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Teks -- Psalms 92:1-15 (NET)

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Konteks
Psalm 92
92:1 A psalm; a song for the Sabbath day. It is fitting to thank the Lord, and to sing praises to your name, O sovereign One! 92:2 It is fitting to proclaim your loyal love in the morning, and your faithfulness during the night, 92:3 to the accompaniment of a ten-stringed instrument and a lyre, to the accompaniment of the meditative tone of the harp. 92:4 For you, O Lord, have made me happy by your work. I will sing for joy because of what you have done. 92:5 How great are your works, O Lord! Your plans are very intricate! 92:6 The spiritually insensitive do not recognize this; the fool does not understand this. 92:7 When the wicked sprout up like grass, and all the evildoers glisten, it is so that they may be annihilated. 92:8 But you, O Lord, reign forever! 92:9 Indeed, look at your enemies, O Lord! Indeed, look at how your enemies perish! All the evildoers are scattered! 92:10 You exalt my horn like that of a wild ox. I am covered with fresh oil. 92:11 I gloat in triumph over those who tried to ambush me; I hear the defeated cries of the evil foes who attacked me. 92:12 The godly grow like a palm tree; they grow high like a cedar in Lebanon. 92:13 Planted in the Lord’s house, they grow in the courts of our God. 92:14 They bear fruit even when they are old; they are filled with vitality and have many leaves. 92:15 So they proclaim that the Lord, my protector, is just and never unfair.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Lebanon a mountain range and the adjoining regions (IBD)


Topik/Tema Kamus: Praise | Sabbath | PSALMS, BOOK OF | God | Palm Tree | Cedar | Unicorn | Music | FLOURISH | Wicked | Thankfulness | Blessing | Evildoers | Faith | HAIR | Horn | Worship | OIL | HIGGAION | Righteous | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 92:5 - Thoughts Thy counsels in the government of the world and of thy church.

Thy counsels in the government of the world and of thy church.

Wesley: Psa 92:6 - A brutish man Who is led by sense, not by reason and faith.

Who is led by sense, not by reason and faith.

Wesley: Psa 92:6 - This The depth of God's counsels and works.

The depth of God's counsels and works.

Wesley: Psa 92:10 - Anointed I shall have cause of testifying my joy by anointing myself, as the manner was at all joyful solemnities.

I shall have cause of testifying my joy by anointing myself, as the manner was at all joyful solemnities.

Wesley: Psa 92:12 - Palm tree - Which is constantly green and flourishing.

tree - Which is constantly green and flourishing.

Wesley: Psa 92:13 - Planted Whom God by his gracious providence has fixed there.

Whom God by his gracious providence has fixed there.

Wesley: Psa 92:13 - The house In its courts; he means in the church of God, whereof all good men are living members.

In its courts; he means in the church of God, whereof all good men are living members.

Wesley: Psa 92:14 - Old age Their last days shall be their best days, wherein they shall grow in grace, and increase in blessedness.

Their last days shall be their best days, wherein they shall grow in grace, and increase in blessedness.

JFB: Psa 92:1 - -- A Psalm-song--(see on Psa 30:1, title). The theme: God should be praised for His righteous judgments on the wicked and His care and defense of His peo...

A Psalm-song--(see on Psa 30:1, title). The theme: God should be praised for His righteous judgments on the wicked and His care and defense of His people. Such a topic, at all times proper, is specially so for the reflections of the Sabbath day. (Psa 92:1-15)

JFB: Psa 92:1 - sing . . . name Celebrate Thy perfections.

Celebrate Thy perfections.

JFB: Psa 92:2 - in the morning, . . . every night Diligently and constantly (Psa 42:8).

Diligently and constantly (Psa 42:8).

JFB: Psa 92:2 - loving kindness Literally, "mercy."

Literally, "mercy."

JFB: Psa 92:2 - faithfulness In fulfilling promises (Psa 89:14).

In fulfilling promises (Psa 89:14).

JFB: Psa 92:3 - -- In such a work all proper aid must be used.

In such a work all proper aid must be used.

JFB: Psa 92:3 - with a . . . sound Or, on Higgaion (see on Psa 9:16), perhaps an instrument of that name, from its sound resembling the muttered sound of meditation, as expressed also b...

Or, on Higgaion (see on Psa 9:16), perhaps an instrument of that name, from its sound resembling the muttered sound of meditation, as expressed also by the word. This is joined with the harp.

JFB: Psa 92:4 - thy work That is, of providence (Psa 90:16-17).

That is, of providence (Psa 90:16-17).

JFB: Psa 92:5 - great . . . works Correspond to deep or vast thoughts (Psa 40:5; Rom 11:23).

Correspond to deep or vast thoughts (Psa 40:5; Rom 11:23).

JFB: Psa 92:6 - A brutish man knoweth not That is, God's works, so the Psalmist describes himself (Psa 73:22) when amazed by the prosperity of the wicked, now understood and explained.

That is, God's works, so the Psalmist describes himself (Psa 73:22) when amazed by the prosperity of the wicked, now understood and explained.

JFB: Psa 92:8 - -- This he does in part, by contrasting their ruin with God's exaltation and eternity.

This he does in part, by contrasting their ruin with God's exaltation and eternity.

JFB: Psa 92:8 - most high As occupying the highest place in heaven (Psa 7:7; Psa 18:16).

As occupying the highest place in heaven (Psa 7:7; Psa 18:16).

JFB: Psa 92:9-10 - -- A further contrast with the wicked, in the lot of the righteous, safety and triumph.

A further contrast with the wicked, in the lot of the righteous, safety and triumph.

JFB: Psa 92:10 - horn . . . exalt Is to increase power (Psa 75:5).

Is to increase power (Psa 75:5).

JFB: Psa 92:10 - anointed . . . fresh Or, "new"

Or, "new"

JFB: Psa 92:10 - oil (Psa 23:5) a figure for refreshment (compare Luk 7:46). Such use of oil is still common in the East.

(Psa 23:5) a figure for refreshment (compare Luk 7:46). Such use of oil is still common in the East.

JFB: Psa 92:11 - see . . . [and] . . . hear my desire Or, literally, "look on" my enemies and hear of the wicked (compare Psa 27:11; Psa 54:7) --that is, I shall be gratified by their fall.

Or, literally, "look on" my enemies and hear of the wicked (compare Psa 27:11; Psa 54:7) --that is, I shall be gratified by their fall.

JFB: Psa 92:12-14 - -- The vigorous growth, longevity, utility, fragrance, and beauty of these noble trees, set forth the life, character, and destiny of the pious;

The vigorous growth, longevity, utility, fragrance, and beauty of these noble trees, set forth the life, character, and destiny of the pious;

JFB: Psa 92:15 - -- And they thus declare God's glory as their strong and righteous ruler.

And they thus declare God's glory as their strong and righteous ruler.

Clarke: Psa 92:1 - It is a good thing to give thanks It is a good thing to give thanks - This Psalm begins very abruptly. Good to confess unto the Lord. He had been acknowledging God’ s goodness, ...

It is a good thing to give thanks - This Psalm begins very abruptly. Good to confess unto the Lord. He had been acknowledging God’ s goodness, and praising him for his mercy; and now he breaks out and tells how good he felt this employment to be.

Clarke: Psa 92:2 - To show forth thy loving-kindness To show forth thy loving-kindness - חסדך chasdecha , thy abundant mercy, in the morning - that has preserved me throughout the night, and broug...

To show forth thy loving-kindness - חסדך chasdecha , thy abundant mercy, in the morning - that has preserved me throughout the night, and brought me to the beginning of a new day: and thy faithfulness in the night, that has so amply fulfilled the promise of preservation during the course of the day. This verse contains a general plan for morning and evening prayer.

Clarke: Psa 92:3 - Upon an instrument of ten strings Upon an instrument of ten strings - Eusebius, in his comment on this Psalm, says: Ψαλτηριον δε δεκαχορδον, ἡ του Ἁγ...

Upon an instrument of ten strings - Eusebius, in his comment on this Psalm, says: Ψαλτηριον δε δεκαχορδον, ἡ του Ἁγιου Πνευματος δια των αισθητηριων πεντε μεν του σωματος, ισαριθμων δε της ψυχης δυναμεων, επιτελουμενη λατρεια· "The Psaltery of ten strings is the worship of the Holy Spirit, performed by means of the five senses of the body, and by the five powers of the soul."And, to confirm this interpretation, he quotes the apostle, 1Co 14:15 : "I will pray with the spirit, and with the understanding also; I will sing with the spirit, and with the understanding also.""As the mind has its influence by which it moves the body, so the spirit has its own influence by which it moves the soul."Whatever may be thought of this gloss, one thing is pretty evident from it, that instrumental music was not in use in the Church of Christ in the time of Eusebius. which was near the middle of the fourth century. Had any such thing then existed in the Christian Church, he would have doubtless alluded to or spiritualized it; or, as he quoted the words of the apostle above, would have shown that carnal usages were substituted for spiritual exercises. I believe the whole verse should be translated thus: Upon the asur, upon the nebel, upon the higgayon, with the kinnor. Thus it stands in the Hebrew.

Clarke: Psa 92:4 - For thou, Lord, hast made me glad through thy work For thou, Lord, hast made me glad through thy work - I am delighted with thy conduct towards me; with the work of thy providence, the works of thy g...

For thou, Lord, hast made me glad through thy work - I am delighted with thy conduct towards me; with the work of thy providence, the works of thy grace, and thy works of creation.

Clarke: Psa 92:5 - Hour great are thy works! Hour great are thy works! - They are multitudinous, stupendous, and splendid: and thy thoughts - thy designs and counsels, from which, by which, and...

