really acted by the art and help of the devil by those ensign-bearers and captains of errors, the more to establish their honour and tradition.  

Therefore, from the story, be it true or false, we observe these two things: --   

I. How tenacious the Jews were of their traditions, and how unmovable in them even beyond the evidence of miracles. That Eliezer was of great fame among them, but he was a follower of Shammai. Hence he is called once and again the Shammean. When, therefore, he taught something against the school of Hillel, although he did miracles (as they themselves relate), they gave not credit to him, nay, they derided him. The same was their practice, the same was their mind, against the miracles of Christ. And to this may these words of our Saviour tend, "Why does this generation seek a sign?" a generation, which is not only altogether unworthy of miracles, but also which is sworn to retain their traditions and doctrines, although infinite miracles be done to the contrary.   

II. You see how the last testimony of the miracles of this conjuror is fetched from heaven: "For the Bath Kol went forth," etc. Which the followers of Hillel nevertheless received not: and therein not justly indeed; when they feign such a voice to have come to themselves from heaven, as a definitive oracle for the authority of the school of Hillel, not to be gainsaid: concerning which the Talmudists speak very frequently, and very boastingly.  

After the same manner they require a sign from heaven of our Saviour; not content with those infinite miracles that he had done, the healing of disease, the casting out devils, the multiplying of loaves, etc. They would also have somewhat from heaven, either after the example of Moses fetching manna from thence; or of Elias fetching down fire; or of Joshua staying the sun; or of Isaiah bringing it backwards.

PBC: Mar 8:34 - -- SEE PB: Mt 16:24 

SEE PB: Mt 16:24 

Haydock: Mar 8:8 - -- After the multitude had eaten and were filled, they did not take the remains; but these the disciples collected, as in the former miracle of the multi...

After the multitude had eaten and were filled, they did not take the remains; but these the disciples collected, as in the former miracle of the multiplication of the loaves. By this circumstance we are taught to be content with what is sufficient, and to seek no unnecessary supplies. We may likewise learn from this stupendous miracle the providence of God and his goodness, who sends us not away fasting, but wishes all to be nourished and enriched with his grace. (Theophylactus) ---

Thus does our Lord verify in his works what he has promised in his instructions; that if we will seek in the first instance the kingdom of God and his justice, that all necessary things shall be added unto us. By the gathering up of the fragments that remained, he not only made the miracle more striking to the multitude and to the apostles, but has also left us a practical lesson, how, in the midst of plenty, which proceeds from the munificence of heaven, we must suffer no waste. (Haydock)

Haydock: Mar 8:9 - -- St. Matthew (xv. 38.) adds, without counting either the women or the children.

St. Matthew (xv. 38.) adds, without counting either the women or the children.

Haydock: Mar 8:10 - Dalmanutha Dalmanutha. St. Matthew (xv. 39.) has, to the borders of Magedan; in Greek, Magdala, or Magedan. These were two towns beyond the sea of Galil...

Dalmanutha. St. Matthew (xv. 39.) has, to the borders of Magedan; in Greek, Magdala, or Magedan. These were two towns beyond the sea of Galilee, situated near each other; it is of little consequence which of these names the Evangelists mention; perhaps our Saviour visited both. (Tirinus) ---

The major part of commentators, if we can believe the Bible of Vence, take Magedan, or Magdala, to be the the town of that name situated to the east of the lake of Tiberias, in the vicinity of Gerasa, and Dalmanutha to be the name of that part of the country in which these two towns were situated. (Bible de Vence) ---

Polus in his Synopsis Criticorum, (vol. iv. p. 410.) gives three explanations for the discrepance of the names in Sts. Matthew and Mark: 1. Idem locus erat binominis, the same place might have two names. 2. Propiqua erant loca, the places were near. 3. Alterum erat regio, alterum vicus, the one was the name of the territory, the other of the town or village; and concludes with asserting from Jewish authorities, that it was the same territory in which the two villages Magedan and Dalmanutha were situated; so that it miht be known by either name, as we find the territory of Gadara and of Gergesæ is one and the same. (Polus)

Haydock: Mar 8:11 - -- Jesus Christ did not consent to the petition they made him, because there will be another time for signs and wonders, viz. his second coming, when the...

Jesus Christ did not consent to the petition they made him, because there will be another time for signs and wonders, viz. his second coming, when the powers of heaven shall be moved, and the moon refuse her light. This his first coming is not to terrify man, but to instruct and store his mind with lessons of humility, and every other virtue. (Theophylactus)

Haydock: Mar 8:12 - A sign shall not be given Jesus Christ fetches a deep sigh on account of their obduracy, and says; why do these ask for a miracle to confirm their belief, when they resist the ...

Jesus Christ fetches a deep sigh on account of their obduracy, and says; why do these ask for a miracle to confirm their belief, when they resist the authority of so many miracles, which are daily performed under their eyes? (Bible de Vence) ---

A sign shall not be given. But by a Hebrew form of speech, if divers times is put for a negative. (Witham)

Haydock: Mar 8:15 - Of the leaven of Herod Of the leaven of Herod. In St. Matthew chap. xvi. ver. 6, we read of the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees: we may conclude that Christ na...

Of the leaven of Herod. In St. Matthew chap. xvi. ver. 6, we read of the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees: we may conclude that Christ named all of them. (Witham)

Haydock: Mar 8:23 - -- It may be asked, why our Lord led the man from the multitude before he cured him? --- It may be answered, that he did it not to seem to perform his p...

It may be asked, why our Lord led the man from the multitude before he cured him? ---

It may be answered, that he did it not to seem to perform his prodigies through vain glory; and thence to teach us to shun the empty praises of men: 2dly, to facilitate recollection, and to give himself to prayer, before he cured the blind man; and lastly, he went out of the city because the inhabitants of Bethsaida had already rendered themselves unworthy of the miracles of Christ. For among them our Saviour had wrought many miracles, yet they would not believe. (St. Matthew xi. 21.) (Tirinus) (Theophylactus) ---

Dionysius says, that Jesus led him from the multitude to shew that if a sinner, figured by the blind man, wishes to be converted from his evil ways, he must first leave all immediate occasions and inducements to sin. (Dionysius)

Haydock: Mar 8:24 - Man Man [1] as trees walking. In the Latin text, walking may agree either with men, or with trees, but the Greek shews that walking must be ref...

Man [1] as trees walking. In the Latin text, walking may agree either with men, or with trees, but the Greek shews that walking must be referred to men. Perhaps Christ restored sight in this manner to the man by degrees, to make him more sensible of the benefit; or to teach us how difficult is a sinner's conversion; of which this was a figure. (Witham)

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Video homines velut arbores ambulantes, Greek: Blepo taus anthropous os dendra peripatountas.

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Haydock: Mar 8:25 - -- Our Saviour made use of exterior signs in the performance of his miracles to command attention, and to signify the inward effects of the favours grant...

Our Saviour made use of exterior signs in the performance of his miracles to command attention, and to signify the inward effects of the favours grants: these the Catholic Church, after the example of her Founder and Model, also uses in the celebration of her sacraments, and for the same purposes. Nor ought any supercilious and superficial reasoner to undervalue and contemn the corporal and external application of holy things, under the hollow plea, that we are exclusively to attend to the spirit and faith.

Haydock: Mar 8:28 - As one of the prophets As one of the prophets. In the Greek it is, one of the prophets.

As one of the prophets. In the Greek it is, one of the prophets.

Haydock: Mar 8:31 - -- After our Redeemer had heard the confession of his first apostle, who spoke in the name of all, as the head, he opens out to them the grand mystery o...

