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Teks -- Job 42:1-17 (NET)

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Konteks
Job’s Confession
42:1 Then Job answered the Lord: 42:2 “I know that you can do all things; no purpose of yours can be thwarted; 42:3 you asked, ‘Who is this who darkens counsel without knowledge?’ But I have declared without understanding things too wonderful for me to know. 42:4 You said, ‘Pay attention, and I will speak; I will question you, and you will answer me.’ 42:5 I had heard of you by the hearing of the ear, but now my eye has seen you. 42:6 Therefore I despise myself, and I repent in dust and ashes!

VII. The Epilogue (42:7-17)

42:7 After the Lord had spoken these things to Job, he said to Eliphaz the Temanite, “My anger is stirred up against you and your two friends, because you have not spoken about me what is right, as my servant Job has. 42:8 So now take seven bulls and seven rams and go to my servant Job and offer a burnt offering for yourselves. And my servant Job will intercede for you, and I will respect him, so that I do not deal with you according to your folly, because you have not spoken about me what is right, as my servant Job has.” 42:9 So they went, Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite, and did just as the Lord had told them; and the Lord had respect for Job. 42:10 So the Lord restored what Job had lost after he prayed for his friends, and the Lord doubled all that had belonged to Job. 42:11 So they came to him, all his brothers and sisters and all who had known him before, and they dined with him in his house. They comforted him and consoled him for all the trouble the Lord had brought on him, and each one gave him a piece of silver and a gold ring. 42:12 So the Lord blessed the second part of Job’s life more than the first. He had 14,000 sheep, 6,000 camels, 1,000 yoke of oxen, and 1,000 female donkeys. 42:13 And he also had seven sons and three daughters. 42:14 The first daughter he named Jemimah, the second Keziah, and the third Keren-Happuch. 42:15 Nowhere in all the land could women be found who were as beautiful as Job’s daughters, and their father granted them an inheritance alongside their brothers. 42:16 After this Job lived 140 years; he saw his children and their children to the fourth generation. 42:17 And so Job died, old and full of days.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Bildad the Shuhite man who was a friend of Job
 · Eliphaz son of Esau,a man of Teman who was a friend of Job
 · Jemimah daughter of Job
 · Job a man whose story is told in the book of Job,a man from the land of Uz in Edom
 · Keren-happuch daughter of Job
 · Keren-Happuch daughter of Job
 · Keziah daughter of Job
 · Naamathite a resident of the town of Naamah
 · Shuhite a resident of the town of Shuah
 · Temanite resident(s) of the region of Teman
 · Zophar a Naamathite man who was a friend of Job


Topik/Tema Kamus: Job | God | Repentance | Intercession | Zophar | MEDIATION; MEDIATOR | Eliphaz | Jemima | Keren-happuch | Humility | JOB, BOOK OF | Dust | GENERATION | Kezia | Prayer | Sin | Uncharitableness | Presents | Shuhite | Naamathite | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Job 42:2 - Thou canst, &c. _Job here subscribes to God's unlimited power, knowledge and dominion, to prove which was the scope of God's discourse out of the whirlwind. And his j...

_Job here subscribes to God's unlimited power, knowledge and dominion, to prove which was the scope of God's discourse out of the whirlwind. And his judgment being convinced of these, his conscience also was convinced, of his own folly in speaking so irreverently concerning him.

Wesley: Job 42:2 - No thought can be withholden from thee No thought of ours can be withholden from thy knowledge. And there is no thought of thine, which thou canst be hindered from bringing into execution.

No thought of ours can be withholden from thy knowledge. And there is no thought of thine, which thou canst be hindered from bringing into execution.

Wesley: Job 42:3 - Who What am I that I should be guilty of such madness! Therefore - Because my mind was without knowledge.

What am I that I should be guilty of such madness! Therefore - Because my mind was without knowledge.

Wesley: Job 42:3 - Knew not I have spoken foolishly and unadvisedly of all things far above my reach.

I have spoken foolishly and unadvisedly of all things far above my reach.

Wesley: Job 42:4 - Hear Hear and accept my humble confession.

Hear and accept my humble confession.

Wesley: Job 42:4 - Enquire I will no more dispute the matter with thee, but beg information from thee. The words which God had uttered to Job by way of challenge, Job returns to...

I will no more dispute the matter with thee, but beg information from thee. The words which God had uttered to Job by way of challenge, Job returns to him in way of submission.

Wesley: Job 42:5 - Seeth thee The knowledge which I had of thy nature, perfections and counsels, was hitherto grounded chiefly, upon the instructions of men; but now it is clear an...

The knowledge which I had of thy nature, perfections and counsels, was hitherto grounded chiefly, upon the instructions of men; but now it is clear and certain, as being immediately inspired into my mind by this thy glorious apparition and revelation, and by the operation of thy holy spirit; which makes these things as evident to me, as if I saw them with my bodily eyes. When the mind is enlightened by the spirit of God, our knowledge of Divine things as far exceeds what we had before, as knowledge by ocular demonstration, exceeds, that by common fame.

Wesley: Job 42:7 - Eliphaz As the eldest of the three, and because he spoke first, and by his example led the rest into the same miscarriages.

As the eldest of the three, and because he spoke first, and by his example led the rest into the same miscarriages.

Wesley: Job 42:7 - Two friends Elihu is not here reproved, because he dealt more mercifully with Job, and did not condemn his person, but only rebuked his sinful expressions.

Elihu is not here reproved, because he dealt more mercifully with Job, and did not condemn his person, but only rebuked his sinful expressions.

Wesley: Job 42:7 - Ye have not, &c. This is not to be understood absolutely, but comparatively. Job was not so much to be blamed as they, because his opinion concerning the methods of Go...

This is not to be understood absolutely, but comparatively. Job was not so much to be blamed as they, because his opinion concerning the methods of God's providence, and the indifferency of its dispensations towards good and bad men was truer than theirs, which was, that God did always reward good men and punish sinners in this life.

Wesley: Job 42:8 - My servant Whom though you condemned as an hypocrite, I own for my faithful servant.

Whom though you condemned as an hypocrite, I own for my faithful servant.

Wesley: Job 42:8 - Offer By the hand of Job, whom I hereby constitute your priest to pray and sacrifice for you.

By the hand of Job, whom I hereby constitute your priest to pray and sacrifice for you.

Wesley: Job 42:8 - Lest I deal Lest my just judgment take hold of you for your false and foolish speeches.

Lest my just judgment take hold of you for your false and foolish speeches.

Wesley: Job 42:9 - Accepted Job And as Job prayed and offered sacrifice for those who had grieved and wounded his spirit, so Christ prayed and died for his persecutors, and ever live...

And as Job prayed and offered sacrifice for those who had grieved and wounded his spirit, so Christ prayed and died for his persecutors, and ever lives, making intercession for transgressors.

Wesley: Job 42:10 - Captivity All his bodily distempers were thoroughly healed, and probably in a moment. His mind was calmed, his peace returned, and the consolations of God were ...

All his bodily distempers were thoroughly healed, and probably in a moment. His mind was calmed, his peace returned, and the consolations of God were not small with him.

Wesley: Job 42:10 - Prayed Whereby he manifests his obedience to God and his true love to them.

Whereby he manifests his obedience to God and his true love to them.

Wesley: Job 42:11 - Then When Job had humbled himself, and God was reconciled to him.

When Job had humbled himself, and God was reconciled to him.

Wesley: Job 42:11 - Sisters His kindred.

His kindred.

Wesley: Job 42:11 - Eat Feasted with him, to congratulate with him God's great and glorious favour.

Feasted with him, to congratulate with him God's great and glorious favour.

Wesley: Job 42:11 - Bemoaned They declared the sense which they had of his calamities while they were upon him, although they had hitherto wanted opportunity to express it.

They declared the sense which they had of his calamities while they were upon him, although they had hitherto wanted opportunity to express it.

Wesley: Job 42:12 - Blessed Not only with spiritual, but also with temporal blessings. Just double to what they were, Job 1:3. This is a remarkable instance of the extent of the ...

Not only with spiritual, but also with temporal blessings. Just double to what they were, Job 1:3. This is a remarkable instance of the extent of the Divine providence, to things that seem minute as this, the exact number of a man's cattle; as also of the harmony of providence, and the reference of one event to another: for known unto God are all his works, from the beginning to the end.

Wesley: Job 42:14 - Jemima The day, either because of her eminent beauty, or because she was born in the day of his prosperity, after a dark night of affliction. Kezia is the na...

The day, either because of her eminent beauty, or because she was born in the day of his prosperity, after a dark night of affliction. Kezia is the name of a spice of a very fragrant smell, commonly called Cassia.

Wesley: Job 42:14 - Keren happuch signifies plenty restored.

happuch signifies plenty restored.

Wesley: Job 42:15 - So fair In the Old Testament we often find women praised for their beauty, but never in the New, because the beauty of holiness is brought to a much clearer l...

In the Old Testament we often find women praised for their beauty, but never in the New, because the beauty of holiness is brought to a much clearer light by the gospel.

Wesley: Job 42:16 - After this, &c. _Some conjecture, that he was seventy when his trouble came. If so his age was doubled, as his other possessions.

_Some conjecture, that he was seventy when his trouble came. If so his age was doubled, as his other possessions.

Wesley: Job 42:17 - Full of days So coming to his grave, as Eliphaz had spoken, like a ripe shock of corn in its season.

So coming to his grave, as Eliphaz had spoken, like a ripe shock of corn in its season.

JFB: Job 42:2 - thought "purpose," as in Job 17:11; but it is usually applied to evil devices (Job 21:27; Psa 10:2): the ambiguous word is designedly chosen to express that, ...

"purpose," as in Job 17:11; but it is usually applied to evil devices (Job 21:27; Psa 10:2): the ambiguous word is designedly chosen to express that, while to Job's finite view, God's plans seem bad, to the All-wise One they continue unhindered in their development, and will at last be seen to be as good as they are infinitely wise. No evil can emanate from the Parent of good (Jam 1:13, Jam 1:17); but it is His prerogative to overrule evil to good.

JFB: Job 42:3 - -- I am the man! Job in God's own words (Job 38:2) expresses his deep and humble penitence. God's word concerning our guilt should be engraven on our hea...

I am the man! Job in God's own words (Job 38:2) expresses his deep and humble penitence. God's word concerning our guilt should be engraven on our hearts and form the groundwork of our confession. Most men in confessing sin palliate rather than confess. Job in omitting "by words" (Job 38:2), goes even further than God's accusation. Not merely my words, but my whole thoughts and ways were "without knowledge."

JFB: Job 42:3 - too wonderful I rashly denied that Thou hast any fixed plan in governing human affairs, merely because Thy plan was "too wonderful" for my comprehension.

I rashly denied that Thou hast any fixed plan in governing human affairs, merely because Thy plan was "too wonderful" for my comprehension.

JFB: Job 42:4 - -- When I said, "Hear," &c., Job's demand (Job 13:22) convicted him of being "without knowledge." God alone could speak thus to Job, not Job to God: ther...

When I said, "Hear," &c., Job's demand (Job 13:22) convicted him of being "without knowledge." God alone could speak thus to Job, not Job to God: therefore he quotes again God's words as the groundwork of retracting his own foolish words.

JFB: Job 42:5 - hearing of the ear (Psa 18:44, Margin). Hearing and seeing are often in antithesis (Job 29:11; Psa 18:8).

(Psa 18:44, Margin). Hearing and seeing are often in antithesis (Job 29:11; Psa 18:8).

JFB: Job 42:5 - seeth Not God's face (Exo 33:20), but His presence in the veil of a dark cloud (Job 38:1). Job implies also that, besides this literal seeing, he now saw sp...

Not God's face (Exo 33:20), but His presence in the veil of a dark cloud (Job 38:1). Job implies also that, besides this literal seeing, he now saw spiritually what he had indistinctly taken on hearsay before God's infinite wisdom. He "now" proves this; he had seen in a literal sense before, at the beginning of God's speech, but he had not seen spiritually till "now" at its close.

JFB: Job 42:6 - myself Rather "I abhor," and retract the rash speeches I made against thee (Job 42:3-4) [UMBREIT].

Rather "I abhor," and retract the rash speeches I made against thee (Job 42:3-4) [UMBREIT].

JFB: Job 42:7 - -- EPILOGUE, in prose. (Job 42:7-17)

EPILOGUE, in prose. (Job 42:7-17)

JFB: Job 42:7 - to Eliphaz Because he was the foremost of the three friends; their speeches were but the echo of his.

Because he was the foremost of the three friends; their speeches were but the echo of his.

JFB: Job 42:7 - right Literally, "well-grounded," sure and true. Their spirit towards Job was unkindly, and to justify themselves in their unkindliness they used false argu...

Literally, "well-grounded," sure and true. Their spirit towards Job was unkindly, and to justify themselves in their unkindliness they used false arguments (Job 13:7); (namely, that calamities always prove peculiar guilt); therefore, though it was "for God" they spake thus falsely, God "reproves" them, as Job said He would (Job 13:10).

JFB: Job 42:7 - as . . . Job hath Job had spoken rightly in relation to them and their argument, denying their theory, and the fact which they alleged, that he was peculiarly guilty an...

Job had spoken rightly in relation to them and their argument, denying their theory, and the fact which they alleged, that he was peculiarly guilty and a hypocrite; but wrongly in relation to God, when he fell into the opposite extreme of almost denying all guilt. This extreme he has now repented of, and therefore God speaks of him as now altogether "right."