Hour great are thy works! - They are multitudinous, stupendous, and splendid: and thy thoughts - thy designs and counsels, from which, by which, and in reference to which, they have been formed; are very deep - so profound as not to be fathomed by the comprehension of man.

Clarke: Psa 92:6 - A brutish man knoweth not A brutish man knoweth not - איש בער ish baar , the human hog - the stupid bear - the boor; the man who is all flesh; in whom spirit or intell...

A brutish man knoweth not - איש בער ish baar , the human hog - the stupid bear - the boor; the man who is all flesh; in whom spirit or intellect neither seems to work nor exist. The brutish man, who never attempts to see God in his works

Clarke: Psa 92:6 - Neither doth a fool understand this Neither doth a fool understand this - כסיל kesil , the fool, is different from בער baar , the brutish man; the latter has mind, but it is b...

Neither doth a fool understand this - כסיל kesil , the fool, is different from בער baar , the brutish man; the latter has mind, but it is buried in flesh; the former has no mind, and his stupidity is unavoidable.

Clarke: Psa 92:7 - When the wicked spring as the grass When the wicked spring as the grass - This is a lesson which is frequently inculcated in the sacred writings. The favor of God towards man is not to...

When the wicked spring as the grass - This is a lesson which is frequently inculcated in the sacred writings. The favor of God towards man is not to be known by outward prosperity; nor is his disapprobation to be known by the adverse circumstances in which any person may be found. When, however, we see the wicked flourish, we may take for granted that their abuse of God’ s mercies will cause him to cut them off as cumberers of the ground; and, dying in their sins, they are destroyed for ever.

Clarke: Psa 92:8 - High for evermore High for evermore - They are brought down and destroyed; but the Lord is exalted eternally, both for his judgments and his mercies.

High for evermore - They are brought down and destroyed; but the Lord is exalted eternally, both for his judgments and his mercies.

Clarke: Psa 92:10 - Like the horn of a unicorn Like the horn of a unicorn - ראים reeym , perhaps here, the oryx or buffalo. But the rhinoceros seems to be the real monoceros of the Scripture...

Like the horn of a unicorn - ראים reeym , perhaps here, the oryx or buffalo. But the rhinoceros seems to be the real monoceros of the Scriptures

Clarke: Psa 92:10 - I shall be anointed unth fresh oil I shall be anointed unth fresh oil - Perhaps the allusion is here not to any sacramental anointing, but to such anointings as were frequent among th...

I shall be anointed unth fresh oil - Perhaps the allusion is here not to any sacramental anointing, but to such anointings as were frequent among the Asiatics, especially after bathing, for the purpose of health and activity.

Clarke: Psa 92:11 - Mine eye also shall see, Mine eye also shall see, - and mine ears shall hear - Even in my own times my enemies shall be destroyed; and of this destruction I shall eithe...

Mine eye also shall see, - and mine ears shall hear - Even in my own times my enemies shall be destroyed; and of this destruction I shall either be an eye-witness or have authentic information.

Clarke: Psa 92:12 - The righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree The righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree - Very different from the wicked, Psa 92:7, who are likened to grass. These shall have a short durat...

The righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree - Very different from the wicked, Psa 92:7, who are likened to grass. These shall have a short duration; but those shall have a long and useful life. They are compared also to the cedar of Lebanon, an incorruptible wood, and extremely long-lived. Mr. Maundrell, who visited those trees in 1697, describes them thus: "These noble trees grow among the snow, near the highest part of Lebanon. Some are very old, and of prodigious bulk. I measured one of the largest, and found it twelve yards six inches in girt, and yet sound; and thirty-seven yards in the spread of its boughs. At about five or six yards from the ground, it was divided into live limbs, each of which was equal to a large tree."Some of these trees are supposed to have lived upwards of one thousand years! The figure of the palm-tree gives us the idea of grandeur and usefulness. The fruit of the palm-tree makes a great part of the diet of the people of Arabia, part of Persia, and Upper Egypt. The stones are ground down for the camels; the leaves are made into baskets; the hard boughs, or rather strong leaves, some being six or eight feet in length, make fences; the juice makes arrack, the threads of the web-like integument between the leaves make ropes, and the rigging of small vessels; and the wood serves for slighter buildings and fire-wood. In short, the palm or date tree, and the olive, are two of the most excellent and useful productions of the forest or the field

The cedar gives us the idea of majesty, stability. durableness, and incorruptibility. To these two trees, for the most obvious reasons, are the righteous compared. William Lithgow, who traveled through the holy land about a.d. 1600, describes the cedars of Mount Lebanon as "being in number twenty-four, growing after the manner of oaks, but a great deal taller straighter, and thicker, and the branches growing so straight, and interlocking, as though they were kept by art: and yet from the root to the top they bear no boughs, but grow straight and upwards like to a palm-tree. Their circle-spread tops do kiss or embrace the lower clouds, making their grandeur overlook the highest bodies of all other aspiring trees. The nature of this tree is, that it is always green, yielding an odoriferous smell, and an excellent kind of fruit, like unto apples, but of a sweeter taste, and more wholesome. The roots of some of these cedars are almost destroyed by the shepherds, who have made fires thereat, and holes where they sleep; yet nevertheless they flourish green above, in the tops and branches."- Lithgow’ s 17 years’ Travels, 4th., London, 1640.

Clarke: Psa 92:13 - Those that be planted in the house of the Lord Those that be planted in the house of the Lord - I believe the Chaldee has the true meaning here: "His children shall be planted in the house of the...

Those that be planted in the house of the Lord - I believe the Chaldee has the true meaning here: "His children shall be planted in the house of the sanctuary of the Lord, and shall flourish in the courts of our God."As these trees flourish in their respective soils and climates, so shall the righteous in the ordinances of God. I do not think there is any allusion to either palm-trees or cedars, planted near the tabernacle or temple.

Clarke: Psa 92:14 - They shall still bring forth fruit in old age They shall still bring forth fruit in old age - They shall continue to grow in grace, and be fruitful to the end of their lives. It is a rare case t...

They shall still bring forth fruit in old age - They shall continue to grow in grace, and be fruitful to the end of their lives. It is a rare case to find a man in old age full of faith, love, and spiritual activity.

Clarke: Psa 92:15 - To show that the Lord is upright To show that the Lord is upright - Such persons show how faithful God is to his promises, how true to his word, how kind to them who trust in him. H...

To show that the Lord is upright - Such persons show how faithful God is to his promises, how true to his word, how kind to them who trust in him. He is the Rock, the Fountain, whence all good comes

Clarke: Psa 92:15 - There is no unrighteousness in him There is no unrighteousness in him - He does nothing evil, nothing unwise, nothing unkind. He is both just and merciful

There is no unrighteousness in him - He does nothing evil, nothing unwise, nothing unkind. He is both just and merciful

Calvin: Psa 92:1 - It is good to give thanks unto Jehovah 1.It is good to give thanks unto Jehovah There is no reason to doubt that the Jews were in the habit of singing this psalm, as the inscription bears,...

1.It is good to give thanks unto Jehovah There is no reason to doubt that the Jews were in the habit of singing this psalm, as the inscription bears, upon the Sabbath-day, and it is apparent, from different passages, that other psalms were applied to this use. As the words may be read literally in the Hebrew, it is good for giving thanks unto the Lord, some interpreters, founding upon the letter ל , lamed, prefixed to the verb, understand the Psalmist to mean that it was good to have a certain day set apart for singing the praises of God — that it was a useful arrangement by which one day had been chosen to be occupied by the Lord’s people in celebrating his works. But it is well known that this letter, when prefixed, is merely the ordinary mark of the infinitive mood — and I have given what is obviously the simple meaning. The reason why the Psalmist appropriated this psalm to the Sabbath is sufficiently obvious. That day is not to be holy, in the sense of being devoted to idleness, as if this could be an acceptable worship to God, but in the sense of our separating ourselves from all other occupations, to engage in meditating upon the Divine works. As our minds are inconstant, we are apt, when exposed to various distractions, to wander from God. 585 We need to be disentangled from all cares if we would seriously apply ourselves to the praises of God. The Psalmist then would teach us that the right observance of the Sabbath does not consist in idleness, as some absurdly imagine, but in the celebration of the Divine name. The argument which he adduces is drawn from the profitableness of the service, for nothing is more encouraging than to know that our labor is not in vain, and that what we engage in meets with the Divine approbation. In the succeeding verse, he adverts to the grounds which we have for praising God, that we may not imagine that God calls upon us to engage in this service without reason, or simply in consideration of his greatness and power, but in remembrance of his goodness and faithfulness, which should inflame our hearts to such exercise, if we had any proper sense and experience of them. He would have us consider, in mentioning these, that not only is God worthy of praise, but that we ourselves are chargeable with ingratitude and perversity should we refuse it. We are the proper objects of his faithfulness and goodness, and it would argue inexcusable indifference if they did not elicit our cordial praises. It might seem a strange distinction which the Psalmist observes when he speaks of our announcing God’s goodness in the morning, and his faithfulness at night. His goodness is constant, and not peculiar to any one season, why then devote but a small part of the day to the celebration of it? And the same may be said of the other Divine perfection mentioned, for it is not merely in the night that his faithfulness is shown. But this is not what the Psalmist intends. He means that beginning to praise the Lord from earliest dawn, we should continue his praises to the latest hour of the night, this being no more than his goodness and faithfulness deserve. 586 If we begin by celebrating his goodness, we must next take up the subject of his faithfulness. Both will occupy our continued praises, for they stand mutually and inseparably connected. The Psalmist is not therefore to be supposed as wishing us to separate the one from the other, for they are intimately allied; he would only suggest that we can never want matter for praising God unless indolence prevail over us, and that if we would rightly discharge the office of gratitude, we must be assiduous in it, since his goodness and his faithfulness are incessant.