After our Redeemer had heard the confession of his first apostle, who spoke in the name of all, as the head, he opens out to them the grand mystery of his passion.

Gill: Mar 8:1 - In those days // the multitude being very great // And having nothing to eat // Jesus called his disciples to him, and saith unto them In those days,.... The Ethiopic version reads, on that day; as if it was on the same day that the deaf man was healed; and so it might be; and on the ...

In those days,.... The Ethiopic version reads, on that day; as if it was on the same day that the deaf man was healed; and so it might be; and on the third day from Christ's coming into those parts; and so is very properly expressed, "in those days"; see Mar 7:31, compared with the following verse:

the multitude being very great: for the number of men that ate, when the following miracle was wrought, were about four thousand; see Mar 8:9. The Vulgate Latin, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions add, "again"; referring to the former miracle of the five thousand, who were fed with five loaves, and two fishes, Mar 6:44.

And having nothing to eat; what they might have brought with them being expended, and they in a desert, where nothing was to be had, nor bought for money:

Jesus called his disciples to him, and saith unto them; See Gill on Mat 15:32.

Gill: Mar 8:2 - I have compassion on the multitude // because // they have now been with me three days, and have nothing to eat I have compassion on the multitude,.... Christ is a compassionate Saviour both of the bodies and souls of men: he had compassion on the souls of this ...

I have compassion on the multitude,.... Christ is a compassionate Saviour both of the bodies and souls of men: he had compassion on the souls of this multitude, and therefore had been teaching them sound doctrine and he had compassion on the bodies of many of them, and had healed them of their diseases; and his bowels yearned towards them all;

because, says he,

they have now been with me three days, and have nothing to eat; for if they brought any food with them, it was all spent, and they were in a wilderness, where nothing was to be got; where they had no house to go into, nor bed to lie upon, and no provisions to be bought; and in this case they had been two nights and three days; which showed great affection and zeal in these people, and a close attachment to Christ, in exposing themselves to all these difficulties and hardships, which they seemed to bear with much patience and unconcernedness. The Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Persic, and Ethiopic versions prefix the word "behold" to this clause, as expressing admiration at their stay with him so long in such a place.

Gill: Mar 8:3 - And if I send them away fasting to their own houses // They will faint by the way // for divers of them came from far And if I send them away fasting to their own houses,.... Greek, "to their own house", or home; but all the Oriental versions render it as we do, in th...

And if I send them away fasting to their own houses,.... Greek, "to their own house", or home; but all the Oriental versions render it as we do, in the plural, "their own houses", or habitations; and it seems from hence that they were now tasting, and at least had had no food all that day, whatever they might have the day before, which it not certain.

They will faint by the way; for want of food their strength will be exhausted, their animal spirits will fail, their nerves will be loosened, they will not be able to perform their journey, or get to the end of it:

for divers of them came from far; perhaps some had followed him from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, from whence he came last; and others from Decapolis, through the midst of the borders of which he passed hither; and others from different parts, who had heard of his coming; See Gill on Mat 15:32.

Gill: Mar 8:4 - And his disciples answered him // from whence can a man satisfy these men with bread here in the wilderness And his disciples answered him,.... The Syriac version renders it, "say unto him"; and the Persic and Ethiopic, "said unto him"; forgetting the late m...

And his disciples answered him,.... The Syriac version renders it, "say unto him"; and the Persic and Ethiopic, "said unto him"; forgetting the late miracle of feeding five thousand with five loaves and two fishes, when they had now a less number, and more provisions:

from whence can a man satisfy these men with bread here in the wilderness? from what place, and by what ways and means can it be thought, that such a quantity of bread can be got at any rate in a desert, as to satisfy so large a number of hungry men? See Gill on Mat 15:33.

Gill: Mar 8:5 - And he asked them, how many loaves have ye // and they said, seven And he asked them, how many loaves have ye?.... See Gill on Mat 15:34; and they said, seven. Matthew adds, "and a few little fishes", which are her...

And he asked them, how many loaves have ye?.... See Gill on Mat 15:34;

and they said, seven. Matthew adds, "and a few little fishes", which are here afterwards mentioned.

Gill: Mar 8:6 - And he commanded the people to sit down on the ground // and he took the seven loaves, and gave thanks, and brake them // and gave to his disciples to set before them // and they did set them before the people And he commanded the people to sit down on the ground,.... See Gill on Mat 15:35; and he took the seven loaves, and gave thanks, and brake them; Se...

And he commanded the people to sit down on the ground,.... See Gill on Mat 15:35;

and he took the seven loaves, and gave thanks, and brake them; See Gill on Mat 15:36;

and gave to his disciples to set before them, the multitude,

and they did set them before the people; in which they were obedient to their Lord's commands, though they were so forgetful, unbelieving, and stupid.

Gill: Mar 8:7 - And they had a few small fishes // and he blessed, and commanded to set them also before them And they had a few small fishes,.... Which they also acquainted Christ with, and brought out unto him: and he blessed, and commanded to set them al...

And they had a few small fishes,.... Which they also acquainted Christ with, and brought out unto him:

and he blessed, and commanded to set them also before them. It looks, by this account, as if the fishes were blessed, and brake, and distributed separately, alter the blessing, breaking, and distribution of the bread; and so the Syriac version renders it, "upon whom also he blessed"; and the Persic thus, "and he also blessed the fishes"; but, according to Matthew they were both blessed, and brake, and distributed together, as it is highly reasonable to suppose they were both ate together; See Gill on Mat 15:36.

Gill: Mar 8:8 - So they did eat, and were filled // and they took up of the broken meat that was left seven baskets So they did eat, and were filled,.... Christ and his disciples, and the whole multitude: they not only had some, but they had all enough, a full meal....

So they did eat, and were filled,.... Christ and his disciples, and the whole multitude: they not only had some, but they had all enough, a full meal. It was surprising that it could be divided so, is that every one should have a bit; but that they should all be satisfied to the full, is amazing:

and they took up of the broken meat that was left seven baskets; as many as there were loaves; See Gill on Mat 15:37.

Gill: Mar 8:9 - And they that had eaten were about four thousand // and he sent them away And they that had eaten were about four thousand,.... That is, men, besides women and children, as Matthew observes; See Gill on Mat 15:38. and he ...

And they that had eaten were about four thousand,.... That is, men, besides women and children, as Matthew observes; See Gill on Mat 15:38.

and he sent them away; some that came dumb, with their speech, and deaf, with their hearing; others that were maimed, with perfect healing of their wounds, and with their limbs sound and whole; others that came lame, he dismissed leaping; and others that were blind, with their sight restored to them, and all of them full.

Gill: Mar 8:10 - And straightway he entered into a ship, with his disciples // and came into the parts of Dalmanutha And straightway he entered into a ship, with his disciples,.... As soon as ever he had, dismissed the multitude, he took shipping with his disciples; ...

And straightway he entered into a ship, with his disciples,.... As soon as ever he had, dismissed the multitude, he took shipping with his disciples; for he was at the sea of Galilee, either at a place near it, or upon the shore of it; see Mar 7:31;

and came into the parts of Dalmanutha; which Matthew calls, "the coasts of Magdala"; See Gill on Mat 15:39. The Arabic version reads it, "Magdal"; and in two of Beza's copies it is read, "Madegada"; but the Syriac version reads, "Dalmanutha"; and the Persic, "Dalmanuth"; and the Ethiopic, "Dalmathy": it was a city in the coasts of Magdala, and is thought by Dr. Lightfoot to be the same with Tzalmon, or Salmon, a place often mentioned f in the Jewish writings.