JFB: Job 42:8 - seven (See Introduction). The number offered by the Gentile prophet (Num 23:1). Job plainly lived before the legal priesthood, &c. The patriarchs acted as p...

(See Introduction). The number offered by the Gentile prophet (Num 23:1). Job plainly lived before the legal priesthood, &c. The patriarchs acted as priests for their families; and sometimes as praying mediators (Gen 20:17), thus foreshadowing the true Mediator (1Ti 2:5), but sacrifice accompanies and is the groundwork on which the mediation rests.

JFB: Job 42:8 - him Rather, "His person [face] only" (see on Job 22:30). The "person," must be first accepted, before God can accept his offering and work (Gen 4:4); that...

Rather, "His person [face] only" (see on Job 22:30). The "person," must be first accepted, before God can accept his offering and work (Gen 4:4); that can be only through Jesus Christ.

JFB: Job 42:8 - folly Impiety (Job 1:22; Job 2:10).

Impiety (Job 1:22; Job 2:10).

JFB: Job 42:9 - -- The forgiving spirit of Job foreshadows the love of Jesus Christ and of Christians to enemies (Mat 5:44; Luk 23:34; Act 7:60; Act 16:24, Act 16:28, Ac...

The forgiving spirit of Job foreshadows the love of Jesus Christ and of Christians to enemies (Mat 5:44; Luk 23:34; Act 7:60; Act 16:24, Act 16:28, Act 16:30-31).

JFB: Job 42:10 - turned . . . captivity Proverbial for restored, or amply indemnified him for all he had lost (Eze 16:53; Psa 14:7; Hos 6:11). Thus the future vindication of man, body and so...

Proverbial for restored, or amply indemnified him for all he had lost (Eze 16:53; Psa 14:7; Hos 6:11). Thus the future vindication of man, body and soul, against Satan (Job 1:9-12), at the resurrection (Job 19:25-27), has its earnest and adumbration in the temporal vindication of Job at last by Jehovah in person.

JFB: Job 42:10 - twice So to the afflicted literal and spiritual Jerusalem (Isa 40:2; Isa 60:7; Isa 61:7; Zec 9:12). As in Job's case, so in that of Jesus Christ, the glorio...

So to the afflicted literal and spiritual Jerusalem (Isa 40:2; Isa 60:7; Isa 61:7; Zec 9:12). As in Job's case, so in that of Jesus Christ, the glorious recompense follows the "intercession" for enemies (Isa 53:12).

JFB: Job 42:11 - -- It was Job's complaint in his misery that his "brethren," were "estranged" from him (Job 19:13); these now return with the return of his prosperity (P...

It was Job's complaint in his misery that his "brethren," were "estranged" from him (Job 19:13); these now return with the return of his prosperity (Pro 14:20; Pro 19:6-7); the true friend loveth at all times (Pro 17:17; Pro 18:24). "Swallow friends leave in the winter and return with the spring" [HENRY].

JFB: Job 42:11 - eat bread In token of friendship (Psa 41:9).

In token of friendship (Psa 41:9).

JFB: Job 42:11 - piece of money Presents are usual in visiting a man of rank in the East, especially after a calamity (2Ch 32:23). Hebrew, kesita. MAGEE translates "a lamb" (the medi...

Presents are usual in visiting a man of rank in the East, especially after a calamity (2Ch 32:23). Hebrew, kesita. MAGEE translates "a lamb" (the medium of exchange then before money was used), as it is in Margin of Gen 33:19; Jos 24:32. But it is from the Arabic kasat, "weighed out" [UMBREIT], not coined; so Gen 42:35; Gen 33:19; compare with Gen 23:15, makes it likely it was equal to four shekels; Hebrew kashat, "pure," namely, metal. The term, instead of the usual "shekel," &c., is a mark of antiquity.

JFB: Job 42:11 - earring Whether for the nose or ear (Gen 35:4; Isa 3:21). Much of the gold in the East, in the absence of banks, is in the shape of ornaments.

Whether for the nose or ear (Gen 35:4; Isa 3:21). Much of the gold in the East, in the absence of banks, is in the shape of ornaments.

JFB: Job 42:12 - -- Probably by degrees, not all at once.

Probably by degrees, not all at once.

JFB: Job 42:13 - -- The same number as before, Job 1:2; perhaps by a second wife; in Job 19:17 his wife is last mentioned.

The same number as before, Job 1:2; perhaps by a second wife; in Job 19:17 his wife is last mentioned.

JFB: Job 42:14 - -- Names significant of his restored prosperity (Gen 4:25; Gen 5:29).

Names significant of his restored prosperity (Gen 4:25; Gen 5:29).

JFB: Job 42:14 - Jemima "daylight," after his "night" of calamity; but MAURER, "a dove."

"daylight," after his "night" of calamity; but MAURER, "a dove."

JFB: Job 42:14 - Kezia "cassia," an aromatic herb (Psa 45:8), instead of his offensive breath and ulcers.

"cassia," an aromatic herb (Psa 45:8), instead of his offensive breath and ulcers.

JFB: Job 42:14 - Keren-happuch "horn of stibium," a paint with which females dyed their eyelids; in contrast to his "horn defiled in the dust" (Job 16:15). The names also imply the ...

"horn of stibium," a paint with which females dyed their eyelids; in contrast to his "horn defiled in the dust" (Job 16:15). The names also imply the beauty of his daughters.

JFB: Job 42:15 - inheritance among . . . brethren An unusual favor in the East to daughters, who, in the Jewish law, only inherited, if there were no sons (Num 27:8), a proof of wealth and unanimity.

An unusual favor in the East to daughters, who, in the Jewish law, only inherited, if there were no sons (Num 27:8), a proof of wealth and unanimity.

JFB: Job 42:16 - -- The Septuagint makes Job live a hundred seventy years after his calamity, and two hundred forty in all. This would make him seventy at the time of his...

The Septuagint makes Job live a hundred seventy years after his calamity, and two hundred forty in all. This would make him seventy at the time of his calamity, which added to a hundred forty in Hebrew text makes up two hundred ten; a little more than the age (two hundred five) of Terah, father of Abraham, perhaps his contemporary. Man's length of life gradually shortened, till it reached threescore and ten in Moses' time (Psa 90:10).

JFB: Job 42:16 - sons' sons A proof of divine favor (Gen 50:23; Psa 128:6; Pro 17:6).

A proof of divine favor (Gen 50:23; Psa 128:6; Pro 17:6).

JFB: Job 42:17 - full of days Fully sated and contented with all the happiness that life could give him; realizing what Eliphaz had painted as the lot of the godly (Job 5:26; Psa 9...

Fully sated and contented with all the happiness that life could give him; realizing what Eliphaz had painted as the lot of the godly (Job 5:26; Psa 91:16; Gen 25:8; Gen 35:29). The Septuagint adds, "It is written, that he will rise again with those whom the Lord will raise up." Compare Mat 27:52-53, from which it perhaps was derived spuriously.

Clarke: Job 42:2 - I know that thou canst do every thing I know that thou canst do every thing - Thy power is unlimited; thy wisdom infinite.

I know that thou canst do every thing - Thy power is unlimited; thy wisdom infinite.

Clarke: Job 42:3 - Who is he that hideth counsel Who is he that hideth counsel - These are the words of Job, and they are a repetition of what Jehovah said, Job 38:2 : "Who is this that darkeneth c...

Who is he that hideth counsel - These are the words of Job, and they are a repetition of what Jehovah said, Job 38:2 : "Who is this that darkeneth counsel by words without knowledge?"Job now having heard the Almighty’ s speech, and having received his reproof, echoes back his words: "Who is he that hideth counsel without knowledge Alas, I am the man; I have uttered what I understood not; things too wonderful for me, that I knew not. God had said, Job 38:3 : "Gird up now thy loins like a man; I will demand of thee, and answer thou me."In allusion to this, Job exclaims to his Maker, Job 42:4 : "Hear, I beseech thee, and I will speak: I will ask of Thee, and declare Thou unto Me."I acknowledge my ignorance; I confess my foolishness and presumption; I am ashamed of my conduct; I lament my imperfections; I implore thy mercy; and beg thee to show me thy will, that I may ever think, speak, and do, what is pleasing in thy sight

Clarke: Job 42:3 - Things too wonderful Things too wonderful - I have spoken of thy judgments, which I did not comprehend.

Things too wonderful - I have spoken of thy judgments, which I did not comprehend.

Clarke: Job 42:5 - I have heard of thee I have heard of thee - I have now such a discovery of thee as I have never had before. I have only heard of thee by tradition, or from imperfect inf...

I have heard of thee - I have now such a discovery of thee as I have never had before. I have only heard of thee by tradition, or from imperfect information; now the eye of my mind clearly perceives thee, and in seeing thee, I see myself; for the light that discovers thy glory and excellence, discovers my meanness and vileness.

Clarke: Job 42:6 - I abhor myself I abhor myself - Compared with thine, my strength is weakness; my wisdom, folly; and my righteousness, impurity "I loathe myself when thee I see And...

I abhor myself - Compared with thine, my strength is weakness; my wisdom, folly; and my righteousness, impurity

"I loathe myself when thee I see

And into nothing fall.

Clarke: Job 42:6 - Repent Repent - I am deeply distressed on account of the imaginations of my heart, the words of my tongue, and the acts of my life. I roll myself in the du...

Repent - I am deeply distressed on account of the imaginations of my heart, the words of my tongue, and the acts of my life. I roll myself in the dust, and sprinkle ashes upon my head. Job is now sufficiently humbled at the feet of Jehovah; and having earnestly and piously prayed for instruction, the Lord, in a finishing speech, which appears to be contained in Job 40:1-14, perfects his teaching on the subject of the late controversy, which is concluded with, "When thou canst act like the Almighty,"which is, in effect, what the questions and commands amount to in the preceding verses of that chapter, "then will I also confess unto thee, that thy own right hand can save thee."In the fifth verse of the fortieth chapter, Job says, "Once have I spoken."This must refer to the declaration above, in the beginning of this chapter, (42). And he goes on to state, Job 40:5 : "Yea, Twice; but I will proceed no farther."This second time is that in which he uses these words: after which he spoke no more; and the Lord concluded with the remaining part of these fourteen verses, viz., from Job 40:7-14, inclusive. Then the thread of the story, in the form of a narration is resumed at Job 42:7.

Clarke: Job 42:7 - After the Lord had spoken these words After the Lord had spoken these words - Those recorded at Job 40:7-14; he said to Eliphaz, who was the eldest of the three friends, and chief speake...

After the Lord had spoken these words - Those recorded at Job 40:7-14; he said to Eliphaz, who was the eldest of the three friends, and chief speaker: Ye have not spoken of me - right. Mr. Peters observes, "It will be difficult to find any thing in the speeches of Eliphaz and his companions which should make the difference here supposed, if we set aside the doctrine of a future state; for in this view the others would speak more worthily of God than Job, by endeavoring to vindicate his providence in the exact distribution of good and evil in this life: whereas Job’ s assertion, Job 9:22, ‘ This is one thing, therefore I said it, He destroyeth the perfect and the wicked,’ which is the argument on which he all along insists, would, upon this supposition, be directly charging God that he made no distinction between the good and the bad. But now, take the other life into the account, and the thing will appear in quite a contrary light; and we shall easily see the reason why God approves of the sentiments of Job, and condemns those of his friends. For supposing the friends of Job to argue that the righteous are never afflicted without remedy here, nor the wicked prosperous on the whole in this life, which is a wrong representation of God’ s providence; and Job to argue, on the other hand, that the righteous are sometimes afflicted here, and that without remedy, but shall be rewarded in the life to come; and that the wicked prosper here, but shall be punished hereafter, which is the true representation of the Divine proceedings; and here is a very apparent difference in the drift of the one’ s discourse, and of the others’ . For Job, in this view, speaks worthily of God, and the rest unworthily. The best moral argument that mankind have ever had to believe in a life to come, is that which Job insists on - that good and evil are, for the most part, dealt out here promiscuously. On the contrary, the topic urged by his friends, and which they push a great deal too far, that God rewards and punishes in this world, tends, in its consequences, like that other opinion which was held by the stoics in after times, that virtue is its own reward, to sap the very foundation of that proof we have, from reason, of another life. No wonder, therefore, that the sentiments of the one are approved, and those of the other condemned."

Clarke: Job 42:8 - Take - seven bullocks and seven rams Take - seven bullocks and seven rams - From this it appears that Job was considered a priest, not only in his own family but also for others. For hi...

Take - seven bullocks and seven rams - From this it appears that Job was considered a priest, not only in his own family but also for others. For his children he offered burnt-offerings, Job 1:5; and now he is to make the same kind of offerings, accompanied with intercession, in behalf of his three friends. This is a full proof of the innocence and integrity of Job: a more decided one could not be given, that the accusations of his friends, and their bitter speeches, were as untrue as they were malevolent. God thus clears his character, and confounds their devices.

Clarke: Job 42:10 - The Lord turned the captivity of Job The Lord turned the captivity of Job - The Vulgate has: Dominus quoque conversus est ad poenitentiam Job ; "And the Lord turned Job to repentance."...