In the fourth verse, he more immediately addresses the Levites, who were appointed to the office of singers, and calls upon them to employ their instruments of music — not as if this were in itself necessary, only it was useful as an elementary aid to the people of God in these ancient times. 587 We are not to conceive that God enjoined the harp as feeling a delight like ourselves in mere melody of sounds; but the Jews, who were yet under age, were astricted to the use of such childish elements. The intention of them was to stimulate the worshippers, and stir them up more actively to the celebration of the praise of God with the heart. We are to remember that the worship of God was never understood to consist in such outward services, which were only necessary to help forward a people, as yet weak and rude in knowledge, in the spiritual worship of God. A difference is to be observed in this respect between his people under the Old and under the New Testament; for now that Christ has appeared, and the Church has reached full age, it were only to bury the light of the Gospel, should we introduce the shadows of a departed dispensation. From this, it appears that the Papists, as I shall have occasion to show elsewhere, in employing instrumental music, cannot be said so much to imitate the practice of God’s ancient people, as to ape it in a senseless and absurd manner, exhibiting a silly delight in that worship of the Old Testament which was figurative, and terminated with the Gospel. 588

Calvin: Psa 92:4 - Because thou, Jehovah, hast made me glad 4.Because thou, Jehovah, hast made me glad The Psalmist repeats the truth that the Sabbath was not prescribed as a day of idleness, but a season when...

4.Because thou, Jehovah, hast made me glad The Psalmist repeats the truth that the Sabbath was not prescribed as a day of idleness, but a season when we should collect our whole energies for meditation upon the works of God. He intimates, at the same time, that those are best qualified for celebrating the praises of God who recognize and feel his fatherly goodness, and can undertake this service with willing and joyful minds. His language implies that the goodness and faithfulness of God, which he had already mentioned, are apparent in his works upon a due examination of them. What produces joy in our hearts is the exhibition which God gives of himself as a Father, and of his deep and watchful anxiety for our welfare; as, on the other hand, the cause of our brutish indifference is our inability to savor or relish the end designed in the works of God. 589 As the universe proclaims throughout that God is faithful and good, it becomes us to be diligently observant of these tokens, and to be excited by a holy joy to the celebration of his praise.

Calvin: Psa 92:5 - O Jehovah! how highly exalted are thy works! 5.O Jehovah! how highly exalted are thy works! The Psalmist, having spoken of the works of God in general, proceeds to speak more particularly of his...

5.O Jehovah! how highly exalted are thy works! The Psalmist, having spoken of the works of God in general, proceeds to speak more particularly of his justice in the government of the world. Though God may postpone the punishment of the wicked, he shows, in due time, that in conniving at their sins, he did not overlook or fail to perceive them; and though he exercises his own children with the cross, he proves in the issue, that he was not indifferent to their welfare. His reason for touching upon this particular point seems to be, that much darkness is thrown upon the scheme of Divine Providence by the inequality and disorder which prevail in human affairs. 590 We see the wicked triumphing, and applauding their own good fortune, as if there was no judge above, and taking occasion from the Divine forbearance to run into additional excesses, under the impression that they have escaped his hand. The temptation is aggravated by that stupidity and blindness of heart which lead us to imagine that God exerts no superintendence over the world, and sits idle in heaven. It is known, too, how soon we are ready to sink under the troubles of the flesh. The Psalmist, therefore, intentionally selects this as a case in which he may show the watchful care exerted by God over the human family. He begins, by using the language of exclamation, for such is the dreadful distemper and disorder by which our understandings are confounded, that we cannot comprehend the method of God’s works, even when it is most apparent. We are to notice, that the inspired penman is not speaking here of the work of God in the creation of the heavens and earth, nor of his providential government of the world in general, but only of the judgments which he executes amongst men. He calls the works of God great, and his thoughts deep, because he governs the world in quite another manner than we are able to comprehend. Were things under our own management, we would entirely invert the order which God observes; and, such not being the case, we perversely expostulate with God for not hastening sooner to the help of the righteous, and to the punishment of the wicked. It strikes us as in the highest degree inconsistent with the perfections of God, that he should bear with the wicked when they rage against him, when they rush without restraint into the most daring acts of iniquity, and when they persecute at will the good and the innocent; — it seems, I say, in our eyes to be intolerable, that God should subject his own people to the injustice and violence of the wicked, while he puts no check upon abounding falsehood, deceit, rapine, bloodshed, and every species of enormity. Why does he suffer his truth to be obscured, and his holy name to be trampled under foot? This is that greatness of the Divine operation, that depth of the Divine counsel, into the admiration of which the Psalmist breaks forth. It is no doubt true, that there is an incomprehensible depth of power and wisdom which God has displayed in the fabric of the universe; but what the Psalmist has specially in view is, to administer a check to that disposition which leads us to murmur against God, when he does not pursue our plan in his providential managements. When anything in these may not agree with the general ideas of men, we ought to contemplate it with reverence, and remember that God, for the better trial of our obedience, has lifted his deep and mysterious judgments far above our conceptions.

Calvin: Psa 92:6 - The foolish man shall not know them 6.The foolish man shall not know them This is added with propriety, to let us know that the fault lies with ourselves, in not praising the Divine jud...

6.The foolish man shall not know them This is added with propriety, to let us know that the fault lies with ourselves, in not praising the Divine judgments as we ought. For although the Psalmist had spoken of them as deep and mysterious, he here informs us that they would be discerned without difficulty, were it not for our stupidity and indifference. By the foolish, he means unbelievers in general, tacitly contrasting them with believers who are divinely enlightened by the word and Spirit. The ignorance and blindness to which he alludes have possession of all without exception, whose understandings have not been illuminated by Divine grace. It ought to be our prayer to God, that he would purge our sight, and qualify us for meditation upon his works. In short, the Psalmist vindicates the incomprehensible wisdom of God from that contempt which proud men have often cast upon it, charging them with folly and madness in acting such a part; and he would arouse us from that insensibility which is too prevalent, to a due and serious consideration of the mysterious works of God.

Calvin: Psa 92:7 - When the wicked flourish as the grass 7.When the wicked flourish as the grass He points out, and exposes, by a striking and appropriate figure, the folly of imagining that the wicked obta...

7.When the wicked flourish as the grass He points out, and exposes, by a striking and appropriate figure, the folly of imagining that the wicked obtain a triumph over God, when he does not, it may be, immediately bring them under restraint. He makes an admission so far — he grants that they spring up and flourish — but adds immediately, by way of qualification, that they flourish, like the grass, only for a moment, their prosperity being brief and evanescent. In this way he removes what has been almost a universal stumbling-block and ground of offense; for it would be ridiculous to envy the happiness of men who are doomed to be speedily destroyed, and of whom it may be said, that to-day they flourish, and to-morrow they are cut down and wither, (Psa 129:6.) It will be shown, when we come to consider the psalm now quoted, that the herbs to which the wicked are compared are such as grow on the roofs of houses, which want depth of soil, and die of themselves, for lack of nourishment. In the passage now before us, the Psalmist satisfies himself with using simply the figure, that the prosperity of the wicked draws after it the speedier destruction, as the grass when it is full grown is ready for the scythe. There is an antithesis drawn, too, between the shortness of their continuance and the everlasting destruction which awaits them; for they are not said to be cut down that they may flourish again, as withered plants will recover their vigor, but to be condemned to eternal perdition. 591 When he says of God, that he sits exalted for evermore, some understand him to mean, that God holds the power and office of governing the world, and that we may be certain nothing can happen by chance when such a righteous governor and judge administers the affairs of the world. Various other meanings have been suggested. But it seems to me that the Psalmist compares the stability of God’s throne with the fluctuating and changeable character of this world, reminding us that we must not judge of Him by what we see in the world, where there is nothing of a fixed and enduring nature. God looks down undisturbed from the altitude of heaven upon all the changes of this earthly scene, which neither affect nor have any relation to him. And this the Psalmist brings forward with another view than simply to teach us to distinguish God from his creatures, and put due honor upon his majesty; he would have us learn in our contemplations upon the wonderful and mysterious providence of God, to lift our conceptions above ourselves and this world, since it is only a dark and confused view which our earthly minds can take up. It is with the purpose of leading us into a proper discovery of the Divine judgments which are not seen in the world, that the Psalmist, in making mention of the majesty of God, would remind us, that he does not work according to our ideas, but in a manner corresponding to his own eternal being. We, short-lived creatures as we are, often thwarted in our attempts, embarrassed and interrupted by many intervening difficulties, and too glad to embrace the first opportunity which offers, are accustomed to advance with precipitation; but we are taught here to lift our eyes unto that eternal and unchangeable throne on which God sits, and in wisdom defers the execution of his judgments. The words accordingly convey more than a simple commendation of the glorious being of God; they are meant to help our faith, and tell us that, although his people may sigh under many an anxious apprehension, God himself, the guardian of their safety, reigns on high, and shields them with his everlasting power.

Calvin: Psa 92:9 - For, lo! thine enemies, O Jehovah! 9.For, lo! thine enemies, O Jehovah! From what was already said in the verse preceding, the Psalmist concludes it to be impossible that God should no...