Gill: Mar 8:11 - And the Pharisees came forth // and began to question with him // seeking of him a sign from heaven, tempting him And the Pharisees came forth,.... Out of their houses; who dwelt in the coasts of Magdala, and parts of Dalmanutha, and came to Jesus, hearing of his ...

And the Pharisees came forth,.... Out of their houses; who dwelt in the coasts of Magdala, and parts of Dalmanutha, and came to Jesus, hearing of his being arrived in their neighbourhood:

and began to question with him; or to dispute with him, it being their manner to carry on disputations by questions and answers. The Persic version has the question they put, and about which they disputed, "if thou art the Christ"; in proof of which they required a sign:

seeking of him a sign from heaven, tempting him; See Gill on Mat 16:1.

Gill: Mar 8:12 - And he sighed deeply in his Spirit // and saith, why doth this generation seek after a sign // verily I say unto you, there shall no sign be given to this generation And he sighed deeply in his Spirit,.... In his human soul; and which shows that he had one, and was subject to grief and sorrow, and all passions and ...

And he sighed deeply in his Spirit,.... In his human soul; and which shows that he had one, and was subject to grief and sorrow, and all passions and infirmities, excepting sin. This deep sigh was on account of the hardness of their hearts, the malignity of their minds, and insincerity of their intentions; who had no view to come at truth by this inquiry, but to ensnare him:

and saith, why doth this generation seek after a sign? when so many have been shown among them, and they will not believe:

verily I say unto you, there shall no sign be given to this generation: such as they desired; namely, one from heaven. The Evangelist Matthew adds, "but the sign of the Prophet Jonas"; See Gill on Mat 16:4, Mat 12:40.

Gill: Mar 8:13 - And he left them // and entering into the ship again // departed to the other side And he left them,.... As a perverse and hardened generation of men, and as such with whom it was not worth while to discourse: and entering into th...

And he left them,.... As a perverse and hardened generation of men, and as such with whom it was not worth while to discourse:

and entering into the ship again; which brought him over, and waited for him:

departed to the other side; of the sea of Galilee, towards Bethsaida, Mar 8:22.

Gill: Mar 8:14 - Now the disciples had, forgotten to take bread // Neither had they in the ship with them more than one loaf Now the disciples had, forgotten to take bread,.... At Dalmanutha, or Magdala, or whatever place in those parts they were at, before they took shippin...

Now the disciples had, forgotten to take bread,.... At Dalmanutha, or Magdala, or whatever place in those parts they were at, before they took shipping, as was their usual method.

Neither had they in the ship with them more than one loaf; for thirteen passengers of them. The Persic version reads the whole thus: "and they forgot to take bread with them, not indeed one loaf, and there was no bread with them in the ship"; See Gill on Mat 16:5.

Gill: Mar 8:15 - And he charged them // saying, take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees; and of the leaven of Herod And he charged them,.... When they were in the ship, and had just recollected themselves, that they had took no care to bring any provisions with them...

And he charged them,.... When they were in the ship, and had just recollected themselves, that they had took no care to bring any provisions with them:

saying, take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees; and of the leaven of Herod: in Matthew, instead of "the leaven of Herod", it is read, "the leaven of the Sadducees": which are either the same, Herod and his courtiers being Sadducees, or favourers of them; or the Sadducees being sticklers for Herod, and his government, which the Pharisees had no good opinion of; or else distinct from one another; and so Christ cautions against the doctrines of the Pharisees, which regarded the traditions of the elders, and of the Sadducees, concerning the resurrection, and of the Herodians, who thought Herod to be the Messiah; and against the unreasonable request and demand of them all to have a sign from heaven, in proof of his own Messiahship; See Gill on Mat 16:6.

Gill: Mar 8:16 - And they reasoned among themselves // saying, it is because we have no bread And they reasoned among themselves,.... Upon Christ's giving this caution, and recollecting with themselves, that they had forgot to buy any provision...

And they reasoned among themselves,.... Upon Christ's giving this caution, and recollecting with themselves, that they had forgot to buy any provisions, and take with them:

saying, it is because we have no bread; that he says these words; tacitly chiding and reproving us, for our want of thought and care; See Gill on Mat 16:7.

Gill: Mar 8:17 - And when Jesus knew it // he saith unto them, why reason ye because ye have no bread // perceive ye not yet, neither understand // have ye your heart yet hardened And when Jesus knew it,.... As he did immediately, by his omniscience; for as he knew the thoughts and reasonings of the Scribes and Pharisees, Mat 9:...

And when Jesus knew it,.... As he did immediately, by his omniscience; for as he knew the thoughts and reasonings of the Scribes and Pharisees, Mat 9:4, so he did those of his own disciples:

he saith unto them, why reason ye because ye have no bread? or imagine that I have given you this caution on that account; or are distressed because this is your case, as if you should be reduced to great difficulties, by reason of your forgetfulness and negligence:

perceive ye not yet, neither understand? the meaning of the parabolical expressions, which he had used them to; or his power in providing food for them, and supporting a great number of persons with very little food, of which they had some very late instances:

have ye your heart yet hardened? as after the first miracle; see Mar 6:52, for it might have been expected, that by a second miracle of the loaves, their understandings would have been more enlightened, and their faith increased, and that they would have relinquished their gross notions, their anxieties, doubts, and unbelief.

Gill: Mar 8:18 - Having eyes, see ye not // and having ears, hear ye not // and do ye not remember Having eyes, see ye not?.... Meaning perhaps both the eyes of their bodies, and of their understandings: they had bodily eyes, and with them saw the m...

Having eyes, see ye not?.... Meaning perhaps both the eyes of their bodies, and of their understandings: they had bodily eyes, and with them saw the miracles he wrought, and yet took little notice of them; and the eyes of their understandings were enlightened by Christ, and yet saw things but very darkly:

and having ears, hear ye not? They had their natural hearing, and yet made but little use of it; and did not so diligently attend to the sound of Christ's words: and though they had spiritual ears given them to hear, yet were very dull of, understanding, and taking in things:

and do ye not remember? the interpretation of parables formerly given, and the miracles of the loaves lately wrought.

Gill: Mar 8:19 - When I brake the five loaves among five thousand // how many baskets full of fragments took ye up // they say unto him, twelve When I brake the five loaves among five thousand,.... This, with what follows, chiefly regards the last question: how many baskets full of fragment...

When I brake the five loaves among five thousand,.... This, with what follows, chiefly regards the last question:

how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? do not you remember? have you forgot what was so lately done? surely you cannot:

they say unto him, twelve. Their memories were hereby refreshed, and they call to mind the exact number of the baskets of fragments that were taken up, which were above double the number of the loaves, the multitude were fed with.

Gill: Mar 8:20 - And when the seven among four thousand // how many baskets full of fragments took ye up // and they said, seven And when the seven among four thousand,.... That is, when seven loaves were broken among four thousand men, how many baskets full of fragments took...

And when the seven among four thousand,.... That is, when seven loaves were broken among four thousand men,

how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? this surely you must remember, it being so recent an action, but just done, as it were:

and they said, seven; for this, as yet, could not have slipped their memories; though they had, been reasoning among themselves because of their straitness of provisions, as if these things had never been done.

Gill: Mar 8:21 - And he said unto them // how is it that ye do not understand And he said unto them,.... Since this was the case, and they so well remembered the miracles he had wrought, and the circumstances of them: how is ...