The Lord turned the captivity of Job - The Vulgate has: Dominus quoque conversus est ad poenitentiam Job ; "And the Lord turned Job to repentance."The Chaldee: "The Word of the Lord ( מימרא דיי meymera dayai ) turned the captivity of Job."There is a remark which these words suggest, which has been rarely, if at all, noticed. It is said that the Lord turned the captivity of Job When He Prayed for His Friends. He had suffered much through the unkindness of these friends; they had criticised his conduct without feeling or mercy; and he had just cause to be irritated against them: and that he had such a feeling towards them, several parts of his discourses sufficiently prove. God was now about to show Job his mercy; but mercy can be shown only to the merciful; Job must forgive his unfeeling friends, if he would be forgiven by the Lord; he directs him, therefore, to pray for them, Job 42:8. He who can pray for another cannot entertain enmity against him: Job did so, and when he prayed for his friends, God turned the captivity of Job. "Forgive, and ye shall be forgiven."Some suppose that Job, being miraculously restored, armed his servants and remaining friends, and fell upon those who had spoiled him; and not only recovered his own property, but also spoiled the spoilers, and thus his substance became double what it was before. Of this I do not see any intimation in the sacred text.

Clarke: Job 42:11 - Then came there unto him all his brethren Then came there unto him all his brethren - " Job being restored to his former health and fortunes, the author,"says Mr. Heath, "presents us with a ...

Then came there unto him all his brethren - " Job being restored to his former health and fortunes, the author,"says Mr. Heath, "presents us with a striking view of human friendship. His brethren, who, in the time of his affliction, kept at a distance from him; his kinsfolk, who ceased to know him; his familiar friends, who had forgotten him; and his acquaintance, who had made themselves perfect strangers to him; those to whom he had showed kindness, and who yet had ungratefully neglected him, on the return of his prosperity now come and condole with him, desirous of renewing former familiarity; and, according to the custom of the Eastern countries, where there is no approaching a great man without a present, each brings him a kesitah, each a jewel of gold."See Job 42:12

Clarke: Job 42:11 - A piece of money A piece of money - קשיטה kesitah signifies a lamb; and it is supposed that this piece of money had a lamb stamped on it, as that quantity of...

A piece of money - קשיטה kesitah signifies a lamb; and it is supposed that this piece of money had a lamb stamped on it, as that quantity of gold was generally the current value for a lamb. See my note on Gen 33:19 (note), where the subject is largely considered. The Vulgate, Chaldee, Septuagint, Arabic, and Syriac, have one lamb or sheep; so it appears that they did not understand the kesitah as implying a piece of money of any kind, but a sheep or a lamb

Clarke: Job 42:11 - Earring of gold Earring of gold - Literally, a nose-jewel. The Septuagint translate, τετραδραχμον χρυσου, a tetra-drachm of gold, or golden daric...

Earring of gold - Literally, a nose-jewel. The Septuagint translate, τετραδραχμον χρυσου, a tetra-drachm of gold, or golden daric; but by adding και ασημου, unstamped, they intimate that it was four drachms of uncoined gold.

Clarke: Job 42:12 - The Lord blessed the latter end of Job The Lord blessed the latter end of Job - Was it not in consequence of his friends bringing him a lamb, sheep, or other kind of cattle, and the quant...

The Lord blessed the latter end of Job - Was it not in consequence of his friends bringing him a lamb, sheep, or other kind of cattle, and the quantity of gold mentioned, that his stock of sheep was increased so speedily to 14,000, his camels to 6000, his oxen to 2000, and his she-asses to 1000? Mr. Heath takes the story of the conduct of Job’ s friends by the worst handle; see Job 42:11. Is it not likely that they themselves were the cause of his sudden accumulation of property? and that they did not visit him, nor seek his familiarity because he was now prosperous; but because they saw that God had turned his captivity, and miraculously healed him? This gave them full proof of his innocence, and they no longer considered him an anathema, or devoted person, whom they should avoid and detest, but one who had been suffering under a strange dispensation of Divine Providence, and who was now no longer a suspicious character, but a favourite of heaven, to whom they should show every possible kindness. They therefore joined hands with God to make the poor man live and their presents were the cause, under God of his restoration to affluence. This takes the subject by the other handle; and I think, as far as the text is concerned, by the right one

Clarke: Job 42:12 - He had fourteen thousand sheep He had fourteen thousand sheep - The reader, by referring to Job 1:3, will perceive that the whole of Job’ s property was exactly doubled.

He had fourteen thousand sheep - The reader, by referring to Job 1:3, will perceive that the whole of Job’ s property was exactly doubled.

Clarke: Job 42:13 - Seven sons and three daughters Seven sons and three daughters - This was the same number as before; and so the Vulgate, Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic read: but the Chaldee double...

Seven sons and three daughters - This was the same number as before; and so the Vulgate, Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic read: but the Chaldee doubles the sons, "And he had fourteen sons, and three daughters."

Clarke: Job 42:14 - The name of the first Jemima The name of the first Jemima - ימימה yemimah , days upon days. Kezia - קציעה ketsiah , cassia, a well-known aromatic plant

The name of the first Jemima - ימימה yemimah , days upon days. Kezia - קציעה ketsiah , cassia, a well-known aromatic plant

Clarke: Job 42:14 - And, Keren-happuch And, Keren-happuch - קרן הפוך keren happuch , the inverted or flowing horn, cornucopiae, the horn of plenty. The Chaldee will not permit the...

And, Keren-happuch - קרן הפוך keren happuch , the inverted or flowing horn, cornucopiae, the horn of plenty. The Chaldee will not permit these names to pass without a comment, to show the reason of their imposition: "He called the first Jemimah, because she was as fair as the day; the second Ketsiah, because she was as precious as cassia; the third Keren-happuch, because her face was as splendid as the emerald."Cardmarden’ s Bible, 1566, has the Hebrew names. The Vulgate has, "He called the name of one Day, of the second Cassia, and of the third The Horn of Antimony."The versions in general preserve these names, only the Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic translate Jemimah, Day; and the former for Keren-happuch has Αμαλθαιας κερας, the horn of Amalthea. This refers to an ancient fable. Amalthea was the nurse of Jupiter, and fed him with goat’ s milk when he was young. The goat having by accident her horn struck off, Jupiter translated the animal to the heavens, and gave her a place among the constellations, which she still holds; and made the horn the emblem of plenty: hence it is always pictured or described as filled with fruits, flowers, and the necessaries and luxuries of life. It is very strange how this fable got into the Septuagint

Coverdale is singular: The first he called Daye, the seconde Poverte, the thirde, All plenteousnes.

Clarke: Job 42:15 - Gave them inheritance among their brethren Gave them inheritance among their brethren - This seems to refer to the history of the daughters of Zelophehad, given Num 28:1-8, who appear to have...

Gave them inheritance among their brethren - This seems to refer to the history of the daughters of Zelophehad, given Num 28:1-8, who appear to have been the first who were allowed an inheritance among their brethren.

Clarke: Job 42:16 - After this lived Job a hundred and forty years After this lived Job a hundred and forty years - How long he had lived before his afflictions, we cannot tell. If we could rely on the Septuagint, a...

After this lived Job a hundred and forty years - How long he had lived before his afflictions, we cannot tell. If we could rely on the Septuagint, all would be plain, who add here, Τα δε παντα ετη εζησεν, διακοσια τεσσαρακοντα ; "And all the years that Job lived were two hundred and forty."This makes him one hundred years of age when his trial commenced. Coverdale has, After this lyved Job forty yeares, omitting the hundred. So also in Becke’ s Bible, 1549. From the age, as marked down in the Hebrew text, we can infer nothing relative to the time when Job lived. See the subscription at the end of the Arabic.

Clarke: Job 42:17 - Job died, being old and full of days Job died, being old and full of days - He had seen life in all its varieties; he had risen higher than all the men of the East, and sunk lower in af...

Job died, being old and full of days - He had seen life in all its varieties; he had risen higher than all the men of the East, and sunk lower in affliction, poverty, and distress, than any other human being that had existed before, or has lived since. He died when he was satisfied with this life; this the word שבע seba implies. He knew the worst and the best of human life; and in himself the whole history of Providence was exemplified and illustrated, and many of its mysteries unfolded

We have now seen the end of the life of Job, and the end or design which God had in view by his afflictions and trials, in which he has shown us that he is very pitiful, and of tender mercy, Jam 5:11; and to discern this end of the Lord should be the object of every person who reads or studies it. Laus in excelsis Deo

Both in the Arabic and Septuagint there is a considerable and important addition at the end of the seventeenth verse, which extends to many lines; of this, with its variations, I have given a translation in the Preface

At the end of the Syriac version we have the following subscription: -

"The Book of the righteous and renowned Job is finished, and contains 2553 verses.

At the end of the Arabic is the following: -

"It is completed by the assistance of the Most High God. The author of this copy would record that this book has been translated into Arabic from the Syriac language.""Glory be to God, the giver of understanding!""The Book of Job is completed; and his age was two hundred and forty years.""Praise be to God for ever!

So closely does the Arabic translator copy the Syriac, that in the Polyglots one Latin version serves for both, with the exception of a few marginal readings at the bottom of the column to show where the Syriac varies.

Defender: Job 42:7 - thing that is right God rebuked Eliphaz, as the chief spokesman of the three friends. Elihu had already been indirectly rebuked and was evidently ignored here, since he h...

God rebuked Eliphaz, as the chief spokesman of the three friends. Elihu had already been indirectly rebuked and was evidently ignored here, since he had merely restated the Eliphaz arguments. What Job had said about God was right; what the others said was wrong. Job had endured the worse tests Satan could devise, yet retained his faith in God; that was the real issue. But even Job had to confess his sin of failing to submit fully to God as Creator. God has every right to do whatever He wills with respect to those He has created, and we do not have to know why. In the scale of eternity, whatever He does is for our ultimate good. "Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God commit the keeping of their souls to him in well doing, as unto a faithful Creator" (1Pe 4:19)."

Defender: Job 42:10 - turned the captivity Job had actually been captive under Satan's control, just as the Lord later allowed Satan to have Peter (Luk 21:31, Luk 21:32), and no doubt others as...

Job had actually been captive under Satan's control, just as the Lord later allowed Satan to have Peter (Luk 21:31, Luk 21:32), and no doubt others as well. But "through death" Christ has destroyed "him that had the power of death, that is, the devil" (Heb 2:14).

Defender: Job 42:10 - twice as much Job only acquired the same number of children as before, but his earlier family still belonged to him, safe in the Lord, awaiting a reunion with their...

Job only acquired the same number of children as before, but his earlier family still belonged to him, safe in the Lord, awaiting a reunion with their new siblings when all later would be together with the Lord."

TSK: Job 42:2 - thou // no // can be withholden from thee thou : Gen 18:14; Isa 43:13; Jer 32:17; Mat 19:26; Mar 10:27, Mar 14:36; Luk 18:27 no : Psa 44:21, Psa 139:2; Jer 17:10; Eze 38:10; Joh 2:24, Joh 2:25...

TSK: Job 42:3 - Who // things Who : Job 38:2 things : Psa 40:5, Psa 131:1, Psa 139:6; Pro 30:2-4

TSK: Job 42:4 - Hear // I will Hear : Gen 18:27, Gen 18:30-32 I will : Job 38:3, Job 40:7

TSK: Job 42:5 - heard // mine heard : Job 4:12, Job 28:22, Job 33:16; Rom 10:17 mine : Job 23:8, Job 23:9; Num 12:6-8; Isa 6:1; Joh 1:18, Joh 12:41, Joh 12:45; Act 7:55, Act 7:56

TSK: Job 42:6 - I // repent I : Job 9:31, Job 40:3, Job 40:4; Ezr 9:6; Psa 51:17; Isa 5:5; Jer 31:19; Eze 16:63; Eze 20:43, Eze 36:31; Luk 15:18, Luk 15:19; 1Co 15:8, 1Co 15:9; 1...

TSK: Job 42:7 - Eliphaz // My // ye have Eliphaz : Job 2:11, Job 4:1, Job 8:1, Job 11:1 My : Job 32:2, Job 32:3, Job 32:5 ye have : Job 11:5, Job 11:6; Psa 51:4

TSK: Job 42:8 - Therefore // seven bullocks // go // offer // my servant Job shall // him // lest Therefore : From this it appears that Job was considered as a priest, not only to his own family, but also to others. For his children he offered bur...

Therefore : From this it appears that Job was considered as a priest, not only to his own family, but also to others. For his children he offered burnt offerings (Job 1:5), and now he is to make the same kind of offerings, accompanied with intercession, in behalf of his three friends. This is a full proof of the innocence and integrity of Job.

seven bullocks : Num 23:1, Num 23:14, Num 23:29; 1Ch 15:26; 2Ch 29:21; Eze 45:23; Heb 10:4, Heb 10:10-14

go : Mat 5:23, Mat 5:24

offer : Job 1:5; Exo 18:12

my servant Job shall : Gen 20:17; Isa 60:14; Jer 14:11, Jer 15:1; Eze 14:14; Heb 7:25; Jam 5:14; 1Jo 5:6; Rev 3:9

him : Heb. his face, or person, Job 42:9; 1Sa 25:35; Mal 1:8, Mal 1:9; Mat 3:17; Eph 1:6

lest : Psa 103:10; 2Ti 4:14

TSK: Job 42:9 - did // Job did : Job 34:31, Job 34:32; Isa 60:14; Mat 7:24; Joh 2:5; Act 9:6, Act 10:33; Heb 11:8 Job : Heb. the face of Job, Job 42:8, Job 22:27; Pro 3:11, Pro ...

TSK: Job 42:10 - turned // when // the Lord // gave Job twice as much as he had before turned : Job 5:18-20; Deu 30:3; Psa 14:7, Psa 53:6, Psa 126:1, Psa 126:4 when : Gen 20:17; Exo 17:4, Exo 17:5; Num 12:2, Num 12:13, Num 14:1-4, Num 14...