9.For, lo! thine enemies, O Jehovah! From what was already said in the verse preceding, the Psalmist concludes it to be impossible that God should not overthrow his enemies. This, as I have already observed, clearly shows that it was his design to establish our faith under the strong temptations to which it is subjected, and, more especially, to remove that offense out of the way, which has disturbed the minds of many, and led them astray; — we refer to the prosperity of the wicked, and its effect in attaching a certain perplexity to the judgments of God. As our faith is never called to a more sharp and arduous trial than upon this point, the Psalmist delivers the truth, which he announces with much force of expression, using both exclamations and repetition. First, he declares the destruction of God’s enemies to be as certain as if it had already taken place, and he had witnessed it with his own eyes; then he repeats his assertion: and from all this we may see how much he had benefited by glancing with the eye of faith beyond this world to the throne of God in the heavens. When staggered in our own faith at any time by the prosperity of the wicked, we should learn by his example to rise in our contemplations to a God in heaven, and the conviction will immediately follow in our minds that his enemies cannot long continue to triumph. The Psalmist tells us who they are that are God’s enemies. God hates none without a cause; nay, so far as men are the workmanship of his hand, he embraces them in his fatherly love. But as nothing is more opposed to his nature than sin, he proclaims irreconcilable war with the wicked. It contributes in no small degree to the comfort of the Lord’s people, to know that the reason why the wicked are destroyed is, their being necessarily the objects of God’s hatred, so that he can no more fail to punish them than deny himself. 595

The Psalmist, shortly afterwards, shows that he intended this to be a ground of comfort and hope under all cares, griefs, anxieties, and embarrassments. He speaks under the figure of oil of enjoying Divine blessings, and by green or fresh oil is meant, such as has not become corrupted, or unfit for use by age. It is noticeable that he appropriates, and improves for his own individual comfort, that grace of God which is extended to all the Lord’s people without exception; and would teach us by this that mere general doctrine is a cold and unsatisfactory thing, and that each of us should improve it particularly for himself, in the persuasion of our belonging to the number of God’s children. In one word, the Psalmist promises himself the protection of God, under whatever persecutions he should endure from his enemies, whether they were secret, or more open and violent, that he may encourage himself to persevere with indefatigable spirit in the world’s conflict. We may judge from this how absurd is the opinion of the Rabbin, who conjectured that Adam was the author of this psalm 596 — as if it were credible that his posterity should have set themselves up in rebellion against him.

Calvin: Psa 92:12 - The righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree 12.The righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree He now passes to the consideration of another general truth, That though God may exercise his peop...

12.The righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree He now passes to the consideration of another general truth, That though God may exercise his people with many trials, subject them to hardships, and visit them with privations, he will eventually show that he had not forgotten them. We need not be surprised that he insists so explicitly and carefully upon this point, as nothing is more difficult than for the saints of God to entertain expectations of being raised up and delivered when they have been reduced almost to the state of the dead, and it does not appear how they can live. Some think the cedar is mentioned from the fragrancy of its smell, and the palm for the sweetness of its fruit; but this is too subtile a meaning to attach to the words. The sense seems simply, that though the righteous may appear for a time to be withered, or to have been cut down, they will again spring up with renewed vigor, and flourish as well and as fair in the Church of God as the stateliest trees upon Lebanon. The expression which is employed — planted in the house of the Lord — gives the reason of their vigorous growth; nor is it meant that they have merely a place there, (which can be said even of hypocrites,) but that they are firmly fixed, and deeply rooted in it, so as to be united to God. The Psalmist speaks of the courts of the Lord, because none but the priests were allowed to enter the holy place; the people worshipped in the court. By those who are planted in the Church he means such as are united to God in real and sincere attachment, and insinuates that their prosperity cannot be of a changeable and fluctuating nature, because it is not founded upon anything that is in the world. Nor indeed can we doubt that whatever has its root, and is founded in the sanctuary, must continue to flourish and partake of a life which is spiritual and everlasting. It is in this sense that he speaks of their still budding forth, and being fat, even in old age, when the natural sap and juices are generally dried up. The language amounts to saying that they are exempt from the ordinary lot of men, and have a life which is taken from under the common law of nature. 599 It is thus that Jacob, speaking of the great renovation which should take place in the Church, mentions, that at that happy period he who was an hundred years old should be a child, meaning that, though old age naturally tends to death, and one who has lived a hundred years is upon the very borders of it, yet in the kingdom of Christ; a man would be reckoned as being merely in his childhood, and starting in life, who entered upon a new century. This could only be verified in the sense, that after death we have another existence in heaven.

Calvin: Psa 92:15 - That they may show that Jehovah is upright 15.That they may show that Jehovah is upright It is evident from this verse that the great object of the Psalmist is, to allay that disquietude of mi...

15.That they may show that Jehovah is upright It is evident from this verse that the great object of the Psalmist is, to allay that disquietude of mind which we are apt to feel under the disorder which reigns apparently in the affairs of this world; and to make us cherish the expectation, (under all that may seem severe and trying in our lot, and though the wicked are in wealth and power, flourish, and abound in places and distinctions,) that God will bring light and order eventually out of confusion. That they may show, it is said particularly, that the Lord is upright; for through the influence of our corruption we are apt to conclude, when things do not proceed as we would wish in the world, that God is chargeable not only with neglect but with unrighteousness, in abandoning his people, and tolerating the commission of sin. When God displays his justice in proceeding to execute vengeance upon the wicked, it will be seen at once, that any prosperity which they enjoyed was but the forerunner of a worse destruction in reserve for them. The Psalmist, in calling God his rock, shows a second time that he reckoned himself amongst the number of those in whom God would illustrate his justice by extending towards them his protection.

Defender: Psa 92:10 - unicorn The unicorn (Hebrew reem) was not a mythical animal but an extinct animal. Many commentators think it was the giant wild ox or aurochs. This verse ind...

The unicorn (Hebrew reem) was not a mythical animal but an extinct animal. Many commentators think it was the giant wild ox or aurochs. This verse indicates that it did have a "horn" (not two horns that may have looked like one horn from a distance). Deu 33:17 speaks of the "horns of unicorns" but this is ambiguous to whether it means one-horned or two-horned animals. Many ancient writers describe unicorns as large and fierce animals with one horn. An extinct type of rhinoceros or some other now-unknown extinct animal may be the best explanation."

Defender: Psa 92:14 - fruit in old age Elderly believers who tend to become heavier as they grew older can perhaps take comfort from this promise!"

Elderly believers who tend to become heavier as they grew older can perhaps take comfort from this promise!"

TSK: Psa 92:1 - for // good // most for : Isa 58:13, Isa 58:14; Heb 4:9 *marg. Rev 4:8-11 good : Psa 33:1, Psa 50:23, Psa 52:9, Psa 54:6, Psa 73:28, Psa 107:1, Psa 107:8, Psa 107:15, Psa...

TSK: Psa 92:2 - show // every night show : Psa 71:15, Psa 89:1, Psa 89:2, Psa 145:2; Isa 63:7; Lam 3:22, Lam 3:23; Joh 1:17 every night : Heb. in the nights, Psa 42:8, Psa 77:2; Job 35:1...

TSK: Psa 92:3 - instrument // the harp // a solemn sound instrument : Psa 33:2, Psa 57:8, Psa 68:25, Psa 81:2, Psa 81:3, Psa 149:3, Psa 150:3-5; 1Ch 15:16, 1Ch 25:6; 2Ch 23:5; 2Ch 29:25 the harp : etc. or, t...

instrument : Psa 33:2, Psa 57:8, Psa 68:25, Psa 81:2, Psa 81:3, Psa 149:3, Psa 150:3-5; 1Ch 15:16, 1Ch 25:6; 2Ch 23:5; 2Ch 29:25

the harp : etc. or, the solemn sound with the harp

a solemn sound : Heb. Higgaion, Psa 9:16

TSK: Psa 92:4 - -- Psa 64:10, Psa 104:31, Psa 104:34, Psa 106:47, Psa 106:48, Psa 126:3, Psa 145:6, Psa 145:7; Isa 61:2-11, Isa 65:13, Isa 65:14; Isa 66:10, Isa 66:11; J...

TSK: Psa 92:5 - O Lord // thoughts // deep O Lord : Psa 40:5, Psa 66:3, Psa 104:24, Psa 111:2, Psa 145:3, Psa 145:4; Rev 15:3 thoughts : Psa 139:17; Isa 28:29, Isa 55:8, Isa 55:9; Jer 23:20; Ro...

TSK: Psa 92:6 - A brutish // a fool A brutish : Psa 32:9, Psa 73:22, Psa 94:8; Pro 30:2; Isa 1:3; Jer 10:14; 1Co 2:14 a fool : Psa 14:1, Psa 49:10, Psa 75:4; Pro 1:22, Pro 24:7; Luk 12:2...

TSK: Psa 92:7 - wicked // workers // it is that wicked : Psa 37:1, Psa 37:2, Psa 37:35, Psa 37:38, Psa 90:5, Psa 90:6, Psa 103:15, Psa 103:16; Isa 37:27, Isa 40:6, Isa 40:7; Jam 1:10, Jam 1:11; 1Pe ...

TSK: Psa 92:8 - art most art most : Psa 56:2, Psa 83:18, Psa 102:26, Psa 102:27; Exo 18:11; Ecc 5:8; Dan 4:34, Dan 4:35; Act 12:1, Act 12:22-24

TSK: Psa 92:9 - For // scattered For : Psa 21:8, Psa 21:9, Psa 37:20, Psa 68:1, Psa 68:2, Psa 73:27, Psa 89:10; Jdg 5:31; Luk 19:27; 2Th 1:7-9 scattered : Psa 1:4, Psa 59:11, Psa 68:3...