And he said unto them,.... Since this was the case, and they so well remembered the miracles he had wrought, and the circumstances of them:

how is it that ye do not understand? my words concerning the leaven of the Pharisees, of the Sadducees, and of Herod, as to imagine I spoke of bread, taken in a literal sense; or that I concerned myself about the scantiness of your provisions, when you, might have learnt from my late miracles, how able I am to support you, if you had not so much as one loaf with you: wherefore it argues great want both of understanding and faith, and shows great stupidity, ignorance, and unbelief, to give such a sense of my words, and to be anxiously concerned on the score of your provisions.

Gill: Mar 8:22 - And he cometh to Bethsaida // and they bring a blind man unto him // and besought him to touch him And he cometh to Bethsaida,.... The city of Andrew, Peter, and Philip, Joh 1:44; a fishing town, which was situated by the sea of Galilee. Beza's anci...

And he cometh to Bethsaida,.... The city of Andrew, Peter, and Philip, Joh 1:44; a fishing town, which was situated by the sea of Galilee. Beza's ancient copy, and the Gothic version, wrongly read "Bethany". The Vulgate Latin, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions read, "they came"; Christ, and his twelve apostles, who landed at this place:

and they bring a blind man unto him; for Christ had been here before, and was known by the inhabitants of the place; who, as soon as they heard of his arrival, and knowing what miracles were done by him, brought a poor blind man, of their town, to him, to be cured by him:

and besought him to touch him; having heard of, or seen cures performed by him this way. This man is an emblem of such who are spiritually blind: he had no natural sight at all; he could see nothing; he had not the least glimmering of any thing, until he was touched by Christ: so men, in a state of nature, are quite dark, even darkness itself, until they are made light by the Lord: they have no sight, nor sense of themselves, of their sinful, lost, and dangerous estate and condition they are in; they know not because they are blind, that they are wretched, and poor, and miserable, and naked: they have no sight of Christ, neither of the glory of his person, nor of the fulness of his grace, nor of the nature, necessity, and suitableness of his salvation: they are quite blind as to any saving knowledge of God in Christ, the way of life and peace by him, and the work of the Spirit of God upon the soul; or with regard to any spiritual experience of the power of Gospel truths, or views of the glories of another world: and as this man seemed to be unconcerned himself about the cure of his blindness, only his friends were affected with his case, and brought him to Christ, and solicited a cure, so it is with unregenerate men, they are insensible of their case, and so thoughtless of it, and unaffected with it, and do not, of themselves, seek for a deliverance out of it; nor do they make use of means for that purpose; but it becomes their friends, relations, and acquaintance, that are spiritual, who know their case, and their need of Christ, and his grace, to bring them to him under the means, and pray unto him, that he would put forth the mighty power of his grace upon them, and give them spiritual sight to see in what a lost condition they are, and their need of him.

Gill: Mar 8:23 - And he took the blind man by the hand // and led him out of the town // and when he had spit on his eyes // and put his hands upon him // he asked him, if he saw ought And he took the blind man by the hand,.... Not for the sake of touching him, in order to heal him, as they desired, but to be his guide: and led hi...

And he took the blind man by the hand,.... Not for the sake of touching him, in order to heal him, as they desired, but to be his guide:

and led him out of the town; to shun all appearance of vain glory and popular applause, being willing to do the miracle in a private manner; and because of the obstinacy and unbelief of the inhabitants of this place, who were not worthy to be witnesses of such a cure; see Mat 11:21;

and when he had spit on his eyes; not as a cause of healing him; for whatever use spittle may be of to such that have weak eyes, it can have no causal influence upon, or be of any service, in a natural way, to a blind man to restore his sight unto him:

and put his hands upon him; as he sometimes did, when he healed persons of any disorder:

he asked him, if he saw ought; any object whatever, whether he could perceive he had any sight at all. Christ's taking the blind man by the hand, and leading him out or the town, and spitting on his eyes, and putting his hands upon him, and then asking him if he saw ought, are emblematical of what he does in spiritual conversion, when he turns men from darkness to light: he takes them by the hand, which expresses his condescension, grace, and mercy, and becomes their guide and leader; and a better, and safer guide they cannot have; he brings them by a way they know not, and leads them in paths they had not known before; makes darkness light before them, and crooked things straight, and does not forsake them: he takes them apart, and separates them from the rest of the world; he calls them out from thence to go with him, teaching them, that, when enlightened by him, they should have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, and the workers of them; for what communion has light with darkness? his putting spittle upon his eyes, may signify the means of grace, the eye salve of the word, which, when attended with a divine power, enlightens the eyes; and which power may be represented here by Christ's putting his hands upon the man; for the Gospel, without the power of Christ, Is insufficient to produce such an effect; but when it is accompanied with that, it always succeeds.

Gill: Mar 8:24 - And he looked up // and said, I see men, as trees, walking And he looked up,.... This is omitted in the Arabic and Persic versions. The sense is, that he opened his eyelids, and lifted up his eyes, to try if h...

And he looked up,.... This is omitted in the Arabic and Persic versions. The sense is, that he opened his eyelids, and lifted up his eyes, to try if he could see, and he could, and did see again; his sight was returned again, though very imperfectly as yet:

and said, I see men, as trees, walking: he saw some objects at a little distance from him, which, by their motion, he supposed to be men; otherwise his sight was so imperfect, that he could not have distinguished them from trees: he was capable of discerning the bulk of their bodies, and that they walked, or moved forward; but he could not distinguish the particular parts of their bodies; they seemed to be like trunks of trees, in an erect posture, and which he should have took for such, had it not been for their walking. As this man immediately, upon Christ's putting spittle on his eyes, and laying his hands on him, had sight given him, though it was very obscure and glimmering; so, as soon as ever the Gospel comes with power, it dispels the darkness of the mind, and introduces light; though at first it is but very small; it is let in gradually: the sinner is first convinced of the evil of his actions, and then of the sinfulness of his nature; he first sees the ability and suitableness of Christ as a Saviour, and after that his willingness, and his interest in him as such; and all this is commonly before he is so well acquainted with the dignity and infiniteness of his person, as the Son of God: and it is some time before he has his spiritual senses exercised to discern between good and evil, between truth and error; or arrives to a clear and distinct knowledge of Gospel truths, and a stability in them. Hence it is, that such are greatly harassed with Satan's temptations; are disquieted in their souls; are filled with doubts and fears, and are in danger of being imposed upon by false teachers.

Gill: Mar 8:25 - After that he had put his hands again upon his eyes // and made him look up // and he was restored // and saw every man clearly After that he had put his hands again upon his eyes,.... By the former account it does not appear on what part of him he put his hands; but this deter...

After that he had put his hands again upon his eyes,.... By the former account it does not appear on what part of him he put his hands; but this determines it; and from hence it seems plain, that he first spit on his eyes, and then closed them, and put his hands on them; which last action of his he repeated, though not the former:

and made him look up. This is omitted in the Syriac, Persic, and Ethiopic versions. The Vulgate Latin reads it, "he began to see"; and so Beza's ancient copy: but this he did before, upon the first imposition of hands on him. The Arabic version renders it, "he saw well": this is expressed afterwards. The words are an order, or command of Christ to the man to lift up his eyes, and try again how he could see, and whether any better than before, which he did:

and he was restored; his sight was restored to him as before, and he was perfectly cured of his blindness;

