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Teks -- Psalms 9:1-20 (NET)

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Konteks
Psalm 9
9:1 For the music director; according to the alumoth-labben style; a psalm of David. I will thank the Lord with all my heart! I will tell about all your amazing deeds! 9:2 I will be happy and rejoice in you! I will sing praises to you, O sovereign One! 9:3 When my enemies turn back, they trip and are defeated before you. 9:4 For you defended my just cause; from your throne you pronounced a just decision. 9:5 You terrified the nations with your battle cry; you destroyed the wicked; you permanently wiped out all memory of them. 9:6 The enemy’s cities have been reduced to permanent ruins; you destroyed their cities; all memory of the enemies has perished. 9:7 But the Lord rules forever; he reigns in a just manner. 9:8 He judges the world fairly; he makes just legal decisions for the nations. 9:9 Consequently the Lord provides safety for the oppressed; he provides safety in times of trouble. 9:10 Your loyal followers trust in you, for you, Lord, do not abandon those who seek your help. 9:11 Sing praises to the Lord, who rules in Zion! Tell the nations what he has done! 9:12 For the one who takes revenge against murderers took notice of the oppressed; he did not overlook their cry for help 9:13 when they prayed: “Have mercy on me, Lord! See how I am oppressed by those who hate me, O one who can snatch me away from the gates of death! 9:14 Then I will tell about all your praiseworthy acts; in the gates of Daughter Zion I will rejoice because of your deliverance.” 9:15 The nations fell into the pit they had made; their feet were caught in the net they had hidden. 9:16 The Lord revealed himself; he accomplished justice; the wicked were ensnared by their own actions. (Higgaion. Selah) 9:17 The wicked are turned back and sent to Sheol; this is the destiny of all the nations that ignore God, 9:18 for the needy are not permanently ignored, the hopes of the oppressed are not forever dashed. 9:19 Rise up, Lord! Don’t let men be defiant! May the nations be judged in your presence! 9:20 Terrify them, Lord! Let the nations know they are mere mortals! (Selah)
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel
 · Higgaion a liturgical or musical notation
 · Muth-Labben a tune notation
 · Selah a musical notation for crescendo or emphasis by action (IBD)
 · Sheol the place of the dead
 · Zion one of the hills on which Jerusalem was built; the temple area; the city of Jerusalem; God's people,a town and citidel; an ancient part of Jerusalem


Topik/Tema Kamus: MUTH-LABBEN | PSALMS, BOOK OF | Praise | Music | VULGATE | Sanctification | God | Prayer | Faith | Afflictions and Adversities | Thankfulness | Church | Poor | Heathen | Throne | HIGGAION | JUDGING JUDGMENT | MEEKNESS | Judgments | Hell | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 9:3 - Turned back Put to flight.

Put to flight.

Wesley: Psa 9:7 - But Though cities and people may perish, yet the Lord abides for ever. Which is sufficient for the terror of his enemies, and the comfort of his church.

Though cities and people may perish, yet the Lord abides for ever. Which is sufficient for the terror of his enemies, and the comfort of his church.

Wesley: Psa 9:10 - Thy name Thy infinite power and wisdom, and faithfulness and goodness. The name of God is frequently put for God.

Thy infinite power and wisdom, and faithfulness and goodness. The name of God is frequently put for God.

Wesley: Psa 9:10 - Put their trust The experience of thy faithfulness to thy people in all ages, is a just ground for their confidence.

The experience of thy faithfulness to thy people in all ages, is a just ground for their confidence.

Wesley: Psa 9:11 - Zion Whose special and gracious presence is there.

Whose special and gracious presence is there.

Wesley: Psa 9:11 - People To the heathen nations.

To the heathen nations.

Wesley: Psa 9:12 - Blood The bloodshed of his innocent and holy ones: which though he may not seem to regard for a season, yet he will certainly call the authors of it to a se...

The bloodshed of his innocent and holy ones: which though he may not seem to regard for a season, yet he will certainly call the authors of it to a severe account.

Wesley: Psa 9:12 - Them The humble, as it follows, or the oppressed, Psa 9:9, that trust in him, and seek to him, Psa 9:10, whom he seemed to have forgotten.

The humble, as it follows, or the oppressed, Psa 9:9, that trust in him, and seek to him, Psa 9:10, whom he seemed to have forgotten.

Wesley: Psa 9:14 - Gates In the great assemblies. These gates he elegantly opposes to the former.

In the great assemblies. These gates he elegantly opposes to the former.

Wesley: Psa 9:14 - Of Of the people who live or meet together in Zion. For cities are as it were mothers to their people, and the people are commonly called their daughters...