TSK: Psa 92:10 - But // an unicorn // I shall But : Psa 89:17, Psa 89:24, Psa 112:9, Psa 132:17, Psa 148:14; 1Sa 2:1, 1Sa 2:10; Luk 1:69 an unicorn : Num 23:22, Num 24:8; 1Jo 2:20 I shall : Psa 23...

TSK: Psa 92:11 - -- Psa 37:34, Psa 54:7, Psa 59:10, Psa 91:8, Psa 112:8

TSK: Psa 92:12 - righteous // cedar righteous : Psa 92:7, Psa 52:8; Isa 55:13, Isa 65:22; Hos 14:5, Hos 14:6 cedar : Psa 104:16, Psa 148:9; Amo 2:9. See note on 1Ki 4:33, and see note on...

righteous : Psa 92:7, Psa 52:8; Isa 55:13, Isa 65:22; Hos 14:5, Hos 14:6

cedar : Psa 104:16, Psa 148:9; Amo 2:9. See note on 1Ki 4:33, and see note on 1Ki 6:29.

TSK: Psa 92:13 - Those // shall flourish // in the Those : Isa 60:21; Rom 6:5, Rom 11:17; Eph 3:17 shall flourish : Isa 61:3; 2Pe 3:18 in the : Psa 100:4, Psa 135:2; 2Ch 4:9

Those : Isa 60:21; Rom 6:5, Rom 11:17; Eph 3:17

shall flourish : Isa 61:3; 2Pe 3:18

in the : Psa 100:4, Psa 135:2; 2Ch 4:9

TSK: Psa 92:14 - They // in old age // flourishing They : Psa 1:3; Mat 3:10; Joh 15:2-5; Gal 5:22, Gal 5:23; Phi 1:11; Jud 1:12 in old age : Psa 71:18; 1Chr. 29:1-30; Job 17:9; Pro 4:18; Isa 46:4; Jer ...

They : Psa 1:3; Mat 3:10; Joh 15:2-5; Gal 5:22, Gal 5:23; Phi 1:11; Jud 1:12

in old age : Psa 71:18; 1Chr. 29:1-30; Job 17:9; Pro 4:18; Isa 46:4; Jer 17:8

flourishing : Heb. green, Eze 47:12

TSK: Psa 92:15 - To show // my rock // and To show : Joh 10:27-29, Joh 15:1-3; 1Co 1:8, 1Co 1:9; 1Th 5:23, 1Th 5:24; Tit 1:2; 1Pe 1:4, 1Pe 1:5 my rock : Psa 18:2, Psa 62:6; Deu 32:4 and : Psa 1...

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Poole: Psa 92:1 - -- To be sung upon the weekly sabbath; to which the matter of this Psalm very well agrees. For it celebrates the works of God, both that first and great...

To be sung upon the weekly sabbath; to which the matter of this Psalm very well agrees. For it celebrates the works of God, both that first and great work of creation, and that succeeding and no less wonderful work of his providence, by which he upholds and governs all his creatures, and especially that by which he ruleth all sorts of men, both good and bad, and that by which he preserveth and manageth his church and people.

The prophet exhorteth to praise God, Psa 92:1-3 , for his great works, Psa 92:4,5 . His judgments on the wicked, Psa 92:6-9 . Gracious promises to the righteous, Psa 92:10-12 . They shall be fruitful, Psa 92:13-15 .

It is a good work, and a just debt to God.

Poole: Psa 92:2 - -- To adore and celebrate thy goodness and truth continually, and especially at those two solemn times of morning and evening, which on every day, and ...

To adore and celebrate thy goodness and truth continually, and especially at those two solemn times of morning and evening, which on every day, and especially upon the sabbath day, were devoted to the worship and service of God.

Poole: Psa 92:4 - -- Which thou didst create by thine almighty power, and dost still govern with infinite wisdom; one instance whereof we have in the following verses.

Which thou didst create by thine almighty power, and dost still govern with infinite wisdom; one instance whereof we have in the following verses.

Poole: Psa 92:5 - Thy thoughts Thy thoughts thy counsels and methods in the government of the world and of thy church.

Thy thoughts thy counsels and methods in the government of the world and of thy church.

Poole: Psa 92:6 - A brutish man // This A brutish man who cannot or doth not seriously consider things, whose mind is corrupted by his sensual and brutish appetites; who is led by sense, an...

A brutish man who cannot or doth not seriously consider things, whose mind is corrupted by his sensual and brutish appetites; who is led by sense, and not by reason and faith.

This the depth of God’ s counsels and works mentioned Psa 92:5 , or that particular work of God described Psa 92:7 .

Poole: Psa 92:7 - -- Their present worldly prosperity is a presage and occasion of their utter and eternal ruin.

Their present worldly prosperity is a presage and occasion of their utter and eternal ruin.

Poole: Psa 92:8 - thou, Lord, art So this verse is added by way of opposition to the former, They shall perish , but thou shalt endure, as is said in a like comparison, Psa 102:26 ;...

So this verse is added by way of opposition to the former, They shall perish , but thou shalt endure, as is said in a like comparison, Psa 102:26 ; they flourish for a season, but thou rulest for ever to judge and punish them. Or, for (as this Hebrew particle is not seldom used, whereof instances have been formerly given)

thou, Lord, art & c. So this verse gives a reason of the former, as well the first branch of it, why God suffers the wicked to flourish so long, because he is not like man, of short and uncertain continuance here, to whom a little time is long and tedious, who therefore impatiently expects the time of vengeance, and fears lest the offender should escape it; whereas God is unchangeable and everlasting, and therefore long-suffering without any inconvenience, and the longest time of the prosperity of the wicked is but short and inconsiderable in his eyes, a thousand years being in his sight but as yesterday when it is past , Psa 90:4 , and they can never escape out of his hands; as also of the latter branch of the verse, why the wicked shall be destroyed for ever, because God lives and reigns for ever to execute that just sentence of everlasting punishment which he hath pronounced against them.

Poole: Psa 92:9 - -- He represents their destruction as present, and as certain, which the repetition of the words implies.

He represents their destruction as present, and as certain, which the repetition of the words implies.

Poole: Psa 92:10 - Unicorn // I shall be anointed // Fresh oil But as for me and other righteous persons, (of whom he saith the same thing Psa 92:12 ) we shall be advanced to the height of honour, and true and l...

But as for me and other righteous persons, (of whom he saith the same thing Psa 92:12 ) we shall be advanced to the height of honour, and true and lasting felicity.

Unicorn of which See Poole "Deu 33:17" .

I shall be anointed I shall have great cause of rejoicing and testifying my joy by anointing myself, as the manner was in feasts and all joyful solemnities.

Fresh oil sweet and uncorrupted.

Poole: Psa 92:11 - My desire // Shall hear My desire to wit, in the ruin of thine and mine incorrigible enemies. Shall hear what I do not see myself, I shall understand by the certain report...

My desire to wit, in the ruin of thine and mine incorrigible enemies.

Shall hear what I do not see myself, I shall understand by the certain reports of others.

Poole: Psa 92:12 - Like the palm tree // Like a cedar Like the palm tree which is constantly green, and flourishing, and fruitful, Son 7:8 , and growing even when it is pressed down; and so is a fit embl...

Like the palm tree which is constantly green, and flourishing, and fruitful, Son 7:8 , and growing even when it is pressed down; and so is a fit emblem of a just man’ s person and condition. See Rev 7:9 .

Like a cedar which spreads itself wide, and grows very high and strong, and is very durable, and in some sort incorruptible.

Poole: Psa 92:13 - Those that be planted // In the house of the Lord // The courts Those that be planted whom God by his gracious providence and Holy Spirit hath planted or fixed there. In the house of the Lord i.e. in its courts,...

Those that be planted whom God by his gracious providence and Holy Spirit hath planted or fixed there.

In the house of the Lord i.e. in its courts, which are a part of the house, and oft come under that name in Scripture. And by this house he means the church of God, whereof all just persons are real and living members.

The courts which he mentions rather than the house, because he speaks not here of the priests, but of all just men, who were permitted to come no further than into the courts.

Poole: Psa 92:14 - -- When their natural strength decayeth, it shall be renewed; their last days shall be their best days, wherein as they shall grow in grace, so they sh...

When their natural strength decayeth, it shall be renewed; their last days shall be their best days, wherein as they shall grow in grace, so they shall increase in comfort and blessedness.

Poole: Psa 92:15 - -- This glorious work of God in compensating the short prosperity of the wicked with everlasting punishments, and of exchanging the momentary afflictio...

This glorious work of God in compensating the short prosperity of the wicked with everlasting punishments, and of exchanging the momentary afflictions of the just with eternal glory and happiness, doth clearly demonstrate that God is just and blameless in all the dispensations of his providence in the world.

Haydock: Psa 92:1 - -- The glory and stability of the kingdom; that is, of the Church of Christ.

The glory and stability of the kingdom; that is, of the Church of Christ.

Haydock: Psa 92:1 - Founded // Himself // Established // Moved Founded. Septuagint, "inhabited." This title occurs not in Hebrew (Theodoret) nor are the copies of the Septuagint uniform, which shews that it is ...