and saw every man clearly; or "all things", as the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Arabic, Persic, and Ethiopic versions read: he saw every object distinctly, and afar off, as the word used also signifies; he could distinguish men from trees, and trees from men. This man, as before observed, was a very lively emblem of one that is spiritually enlightened by the grace of God: Christ first separated this man from the rest of the multitude; and such are first distinguished from others in election, and redemption, and calling, who are illuminated by the Spirit of God: means were made use of by Christ for healing this man; though the bare actions, without a divine power, would have been insufficient, as the spittle of his mouth, and the imposition of his hands: and, generally speaking, in the illumination of a sinner the word of Christ's mouth is a means; though this, without the efficacy of his grace, is not of itself sufficient. This man, upon his first reception of sight, had a very dim, obscure, and imperfect view of things; could not well distinguish one thing from another, though he saw. As at first conversion, the enlightened soul has but a very glimmering view of things, particularly of Christ, the glory and fulness of his person, the efficacy of his blood, the excellency of his righteousness, of his ability, willingness, and suitableness as a Saviour; and especially of those doctrines of the Gospel, that are more sublime and distinguishing. But as this man afterwards had a more clear, and distinct view of objects; so it is with true believers in Christ; their shining light increases, and shines more and more unto the perfect day. For Gospel light at present is not perfect in any such who have the clearest views of things, have some darkness and imperfection in them; though they may be said to see all things clearly in comparison of what they sometimes did, and others do: particularly saints, under the Gospel dispensation see more clearly than those under the legal dispensation did; the object was at a greater distance from them; they saw the promises afar off; and the medium of their sight or through which they saw were obscure types shadows and sacrifices and dark prophecies. Moses, and his law, had a veil over them; but New Testament saints with open face without a veil behold as in a glass the glory of the Lord Jesus and of Gospel truths: indeed, they that know most see things most clearly and speak of them most distinctly know but in part and prophesy but in part in comparison of the beatific vision; when saints shall see face to face and know, as they are known; they now see but through a glass darkly. How clearly will all things be seen in the new Jerusalem state when there will be no need of the light of the sun or moon of ordinances; but Christ, the Lamb will be the everlasting light thereof in which the nations of them that are saved shall walk!

Gill: Mar 8:26 - And he sent him away to his house // Saying, neither go into the town // nor tell it to any in the town And he sent him away to his house,.... Which seems to have been in one of the neighbouring villages or was one of the houses scattered about in the fi...

And he sent him away to his house,.... Which seems to have been in one of the neighbouring villages or was one of the houses scattered about in the fields for the conveniency of rural business.

Saying, neither go into the town: or "that town", as the Syriac, the town or city of Bethsaida:

nor tell it to any in the town; to any of the inhabitants of the town that he should meet with any where or at any time: the reason of this was not merely or only because Christ would have the miracle concealed; but chiefly because the inhabitants of this place were notorious for their impenitence and unbelief. Christ had done many wonderful works among them and yet they repented not; nor did they believe in him; but despised him, his doctrine and his miracles; and therefore for their neglect and contempt of such means he was determined to withdraw them from them. So Christ sometimes deals with nations cities and towns that disbelieve reject and despise his Gospel; he takes it away from them he orders his ministering servants to preach no more to them; no more to tell them of the good news of life and salvation by him: thus he dealt with the Jews who contradicted and blasphemed and judged themselves or by their conduct made themselves appear to be unworthy of the words of eternal life; he took away the kingdom of God or the Gospel from them and sent it among the Gentiles: and thus he threatened the church of Ephesus for leaving its first love to remove the candlestick out of its place in case of non-repentance; and a grievous judgment it is upon a place and people when God commands the clouds to rain no rain upon them, Isa 5:6; or, in other words when he enjoins his ministers no more to tell, or publish his Gospel to them; he determining to withdraw from them and have no more to do with them; so Christ and his disciples departed from this place, declared in the following verse.

Gill: Mar 8:27 - And Jesus went out, and his disciples // into the towns Caesarea Philippi // and by the way he asked his disciples // saying unto them; whom do men say that I am And Jesus went out, and his disciples,.... From Bethsaida and even from Galilee into the towns Caesarea Philippi; in the jurisdiction of Philip, te...

And Jesus went out, and his disciples,.... From Bethsaida and even from Galilee

into the towns Caesarea Philippi; in the jurisdiction of Philip, tetrarch of Iturea and Trachonitis; for this Caesarea was rebuilt by him and called so in honour of Tiberius Caesar; and the towns and villages adjacent to it are here intended: See Gill on Mat 16:13;

and by the way he asked his disciples; as they were going from Galilee to those parts:

saying unto them; whom do men say that I am? not that he needed any information of this; for he knew not only what was said by men but What was in them; but he put this question, in order to bring out their sense of, and faith in him, and to impart something to them which was necessary they should be acquainted with; See Gill on Mat 16:13, where it is read, "whom do men say that I, the son of man am?"

Gill: Mar 8:28 - And they answered // John the Baptist // but some say Elias // and others one of the prophets And they answered,.... That some said he was John the Baptist; which was the opinion of Herod, and others: but some say Elias; that is the "Tish...

And they answered,.... That some said he was

John the Baptist; which was the opinion of Herod, and others:

but some say Elias; that is the "Tishbite", whom the Jews in general expected in person before the coming of the Messiah and imagined that Jesus was he:

and others one of the prophets; as Jeremiah or Isaiah or some other. The Vulgate Latin reads, "as one of the prophets"; and so Beza's ancient copy as in Mar 6:15. All spake highly and honourably of him: the people in common did not look upon him as a mean person; they perceived by his doctrine and more especially by his miracles that he was an extraordinary one: the several persons which they differently took him to be and make mention of were such as were of great repute; as John the Baptist, who had lately, been among them and whom all held to be a prophet, and indeed was more than a prophet; and Elias who was so very zealous for the Lord of hosts and wrought many miracles in his day; and whose coming the Jews were in expectation of to usher in the Messiah; and none thought him less than one of the prophets; and all agreed he was an uncommon man; even one raised from the dead as he must be, if he was John the Baptist or Elias or one of the old prophets; but they knew him not at least did not confess him to be the Messiah; he not appearing as a temporal prince, they were taught to believe he would be; See Gill on Mat 16:14.

Gill: Mar 8:29 - And he saith unto them, but whom say ye that I am // and Peter answereth and saith unto him, thou art the Christ And he saith unto them, but whom say ye that I am?.... It was for the sake of this question he put the former; See Gill on Mat 16:15; and Peter ans...

And he saith unto them, but whom say ye that I am?.... It was for the sake of this question he put the former; See Gill on Mat 16:15;

and Peter answereth and saith unto him, thou art the Christ; the Messiah that was long ago promised and so often prophesied of in the books of Moses and the prophets; and whom the Jews have so much and long expected. This confession of Peter's in which all the apostles agreed with him speaks out what Jesus really was, and exceeds the most exalted sentiments which the people had of him: he was not the harbinger of the Messiah but the Messiah himself; not Elias in whose Spirit his forerunner was to come and did come; nor any one of the prophets; but he who was spoken of by all the holy prophets; which have been since the beginning of the world. Not one of the various opinions of the people being just, and answering the true character of Jesus, he demands the sense of his disciples which is here given by Peter in their name, and which was right; and on account of which he declared Peter blessed and ascribed his knowledge of him not to flesh and blood but to the revelation of his Father. The Syriac and Persic versions add, "the Son of the living God"; and so Beza found it in one ancient copy; but it may be it is only taken from Mat_16:16; See Gill on Mat 16:16.

Gill: Mar 8:30 - And he charged them // that they should tell no man of him And he charged them,.... His disciples, after he had declared his approbation of Peter's confession of faith, and signified he would build his church ...

And he charged them,.... His disciples, after he had declared his approbation of Peter's confession of faith, and signified he would build his church on that rock, and the gates of hell should not prevail against it: and promised Peter the keys of the kingdom of heaven; and that whatsoever was bound, or loosed by him on earth, should be bound and loosed in heaven; which are omitted by Mark, but related by Matthew, Mat 16:17, after this he gave a strict and severe charge,

that they should tell no man of him; that he was the Messiah, and the Son of God; See Gill on Mat 16:20.