TSK: Job 42:11 - all his brethren // they bemoaned // every man all his brethren : Job 19:13, Job 19:14; Pro 16:7 they bemoaned : Job 2:11, Job 4:4, Job 16:5; Gen 37:35; Isa 35:3, Isa 35:4; Joh 11:19; Rom 12:15; 1C...

TSK: Job 42:12 - So // he had So : Job 8:7; Deu 8:16; Pro 10:22; Ecc 7:8; 1Ti 6:17; Jam 5:11 he had : Job 1:3; Gen 24:35, Gen 26:12-14; Psa 107:38, Psa 144:13-15

TSK: Job 42:13 - -- Job 1:2; Psa 107:41, Psa 127:3; Isa 49:20

TSK: Job 42:15 - no // gave no : Psa 144:12; Act 7:20 gave : Num 27:7; Jos 15:18, Jos 15:19, Jos 18:4

TSK: Job 42:16 - After // an // and saw After : How long he had lived before his afflictions we cannot tell: if we could rely upon the LXX, all would be plain, which adds here, τα δε ...

After : How long he had lived before his afflictions we cannot tell: if we could rely upon the LXX, all would be plain, which adds here, τα δε παντα ετη εζησεν διακοσια τεσσαρακοντα . ""And all the years he lived were two hundred and forty."

an : Gen 11:32, Gen 25:7, Gen 35:28, Gen 47:28, Gen 50:26; Deu 34:7; Jos 24:29; Psa 90:10

and saw : Gen 50:23; Psa 128:6; Pro 17:6

TSK: Job 42:17 - -- Job 5:26; Gen 15:15, Gen 25:8; Deu 6:2; Psa 91:16; Pro 3:16

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Job 42:2 - Thou canst do // Every thing // No thought can be withholden from thee Thou canst do not only by power, (for that he always thought,) but also by right; about which he had in some sort doubted and disputed. It is a maxim...

Thou canst do not only by power, (for that he always thought,) but also by right; about which he had in some sort doubted and disputed. It is a maxim in law, that a man can only do that which he hath a right to do.

Every thing whatsoever it pleaseth thee to do with thy creatures.

No thought can be withholden from thee he speaks either,

1. Of Job’ s thoughts. Thou knowest me and all my sinful and unworthy thoughts of thy providential dealings with me, though I was not able to see the evil of them. Or,

2. Of God’ s thoughts. Whatsoever thou thinkest or proposest to do thou canst or mayst do it; and neither I nor any of thy creatures can either restrain thee from it, or condemn thee for it, as I have boldly and wickedly presumed to do. So this last clause of the verse explains the former.

Poole: Job 42:3 - Who is he? // That hideth counsel without knowledge // Therefore // Things too wonderful for me, which I knew not Who is he? i.e. what am I, that I should dare to do so? Ah silly audacious wretch that I am, that I should be guilty of such madness! That hideth co...

Who is he? i.e. what am I, that I should dare to do so? Ah silly audacious wretch that I am, that I should be guilty of such madness!

That hideth counsel without knowledge which words are repeated out of Job 38:2 , where they are explained.

Therefore because my mind was without knowledge, therefore my speech was ignorant and foolish. Or, being sensible of my ignorance and rashness, I think fit to make this humble and ingenuous confession.

Things too wonderful for me, which I knew not I have spoken foolishly and unadvisedly of things far above my reach, even of God’ s infinite and sovereign majesty, and of his deep and unsearchable counsels and providence.

Poole: Job 42:4 - I will demand of thee Hear and accept my humble and penitent confession and recantation. I will demand of thee or, and inquire , to wit, counsel or instruction, as a s...

Hear and accept my humble and penitent confession and recantation.

I will demand of thee or, and inquire , to wit, counsel or instruction, as a scholar doth of his master, as the following words note. I will no more saucily dispute the matter with thee, but beg information from thee. The words which God had uttered to Job by way of challenge, Job 38:3 40:7 , Job returns to him again in way of submission.

Poole: Job 42:5 - -- The knowledge which I had of thy Divine nature, and perfections, and counsels, was hitherto dark, and doubtful, and conjectural, being grounded chie...

The knowledge which I had of thy Divine nature, and perfections, and counsels, was hitherto dark, and doubtful, and conjectural, being grounded chiefly, if not only, upon the instructions and reports of other men; but now it is clear and certain, as being immediately inspired into my mind by this thy glorious apparition and revelation, and by the operation of thy Holy Spirit; which makes these things as certain and evident to me, as if I saw them with my bodily eyes.

Poole: Job 42:6 - I abhor // myself // In dust and ashes I abhor i.e. dislike, and detest, and loathe myself or my former words and carriage . One of these or some like supplement is necessary to complet...

I abhor i.e. dislike, and detest, and loathe

myself or my former words and carriage . One of these or some like supplement is necessary to complete the sense, and is clearly gathered from the following words.

In dust and ashes sitting in dust and ashes; which hitherto I have done in token of my grief for my affliction; but now I desire and resolve to do in testimony of my penitence for my sins.

Poole: Job 42:7 - To Eliphaz the Temanite // Thy two friends // As my servant Job hath To Eliphaz the Temanite as the eldest of the three, and because he spoke first, and by his evil example led the rest into the same mistakes and miscar...

To Eliphaz the Temanite as the eldest of the three, and because he spoke first, and by his evil example led the rest into the same mistakes and miscarriages.

Thy two friends to wit, Bildad and Zophar, who are not excused, but severely reproved, although they, were drawn into the sin by Eliphaz’ s authority and influence. Elihu is not here reproved, because he dealt more justly and mercifully with Job, and did not condemn his person, but only rebuke his sinful expressions.

As my servant Job hath either,

1. As Job hath now spoken: you have not acknowledged your errors as he hath done. Or rather,

2. As Job did in his discourses with you; which is not to be understood simply and absolutely, (as is manifest from God’ s censure upon Job for his hard and evil speeches of him,) but comparatively, because Job was not so much to be blamed as they; partly, because his opinion concerning the methods of God’ s providence, and the indifferency and promiscuousness of its dispensations towards good and bad men, was truer than theirs, which was that God did generally reward good men and punish sinners in this life; partly, because their misbelief of God’ s counsels and dealings with men was attended with horrid uncharitableness and cruelty towards Job, whom they wounded with bitter and injurious speeches, and condemned as a hypocrite, not only without sufficient evidence, as not being able to search his heart, but upon false and frivolous grounds, to wit, his sore afflictions, and against many evidences of piety which Job had given; and partly, because Job’ s heavy pressures might easily cloud and darken his mind, and draw forth his impatience and passionate speeches; which although it did not wholly excuse Job, yet did certainly much extenuate his offences; whereas they were under no such temptations or provocations, either from God or from Job, but voluntarily broke forth into their hard, and severe, and untrue expressions concerning God’ s counsels and Job’ s conditions, thereby adding affliction to him whom God did sorely afflict, which was most unfriendly and inhuman.

Poole: Job 42:8 - Go to my servant Job // Offer up // Him will I accept // Lest I deal with you after your folly Go to my servant Job whom though you have censured and condemned as a hypocrite, I own for my faithful servant, human infirmity excepted. Offer up ...

Go to my servant Job whom though you have censured and condemned as a hypocrite, I own for my faithful servant, human infirmity excepted.

Offer up by the hand of Job, whom I do hereby constitute your priest, to pray and sacrifice for you.

Him will I accept to wit, on your behalf, as well as on his own.

Lest I deal with you after your folly lest my wrath and just judgment take hold of you for your false and foolish speeches.

Poole: Job 42:9 - Did according as the Lord commanded them // The Lord also accepted Job Did according as the Lord commanded them showing their repentance by their submission to God, and to Job for God’ s sake, and by taking shame to...

Did according as the Lord commanded them showing their repentance by their submission to God, and to Job for God’ s sake, and by taking shame to themselves.

The Lord also accepted Job both for his friends and for himself, as the next verse explains it.

Poole: Job 42:10 - Turned the captivity of Job // When he prayed for his friends // Also Turned the captivity of Job i.e. brought him out of that state of bondage in which he had been so long held by Satan and by his own Spirit, and out o...

Turned the captivity of Job i.e. brought him out of that state of bondage in which he had been so long held by Satan and by his own Spirit, and out of all his distresses and miseries. Or, returned Job’ s captivity , i.e. the persons and things which had been taken from him; not the same which he had lost, but other equivalent to them, and that with advantage.

When he prayed for his friends whereby he manifesteth his obedience to God, and his true love and charity to them, in being so ready to forgive them, and heartily to pray for them; for which God would not let him lose his reward.

Also an emphatical particle. He not only gave him as much as he lost, but double to it.

Poole: Job 42:11 - Then // His brethren and his sisters // Did eat bread with him // They bemoaned him // Over all the evil // Every man also gave him a piece of money, and every one an earring of gold Then when Job had humbled himself, and God was reconciled to Job, he quickly turned the hearts of his friends to favour him, according to Pro 16:7 ; ...

Then when Job had humbled himself, and God was reconciled to Job, he quickly turned the hearts of his friends to favour him, according to Pro 16:7 ; as during his impenitency, and for his trial and humiliation, lie had alienated their hearts from him, of which Job so sadly complains.

His brethren and his sisters largely so called, according to the Scripture use of these titles, to wit, his kindred distinguished from his other acquaintance.

Did eat bread with him i.e. feasted with him, as that phrase is commonly used in Scripture, to congratulate with him for God’ s great and glorious favour already vouchsafed to him in so eminent a vision and revelation.

They bemoaned him they declared the sense which they had of his calamities whilst they were upon him, although they had hitherto wanted opportunity to express it.

Over all the evil or, concerning all the evil ; which though it was bitter to endure when it was present, yet the remembrance of it revived in him by the discourses of his friends was very delightful, as is usual in such cases.

Every man also gave him a piece of money, and every one an earring of gold partly to make up his former losses, and partly as a testimony of their honourable respect to him.

Poole: Job 42:12 - The Lord blessed Job The Lord blessed Job not only with spiritual, but also with temporal and earthly blessings.

The Lord blessed Job not only with spiritual, but also with temporal and earthly blessings.

Poole: Job 42:14 - -- Giving them such excellent names as signify their excellent beauty, of which see my Latin Synopsis.

Giving them such excellent names as signify their excellent beauty, of which see my Latin Synopsis.

Poole: Job 42:15 - -- Gave his daughters a share, and possibly an equal share, with his sons in his inheritance; which in so plentiful an estate he might easily do, espec...

Gave his daughters a share, and possibly an equal share, with his sons in his inheritance; which in so plentiful an estate he might easily do, especially to such amiable sisters, without the envy of their brethren; and which peradventure he did to oblige them to settle themselves amongst their brethren, and to marry into their own religious kindred, not to strangers, who in those times were generally swallowed up in the gulf of idolatry.

Poole: Job 42:17 - Old and full of days After God had turned his captivity, as is said Job 42:10 . Old and full of days by which length of his days it seems most probable that he lived b...

After God had turned his captivity, as is said Job 42:10 .

Old and full of days by which length of his days it seems most probable that he lived before the times of Moses, when the days of human life were much shortened, as he complains.

END OF VOL. I.

Haydock: Job 42:2 - I know // Hid I know. So the Keri orders us to translate, with all the ancient versions, as the Hebrew text has, "thou knowest;" which Prof. Chappelow and Schulte...

I know. So the Keri orders us to translate, with all the ancient versions, as the Hebrew text has, "thou knowest;" which Prof. Chappelow and Schultens deem more "sublime," though one would think it was hardly "sense." (Kennicott) ---

Hid. Hebrew, "of thine can be hindered." All thy orders must be obeyed. It is in vain to keep silence: (chap. xxxix. 34.) I will confess openly thy justice and power. (Haydock) -- He acknowledges his error, in not having before spoken enough of a just Providence. (Worthington)

Haydock: Job 42:3 - Who // Unwisely Who. Hebrew, "Who is he that hideth counsel without knowledge?" (Protestants) This seems to allude to the words of God, chap. xxxviii. 2. Eac...

Who. Hebrew, "Who is he that hideth counsel without knowledge?" (Protestants) This seems to allude to the words of God, chap. xxxviii. 2. Each of my friends has only rendered the ways of Providence more obscure, and I myself have not perfectly understood them. (Haydock) ---

Unwisely. See chap. xxxix. 35. (Worthington) (Du Hamel) ---

Hebrew, "without knowledge, thing wonderful to me, which I knew not." (Haydock) ---

Now I comprehend that thou didst not afflict me, but hast given me into the hands of the enemy, as thou wilt hereafter do others of the greatest virtue, that their patience may shine the brighter, and be rewarded. I need inquire no father, now I see thy design plainly, ver. 5. He does not accuse himself of any sin or false assertion, but acknowledges his infirmity in not having understood this before, ver. 6. (Houbigant) ---

Septuagint, "I have been told what I knew not, things great and wonderful, of which I was not apprized." (Haydock) ---

Who can deny God's providence? (Du Hamel)

Haydock: Job 42:5 - Seeth thee Seeth thee. Some have thought that God now manifested himself from the cloud. (Eusebius, Dem. i. 4.; Titalman, &c.) But all now agree that he only ...

Seeth thee. Some have thought that God now manifested himself from the cloud. (Eusebius, Dem. i. 4.; Titalman, &c.) But all now agree that he only enlightened his understanding, and made known his designs more clearly. (Calmet) ---

Job now perceived that he had spoken too boldly, in saying, Hear, and I will speak, &c., ver. 4. The rest of this book is in prose. (Tirinus)

Haydock: Job 42:6 - Reprehend // Penance Reprehend. Hebrew and Septuagint, "vilify." (Haydock) --- I recall the obscure expression which has occasioned my friends to mistake. (Du Hamel) ...