Founded. Septuagint, "inhabited." This title occurs not in Hebrew (Theodoret) nor are the copies of the Septuagint uniform, which shews that it is a later insertion, intimating perhaps, that it was sung on Friday, when the works of creation were completed, (Berthier) and the world redeemed. (Worthington) ---

It seems to refer to the translation of the ark, (Muis; 1 Paralipomenon xvi. 30.) and the establishment of the Church, the house of God, though the universe may be so styled, (Berthier) or it speaks of the return from captivity, (Ven. Bede) as well as the preceding and following psalms. ---

Himself. As if to perform some great work, the liberation of his people from the captivity of Babylon, and of the devil, (Calmet) or to create the world. (Berthier) ---

Established. "Weighed." (Houbigant) ---

Moved, or disturbed in the order established by him. (Haydock) ---

This does not prove that the earth moves not on its own axis daily, and round the sun every year. (Berthier) ---

The Church shall not fail, (Menochius) which Christ has redeemed by his own blood, and with great power. In it He reigns, and will draw all to himself, John xii. 31. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 92:2 - Of old Of old. Literally, "that time," ex tunc, (Worthington) alluding to some distant period, Isaias xvi. 13. (Calmet) --- God's throne is established...

Of old. Literally, "that time," ex tunc, (Worthington) alluding to some distant period, Isaias xvi. 13. (Calmet) ---

God's throne is established over creatures, as soon as they exist. (Haydock) ---

Yet he is eternal, (Menochius) as Christ is likewise. At his ascension, He placed his sacred humanity on the throne. (Calmet) ---

His kingdom, the Church, continues for ever. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 92:3 - Floods // Waves Floods. The apostles, (Eusebius; St. Augustine) or persecutors. (Worthington) --- Waves. This sentence is not in the Roman Septuagint, &c. (Cal...

Floods. The apostles, (Eusebius; St. Augustine) or persecutors. (Worthington) ---

Waves. This sentence is not in the Roman Septuagint, &c. (Calmet) ---

But it is in the Alexandrian and Aldine editions. Storms and tides fill all with awe and astonishment. (Calmet) ---

The motion of waters, when they were first confined to their channels, and the persecutions of the Church, and rebellions against God, are described. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 92:4 - On high On high. In heaven, more to be admired than all the phenomena of nature, and more powerful than all the vast armies of the Babylonians, Isaias xl. 1...

On high. In heaven, more to be admired than all the phenomena of nature, and more powerful than all the vast armies of the Babylonians, Isaias xl. 15. (Calmet) ---

The conversion of many nations, (Apocalypse xvii. 5.) is the work and glory of God, (Haydock) and his preserving the Church in the midst of the most violent attacks, shews his power. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 92:5 - Credible // Days Credible. St. Jerome, "faithful." --- Protestants, "very sure." (Haydock) --- A person must shut his eyes not to see the prophecies fulfilled con...

Credible. St. Jerome, "faithful." ---

Protestants, "very sure." (Haydock) ---

A person must shut his eyes not to see the prophecies fulfilled concerning Christ, and his Church. (Eusebius) ---

The majesty of God should strike us with a holy fear, and teach us to observe his commandments, and to behave with the utmost respect in his house, (Calmet) which is the whole world, or the society of the faithful. (Berthier) ---

Articles of faith are perfectly credible to those whose hearts are moved by grace, (Worthington) though they cannot be understood. (Haydock) ---

All the members of the Church should carefully approve themselves to God, who is her spouse, (Worthington) and protector, (Menochius) to the end of the world. (Worthington) ---

Days. Since thy power and fidelity are so great, suffer not thy temple to be any longer in ruins, or profaned. (Calmet)

Gill: Psa 92:1 - It is a good thing to give thanks unto the Lord // and to sing praises unto thy name, O most High It is a good thing to give thanks unto the Lord,.... For all mercies, temporal and spiritual; for Christ, and salvation by him; for the Gospel, and fo...

It is a good thing to give thanks unto the Lord,.... For all mercies, temporal and spiritual; for Christ, and salvation by him; for the Gospel, and for Gospel opportunities and ordinances; for, such days and seasons this psalm was composed for. It is "good" so to do, for it is the will of God that we should in and for every thing give thanks; it is due unto him, and is our reasonable service; it is well pleasing unto God through Christ; it is pleasant work for the saints themselves, and is profitable unto them; to be thankful for what they have is the way to have more. Kimchi connects this with the title; the sabbath day is good to give thanks unto the Lord; it is a very fit opportunity for such service; when a man is at leisure from worldly business, and his heart is engaged in spiritual exercises, and especially when it is warmed with the love of God:

and to sing praises unto thy name, O most High; a name and epithet of God, suitable to his majesty and glory, to his supereminence over all his creatures, and the place where he dwells, and to whom the highest praises are due; these two phrases, giving thanks, and singing praise, are much the same; only with this difference, the former may be done in prayer, and without the modulation of the voice, as well as with it; the latter only with it; hence these two are mentioned as distinct things in Eph 5:19.

Gill: Psa 92:2 - To show forth thy lovingkindness in the morning // and thy faithfulness every night To show forth thy lovingkindness in the morning,.... God has shown forth his lovingkindness in Christ, and Christ has shown it in a ministerial way; a...

To show forth thy lovingkindness in the morning,.... God has shown forth his lovingkindness in Christ, and Christ has shown it in a ministerial way; and saints should show it forth also with their lips, to warm the hearts of one another, and encourage distressed minds; this should be a part, and a considerable one, of their thanksgiving and praise; as it will appear to be, when the objects of it are considered, not angels, but men, and these the worst and vilest; the instances of it in election, redemption, calling, adoption, and eternal life; and the freeness, earliness, and immovableness of it; and this is to be done in the "morning", not of the sabbath day only, but every other day, giving praise and thanks for the mercies of the night. Jarchi interprets it of the time of salvation:

and thy faithfulness every night: or "in the nights" b; not the night and goings out of the sabbath only, so Arama; but every other night, observing and declaring the faithfulness and truth of God in his counsels and covenant, in his word and promises, and in the preservation of his people, and the continuance of favours to them; particularly praising his name, and giving thanks unto him openly for the mercies of the day past: morning and night being mentioned may have some respect to the morning and evening sacrifices; and may signify that our sacrifices of praise should be offered up to God continually, Heb 13:15.

Gill: Psa 92:3 - Upon an instrument of ten strings // and upon the psaltery Upon an instrument of ten strings,.... An harp of ten strings, as the Targum. The harp invented by Terpander had only seven strings c; according to Pl...

Upon an instrument of ten strings,.... An harp of ten strings, as the Targum. The harp invented by Terpander had only seven strings c; according to Pliny d; Simonides added the eighth, and Timotheus the ninth; but this of David was of ten strings:

and upon the psaltery; of which See Gill on Psa 33:2, "upon the harp with a solemn sound"; or "upon higgaon with the harp"; which "higgaon", Aben Ezra says, was either the tune of a song, or an instrument of music; all these instruments of music were typical of the spiritual joy and melody which the saints have in their hearts when they praise the Lord; hence mention is made of harps in particular in this spiritual sense, under the Gospel dispensation, Rev 5:8.

Gill: Psa 92:4 - For thou, Lord, hast made me glad through thy work // I will triumph in the works of thine hands For thou, Lord, hast made me glad through thy work,.... Either of creation, which work is mentioned in the precept of the sabbath, as an argument for ...

For thou, Lord, hast made me glad through thy work,.... Either of creation, which work is mentioned in the precept of the sabbath, as an argument for it; and therefore a very proper work to be remembered and observed on that day; or of providence, which in general extends to all men, but especially to them that believe; or of the work of redemption wrought out by Christ, which is cause of great joy and gladness; or of the work of grace upon the soul, which when a man is satisfied of, gives him infinite pleasure, as knowing it will be performed until the day of Christ; and when a man is in such a joyful frame of spirit, he is in a very suitable one to sing the praises of God, Jam 5:13,

I will triumph in the works of thine hands; those before mentioned; or shout aloud for joy, on account of them; and also triumph over all enemies, as being out of the reach of them, so as to be hurt and ruined by them.

Gill: Psa 92:5 - O Lord, how great are thy works! // and thy thoughts are very deep O Lord, how great are thy works!.... Of nature, providence, and grace, both for quantity and for quality, for number, excellency, and glory, as they a...

O Lord, how great are thy works!.... Of nature, providence, and grace, both for quantity and for quality, for number, excellency, and glory, as they are a display of God's wisdom, power, and goodness; see Psa 104:24,

and thy thoughts are very deep; his counsels, purposes, and designs, they are unfathomable and unsearchable; see 1Co 2:10.

Gill: Psa 92:6 - A brutish man knoweth not // neither doth a fool understand this A brutish man knoweth not,.... The lovingkindness of the Lord, and his faithfulness, nor how to show them forth, nor his great works and deep thoughts...

A brutish man knoweth not,.... The lovingkindness of the Lord, and his faithfulness, nor how to show them forth, nor his great works and deep thoughts; man was made originally far above the brute creatures, and had them all under his dominion; but, sinning, became like the beasts that perish; and is in Scripture often compared to one or other of them, as the horse, ass, &c. a brutish man is one that only knows things naturally, as brute beasts do, and in which also he corrupts himself; he is governed by sense, and not by reason, and much less by faith, which he has not; one that indulges his sensual appetite, whose god is his belly, and minds nothing but earth and earthly things; and, though he has an immortal soul, has no more care of it, and concern about it, than a beast that has none; he lives like one, without fear or shame; and in some things acts below them, and at last dies, as they do, without any thought of, or regard unto, a future state:

neither doth a fool understand this; what is before said, or else what follows in the next verse, as Jarchi and others interpret it, concerning the end and event of the prosperity of the wicked; Arama interprets it of the Gentiles not knowing this law of the land, the sabbath, and so rejected it: a "fool" is the same with the "brutish" man, one that is so, not in things natural and civil, but in things moral, spiritual, and religious.