Of the people who live or meet together in Zion. For cities are as it were mothers to their people, and the people are commonly called their daughters. So the names of the daughters of Egypt, Jer 46:11, and of Edom, Lam 4:21-22, and of Tyre, Psa 45:12, are put for the people of those places.

Wesley: Psa 9:16 - Higgaion This is either a musical term, or a note of attention, intimating that the matter deserves deep meditation, or consideration, as the word signifies.

This is either a musical term, or a note of attention, intimating that the matter deserves deep meditation, or consideration, as the word signifies.

Wesley: Psa 9:17 - Forget That do not regard God, nor his precepts, nor his threatenings and judgments.

That do not regard God, nor his precepts, nor his threatenings and judgments.

JFB: Psa 9:1 - -- Upon Muthlabben, or, after the manner according to "death to the Son," by which some song was known, to whose air or melody the musician is directed t...

Upon Muthlabben, or, after the manner according to "death to the Son," by which some song was known, to whose air or melody the musician is directed to perform this Psalm. This mode of denoting a song by some prominent word or words is still common (compare Psa 22:1). The Psalmist praises God for deliverance from his enemies and celebrates the divine government, for providing security to God's people and punishment to the wicked. Thus encouraging himself, he prays for new occasions to recount God's mercies, and confident of His continued judgment on the wicked and vindication of the oppressed, he implores a prompt and efficient manifestation of the divine sovereignty. (Psa. 9:1-20)

Heartfelt gratitude will find utterance.

JFB: Psa 9:3-5 - When . . . are turned back It is the result of God's power alone. He, as a righteous Judge (Psa 7:11), vindicates His people. He rebukes by acts as well as words (Psa 6:1; Psa 1...

It is the result of God's power alone. He, as a righteous Judge (Psa 7:11), vindicates His people. He rebukes by acts as well as words (Psa 6:1; Psa 18:15), and so effectually as to destroy the names of nations as well as persons.

JFB: Psa 9:6 - -- Literally, "As to the enemy finished are his ruins for ever. Thou [God] hast destroyed," &c. (1Sa 15:3, 1Sa 15:7; 1Sa 27:8-9). The wicked are utterly ...

Literally, "As to the enemy finished are his ruins for ever. Thou [God] hast destroyed," &c. (1Sa 15:3, 1Sa 15:7; 1Sa 27:8-9). The wicked are utterly undone. Their ruins shall never be repaired.

JFB: Psa 9:7-8 - -- God's eternal possession of a throne of justice is contrasted with the ruin of the wicked.

God's eternal possession of a throne of justice is contrasted with the ruin of the wicked.

JFB: Psa 9:9-10 - -- The oppressed, and all who know Him (Psa 5:3; Psa 7:1), find Him a sure refuge.

The oppressed, and all who know Him (Psa 5:3; Psa 7:1), find Him a sure refuge.

JFB: Psa 9:11 - -- (Compare Psa 2:6; Psa 3:4).

(Compare Psa 2:6; Psa 3:4).

JFB: Psa 9:12 - for blood That is, murders (Psa 5:6), including all the oppressions of His people.

That is, murders (Psa 5:6), including all the oppressions of His people.

JFB: Psa 9:12 - maketh inquisition (compare Gen 9:5). He will avenge their cause.

(compare Gen 9:5). He will avenge their cause.

JFB: Psa 9:13 - gates Or, "regions."

Or, "regions."

JFB: Psa 9:13 - of death Gates being the entrance is put for the bounds.

Gates being the entrance is put for the bounds.

JFB: Psa 9:14 - gates . . . Zion The enclosure of the city (compare Psa 48:12; Isa 23:12), or, church, as denoted by this phrase contrasted with that of death, carries out the idea of...

The enclosure of the city (compare Psa 48:12; Isa 23:12), or, church, as denoted by this phrase contrasted with that of death, carries out the idea of exaltation as well as deliverance. Signal favors should lead us to render signal and public thanks.

JFB: Psa 9:15-16 - -- The undesigned results of the devices of the wicked prove them to be of God's overruling or ordering, especially when those results are destructive to...

The undesigned results of the devices of the wicked prove them to be of God's overruling or ordering, especially when those results are destructive to the wicked themselves.

JFB: Psa 9:16 - Higgaion Means "meditation," and, combined with Selah, seems to denote a pause of unusual solemnity and emphasis (compare Psa 3:2). Though Selah occurs seventy...

Means "meditation," and, combined with Selah, seems to denote a pause of unusual solemnity and emphasis (compare Psa 3:2). Though Selah occurs seventy-three times, this is the only case in which Higgaion is found. In the view which is given here of the retribution on the wicked as an instance of God's wise and holy ordering, we may well pause in adoring wonder and faith.