Reprehend. Hebrew and Septuagint, "vilify." (Haydock) ---

I recall the obscure expression which has occasioned my friends to mistake. (Du Hamel) ---

Penance. Hebrew, "groan." Septuagint, "pine away, I look upon myself as dust and ashes." Such are the sentiments which every one will entertain the nearer he approaches to the divine Majesty. (Haydock) ---

I no longer assert my innocence, but wait patiently in my present forlorn condition, till thou shalt be pleased to dispose of me. How much would the reputation and authority of Job sink, if some of his assertions had been destitute of truth, particularly as the sacred author does not mention which they were! But God exculpates his servant, ver. 8. (Houbigant) ---

Chaldean, "I have despised my riches, and I am comforted with respect to my children, who are now reduced to dust and ashes." I find a consolation in submitting patiently to my sufferings, which I may have deserved on account of my unguarded speeches. (Calmet) ---

Job waits not for God's answer, ver. 4. He at once feels an interior light, and is resigned. (Haydock) ---

He had defended the truth against men: now, with more resignation, he is content to suffer, and does penance for himself and others. (Worthington)

Haydock: Job 42:7 - Two friends // As Two friends. It is astonishing that Eliu is not also reprehended, as he was no better than the rest. Some answer, that god had passed sentence upo...

Two friends. It is astonishing that Eliu is not also reprehended, as he was no better than the rest. Some answer, that god had passed sentence upon him first. Others maintain, that he spoke with greater dignity of God's judgments, and that his ignorance was blameless; while others remark, that he was connected with some of the three friends, or only came accidentally to enter into the debate. God gives sentence in favour of Job, though with some reproof for his manner of speaking. ---

As. They had maintained false doctrines, and shewed a want of due respect and compassion for their friend; (Tirinus) whereas Job's assertions were true. (Calmet) ---

How then can he be accused of denying the divine justice, or of speaking disrespectfully of Providence? God seemed to interrogate him on this account, though he approved of his sentiments, because some might draw such inferences from his words as all his friends did. But Job entertained no such ideas. He was not guilty of such folly, ver. 8. Septuagint, "Thou hast sinned, and thy two friends, for you have spoken in my presence nothing true like my servant Job."

Haydock: Job 42:8 - Offer // Pray // Face // Before Offer. Septuagint, "Thou shalt make an oblation, Greek: karpoma, for you." (Haydock) --- Yet holocausts seem to have been the only species of sa...

Offer. Septuagint, "Thou shalt make an oblation, Greek: karpoma, for you." (Haydock) ---

Yet holocausts seem to have been the only species of sacrifice before Moses. The number seven, has always been in a manner sacred; (Calmet) being doubled, it shews the greatness of the offence. (St. Gregory) (Worthington) ---

Job was to present these victims to God, (Calmet) as the priest and mediator, (Du Hamel) of whom God approved. He officiated for his family, (Calmet) and was the most honourable person there. (Haydock) ---

It seems Job was not present when God gave this injunction; perhaps some time after their debates. (Calmet) ---

Pray. Behold the efficacy of the prayers of the saints, even while upon earth. How much greater will it be, when their charity is greater and unfailing! (Haydock) ---

The many sacrifices would not have sufficed, if Job had not joined his prayer, as St. Chrysostom (or 5 con. Judœos) observes. His mediation did not derogate from God's mercy, under the law of nature; not does that of other men injure Christ's under the law of grace, 2 Corinthians i. 11. We have here also a proof that both sacrifice and the devotion of the offerer, have their distinct effects; opus operatum, and opus operantis, as the schoolmen speak. Thus Job was honourably acquitted, while his friends were justly rebuked. Eliu needed no express condemnation; as what God says to one, must be applied to another in the same circumstances, chap. xxxiii. 14. Protestants are therefore inexcusable, who preach a doctrine not only condemned in their fellows, Luther, &c., but long before in ancient heretics: as the justification by faith alone was in the apostles' time, the rejection of the ceremonies of baptism, of confirmation and penance, in the Novatians, &c. See St. Cyprian iv. ep. 2. (Worthington) ---

Face. Septuagint, "For I would not accept his face, and if it were not on his account, I had surely destroyed you. For you have not said to me any thing good (Roman Septuagint, true, ) against (or concerning, Greek: kata, ) my servant Job." They acted both against charity and truth. (Haydock) ---

Before. Protestants, "of me the thing which is right." The words underlined were not so in the earlier edition by Barker, printer to James I, (1613) where some of the margin translations are also omitted, ver. 14, &c. The matter is of no farther consequence, than to shew that alterations have taken place since the days of James I, who Bible is supposed to be the standard of the English Church. The marginal version is also frequently neglected altogether, (the year of our Lord 1706) though the authors seem to have looked upon it as equally probable with that in the text. (Pref.) (Haydock)

Haydock: Job 42:10 - Penance // Twice Penance. Hebrew, "return." He resolved to restore him to his former prosperous condition, while he prayed for those who had so cruelly exercised hi...

Penance. Hebrew, "return." He resolved to restore him to his former prosperous condition, while he prayed for those who had so cruelly exercised his patience. (Calmet) ---

Protestants and Vatable, "the Lord turned the captivity of Job:" so any great distress may be styled, though Job was in a manner abandoned to the power and bondage of satan. Septuagint, "But the Lord gave an increase to Job, and while he was praying for his friends, He forgave them their sin. And," &c. (Haydock) ---

Twice, excepting children, who were living (Worthington) with God. (Rabbins) (St. Gregory, &c.) ---

Some also include the years of Job's life, but that is not clear, (see Spanheim, c. 7.; Calmet) though not improbable; as he might very well live twice as long as he had done, if we suppose that the was about (Haydock) 50 when he was so much distressed (Petau); and thus arrived at the age of 140, ver. 16. (Haydock)

Haydock: Job 42:11 - Brethren // Bemoaned // Ewe // Ear-ring Brethren. Who had before shamefully abandoned him, chap. vi. 13. (Calmet) --- Bemoaned. Literally, "shaked their heads at him," (Haydock) out of...

Brethren. Who had before shamefully abandoned him, chap. vi. 13. (Calmet) ---

Bemoaned. Literally, "shaked their heads at him," (Haydock) out of pity, (Menochius) or astonishment, (Tirinus; Calmet) at his fallen state, and at the present change for the better. They helped to restore him to affluence, in conformity with the will of God, who caused their presents of multiply. The kindred and friends of Job were undoubtedly numerous. (Haydock) ---

Ewe. Kesita, "lamb," as most of the ancients agree, (Spanheim) or a piece of money, (Bochart) marked with the figure of a lamb. (Grotius) See Genesis xxxiii. 19. (Calmet) ---

Ear-ring. Hebrew Nezem, an ornament (Haydock) "for the nose," still very common in the East. Symmachus adds, "it was unadorned," (Calmet) or plain. Septuagint, "a piece of gold worth four drachms, and not coined," Greek: asemon. (Haydock) ---

Oleaster supposes that the nose was perforated, like the ear. But the ornament would thus be very inconvenient, and we may rather conclude that it hung down from the forehead upon the nose. (St. Jerome, in Ezechiel xvi.) (Pineda)

Haydock: Job 42:12 - Asses Asses. Septuagint, "droves of," &c., which would greatly increase the number.

Asses. Septuagint, "droves of," &c., which would greatly increase the number.

Haydock: Job 42:14 - Dies // Yemima....Ketsiha....Keren hapuc // Cassia // Cornustibii Dies, &c. "Day....cassia....and horn of antimony." (Hebrew) --- Yemima....Ketsiha....Keren hapuc. This last may signify (Haydock) "horn of chang...

Dies, &c. "Day....cassia....and horn of antimony." (Hebrew) ---

Yemima....Ketsiha....Keren hapuc. This last may signify (Haydock) "horn of change," (Pagnin) in allusion to Job's different states. (Menochius) (Du Hamel) ---

Sometimes we find the Latin names retained, and at other times translated. It would perhaps be as well to give their force uniformly in English, or rather to insert the original terms, if they could be now properly expressed. But that is impossible. Protestants, Jemima, "handsome as the day." Kezia, "superficies, angle, or cassia." Keren-happuch, "the horn or child of beauty." The marginal explanations are given at least in the edition Edinb. 1787. (Haydock) ---

Cassia, an aromatic herb, which is perhaps not now found to be found in Europe, Matthiol. in Dios. i. 12. ---

The Arabs like to give such names to their children. (Spanheim, Hist. Job.) ---

Cornustibii, (Hebrew Puc ) means a sort of paint, used to blacken the eyelids, (4 Kings ix. 30.) or a precious stone, Isaias liv. 11. Chaldean, "brilliant as an emerald." She was so styled, on account of her great beauty, (Calmet) in which she was not inferior to her two sisters. Septuagint, "Horn of Amalthea," (Haydock) or of plenty, (Calmet) which is not an approbation of the fable, but to show the abundance which Job now enjoyed. (Nicetas.) ---

Cassia might remind him of the bad smells to which he had been exposed. (Menochius) (Tirinus)

Haydock: Job 42:15 - Daughters // Brethren Daughters. Alexandrian Septuagint adds, "and sons." --- Brethren. This was contrary to the custom of the Jews, (Numbers xxvii. 8.) but conformabl...

Daughters. Alexandrian Septuagint adds, "and sons." ---

Brethren. This was contrary to the custom of the Jews, (Numbers xxvii. 8.) but conformable to the Roman laws, and to the Koran. (Sur. 4.) (Calmet)

Haydock: Job 42:16 - Years // Days Years, in all, as Judith is said to have dwelt in the house of her husband 105 years; though it is agreed that she only lived that space of time....

Years, in all, as Judith is said to have dwelt in the house of her husband 105 years; though it is agreed that she only lived that space of time. (Haydock) ---

Authors are much divided about the length of Job's life. Some suppose that he was afflicted with the leprosy at the age of 70, for several months, (Tirinus) or for a whole year, (Calmet) or for seven, (Salien) and that he lived twice as long after his re-establishment, in all 210. (Calmet) (Tirinus) Septuagint, "Job lived after his chastisement 170," (Grabe substitutes 140 years. Then he marks with an obel as redundant) "but all the years which he lived were 248;" and adds from Theodition, "And Job saw his sons and their children, even the fourth generation." (Haydock) ---

The old Vulgate had also 248 years; while some Greek copies read 740. But Grotius thinks the life of Job was not extended beyond 200. Petau and Spanheim say 189, (Calmet) and Pindea 210, or rather 280, years. Yet the life of man, in the days of Moses, his contemporary, was not often longer than 120; so that if we allow Job 140, he would be an old man, and might see the fourth generation, ver. 10. (Haydock) ---

The Greeks celebrate his festival on the 6th, the Latins on the 10th of May. (Pineda) ---

Days. Here a long addition is found in the Greek, Arabic, and old Vulgate; and Theodotion has also inserted it in his version, as it seems to contain a true and ancient tradition, (see Eusebius, præp. ix. 25.) though the Fathers have properly distinguished it from the inspired text. It stands thus in the Alexandrian Septuagint with an obel prefixed: "But it is written, that he shall be raised again, with those whom the Lord will restore to life. " He, this man, as it is translated from the Syriac book, lived in the land of Ausites, (Hus.) on the borders of Idumea, and of Arabia, and was before called Jobab. But marrying an Arabian woman, he begot a son by name Ennon. But his father was Zareth, a descendant of the sons of Esau, and his mother was Bossora; (Arabic, a native of Bosra) so that he was the 5th (Arabic, the 6th) from Abraham. Now these were the kings who reigned in Edom; over which country he also ruled. First, Balac, son of Semphor; (others have Beor ) and the name of his city was Dennaba. After Balak, Jobab, who is called Job. After him, Assom, a leader from the country of Theman. After this man, Adad, son of Barad, who slew Madian in the plain of Moab; and the name of his city was Gethaim. But the friends who came to him were, Eliphaz, [ son of Sophan ] of the sons of Esau, king of the Themanites; Baldad, [ son of Amnon, of Chobar ] of the Auchite tyrant; (Grabe substitutes the tyrant of the Saucheans, as they call our Shuhites) Sophor, king of the Mineans." What is marked with crotchets, (Haydock) has been probably taken from Theodotion. See the Greek Catena. What follows occurs in the Alexandrian manuscript. (Calmet) ---

" [ Theman, son of Eliphaz, he, as the Syriac book is rendered, lived in the land of Ausites, on the borders of the Euphrates. His former name was Jobab, but Zareth was his father, from the sun rising." ] or eastern country. (Haydock) ---

Job might very well be the 5th or 6th from Abraham, if he were a contemporary with Moses, as Levi and Amram would live at the same time with Rahuel and Zare; (See 1 Paralipomenon i. 35, 44.) so that this tradition agrees with history. But what is said of the Syriac version is not so certain. (Calmet) ---

Some think the Syriac or Arabic was the original text, as the Greek seems to indicate, Greek: outos ermeneuetai ek tes Suriakes Biblou, en men ge katoikon, &c. The passage at the end, where this is repeated, may be an interpolation, as the latter part seems rather to belong to Job. For how could Theman have both Eliphaz and Zareth for his father? Grabe therefore, marks it as such. It would be too long for us to transcribe (Haydock) the praises which the Fathers have given to Job, and the resemblance which they have discovered between him and Jesus Christ. See Hebrews iv. 15 and xiii. 12.; Tertullian, patient.; St. Chrysostom, hom. xxxiv. in Matt. St. Ambrose, in Psalm xxxvii. 21., observes, that his behaviour on the dunghill was the greatest condemnation of satan, who fell by pride, though so highly favoured. (Calmet) ---

Besides the literal sense of this book, which displays the trials and victories of Job, we may consider him as a lively figure of Christ; who was perfectly innocent, and yet a man of sorrows: we may raise our minds to the contemplation of the greater glory which will attend the bodies of the just, after the resurrection; and, above all, we may discover lessons of morality, enforcing the observance of every virtue, and particularly of patience and resignation. (St. Gregory, &c.) (Worthington) ---

The books of Machabees, which are the only remaining pieces of sacred history, might have been here inserted, as they are in Calmet's edition, that so all the historical part might come together. But is is more common to place those books after the prophets. They only relate a few of the transactions which took place during the 400 or 500 years preceding the Christian era. The rest must be borrowed from Josephus, or from profane authors. It would, however, be proper to read those books, and to have an idea of that period, before we attempt to explain the prophecies. (Haydock)

Gill: Job 42:1 - Then Job answered the Lord, and said. Then Job answered the Lord, and said. For though he had said he would answer no more, Job 40:5; yet he might mean not in the manner he had, complainin...