Gill: Psa 92:7 - When the wicked spring as the grass // and when all the workers of iniquity do flourish // it is that they shall be destroyed for ever When the wicked spring as the grass,.... Out of the earth, as they do, and are of the earth earthly, and become numerous as spires of grass, and look ...

When the wicked spring as the grass,.... Out of the earth, as they do, and are of the earth earthly, and become numerous as spires of grass, and look pleasant and beautiful for a while, as that does; but, like it, weak and unstable, and of a short continuance:

and when all the workers of iniquity do flourish; in the health of their bodies; not being afflicted as other men, and their eyes standing out with fatness; while a Job, an upright man, is smitten with boils from the crown of the head to the sole of the foot: in wealth and riches, in which they increase often to such a degree, as to think of pulling down their barns, and building greater, to put their substance in; in their progeny and offspring, having a numerous issue; as well as in their cattle, and the standing of them, and in other stores; likewise in their power and authority, grandeur and glory, being set in high places of honour and profit, though slippery ones: these are the godly, who are "wicked" at heart, and show it by their wicked works; who are continually committing sin, it is the course of their conversation, and yet prosper in the world; which is sometimes a stumblingblock to God's people, and a hardening of sinners, who consider not that

it is that they shall be destroyed for ever they are like brute beasts, made to be taken and destroyed, and as lambs and other creatures are nourished and fattened for the day of slaughter, 2Pe 2:12, and as land is manured and cultivated, and grass springs up and flourishes, that it may be, when grown, cut down, and become the fodder of beasts, or the fuel of fire; so the prosperity of the wicked issues in their ruin, and is an aggravation of their damnation; their destruction is of soul and body in hell, and is an everlasting one; the Targum is,

"and it shall be that God shall destroy them for ever,''

Gill: Psa 92:8 - But thou, Lord, art most high for evermore But thou, Lord, art most high for evermore,.... God is "the most High"; that is one of his names; he is above all, is higher than the highest; and he ...

But thou, Lord, art most high for evermore,.... God is "the most High"; that is one of his names; he is above all, is higher than the highest; and he dwells on high, and looks down upon the inhabitants of the earth, and sees what is doing among them; and to him they will be accountable another day for what they do; and when wicked, men perish, being destroyed, he will continue for ever in all his greatness, glory, and majesty; for there seems to be an antithesis in this verse to the former, or between wicked men and the Lord; and besides he endures for ever to inflict punishment upon them; and therefore it is that they shall be destroyed for ever.

Gill: Psa 92:9 - For, lo, thine enemies, O Lord // for, lo, thine enemies shall perish For, lo, thine enemies, O Lord,.... The particle "lo", or "behold", is not used for the sake of God, but for the sake of men; to excite their attentio...

For, lo, thine enemies, O Lord,.... The particle "lo", or "behold", is not used for the sake of God, but for the sake of men; to excite their attention, and to observe unto them that those who are everlastingly destroyed are the enemies of the Lord; who are enemies in their minds by wicked works, yea, enmity itself against God; and therefore their perdition is just as well as certain; sooner or later these shall be brought forth and slain before him; and for the certainty of it is repeated,

for, lo, thine enemies shall perish; the Targum adds, in the world to come: "all the workers of iniquity shall be scattered"; one from another, and not be able to unite and combine together against the saints, as they have done; or they shall be separated from them at the last day, being placed at Christ's left hand; and shall not stand in judgment, nor in the congregation of the righteous; and so the Targum,

"and all the workers of iniquity shall be separated from the congregation of the righteous;''

see Psa 1:5.

Gill: Psa 92:10 - But my horn shall thou exalt like the horn of an unicorn // I shall be anointed with fresh oil But my horn shall thou exalt like the horn of an unicorn,.... Which is said to be very high and strong, see Deu 33:17 this may be understood of the es...

But my horn shall thou exalt like the horn of an unicorn,.... Which is said to be very high and strong, see Deu 33:17 this may be understood of the establishment of David's kingdom, of his royal authority, power, and the glory of it, signified by his horn; which was fulfilled when he had subdued the neighbouring nations, and the kings of them, and was exalted above them, and had rest from all his enemies: and may be applied unto the Messiah, the horn of David, the horn of salvation raised up in his house, Psa 132:17 and so may refer to exaltation at the right hand of God, and the strength and glory of his kingdom; see 1Sa 2:10, and also may be interpreted of every good man, in opposition to the wicked; who, though low and abased, God will exalt and set them among princes, and cause them to inherit the throne of glory, and even to sit down on the same throne with Christ; see 1Sa 2:8.

I shall be anointed with fresh oil; oil of olive, as the Targum; oil of myrrh, as Aben Ezra; it may respect David's unction to office, as king of Israel; for not only after he had been anointed by Samuel, but even after he was anointed by the men of Judah as king over them, he was afresh anointed by all the tribes of Israel as their king, 2Sa 2:4, "oil" often signifies the Spirit of God, his gifts and graces; and "fresh" oil may intend new supplies of his grace out of the fulness of it, which is in Christ; and also the renewed joys and comforts of the Holy Spirit, who is the oil of gladness Christ was anointed with above his fellows, and is given to his people in measure.

Gill: Psa 92:11 - Mine eyes also shall see my desire on mine enemies // and mine ears shall hear my desire of the wicked that rise up against me Mine eyes also shall see my desire on mine enemies,.... The Targum supplies thus, "shall see destruction;'' Aben Ezra, shall see "the vengeance ...

Mine eyes also shall see my desire on mine enemies,.... The Targum supplies thus,

"shall see destruction;''

Aben Ezra, shall see "the vengeance of God", as in Psa 58:10, and Kimchi, as we do, shall "see what I will", or "my desire"; which arose not from a revengeful spirit, or from a spirit of private revenge, but from a regard to the glory of God, and the honour of his name; and in no other view could the destruction of fellow creatures, though his enemies, be grateful to him:

and mine ears shall hear my desire of the wicked that rise up against me; he should see the ruin of some, and hear of the destruction of others; that which his eyes saw not, his ears should hear; the report would be brought to him; as in the latter day the voice of the angel will be heard, "Babylon is fallen"; and other voices heard in heaven, giving glory to God; an account of which will be acceptable to the saints, because of the justice of God, and the honour of it, as well as because it will make for their future peace and comfort, Rev 18:2.

Gill: Psa 92:12 - The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree // he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree,.... Not like grass, as the wicked, Psa 92:7 which is weak and tender, and soon cut down; but like tre...

The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree,.... Not like grass, as the wicked, Psa 92:7 which is weak and tender, and soon cut down; but like trees, and like palm trees, that are firm and strong, and of a long continuance: the word for righteous being of the singular number, has led some to think that Christ is meant; but though he is eminently the righteous One, being so in himself, and the author of righteousness to others, yet not he, but his church and people, are compared to a palm tree, Son 7:7, the reason why the singular number is made use of is, as Aben Ezra thinks, because the righteous are very few, in comparison of the wicked: the sense is, that everyone of the righteous, or everyone that is righteous, through the righteousness of Christ imputed to them, and are created anew in righteousness and true holiness, and live soberly, righteously, and godly, are like the flourishing palm trees; which grow upright, and under the greatest pressures, and rise upwards against the greatest weight upon them e; whose force and vigour is on the top of them, which being cut off, they die; which delight in hot climates and sunny places, bear a delicious fruit, are ever green, are very durable, and their branches used in token of joy and victory; it is said to be a perfect image of a man, and in many things to resemble him f: so truly righteous persons are upright ones in heart and life, grow up into their head, Christ, and rise up heavenwards in their desires and affections; and, like the Israelites, the more they are pressed with the weight of afflictions, the more they grow; their grace and strength, their life and rigour, lie in their head, Christ; from whom was it possible they could be separated, as it is not, they would instantly die; they flourish under him, the sun of righteousness, and his warming beams of love, and bring forth the fruits of righteousness by him, to the glory of God; their leaf of profession does not wither, but is always green; the grace of God, which is in them, being an incorruptible and never dying seed: hence, in the issue, they make that palm, bearing company in Rev 7:9 who are more than conquerors through Christ, that has loved them: the Greek version is, "as the phoenix", which some of the ancients understood of a bird so called, supposed to rise out of its ashes, and use it to prove the resurrection of the dead g:

he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon; where the best, tallest, largest, and strongest cedars grow; See Gill on Isa 37:24 to which the righteous are compared, who grow up by degrees higher and higher, even to the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ; and, stronger and stronger in him, go from strength to strength, having their spiritual strength renewed by him; and cast forth their roots in him, like Lebanon, and the cedars there; and spread their boughs and branches, like them, in the exercise of grace and discharge of duty; and grow in every grace, of faith, hope, love, humility, self-denial, and submission to the will of God, and in the knowledge of Jesus Christ; and are durable as the cedar, never die, their life being hid with Christ in God. Kimchi refers this to the days of the Messiah.

Gill: Psa 92:13 - Those that be planted in the house of the Lord, // shall flourish in the courts of our God Those that be planted in the house of the Lord,.... Or being planted e, that is, everyone of the righteous before mentioned; such are they that are pl...