Gill: Mar 8:31 - And he began to teach them // that the son of man must suffer many things // and be rejected of the elders, and of the chief priests and Scribes // and be killed // and after three days rise again And he began to teach them,.... For as yet he had said nothing to them about his sufferings and death, at least in express terms; but now they being f...

And he began to teach them,.... For as yet he had said nothing to them about his sufferings and death, at least in express terms; but now they being firmly established in the faith of him, as the Messiah, he thought it proper to inform them,

that the son of man must suffer many things; meaning himself, as that he should be betrayed, apprehended, and bound, should be smitten, spit upon, buffeted, and scourged; and which things must be done, and he suffer them, because it was so determined by God, and foretold in the Scriptures:

and be rejected of the elders, and of the chief priests and Scribes; which composed the grand sanhedrim of the nation, and are the builders that were prophesied of by whom he should be rejected, Psa 118:22,

and be killed; in a violent manner; his life be taken away by force, without law, or justice:

and after three days rise again: not after three days were ended, and on the fourth day, but after the third day was come; that is, "on the third day", as the Syriac, Arabic, Persic, and Ethiopic versions read; and even the Pharisees themselves thus understood Christ, Mat 27:63, so the phrase, "after eight days", is used for the eighth day, being come, or that same day a week later; see Luk 9:28 compared with Mat 17:1.

Gill: Mar 8:32 - And he spake that saying openly // and Peter took him, and began to rebuke him And he spake that saying openly,.... Concerning his sufferings, death, and resurrection from the dead. He not only spoke it before them all, but in pl...

And he spake that saying openly,.... Concerning his sufferings, death, and resurrection from the dead. He not only spoke it before them all, but in plain words, without a figure; so that it might be, and was clearly understood by them; and he spake it as the word will also bear, not only very freely, but likewise boldly, with an undaunted courage, with intrepidity of mind; being not in the least discouraged, nor showing any concern or fear about what was to befall him:

and Peter took him, and began to rebuke him. Peter might more especially be concerned at this free and open account Christ gave of his sufferings and death, because he had just now acquainted him, that he should have the keys of the kingdom of heaven; by which he might understand some high post in the temporal kingdom of the Messiah he expected; and immediately to hear of his sufferings and death, damped his spirits, and destroyed his hopes, and threw him into such difficulties he was not able to remove; and therefore he takes Christ aside, and very warmly expostulates with him about what he had said, and chides him for it, and entreats him that he would not think, or talk of such like things: the words of Peter are recorded by Matthew; see Gill on Mat 16:22.

Gill: Mar 8:33 - But when he had turned about // and looked on his disciples // he rebuked Peter, saying, get thee behind me, Satan: for thou savourest not the things that be of God // but the things that be of men But when he had turned about,.... Upon Peter, and showed quick resentment at what he said: and looked on his disciples; he cast his eye toward, the...

But when he had turned about,.... Upon Peter, and showed quick resentment at what he said:

and looked on his disciples; he cast his eye toward, them at the same time, and expressed to them the same displeasure in his countenance, they being of the same mind:

he rebuked Peter, saying, get thee behind me, Satan: for thou savourest not the things that be of God; things which were according to the will of God, as the sufferings of Christ were: they were according to the determinate counsel of his will; what he had determined in his purposes and council should be; and what he had declared in the Scriptures of truth, the revelation of his will, would be; and in which, according to them, he should have a great concern himself, Isa 53:6, and whereby all his divine perfections would be glorified, and therefore may well be said to be the things of God; and which ought to be savoured, minded, and attended to, as things of the greatest moment and importance: and which, though the apostle had often read of in the books of the Old Testament; yet either had not a clear understanding of them, as being the will of God; or however, they were greatly out of his view at this time, his mind being possessed with notions of a temporal kingdom, and of worldly honour and grandeur: wherefore it follows,

but the things that be of men; as were the notions of Christ's being a temporal prince, that would set up a worldly kingdom, and deliver the Jews from the Roman yoke, and make his subjects happy, with an affluence of all worldly things; and particularly his favourites, as the disciples were: these were schemes of men's devising, and were suited to the corrupt nature, and carnal inclinations of men; and these things at present too much possessed Peter's mind: wherefore the Lord rebuked him in a very severe, though just manner; being touched in his most tender part, and dissuaded from that which his heart was set upon, and he came into the world for; whose keen resentment is seen by using a phrase he never did but to the devil himself, Mat 4:10; See Gill on Mat 16:23.

Gill: Mar 8:34 - And when he had called the people unto him // with his disciples also // whosoever will come after me // let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me And when he had called the people unto him,.... Who, it seems, followed him out of Galilee, from Bethsaida, and these parts; for it was in the way fro...

And when he had called the people unto him,.... Who, it seems, followed him out of Galilee, from Bethsaida, and these parts; for it was in the way from thence to Caesarea Philippi, that Christ had this conversation with his disciples; who walked together alone, the multitude following at some distance; and the private conversation being ended, Christ called, or beckoned to the people, to come nearer to him:

with his disciples also; for what he was about to say, concerned them both:

whosoever will come after me; in a spiritual sense, as this multitude did in a natural one, and which is the same as to be a disciple of his:

let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me; signifying, that his followers must deny themselves of worldly advantages, and suffer many things, as well as he, which he had been but just before acquainting his disciples with; See Gill on Mat 16:24.

Gill: Mar 8:35 - For whosoever will save his life // shall lose it // but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the Gospel's // the same shall save it For whosoever will save his life,.... Life is a valuable thing, and all that a man has he will give for it; self preservation is a principle in nature...

For whosoever will save his life,.... Life is a valuable thing, and all that a man has he will give for it; self preservation is a principle in nature; and it becomes every man to take all lawful methods to save his life, when it is threatened, or is in danger: but whoever is willing to save it, when it is called for to be laid down for Christ's sake; and rather than lay it down, will deny Christ, and give up a profession of him, and his Gospel,

shall lose it: he shall not enjoy it with honour and comfort now, and much less with peace, pleasure, and happiness hereafter, but shall be under the power of the second death:

but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the Gospel's; that is, shall willingly part with it when he is called to it, rather than deny Christ and his Gospel,

the same shall save it: though he will lose it now, he will find it again in the resurrection of life; for he will rise to eternal life; when such, who have apostatized from Christ, will rise to shame, and everlasting contempt: this man will have greatly the advantage over such; they will die the second death, or be destroyed soul and body in hell; and he will live for ever with Christ, in endless pleasure and glory; See Gill on Mat 16:25.

Gill: Mar 8:36 - For what shall it profit a man // if he shall gain the whole world // and lose his own soul For what shall it profit a man,.... In the long run, in the issue of things, who by denying Christ, and his Gospel, may not only save his life for the...

For what shall it profit a man,.... In the long run, in the issue of things, who by denying Christ, and his Gospel, may not only save his life for the present, but procure for himself great riches and wealth:

if he shall gain the whole world; were that possible to be done, and which the ambitious, worldly man is desirous of; yet supposing he: had his desire, of what avail would this be in the upshot of things, should the following be his case, as it will,

and lose his own soul? which is immortal and everlasting, when the world, and the glory of it pass away, and so is of more worth than the whole world. The world can only be enjoyed for a season, and that with a great deal of fatigue and trouble; but the soul continues for ever; and if it is lost and damned, its torment always abides, and the smoke of it ascends for ever, its worm never dies, and its fire is never quenched; See Gill on Mat 16:26.