Then Job answered the Lord, and said. For though he had said he would answer no more, Job 40:5; yet he might mean not in the manner he had, complaining of God and justifying himself; besides he might change his mind without any imputation of falsehood or a lie; see Jer 20:9; to which may be added, that he had then said all he had to say, and did not know he should have more: he then confessed as much as he was convinced of, but it was not enough; and now through what the Lord had since said to him he was more convinced of his ignorance, mistakes, and sins, and had such a sight of God and of himself, that he could not forbear speaking; moreover an injunction was laid upon him from the Lord to speak again, and therefore he was obliged to give in his answer; see Job 40:7.

Gill: Job 42:2 - I know that thou canst do every thing I know that thou canst do every thing,.... As the works of creation, and the sustentation of them, show; so the Targum, "thou sustainest all thing...

I know that thou canst do every thing,.... As the works of creation, and the sustentation of them, show; so the Targum,

"thou sustainest all things,''

and can manage, every creature made by him, even such as were not tractable by men, such as behemoth and leviathan, the creatures last instanced in; and was able to abase and bring low the proud, which Job could not do; and could also save him by his right hand, and bring him out of his low estate in which he was, and raise him to great prosperity again, which Job always despaired of till now; and though he had a theoretical knowledge of the omnipotence of God before, see Job 9:4; yet not a practical experimental knowledge of it; at least not to such a degree as he now had, working upon his heart, bowing his will, and bringing him to a resignation to the will of God; he not only knew he could do all things, but that he had a right to do what he pleased; and that whatever he did he did well and wisely, and in a righteous manner, of which before he seemed to have some doubt. And that no thought can be withholden from thee; either no thought of men, good or bad, of God or of themselves, and so is an acknowledgment of the omniscience of God, and may be an appeal to that; that God, who knows the secrets of men's hearts, knew what thoughts Job now had of God; of the wisdom, righteousness, and goodness of God in the dispensations of his providence, different from what he had before; see Joh 21:17; or rather it may be understood of every thought of God's heart, of every secret purpose and wise counsel of his; which, as they are all well known to him, and cannot be withheld from having effect, or the performance of them hindered, Job now saw and was fully assured that all that had befallen him was according to the sovereign and inscrutable purposes of God, and according to the wise counsels of his will; he knew that not only God could do everything, but that he also did whatever he pleased.

Gill: Job 42:3 - Who is he that hideth counsel without knowledge // therefore have I uttered that I understood not // things too wonderful for me, which I knew not Who is he that hideth counsel without knowledge?.... It may be understood, and supplied, as it is by Cocceius, "thou didst say"; as the Lord had said...

Who is he that hideth counsel without knowledge?.... It may be understood, and supplied, as it is by Cocceius, "thou didst say"; as the Lord had said, or to this purpose; see Gill on Job 38:2; to which Job here replies, I am the foolish man that has done it, I own it with sorrow, shame, and confusion: or it may be interpreted as condemning every other man that should act the like part. Schultens understands this as spoken by Job of God, and renders the words,

"who is this that seals up counsel, which cannot be known?''

the counsels, purposes, and decrees of God are sealed up by him, among his treasures, in the cabinet of his own breast, and are not to be unsealed and unlocked by creatures, but are impenetrable to them, past finding out by them, and not to be searched and pried into; and so the secret springs of Providence are not to be known, which Job had attempted, and for which he condemns himself;

therefore have I uttered that I understood not; concerning the providential dealings of God with men, afflicting the righteous, and suffering the wicked to prosper, particularly relating to his own afflictions; in which he arraigned the wisdom, justice, and goodness of God, as if things might have been better done than they were; but now he owns his ignorance and folly, as Asaph did in a like case, Psa 73:22;

things too wonderful for me, which I knew not; things out of his reach to search into, and beyond his capacity to comprehend; what he should have gazed upon with admiration, and there have stopped. The judgments of God are a great deep, not to be fathomed with the line of human understanding, of which it should be said with the apostle, "O the depth", Rom 11:33, &c. Job ought to have done as David did, Psa 131:1; of which he was now convinced, and laments and confesses his folly.

Gill: Job 42:4 - Hear, I beseech thee, and I will speak // I will demand of thee // and declare thou unto me Hear, I beseech thee, and I will speak,.... Not in the manner he had before, complaining of God and justifying himself, but in a way of humble entreat...

Hear, I beseech thee, and I will speak,.... Not in the manner he had before, complaining of God and justifying himself, but in a way of humble entreaty of favours of him, of confession of sin before him, and of acknowledgment of his wisdom, goodness, and justice in all his dealings with him, which before he arraigned;

I will demand of thee; or rather "I will make petition to thee", as Mr. Broughton renders it; humbly ask a favour, and entreat a gracious answer; for to demand is not so agreeable to the frame and temper of soul Job was now in;

and declare thou unto me; or make him know what he knew not; he now in ignorance applies to God, as a God of knowledge, to inform him in things he was in the dark about, and to increase what knowledge he had. He was now willing to take the advice of Elihu, and pursue it, Job 34:31.

Gill: Job 42:5 - I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear // but now mine eye seeth thee I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear,.... From his ancestors, who in a traditionary way had handed down from one to another what they knew o...

I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear,.... From his ancestors, who in a traditionary way had handed down from one to another what they knew of God, his will and worship, his works and ways; and from those who had the care of his education, parents and tutors, who had instilled the principles of religion, and the knowledge of divine things, into him very early; and from such as might instruct in matters of religion in a public manner; and both by ordinary and extraordinary revelation made unto him, as was sometimes granted to men in that age in which Job lived; see Job 4:16. Though he had heard more of God through his speaking to him out of the whirlwind than ever he did before, to which he had attentively listened; and the phrase, hearing by or with the hearing of the ear, denotes close attention; see Eze 44:5;

but now mine eye seeth thee; thy Shechinah, as Jarchi; thy divine glory and Majesty; the Logos, the Word or Son of God, who now appeared in an human form, and spake to Job out of the whirlwind; and whom he saw with the eyes of his body, as several of the patriarchs had seen him, and which is the sense of an ancient writer n; though no doubt he saw him also with the eyes of his understanding, and had a clearer sight of his living Redeemer, the Messiah, than ever he had before; and saw more of God in Christ, of his nature, perfections, and glory, than ever he had as yet seen; and what he had heard of him came greatly short of what he now saw; particularly he had a more clear and distinct view of the sovereignty, wisdom, goodness, and justice of God in the dealings of his providence with the children of men, and with himself, to which now he humbly submitted.

Gill: Job 42:6 - Wherefore I abhor myself // and repent in dust and ashes Wherefore I abhor myself,.... Or all my words, as Aben Ezra; all the indecent expressions he had uttered concerning God; he could not bear to think o...

Wherefore I abhor myself,.... Or all my words, as Aben Ezra; all the indecent expressions he had uttered concerning God; he could not bear to think of them; he loathed them, and himself on account of them: sin is abominable in its own nature, and makes men so; it is loathsome to God, and so it is to all good men when they see it in its proper light; am especially when they have a view of the purity and holiness of God, to which that is so very contrary, and also of his grace and goodness in the forgiveness of it; see Isa 6:3, Eze 16:63;

and repent in dust and ashes; which was an external ceremony used by mournful and penitent persons; see Job 2:8; and is expressive of the truth and sincerity of repentance; and never do any more truly mourn for sin and repent of it, are more ashamed of it, or have a more godly sorrow for it, or more ingenuously confess it, and heartily forsake it, than those who with an eye of faith behold God in Christ as a sin forgiving God; or behold their sins through the glass of pardoning grace and mercy; see Zec 12:10.

Gill: Job 42:7 - And it was so // that after the Lord had spoken these words unto Job // the Lord said to Eliphaz the Temanite // my wrath is kindled against thee, and against thy two friends // for ye have not spoken of me the thing that is right, as my servant Job hath And it was so,.... What follows came to pass: that after the Lord had spoken these words unto Job; which he spake to him out of the whirlwind, and...

And it was so,.... What follows came to pass:

that after the Lord had spoken these words unto Job; which he spake to him out of the whirlwind, and after he had heard Job's confession, and the declaration he made of his humiliation and repentance:

the Lord said to Eliphaz the Temanite; who with his two friends were still present and heard the speeches of the Lord to Job, and the acknowledgment he had made of sin; though some o think that, when the dispute ended between Job and them, they returned to their own country, where Eliphaz is now supposed to be, and was bid with his two friends to go to Job again, which they did, as is concluded from the following verses: but no doubt they stayed and heard what Elihu had to say; and the voice of the Lord out of the whirlwind would command their attention and stay; and very desirous they must be to know how the cause would go, for or against Job; the latter of which they might expect from the appearance of things. Now the Lord directs his speech to Eliphaz, he being perhaps the principal man, on account of his age, wisdom and wealth, and being the man that led the dispute, began it, and formed the plan to go upon, and was the most severe on Job of any of them; wherefore the Lord said to him,

my wrath is kindled against thee, and against thy two friends; who were Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite; who gave into the same sentiments with Eliphaz, and went upon the same plan, speaking wrong things of God, charging Job falsely, and condemning him; which provoked the Lord, and caused his wrath to be kindled like fire against them, of which there were some appearances and breakings forth in his words and conduct towards them;

for ye have not spoken of me the thing that is right, as my servant Job hath; they had said many right things of God, and Job had said many wrong ones of him, and yet upon the whole Job had said more corrcet things of God than they; their notion, and which they had expressed, was, that God deals with men in this life according to their outward behaviour; that God did not afflict good men, at least not sorely, nor long; and that wicked men were always punished now: from whence they drew this inference, that Job, being so long and so greatly afflicted, must be a bad man, or God would never have dealt with him after this manner. Job, on the other hand, affirmed, that wicked men enjoyed great prosperity, which good men did not; and therefore the love and hatred of God were not known by these things; and men's characters were not to be judged of by these outward things; in which he was doubtless right: some render the words "have not spoken unto me" p, before him, in his presence; for they were all before God, and to him they all appealed, and he heard and observed all that was said, and now passed judgment. No notice is taken of Elihu, nor blame laid on him; he acting as a moderator, taking neither the part of Job, nor of his friends, but blaming both: nor did he pretend to charge Job with any sins of his former life as the cause of his calamities; only takes up some indecent, unguarded, and extravagant expressions of his in the heat of this controversy, and rebukes him for them; and throughout the whole vindicates the justice of God in his dealings with him.

Gill: Job 42:8 - Therefore take unto you now seven bullocks, and seven rams // and go to my servant Job, and offer up for yourselves a burnt offering // and my servant Job shall pray for you // for him will I accept // lest I deal with you after your folly // in that ye have not spoken of me the thing which is right, like my servant Job Therefore take unto you now seven bullocks, and seven rams,.... Creatures used in sacrifice before the giving of the Levitical law, Gen 4:4; and the s...