JFB: Psa 9:17 - shall be turned Or, "shall turn," retreating under God's vengeance, and driven by Him to the extreme of destruction, even hell itself. Those who forget God are classe...

Or, "shall turn," retreating under God's vengeance, and driven by Him to the extreme of destruction, even hell itself. Those who forget God are classed with the depraved and openly profane.

JFB: Psa 9:18 - -- (Compare Psa 13:1-6).

(Compare Psa 13:1-6).

JFB: Psa 9:18 - the needy Literally, "poor," as deprived of anything; hence miserable.

Literally, "poor," as deprived of anything; hence miserable.

JFB: Psa 9:18 - expectation of the poor Or, "meek," "humble," made so by affliction.

Or, "meek," "humble," made so by affliction.

JFB: Psa 9:19 - Arise (compare Psa 4:7).

(compare Psa 4:7).

JFB: Psa 9:19 - let not man (Psa 8:4).

(Psa 8:4).

JFB: Psa 9:19 - let . . . be judged And of course condemned.

And of course condemned.

JFB: Psa 9:20 - -- By their effectual subjection, make them to realize their frail nature (Psa 8:4), and deter them from all conceit and future rebellion.

By their effectual subjection, make them to realize their frail nature (Psa 8:4), and deter them from all conceit and future rebellion.

Clarke: Psa 9:1 - I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole heart I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole heart - And it is only when the whole heart is employed in the work that God can look upon it with accepta...

I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole heart - And it is only when the whole heart is employed in the work that God can look upon it with acceptance

Clarke: Psa 9:1 - I will show forth I will show forth - אספרה asapperah , "I will number out, or reckon up;"a very difficult task, נפלאותיך niphleotheycha , "thy miracle...

I will show forth - אספרה asapperah , "I will number out, or reckon up;"a very difficult task, נפלאותיך niphleotheycha , "thy miracles;"supernatural interventions of thy power and goodness. He whose eye is attentive to the operation of God’ s hand will find many of these. In the Vulgate this Psalm begins with Confitebor tibi, Domine, "I will confess unto thee, O Lord,"which my old MS. above quoted translates thus: I sal schrife Lard, til the, in al my hert, I sal tel al twi wonders. On which we find the following curious paraphrase: "Here the prophete spekes agaynes that grucches with ese of il men: and the travel and anguis of gude men. I sal schrife til the Lard, that is, I sal lufe the in al my hert, hally gederant it til thi luf: and gyfand na party tharof tyl errour, na to covatyse: ne til fleschly luf. A vile errour it is that some men says, that God dose unrightwisly in mani thinges in erthe: for tham thynk that tay sold noght be done. Als I hard say noght lang sythem, of a man of religyon, and of grete fame, that qwen he was in tlle see, in poynte to peryshe, he said tyl Gode: Lard thu dos unryghtwysly if thou sofyr us to perysch here. God myght haf answered and said, My rightwysnes reches to sofer a beter man than thou ert to perisse here: for I hope, had he ben a ryghtwyse man, he had noght sayd swa: for al ar unryghtwyse, that hopes that any unrightwysnes may be in Godes wylle. Bot I sal luf the in al thi workes; and tel al thy wonders; that is, bathe that er sene, and that ar noght sene; visibels and invisibels."

Clarke: Psa 9:2 - I will be glad and rejoice in thee I will be glad and rejoice in thee - I am glad that thou hast heard my prayer, and showed me mercy; and I will rejoice in thee, in having thee as my...

I will be glad and rejoice in thee - I am glad that thou hast heard my prayer, and showed me mercy; and I will rejoice in thee, in having thee as my portion, dwelling and working in my heart.

Clarke: Psa 9:3 - When mine enemies are turned back When mine enemies are turned back - It is a sure sign of a nearly approaching complete conquest over sin, when, by resistance to its influences, it ...

When mine enemies are turned back - It is a sure sign of a nearly approaching complete conquest over sin, when, by resistance to its influences, it begins to lose its power. That is the time to follow on to know the Lord.

Clarke: Psa 9:5 - Thou hast rebuked the heathen Thou hast rebuked the heathen - We know not what this particularly refers to, but it is most probably to the Canaanitish nations, which God destroye...

Thou hast rebuked the heathen - We know not what this particularly refers to, but it is most probably to the Canaanitish nations, which God destroyed from off the face of the earth; hence it is said, Thou hast put out their name for ever and ever, לעולם ועד leolam vaed , endlessly. Here עולם olam has its proper signification, without end. He who contends it means only a limited time, let him tell us where the Hivites, Perizzites, Jebusites, etc., now dwell; and when it is likely they are to be restored to Canaan.