Gill: Mar 8:37 - Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? To deliver it out of its miserable state and condition; all the riches of the world, and the whole ...

Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? To deliver it out of its miserable state and condition; all the riches of the world, and the whole world itself, are not an equivalent to it, or a sufficient ransom for it; riches will not profit in the day of wrath, or deliver a soul from damnation, and ruin: wherefore, if he had the whole world, he could not redeem his soul with it; and he has nothing else to give for it, and therefore it is past all recovery: See Gill on Mat 16:26.

Gill: Mar 8:38 - Whosoever therefore shall be ashamed of me // and of my words // in this adulterous and sinful generation // of him also shall the son of man be ashamed // when he cometh in the glory of his Father // with the holy angels Whosoever therefore shall be ashamed of me,.... As suffering, crucified, and put to death; things he had been speaking of before: whoever through scan...

Whosoever therefore shall be ashamed of me,.... As suffering, crucified, and put to death; things he had been speaking of before: whoever through scandal of the cross, and fear of men, will be ashamed of Christ, and dare not profess faith in him, but shall conceal and keep it to themselves:

and of my words; the doctrines of the Gospel, of remission of sins by his blood, of justification by his righteousness, and of salvation alone by him, with every other truth relating to him, or connected with these;

in this adulterous and sinful generation; which was so both in a moral and spiritual sense; for both corporeal and spiritual adultery prevailed among them, And particularly the Scribes and Pharisees adulterated the word of God by their false glosses, in which they acted a very sinful part; and such was their authority, that few durst contradict them, or profess doctrines which were the reverse of them. Wherefore our Lord assures his disciples and followers, that should they be deterred by these men from a free and open profession of him, and his Gospel, by which it would appear that they were ashamed of both,

of him also shall the son of man be ashamed; will not own such an one for his; he will take no notice of him; he will not confess his name; but, as one that he is ashamed of, he will turn away from him; not so much as look at him, or say one favourable word to him, or for him; but bid him be gone from him, as a worker of iniquity: this he will do,

when he cometh in the glory of his Father; the same that the Father has; being his Son, of the same nature with him, and equal to him; and as mediator, endued with power and authority from him, to judge the world; and when he will be accompanied

with the holy angels; who will descend from heaven with him, and be employed on earth by him; See Gill on Mat 16:27.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Mar 8:1 Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Mar 8:6 Grk “And.” Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of previous action(s) in t...

NET Notes: Mar 8:8 Grk “They.”

NET Notes: Mar 8:9 Mark 8:1-10. Many commentators, on the basis of similarities between this account of the feeding of the multitude (8:1-10) and that in 6:30-44, have a...

NET Notes: Mar 8:10 The exact location of Dalmanutha is uncertain, but it is somewhere close to the western shore of the Sea of Galilee.

NET Notes: Mar 8:11 What exactly this sign would have been, given what Jesus was already doing, is not clear. But here is where the fence-sitters reside, refusing to comm...

NET Notes: Mar 8:12 Grk “Truly (ἀμήν, amhn), I say to you.”

NET Notes: Mar 8:13 Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

NET Notes: Mar 8:14 Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

NET Notes: Mar 8:15 See the note on Pharisees in 2:16.

NET Notes: Mar 8:16 Grk “And they were discussing with one another that they had no bread.”

NET Notes: Mar 8:17 Or “discussing.”

NET Notes: Mar 8:18 Grk “do you not hear?”

NET Notes: Mar 8:20 ‡ A difficult textual problem is found here, involving three different variants: καὶ λέγουσι&...

NET Notes: Mar 8:21 Do you still not understand? The disciples in Mark’s Gospel often misunderstood the miracles of Jesus as well as his teaching. Between Matthew, ...

NET Notes: Mar 8:22 Grk “to him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

NET Notes: Mar 8:23 Grk “on him,” but the word πάλιν in v. 25 implies that Jesus touched the man’s eyes at this point.

NET Notes: Mar 8:24 The verb ἀναβλέπω, though normally meaning “look up,” when used in conjunction with blindness mea...

NET Notes: Mar 8:25 Or “he looked intently”; or “he stared with eyes wide open” (BDAG 226 s.v. διαβλέπω 1)...

NET Notes: Mar 8:26 Codex Bezae (D) replaces “Do not even go into the village” with “Go to your house, and do not tell anyone, not even in the village.&...

NET Notes: Mar 8:27 Grk “he asked his disciples, saying to them.” The phrase λέγων αὐτοῖς (legwn auto...

NET Notes: Mar 8:28 The appearance of Elijah would mean that the end time had come. According to 2 Kgs 2:11, Elijah was still alive. In Mal 4:5 it is said that Elijah wou...

NET Notes: Mar 8:29 The term χριστός (cristos) was originally an adjective (“anointed”), developing in LXX into a substanti...

NET Notes: Mar 8:30 Mark 8:27-10:52. The entire section 8:27-10:52 is built around three passion predictions of Jesus (8:31; 9:31; 10:33). These predictions form the stru...

NET Notes: Mar 8:31 Or “and the scribes.” See the note on the phrase “experts in the law” in 1:22.

NET Notes: Mar 8:32 Here καί (kai) has been translated as “So” to indicate Peter’s rebuke is in response to Jesus’ teaching about t...

NET Notes: Mar 8:33 Grk “people’s.”

NET Notes: Mar 8:34 To bear the cross means to accept the rejection of the world for turning to Jesus and following him. Discipleship involves a death that is like a cruc...

NET Notes: Mar 8:35 The point of the saying whoever wants to save his life will lose it is that if one comes to Jesus then rejection by many will certainly follow. If sel...

NET Notes: Mar 8:36 Here καί (kai) has been translated as “yet” to indicate the contrast present in this context.

NET Notes: Mar 8:38 How one responds now to Jesus and his teaching is a reflection of how Jesus, as the Son of Man who judges, will respond then in the final judgment.

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:3 And if I send them away fasting to their own houses, they will ( a ) faint by the way: for divers of them came from far. ( a ) Literally, "they will ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:11 ( 1 ) And the Pharisees ( b ) came forth, and began to question with him, seeking of him a sign from heaven, tempting him. ( 1 ) The stubborn enemies...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:12 And he ( c ) sighed deeply in his spirit, and saith, Why doth this generation seek after a sign? verily I say unto you, ( d ) There shall no sign be g...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:15 ( 2 ) And he charged them, saying, Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and [of] the leaven of Herod. ( 2 ) We must especially take heed...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:16 ( 3 ) And they reasoned among themselves, saying, [It is] because we have no bread. ( 3 ) They that have their minds fixed on earthly things are utte...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:21 And he said unto them, ( c ) How is it that ye do not understand? ( c ) How does it come to pass that you do not understand these things which are so...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:22 ( 4 ) And he cometh to Bethsaida; and they bring a blind man unto him, and besought him to touch him. ( 4 ) A true image of our regeneration, which C...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:24 And he looked up, and said, I ( f ) see men as trees, walking. ( f ) He perceived men moving but at the same time could not discern their bodies.

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:25 After that he put [his] hands again upon his eyes, and made him ( g ) look up: and he was restored, and saw every man clearly. ( g ) He commanded him...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:26 ( 5 ) And he sent him away to his house, saying, Neither go into the town, nor tell [it] to any in the town. ( 5 ) Christ will not have his miracles ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:27 ( 6 ) And Jesus went out, and his disciples, into the towns of Caesarea Philippi: and by the way he asked his disciples, saying unto them, Whom do men...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:30 ( 7 ) And he charged them that they should tell no man of him. ( 7 ) Christ has appointed certain times for the preaching of the gospel, and therefor...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:31 ( 8 ) And he began to teach them, that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders, and [of] the chief priests, and scribes,...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:32 ( 9 ) And he spake that saying openly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him. ( 9 ) None are more mad than they that are wise without the word ...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:33 But when he had turned about and looked on his disciples, he rebuked Peter, saying, Get thee behind me, Satan: for thou ( h ) savourest not the things...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:34 ( 10 ) And when he had called the people [unto him] with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, an...