Those that be planted in the house of the Lord,.... Or being planted e, that is, everyone of the righteous before mentioned; such are they that are planted out of the wilderness of the world, and into Christ, and are rooted in him, and are planted together in the likeness of his death and resurrection; have the graces of the Spirit of God implanted in them, have received the ingrafted word; and, in consequence of all this, are grafted into the olive tree, the church; or have a place and name there, better than that of sons and daughters, where they are as plants grown up in their youth; and which is here meant by "the house of the Lord", in allusion to the tabernacle, or temple, which had the figure of palm trees on the walls of it: so the Targum interprets it the temple, rendering it,

"his children shall be planted in the sanctuary of the Lord:''

and though it may seem strange that trees should be planted in an house, it should be remembered that the house of the Lord, or the church, is a garden, whose plants are an orchard of pomegranates, Son 4:12, and such are not mere education plants, or such as are merely by outward profession, or only ministerially, planted, but are planted by the Lord himself; and so are choice and pleasant ones, by which God is glorified, and which shall never be plucked up: and these

shall flourish in the courts of our God; like trees in courtyards before houses; alluding to the courts in the tabernacle or temple, where the people worshipped: here the righteous flourish like palm trees, as in the preceding verse, being rooted in Christ, who is the righteous man's root, that yieldeth fruit, and from whom all his fruit is found; but this flourishing is not merely in the leaves of profession, but in the fruits of grace and righteousness, being watered with the dews of divine grace, and having the benefit of the word and ordinances; which are the waters of the sanctuary, that refresh and quicken the trees of righteousness that grow by it; see Eze 47:1. This is referred to the times of the Messiah, and the resurrection, by the ancient Jews f.

Gill: Psa 92:14 - They shall still bring forth fruit in old age // they shall be fat and flourishing They shall still bring forth fruit in old age,.... Being thus planted and watered, they shall not only bring forth the fruits of righteousness, but sh...

They shall still bring forth fruit in old age,.... Being thus planted and watered, they shall not only bring forth the fruits of righteousness, but shall continue, and go on to do so, and even when they are grown old; contrary to all other trees, which, when old, cease bearing fruit; but so do not the righteous; grace is often in the greatest vigour when nature is decayed; witness Abraham, Job, David, Zachariah, and Elisabeth, and good old Simeon, who went to the grave like shocks of corn, fully ripe:

they shall be fat and flourishing; or "green", full of sap and moisture, abound with green leaves and precious fruit; or, in other words, abound in grace, and be fruitful in every good work: being ingrafted into the true olive, the church of God, they partake of the root and fatness of it; having a place in the house of the Lord, they are satisfied with the goodness and fatness thereof, and are made to drink of the river of divine pleasure; and being in the courts of the Lord, where a feast of fat things is provided for them, they eat and feed, and so thrive and flourish; the allusion is to fat and flourishing palm trees g.

Gill: Psa 92:15 - To show that the Lord is upright // he is my Rock // even the Rock whose work is perfect // just and right is he // and there is no unrighteousness in him To show that the Lord is upright,.... Or righteous, that is, faithful; as he is in his counsels, covenant, and promises, which he makes good by causin...

To show that the Lord is upright,.... Or righteous, that is, faithful; as he is in his counsels, covenant, and promises, which he makes good by causing his people to grow and flourish, and become fruitful; by carrying on the work of grace upon their souls, and by preserving them to the end safe to his kingdom and glory; by all which it appears that he does not and will not suffer his faithfulness to fail: the Targum is,

"that the inhabitants of the earth may show, &c.''

he is my Rock; the psalmist sets his seal to the truth of God's faithfulness, firmness, and constancy, calling him a Rock for his strength and stability, and claiming his interest in him; declaring he found him to be so by experience,

even the Rock whose work is perfect; who always completes what he undertakes, and finishes what he begins, and will not forsake the work of his own hands:

just and right is he; the Rock of ages, that remains firm, steadfast, and unalterable in all generations:

and there is no unrighteousness in him; as not in his sovereign acts of grace, so neither in his providential dispensations, either towards good men or bad men; not in suffering the wicked to prosper, as in Psa 92:7, and the righteous to be afflicted; nor in punishing bad men here, or hereafter; nor in justifying sinners by the righteousness of his Son, and giving them the crown of righteousness at the last day: all his proceedings are in the most just and equitable manner; see Rom 9:14.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 92:1 Traditionally “O Most High.”

NET Notes: Psa 92:2 The words “it is fitting” are supplied in the translation for stylistic reasons. Verses 1-3 are actually one long sentence in the Hebrew t...

NET Notes: Psa 92:4 Heb “the works of your hands.”

NET Notes: Psa 92:5 Heb “very deep [are] your thoughts.” God’s “thoughts” refer here to his moral design of the world, as outlined in vv. 6-...

NET Notes: Psa 92:6 Heb “the brutish man does not know, and the fool does not understand this.” The adjective בַּעַר (ba&#...

NET Notes: Psa 92:7 God allows the wicked to prosper temporarily so that he might reveal his justice. When the wicked are annihilated, God demonstrates that wickedness do...

NET Notes: Psa 92:8 Heb “[are elevated] on high.”

NET Notes: Psa 92:9 Or “for.”

NET Notes: Psa 92:10 The Hebrew verb בָּלַל (balal) usually has the nuance “to mix.” Here it seems to mean “to smear&...

NET Notes: Psa 92:11 Heb “those who rise up against me, evil [foes], my ears hear.”

NET Notes: Psa 92:12 The cedars of the Lebanon forest were well-known in ancient Israel for their immense size.

NET Notes: Psa 92:14 Heb “they are juicy and fresh.”

NET Notes: Psa 92:15 Heb “so that [they] proclaim that upright [is] the Lord, my rocky summit, and there is no injustice in him.”

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:1 "A Psalm [or] Song for the ( a ) sabbath day." [It is a] good [thing] to give thanks unto the LORD, and to sing praises unto thy name, O most High: (...

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:2 To shew forth thy lovingkindness in the ( b ) morning, and thy faithfulness every night, ( b ) For God's mercy and fidelity in his promises toward hi...

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:3 Upon an ( c ) instrument of ten strings, and upon the psaltery; upon the harp with a solemn sound. ( c ) These instruments were then permitted in the...

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:4 For thou, LORD, hast made me glad through thy ( d ) work: I will triumph in the works of thy hands. ( d ) He shows the use of the Sabbath day: that i...

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:6 A ( e ) brutish man knoweth not; neither doth a fool understand this. ( e ) That is, the wicked do not consider God's works nor his judgments against...

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:8 But thou, LORD, [art ( f ) most] high for evermore. ( f ) Your judgments are most constant against the wicked and pass our reach.

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:10 ( g ) But my horn shalt thou exalt like [the horn of] an unicorn: I shall be anointed with fresh oil. ( g ) You will strengthen them with all power, ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:12 The righteous shall ( h ) flourish like the palm tree: he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon. ( h ) Though the faithful seem to whither and be cut do...

Geneva Bible: Psa 92:14 They shall still bring forth fruit in old ( i ) age; they shall be fat and flourishing; ( i ) The children of God will have a power above nature and ...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 92:1-6 - --It is a privilege that we are admitted to praise the Lord, and hope to be accepted in the morning, and every night; not only on sabbath days, but ever...

MHCC: Psa 92:7-15 - --God sometimes grants prosperity to wicked men in displeasure; yet they flourish but for a moment. Let us seek for ourselves the salvation and grace of...

Matthew Henry: Psa 92:1-6 - -- This psalm was appointed to be sung, at least it usually was sung, in the house of the sanctuary on the sabbath day, that day of rest, which was an ...

Matthew Henry: Psa 92:7-15 - -- The psalmist had said (Psa 92:4) that from the works of God he would take occasion to triumph; and here he does so. I. He triumphs over God's enemie...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 92:1-3 - -- The Sabbath is the day that God has hallowed, and that is to be consecrated to God by our turning away from the business pursuits of the working day...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 92:4-6 - -- Statement of the ground of this commendation of the praise of God. Whilst פּעל is the usual word for God's historical rule (Psa 44:2; Psa 64:10;...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 92:7-9 - -- Upon closer examination the prosperity of the ungodly is only a semblance that lasts for a time. The infinitive construction in Psa 92:8 is continue...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 92:10-12 - -- The hitherto oppressed church then stands forth vindicated and glorious. The futt. consec. as preterites of the ideal past, pass over further on in...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 92:13-15 - -- The soil in which the righteous are planted or (if it is not rendered with the lxx πεφυτευμένοι , but with the other Greek versions ...

Constable: Psa 90:1--106:48 - --IV. Book 4: chs. 90--106 Moses composed one of the psalms in this section of the Psalter (Ps. 90). David wrote t...

Constable: Psa 92:1-15 - --Psalm 92 In this psalm the unknown writer praised God for the goodness of His acts and the righteousness...

Constable: Psa 92:1-6 - --1. Praise for God's goodness 92:1-7 92:1-3 It is appropriate to praise God because of the good things He has done for His people. He is faithful to Hi...

Constable: Psa 92:7-14 - --2. Praise for God's righteousness 92:8-15 92:8-9 In contrast to the wicked who will perish (v. 7) the Lord will reign forever. He will cause His enemi...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 92:5-6 The unregenerate mind is able to see God’s creation and not begin to comprehend how great God is. His understanding is darkened. He is alienated fro...

Evidence: Psa 92:13 " Most people think churches are like cafeterias; they pick and choose what they like! They feel the freedom to stay as long as there are no problems....

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 92 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 92:1, The prophet exhorts to praise God, Psa 92:4, for his great works; Psa 92:6, for his judgments on the wicked; Psa 92:10, and for...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 92 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 92:1-6) Praise is the business of the sabbath. (Psa 92:7-15) The wicked shall perish, but God's people shall be exalted.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 92 (Pendahuluan Pasal) It is a groundless opinion of some of the Jewish writers (who are usually free of their conjectures) that this psalm was penned and sung by Adam in...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 92 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 92 A Psalm or Song for the Sabbath day. Many of the Jewish writers a think that this psalm was written by the first man Adam,...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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