Therefore take unto you now seven bullocks, and seven rams,.... Creatures used in sacrifice before the giving of the Levitical law, Gen 4:4; and the same number of the same creatures were offered by Balaam in the country of Moab, not far from where Job lived, nor at any great distance of time from his age, Num 23:1; and among the Gentiles in later times q. And these were typical of Christ, being strong creatures, especially the bullocks, and which were used for labour; and the number seven may point at the perfection of Christ's sacrifice; to which these men were directed in their sacrifices to look for the complete atonement of their sins: now though they were not at their own dwellings, and could not take these out of their own herds and flocks, and Job had none, yet they could purchase them of others; and which having done, they are bid to do as follows:

and go to my servant Job, and offer up for yourselves a burnt offering; that is, by Job, who was to offer it for them in their name, and at whose hands the Lord would accept it, and for his sake. Job, as the head and master of his family, was wont to sacrifice, as every such man did before the Aaronic priesthood took place, Job 1:5. Now this was doing Job a great deal of honour, both by calling him his servant, as before in Job 42:7, and twice more in this; which was plainly giving the cause on his side; confirming the character he always bore, and still retained; and declaring he had other thoughts of him than his friends had; as well by sending them to him with their sacrifices to offer for them; which was saying, that they had sinned, and must offer sacrifice, and that Job was in the right; and therefore must offer the sacrifice for them. This was putting them on a great piece of self-denial; that men, who were older than Job, great personages, heads of families, and who had been wont to offer sacrifices in them, yet are now sent to Job to offer them for them; a man now in mean circumstances, and who in they had treated with great contempt; and he in his turn had used them as roughly. And it was also a trial of Job's grace, and of his forgiving spirit, to do this for them, and pray to God on their behalf: and the Lord's design in it was, to exercise the graces of them both, and to reconcile them to one another, and to himself;

and my servant Job shall pray for you; that their sacrifice might be accepted, and their sin pardoned. In this Job was a type of Christ, as he was in many other things; see the notes on Job 16:9. There is an agreement in his name; Job, whether it signifies love or hatred, desired or hated, in both ways the etymology of it is given; it agrees with Christ, who is beloved of God and man, and the desire of all nations; who hates iniquity, and was hated for his inveighing against it. Job was a type of him in his threefold state; before his low estate, in it, and after it; see Phi 2:6. In his temptations by Satan, and sufferings from men; and particularly in his office as a priest, who both offered himself a sacrifice for his people, and offers their services and sacrifices of prayer and praise to God; and who prayed for his disciples, and for all the Father has given him, for transgressors and sinners, and even for his enemies that used him ill;

for him will I accept; or his face, that is, hear his prayer, and grant what is asked by him; as well as accept his sacrifice;

lest I deal with you after your folly; as all sin is, being committed against God, a breach of his law, and injurious to men themselves; see Deu 32:6. Though here it seems to be restrained to their particular sin and folly in their dispute with Job; want of wisdom in them was discerned by Elihu, Job 32:7. So it follows:

in that ye have not spoken of me the thing which is right, like my servant Job; and if by neglect of his advice, which would have been another instance of their folly, they had provoked the Lord to deal with them as their sin deserved, it must have gone hard with them. The Targum is,

"lest I should do with you "what would be" a reproach''

(or disgrace); would put them to shame, and make them appear ignominious to men; as by stripping them of their substance and honour, and reducing them to the condition Job was in.

Gill: Job 42:9 - So Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite, went // and did according as the Lord commanded them // the Lord also accepted Job So Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite, went,.... Having taken the above creatures for sacrifice, as directed, th...

So Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite, went,.... Having taken the above creatures for sacrifice, as directed, they went to Job with them;

and did according as the Lord commanded them; offered them by Job for a burnt offering, and desired him to pray for them. This they did, both as to matter and manner, as the Lord ordered them; and they did it immediately, without consulting flesh and blood, the pride and other passions of their hearts; and they all united in it, and served the Lord with one consent, which showed them to be good men;

the Lord also accepted Job; the sacrifice he offered; perhaps by sending fire from heaven, which consumed the burnt offering: or "the face of Job"; he heard his prayer for his friends, and granted his request for them: or "the person of Job", as Mr. Broughton renders it; Job in this was a type of Christ also, who is always heard in his intercession and mediation for his people. God has respect to his person, which always acceptable to him, and in whom he is well pleased; and he has respect to his offering and sacrifice, which is of a sweet smelling savour to him. And the persons of his people are accepted in him the Beloved, and all their services and sacrifices of prayer and praise, Mat 3:17. The Targum is,

"they did as the Word of the Lord spake unto them, and the Word of the Lord accepted the face of Job.''

Gill: Job 42:10 - And the Lord turned the captivity of Job // when he prayed for his friends // also the Lord gave Job twice as much as he had before And the Lord turned the captivity of Job,.... Not literally, in such sense as Lot's captivity was turned, Gen 14:12; for Job's person was not seized o...

And the Lord turned the captivity of Job,.... Not literally, in such sense as Lot's captivity was turned, Gen 14:12; for Job's person was not seized on and carried away, though his cattle were: nor spiritually, being delivered from the captivity of sin; that had been his case many years ago, when first converted: but it is to be understood of his restoration from afflictions and calamities to a happy state; as of the return of his substance, his health and friends, and especially of his deliverance from Satan, in whose hands he had been some time, and by him distressed both in body and mind. But now his captivity was turned, and he was freed from all his distresses; and even from those which arose from the dealings of God with him, which he was now fully satisfied about; and this was done,

when he prayed for his friends; as he was directed to do. A good man will not only pray for himself, as Job doubtless did, but for others also; for his natural and spiritual friends, yea, for unkind friends, and even for enemies likewise: and the prayer of an upright man is very acceptable to the Lord; and many mercies and blessings come by it; and even prayer for others is profitable to a man's self; and sometimes he soon reaps the benefit of it, as Job now did. For when and while he was praying, or quickly upon it, there was a turn in his affairs: he presently found himself in better health; his friends came about him, and his substance began to increase; Satan had no more power over him, and the presence of God was with him. All which was of the Lord; and he enjoyed it in the way of prayer, and as the fruit of that;

also the Lord gave Job twice as much as he had before: or added to him double. Which chiefly respects his substance; his cattle, as appears from Job 42:12, and might be true both with respect to things temporal and spiritual. "Double" may denote an abundance, a large measure of good things; see Zec 9:12.

Gill: Job 42:11 - Then came there unto him all his brethren, and all his sisters // and all they that had been of his acquaintance before // and did eat bread with him in his house // and they bemoaned him // and comforted him over all the evil that the Lord had brought upon him // every man also gave him a piece of money // and everyone earring of gold Then came there unto him all his brethren, and all his sisters,.... Which may be taken not in a strict sense, but in a larger sense for all that were ...

Then came there unto him all his brethren, and all his sisters,.... Which may be taken not in a strict sense, but in a larger sense for all that were related to him; the same with his kinsfolks, Job 19:14;

and all they that had been of his acquaintance before; that knew him, visited him, conversed with him, and kept up a friendly correspondence with him; the circle of his acquaintance must have been large, for wealth makes many friends: now these had been shy of him, and kept at a distance from him, during the time of his affliction and distress; see Job 19:13; but hearing he was in the favour of God, and the cause was given on his side, and against his friends, and his affairs began to take a more favourable turn, they came to him again, and paid him a friendly visit, even all of them;

and did eat bread with him in his house: expressing their joy for his recovery, and renewing their friendship with him: this was done either at their own expense or at Job's, for he might not be so poor at the worst as he is by most represented; for he had still an house of his own, and furniture in it, and servants to wait upon him, as appears from Job 19:15; nor do we read of anything being taken out of his house from him; he might still have gold and silver, and so could entertain his friends: and being a man of an excellent spirit received them kindly, without upbraiding them with their unkindness in deserting him when afflicted;

and they bemoaned him; shook their heads at him, pitying his case, that is, which he had been in; for this they might do, though things were now better with him, and might express themselves in such manner as this,

"Poor man, what hast thou endured? what hast thou gone through by diseases of body, loss of substance, and vexation from friends?''

and besides, though things began to mend with him, he was not come at once to the pitch of happiness he arrived unto; so that there might be still room for bemoaning, he being comparatively in poor circumstances to what he was before;

and comforted him over all the evil that the Lord had brought upon him; the evil of afflictions, of body and estate; which, though by means of Satan and wicked men, was according to the will of God, and might be said to be brought on him and done to him by the Lord, Amo 3:6; and they congratulated him upon his deliverance from them;

every man also gave him a piece of money, or a "lamb"; which some understand in a proper sense, as being what might serve towards making up his loss of sheep, and increasing his stock of them; but others with us take it for a piece of money, in which sense it is used in Gen 33:19, compared with Act 7:16; which might have the figure of a lamb impressed upon it; as we formerly had a piece of money called an angel, having the image of one stamped on it; and it was usual with the ancients both to barter with cattle instead of money before the coining of it, and when it was coined to impress upon it the figure of cattle; hence the Latin word "pecunia", for money, is from "pecus", cattle r; this piece of money in Africa is the same with the Jewish "meah" s, which weighed sixteen barley corns; the value of a penny;

and everyone earring of gold; or a jewel set in gold; such used to wear in Arabia, as appears from, Jdg 8:24; however Job could turn them into money, and increase his stock of cattle thereby. Though, perhaps, these presents were made him, not so much to enrich him, but as tokens of renewing their friendship with him; it being then usual in the eastern countries, as it is to this day, that whenever they pay visits, even to the greatest personages, they always carry presents with them; see 1Sa 9:7.

Gill: Job 42:12 - So the Lord blessed the latter end of Job more than his beginning // for he had fourteen thousand sheep, and six thousand camels, and a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand she asses So the Lord blessed the latter end of Job more than his beginning,.... Which verified the words of Bildad, Job 8:6; though they were spoken by him onl...

So the Lord blessed the latter end of Job more than his beginning,.... Which verified the words of Bildad, Job 8:6; though they were spoken by him only by way of supposition. All blessings are of the Lord, temporal and spiritual; and sometimes the last days of a good man are his best, as to temporal things, as were David's, and here Job's; though this is not always the case: however, if their last days are but the best in spiritual things, that is enough: if they have more faith, hope, love, patience, humility, and self-denial, and resignation of will to the will of God; are more holy, humble, spiritually and heavenly minded; have more light and knowledge in divine things; have more peace and joy, and are more fruitful in every good work, and more useful; and often they are in their very last moments most cheerful and comfortable: the best wine is reserved till last;

for he had fourteen thousand sheep, and six thousand camels, and a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand she asses: just double the number of each of what he had before, Job 1:3.

Gill: Job 42:13 - He had also seven sons, and three daughters. He had also seven sons, and three daughters. The same number of children, and of the same sort he had before, Job 1:2; and according to Nachman the ve...

He had also seven sons, and three daughters. The same number of children, and of the same sort he had before, Job 1:2; and according to Nachman the very same he had before, which the additional letter in the word "seven" is with him the notification of; so that the doubting of what he had before, Job 42:10; respects only his substance, and particularly his cattle; though the Targum says he had fourteen sons, and so Jarchi t; others think these may be said to be double to Job in their good qualities, external and internal, in their dispositions, virtues, and graces; and others, inasmuch as his former children were not lost, but lived with God, and would live for ever, they might now be said to be double; and so they consider this as a proof of the immortality of the soul, and of the resurrection of the body; but these senses are not to be trusted to; whether these children were by a former wife or another is uncertain.

Gill: Job 42:14 - And he called the name of the first Jemima // and the name of the second, Kezia // and the name of the third, Kerenhappuch And he called the name of the first Jemima,.... That is, the name of the first and eldest daughter was called by Job Jemima; which either signifies "d...

And he called the name of the first Jemima,.... That is, the name of the first and eldest daughter was called by Job Jemima; which either signifies "day", so the Targum interprets it, and most do, and so is the same with Diana; or, as Spanheim u observes, it may be the same with the Arabic word "jemama", which signifies a turtle or dove w; and who also observes that a country in Arabia is so called, and perhaps from her; and which seems to be confirmed by the Arabic geographer x, who speaks of a queen called Jamama, who dwelt in a city of the country he describes as being on the north of Arabia Felix, and also speaks of a way from thence to Bozrah in Edom;

and the name of the second, Kezia; or Cassia; an aromatic herb of a very fragrant smell, as we render the word, Psa 45:8; and from this person the above learned writer conjectures Mount Casius in Arabia might have its name;

and the name of the third, Kerenhappuch; which signifies an horn or vessel of paint, such as the eastern women used to paint their faces, particularly their eyes with, Jer 4:30; and as Jezebel did, 2Ki 9:30; or "the ray of a precious stone"; some say the carbuncle y or ruby; according to the Targum, the emerald; in 1Ch 29:2, the word is rendered "glittering stones". Now these names may have respect to Job's daughters themselves, to their external beauty, afterwards observed, so the Targum,

"he called the one Jemima, because her beauty was as the day; the other he called Kezia, because she was precious like cassia; and another he called Kerenhappuch, because great was the brightness of the glory of her countenance, as the emerald.''

The complexion of the first might be clear as a bright day, though like that but of a short duration; see Son 6:10; the next might have her name from the fragrancy and sweetness of her temper; and the third, as being so beautiful that she needed no paint to set her off, but was beauty and paint herself; or her beauty was as bright and dazzling as a precious stone; see Lam 4:7. Or these may respect their internal qualities, virtues, and graces; being children of the day, and not of the night; having a good name, which is better than all spices; and possessed of such graces as were comparable to jewels and precious stones. Though it might be, that Job, in giving them these names, may have respect to the change of his state and condition; his first daughter he called Jemima, or "day", because it was now day, with him: he had been in the night and darkness of adversity, temporal and spiritual, but now he enjoyed a day of prosperity, and of spiritual light and joy; the justness of his cause appeared, his righteousness was brought forth as the light, and his judgment as noonday; and the dispensations of divine Providence appeared to him in a different light than he had seen them in: his second daughter he called Kezia, or Cassia, an herb of a sweet smell, in opposition to the stench of his ulcers and of his breath, which had been so very offensive, and from which he was now free; and may denote also the recovery of his good name, better than precious ointment, in which cassia was an ingredient: his youngest daughter he called Kerenhappuch, the horn of paint, in opposition to his horn being defiled in the dust, and his face foul with weeping, Job 16:15; or if Kerenhappuch signifies the horn turned, as Peritsol interprets it, it may have respect to the strange and sudden turn of Job's affairs: and it is easy to observe, that men have given names to their children on account of their present state and condition, or on account of the change of a former one; see Gen 41:51.

Gill: Job 42:15 - And in all the land were no women found so fair as the daughters of Job // and their father gave them inheritance among their brethren And in all the land were no women found so fair as the daughters of Job,.... Either in the whole world, which is not improbable: or it may be rather ...