Geneva Bible: Mar 8:36 ( 11 ) For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? ( 11 ) They are the most foolish of all men who purch...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Mar 8:17-18 - A Libation To Jehovah The Patient Teacher, And The Slow Scholars And when Jesus knew it, He saith unto them, Why reason ye, because ye have no bread? perceive ye not yet, ...

Maclaren: Mar 8:18 - A Libation To Jehovah The Religious Uses Of Memory Do ye not remember?'--Mark 8:18. THE disciples had misunderstood our Lord's warning against the leaven of the Pharisees,...

Maclaren: Mar 8:22-25 - A Libation To Jehovah The Gradual Healing Of The Blind Man And Jesus cometh to Bethsaida; and they bring a blind man unto Him, and besought Him to touch him. 23. And He to...

Maclaren: Mar 8:27 - A Libation To Jehovah Christ's Cross. And Ours Asked his disciples, saying unto them, Whom do men say that I am? 28 And they answered, John the Baptist: but some [say], El...

MHCC: Mar 8:1-10 - --Our Lord Jesus encouraged the meanest to come to him for life and grace. Christ knows and considers our frames. The bounty of Christ is always ready; ...

MHCC: Mar 8:11-21 - --Obstinate unbelief will have something to say, though ever so unreasonable. Christ refused to answer their demand. If they will not be convinced, they...

MHCC: Mar 8:22-26 - --Here is a blind man brought to Christ by his friends. Therein appeared the faith of those that brought him. If those who are spiritually blind, do not...

MHCC: Mar 8:27-33 - --These things are written, that we may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God. These miracles of our Lord assure us that he was not conquered...

MHCC: Mar 8:34-38 - --Frequent notice is taken of the great flocking there was to Christ for help in various cases. All are concerned to know this, if they expect him to he...

Matthew Henry: Mar 8:1-9 - -- We had the story of a miracle very like this before, in this gospel (Mar 6:35), and of this same miracle (Mat 15:32), and here is little or no addit...

Matthew Henry: Mar 8:10-21 - -- Still Christ is upon motion; now he visits the parts of Dalmanutha, that no corner of the land of Israel might say that they had not had his presenc...

Matthew Henry: Mar 8:22-26 - -- This cure is related only by this evangelist, and there is something singular in the circumstances. I. Here is a blind man brought to Christ by hi...

Matthew Henry: Mar 8:27-38 - -- We have read a great deal of the doctrine Christ preached, and the miracles he wrought, which were many, and strange, and well-attested, of various ...

Barclay: Mar 8:1-10 - "COMPASSION AND CHALLENGE" There are two things closely intertwined in this incident. (i) There is the compassion of Jesus. Over and over again we see Jesus moved with compassi...

Barclay: Mar 8:11-13 - "THE BLINDNESS WHICH DESIRES A SIGN" The whole tendency of the age in which Jesus lived was to look for God in the abnormal. It was believed that when the Messiah came the most startling...

Barclay: Mar 8:14-21 - "THE FAILURE TO LEARN FROM EXPERIENCE" This passage sheds a very vivid light on the minds of the disciples. They were crossing over to the other side of the Sea of Galilee, and they had f...

Barclay: Mar 8:22-26 - "A BLIND MAN LEARNS TO SEE" Blindness was, and still is, one of the great curses of the East. It was caused partly by ophthalmia and partly by the pitiless glare of the sun. ...

Barclay: Mar 8:27-30 - "THE GREAT DISCOVERY" Caesarea Philippi was outside Galilee altogether. It was not in the territory of Herod, but in the territory of Philip. It was a town with an amazi...

Barclay: Mar 8:31-33 - "THE TEMPTER SPEAKS IN THE VOICE OF A FRIEND" It is against the background of what we have just seen of the common conception of the Messiah that we must read this. When Jesus connected Messiahsh...

Barclay: Mar 8:34-35 - "THE WAY OF THE DISCIPLE" This part of Mark's gospel is so near the heart and centre of the Christian faith that we must take it almost sentence by sentence. If each day a man...

Barclay: Mar 8:36 - "FINDING LIFE BY LOSING LIFE" There are certain things which are lost by being kept and saved by being used. Any talent that a man possesses is like that. If he uses it, it will...

Barclay: Mar 8:37 - "THE SUPREME VALUE IN LIFE" It is quite possible for a man in one sense to make a huge success of life and in another sense to be living a life that is not worth living. The rea...

Barclay: Mar 8:38 - "WHEN THE KING COMES INTO HIS OWN" One thing leaps out from this passage--the confidence of Jesus. He has just been speaking of his death; he has no doubt that the Cross stands ahead ...

Constable: Mar 6:6--8:31 - --IV. The Servant's self-revelation to the disciples 6:6b--8:30 The increasing hostility of Israel's religious lea...

Constable: Mar 6:31--8:1 - --B. The first cycle of self-revelation to the disciples 6:31-7:37 Mark arranged selected events in Jesus'...

Constable: Mar 8:1-30 - --C. The second cycle of self-revelation to the disciples 8:1-30 The disciples had not yet understood the ...

Constable: Mar 8:1-9 - --1. The feeding of the 4,000 8:1-9 (cf. Matt. 15:32-38) This miracle repeated the lesson of the feeding of the 5,000 for the disciples who had not lear...

Constable: Mar 8:10 - --2. The return to Galilee 8:10 (cf. Matt. 15:39) Jesus and the disciples returned to Galilee by b...

Constable: Mar 8:11-13 - --3. Conflict with the Pharisees over signs 8:11-13 (cf. Matt. 16:1-4) Matthew's account of this incident is fuller than Mark's. Probably Mark just summ...

Constable: Mar 8:14-21 - --4. Jesus' teaching about the yeast of the Pharisees and Herod 8:14-21 (cf. Matt. 16:5-12) This pericope parallels and recalls Jesus' teaching about br...

Constable: Mar 8:22-26 - --5. The healing of a blind man near Bethsaida 8:22-26 Mark is the only evangelist who recorded this miracle. It corresponds to the healing of the deaf ...

Constable: Mar 8:27-30 - --6. Peter's confession of faith 8:27-30 (cf. Matt. 16:13-20; Luke 9:18-21) The healing of the deaf man with the speech impediment resulted in a confess...

Constable: Mar 8:31--11:1 - --V. The Servant's journey to Jerusalem 8:31--10:52 Having comprehended Jesus' true identity the disciples next tu...

Constable: Mar 8:31--9:30 - --A. The first passion prediction and its lessons 8:31-9:29 In this section, Mark recorded Jesus' first cl...

Constable: Mar 8:31-33 - --1. The first major prophecy of Jesus' passion 8:31-33 (cf. Matt. 16:21-23; Luke 9:22) 8:31 Jesus' clear revelation of His coming suffering, death, and...

Constable: Mar 8:34--9:2 - --2. The requirements of discipleship 8:34-9:1 (cf. Matt. 16:24-28; Luke 9:23-27) Jesus now proceeded to explain to His disciples that suffering would n...

College: Mar 8:1-38 - --MARK 8 J. FEEDING THE FOUR THOUSAND (8:1-10) 1 During those days another large crowd gathered. Since they had nothing to eat, Jesus called his disci...