And in all the land were no women found so fair as the daughters of Job,.... Either in the whole world, which is not improbable: or it may be rather in the land or country in which they dwelt; and which may be gathered from their names, as before observed. The people of God, and children of Christ, the antitype of Job, are all fair, and there is no spot in them; a perfection of beauty, perfectly comely, through the comeliness of Christ put upon them, and are without spot or wrinkle, or any such thing;

and their father gave them inheritance among their brethren; which was done not on account of their beauty or virtue; nor is this observed so much to show the great riches of Job, that he could give his daughters as much as his sons, as his impartiality to his children, and his strict justice and equity in distributing his substance to them all alike, making no difference between male and female. And so in Christ, the antitype of Job, there is neither male nor female, no difference between them, Gal 3:28, but being all children, they are heirs, heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ, and equally partake of the same inheritance with the saints in light, Rom 8:17.

Gill: Job 42:16 - After this lived Job an hundred and forty years // and saw his sons, and his sons' sons, even four generations After this lived Job an hundred and forty years,.... Not after he had arrived to the height of his prosperity; not after the birth of his children, an...

After this lived Job an hundred and forty years,.... Not after he had arrived to the height of his prosperity; not after the birth of his children, and they were grown up, and had their portions given them, which must take in a considerable number of years; but after his afflictions were over, and his prosperity began: and if his years were doubled, as some think, though that is not certain, then he must be seventy years of age when he was so sorely afflicted and must live to the age of two hundred and ten; which is the common notion of the Jewish writers z: however, he must be fifty or sixty years of age at that time, since his former children were grown up and were for themselves; and it is said a, his afflictions continued seven years. So that it is not at all improbable that he lived to be about two hundred years of age; and which was a singular blessing of God to him, if you compare his age with that of Jacob, Joseph, Moses, and Joshua, between the two former and the two latter he may be supposed to live;

and saw his sons, and his sons' sons, even four generations; Joseph saw but the third, Job the fourth, he was a great-great-grandfather. This was no doubt a pleasant sight to him, to see such a numerous offspring descending from him; and especially if they were walking in the ways of God, as probably they were, since no doubt he would take all the care of their education that in him lay. This is the great blessing promised to the Messiah, the antitype of Job, Isa 53:10; see also Isa 59:21.

Gill: Job 42:17 - So Job died // being old // and full of days So Job died,.... As every man does, though he lived so long, and as Methuselah the oldest man did, Gen 5:27; and though a good man, the best of men di...

So Job died,.... As every man does, though he lived so long, and as Methuselah the oldest man did, Gen 5:27; and though a good man, the best of men die as well as others: so Job died, as a good man, in the Lord, in faith and hope of eternal life and happiness; and so he died in all his outward prosperity and happiness, having great substance and a numerous offspring;

being old; as he might be truly called, being two hundred years of age or thereabout:

and full of days; lived out all his days, the full term of life in common, and longer than it was usual for men to live. He had a long life to satisfaction, as is promised, Psa 91:16. He lived as long as he desired to live, was quite satisfied with living; not that he loathed life, as he once did, and in that sense he did, and from such principles and with such views as he then had, Job 7:15. But he had enough of life, and was willing to die; and came to his grave, as Eliphaz said, "like a shock of corn in his season", Job 5:26. Adrichomius b, from certain travellers, speaks of the sepulchre of Job, in the form of a pyramid, in the plains of the land of Uz, to the east of the city Sueta, shown to this day, and had in great honour by Greeks and others; and which is more probable than what some say c, that his grave is in Constantinople, where there is a gate called Job's gate, from thence: but the Job there buried was a general of the Saracens, who died besieging that city with a numerous army, and was there buried, A. D. 675 d. There is a fragment at the end of the Septuagint and Arabic versions of this book, said to be translated from a Syriac copy, which gives a very particular account of Job's descent as,

"that he dwelt in the land of Ausitis, on the borders of Idumaea and Arabia; that his name was first Jobab; that he married an Arabian woman, and begot a son, whose name was Ennon; that his father was Zare, a son of the sons of Esau; that his mother was Bosorra (or Bosra); and that he was the fifth from Abraham. And these are the kings that reigned in Edom, which country he reigned over; the first was Balac, the son of Beor, the name of whose city was Dennaba; after Balac, Jobab, called Job; after him Asom, who was governor in the country of Theman; after him Adad, the son of Barad, who cut off Midian in the field of Moab, the name of whose city was Gethaim. The friends that came to him (Job) were Eliphaz, of the sons of Esau, the king of the Themanites; Baldad, king of the Sauchseans; and Sophar, king of the Minaeans.''

The substance of this is confirmed by Aristaeus, Philo, and Polyhistor e, ancient historians.

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NET Notes: Job 42:3 The last clause is “and I do not know.” This is also subordinated to become a dependent clause.

NET Notes: Job 42:4 This phrase, “you said,” is supplied in the translation to introduce the recollection of God’s words.

NET Notes: Job 42:5 This statement does not imply there was a vision. He is simply saying that this experience of God was real and personal. In the past his knowledge of ...

NET Notes: Job 42:6 Or “despise what I said.” There is no object on the verb; Job could be despising himself or the things he said (see L. J. Kuyper, “R...

NET Notes: Job 42:7 The form נְכוֹנָה (nÿkhonah) is from כּוּן (kun, “to be firm;...

NET Notes: Job 42:8 The difference between what they said and what Job said, therefore, has to do with truth. Job was honest, spoke the truth, poured out his complaints, ...

NET Notes: Job 42:9 The expression “had respect for Job” means God answered his prayer.

NET Notes: Job 42:10 The construction uses the verb “and he added” with the word “repeat” (or “twice”).

NET Notes: Job 42:11 This gold ring was worn by women in the nose, or men and women in the ear.

NET Notes: Job 42:13 The word for “seven” is spelled in an unusual way. From this some have thought it means “twice seven,” or fourteen sons. Sever...

NET Notes: Job 42:14 The Hebrew name Keren-Happuch means “horn of eye-paint.”

Geneva Bible: Job 42:2 I know that thou canst do every [thing], and [that] no ( a ) thought can be withholden from thee. ( a ) No thought so secret but you see it, nor anyt...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:3 Who [is] he that hideth counsel without ( b ) knowledge? therefore have I uttered that I understood not; things too wonderful for me, ( c ) which I kn...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:4 Hear, I beseech thee, and I will speak: I will demand of thee, ( d ) and declare thou unto me. ( d ) He shows that he will be God's scholar to learn ...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:5 I have ( e ) heard of thee by the hearing of the ear: but now mine eye seeth thee. ( e ) I knew you only before by hearsay, but now you have caused m...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:7 And it was [so], that after the LORD had spoken these words unto Job, the LORD said to Eliphaz the Temanite, My wrath is kindled against thee, and aga...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:8 Therefore take unto you now seven bullocks and seven rams, and go to my servant Job, and offer up for yourselves a burnt offering; and my servant Job ...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:10 And the LORD turned the ( i ) captivity of Job, when he prayed for his friends: also the LORD gave Job twice as much as he had before. ( i ) He deliv...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:11 Then came there unto him all his ( k ) brethren, and all his sisters, and all they that had been of his acquaintance before, and did eat bread with hi...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:12 So the LORD blessed the latter end of Job more than his beginning: for he had ( l ) fourteen thousand sheep, and six thousand camels, and a thousand y...

Geneva Bible: Job 42:14 And he called the name of the first, ( m ) Jemima; and the name of the second, ( n ) Kezia; and the name of the third, ( o ) Kerenhappuch. ( m ) That...

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MHCC: Job 42:1-6 - --Job was now sensible of his guilt; he would no longer speak in his own excuse; he abhorred himself as a sinner in heart and life, especially for murmu...

MHCC: Job 42:7-9 - --After the Lord had convinced and humbled Job, and brought him to repentance, he owned him, comforted him, and put honour upon him. The devil had under...

MHCC: Job 42:10-17 - --In the beginning of this book we had Job's patience under his troubles, for an example; here, for our encouragement to follow that example, we have hi...

Matthew Henry: Job 42:1-6 - -- The words of Job justifying himself were ended, Job 31:40. After that he said no more to that purport. The words of Job judging and condemning himse...

Matthew Henry: Job 42:7-9 - -- Job, in his discourses, had complained very much of the censures of his friends and their hard usage of him, and had appealed to God as Judge betwee...

Matthew Henry: Job 42:10-17 - -- You have heard of the patience of Job (says the apostle, Jam 5:11) and have seen the end of the Lord, that is, what end the Lord, at length, put...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:1-3 - -- 1 Then Job answered Jehovah, and said: 2 Now I know that Thou canst do all things, And no plan is impracticable to Thee. 3 "Who then hideth couns...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:4-6 - -- 4 O hear now, and I will speak: I will ask Thee, and instruct Thou me. 5 I had heard of Thee by the hearing of the ear, And now mine eye hath see...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:7 - -- Job's confession and tone of penitence are now perfected. He acknowledges the divine omnipotence which acts according to a wisely-devised scheme, in...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:8 - -- 8 And now take unto you seven bullocks and seven rams, and go to My servant Job, and offer an offering for yourselves, and Job My servant shall pray...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:9 - -- 9 The Eliphaz of Teman, and Bildad of Shuach, and Zophar of Naamah, went forth and did as Jehovah had said to them; and Jehovah accepted the person ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:10 - -- 10 And Jehovah turned the captivity of Job, when he prayed for his friends; and Jehovah increased everything that Job had possessed to the double. ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:11 - -- 11 Then came to him all his brothers, and all his sisters, and all his former acquaintances, and ate bread with him in his house, and expressed symp...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:12 - -- The author now describes the manner of Job's being blessed. 12 And Jehovah blessed Job's end more than his beginning; and he had fourteen thousand ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:13 - -- 13 And he had seven sons and three daughters. Therefore, instead of the seven sons and three daughters which he had, he receives just the same agai...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:14 - -- 14 And the one was called Jemîma, and the second Kezia, and the third Keren ha-pûch. The subject of ויּקרא is each and every one, as Isa 9:...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:15 - -- 15 And in all the land there were not found women so fair as the daughters of Job: and their father gave them inheritance among their brothers. On ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:16 - -- 16 And Job lived after this a hundred and forty years, and saw his children and his children's children to four generations. In place of ויּרא...

Keil-Delitzsch: Job 42:17 - -- 17 And Job died, old, and weary of life. In the very same manner Genesis, Gen 25:8, Gen 35:29, records the end of the patriarchs. They died satiate...

Constable: Job 38:1--42:7 - --G. The Cycle of Speeches between Job and God chs. 38:1-42:6 Finally God spoke to Job and gave revelation...

Constable: Job 40:6--42:1 - --3. God's second speech 40:6-41:34 This second divine discourse is similar to, yet different from...

Constable: Job 40:15--42:1 - --God's questions 40:15-41:34 Yahweh's purpose in directing Job's attention to such inexpl...

Constable: Job 42:1-6 - --4. Job's second reply to God 42:1-6 Job's words reveal the changes that God's revelations had pr...

Constable: Job 42:7-17 - --III. EPILOGUE 42:7-17 The book closes as it opened with a prose explanation by the inspired human writer. He gav...

Constable: Job 42:7-9 - --A. Job's Friends 42:7-9 God addressed Eliphaz but also had Bildad and Zophar in view. He evidently exclu...

Constable: Job 42:10-17 - --B. Job's Fortune 42:10-17 Notice that God began to prosper Job again after he interceded for his friends...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) JOB A REAL PERSON.--It has been supposed by some that the book of Job is an allegory, not a real narrative, on account of the artificial character of ...

JFB: Job (Garis Besar) THE HOLINESS OF JOB, HIS WEALTH, &c. (Job 1:1-5) SATAN, APPEARING BEFORE GOD, FALSELY ACCUSES JOB. (Job 1:6-12) SATAN FURTHER TEMPTS JOB. (Job 2:1-8)...

TSK: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) A large aquatic animal, perhaps the extinct dinosaur, plesiosaurus, the exact meaning is unknown. Some think this to be a crocodile but from the desc...

TSK: Job 42 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Job 42:1, Job submits himself unto God; Job 42:7, God, preferring Job’s cause, makes his friends submit themselves, and accepts him; Jo...

Poole: Job 42 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 42 Job’ s humiliation and repentance, Job 42:1-6 . God preferring Job’ s cause, reproveth his friends, for whom Job must interce...

MHCC: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) This book is so called from Job, whose prosperity, afflictions, and restoration, are here recorded. He lived soon after Abraham, or perhaps before tha...

MHCC: Job 42 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Job 42:1-6) Job humbly submits unto God. (Job 42:7-9) Job intercedes for his friends. (Job 42:10-17) His renewed prosperity.

Matthew Henry: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Job This book of Job stands by itself, is not connected with any other, and is therefore to...

Matthew Henry: Job 42 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Solomon says, " Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof," Ecc 7:8. It was so here in the story of Job; at the evening-time it was ...

Constable: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title This book, like many others in the Old Testament, got its name from...

Constable: Job (Garis Besar) Outline I. Prologue chs. 1-2 A. Job's character 1:1-5 B. Job's calamitie...

Constable: Job Job Bibliography Andersen, Francis I. Job. Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries series. Leicester, Eng. and Downe...

Haydock: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF JOB. INTRODUCTION. This Book takes its name from the holy man, of whom it treats; who, according to the more probable opinion, was ...

Gill: Job (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO JOB This book, in the Hebrew copies, generally goes by this name, from Job, who is however the subject, if not the writer of it. In...

Gill: Job 42 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO JOB 42 This chapter contains Job's answer to the last speech of the Lord's, in which he acknowledges his omnipotence, and his certa...

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