Clarke: Psa 9:6 - Destructions are come to a perpetual end Destructions are come to a perpetual end - Rather, "The enemy is desolated for ever; for thou hast destroyed their cities, and their memory is peris...

Destructions are come to a perpetual end - Rather, "The enemy is desolated for ever; for thou hast destroyed their cities, and their memory is perished with them."Multitudes of the cities of the Canaanites have perished so utterly that neither name nor vestige remains of them.

Clarke: Psa 9:7 - But the Lord shall endure But the Lord shall endure - All things shall have an end but God and holy spirits.

But the Lord shall endure - All things shall have an end but God and holy spirits.

Clarke: Psa 9:8 - He shall judpe the world in righteousness He shall judpe the world in righteousness - All the dispensations of God’ s providence are founded in righteousness and truth.

He shall judpe the world in righteousness - All the dispensations of God’ s providence are founded in righteousness and truth.

Clarke: Psa 9:9 - A refuge A refuge - משגב misgab , a high place, where their enemies can neither reach nor see them. He who has God for his portion has all safety in him...

A refuge - משגב misgab , a high place, where their enemies can neither reach nor see them. He who has God for his portion has all safety in him.

Clarke: Psa 9:10 - They that know thy name They that know thy name - Who have an experimental acquaintance with thy mercy, will put their trust in thee, from the conviction that thou never ha...

They that know thy name - Who have an experimental acquaintance with thy mercy, will put their trust in thee, from the conviction that thou never hast forsaken, and never wilt forsake, them that trust in thee.

Clarke: Psa 9:11 - Declare among the people his doings Declare among the people his doings - It is the duty of all those who have received the salvation of God, to recommend him and his salvation to the ...

Declare among the people his doings - It is the duty of all those who have received the salvation of God, to recommend him and his salvation to the whole circle of their acquaintance, Christians, so called, when they meet, seldom speak about God! Why is this? Because they have nothing to say.

Clarke: Psa 9:12 - When he maketh inquisition for blood When he maketh inquisition for blood - This not only applies to the Canaanites, Moabites, Ammonites, and Philistines, who shed the blood of God̵...

When he maketh inquisition for blood - This not only applies to the Canaanites, Moabites, Ammonites, and Philistines, who shed the blood of God’ s people unjustly, but to all the nations of the earth who, to enlarge their territory, increase their wealth, or extend their commerce, have made destructive wars. For the blood which such nations have shed, their blood shall be shed. If man should make no inquisition for this iniquitously spilt blood, God will do it, for he remembers them; and the cry of the humbled, distressed people, driven to distraction and ruin by such wars, is not forgotten before him.

Clarke: Psa 9:13 - Have mercy upon me, O Lord Have mercy upon me, O Lord - David, having laid down the preceding maxims, now claims his part in their truth. I also am in trouble through the unju...

Have mercy upon me, O Lord - David, having laid down the preceding maxims, now claims his part in their truth. I also am in trouble through the unjust dealings of my enemies; I am brought to the gates of death; have mercy on me, and lift me up, that, being saved from the gates of death, I may show forth thy praise in the gates of the daughter of Zion. The gates of death - an open grave, leading to a yawning hell. The gates of the daughter of Zion - all the ordinances of God, by which the soul is helped forward to heaven.

Clarke: Psa 9:15 - The heathen are sank down to the pit The heathen are sank down to the pit - See on Psa 7:15 (note).

The heathen are sank down to the pit - See on Psa 7:15 (note).

Clarke: Psa 9:16 - The Lord is known by the judgment The Lord is known by the judgment - It is not every casualty that can properly be called a judgment of God. Judgment is his strange work; but when h...

The Lord is known by the judgment - It is not every casualty that can properly be called a judgment of God. Judgment is his strange work; but when he executes it, his mind is plainly to be seen. There are no natural causes to which such calamities can be legally attributed

Clarke: Psa 9:16 - The wicked is snared in the work of his own hands The wicked is snared in the work of his own hands - There is nothing that a wicked man does that is not against his own interest. He is continually ...

The wicked is snared in the work of his own hands - There is nothing that a wicked man does that is not against his own interest. He is continually doing himself harm, and takes more pains to destroy his soul than the righteous man does to get his saved unto eternal life. This is a weighty truth; and the psalmist adds: Higgaion, Selah. Meditate on this; mark it well. See on Psa 3:3 (note). Some think that it is a direction to the musicians, something like our Presto, Largo, Vivace, Allegro, "Play briskly and boldly; beat away; and let sense and sound accompany each other."

Clarke: Psa 9:17 - The wicked shall be turned into hell The wicked shall be turned into hell - לשאולה lisholah , headlong into hell, down into hell. The original is very emphatic

The wicked shall be turned into hell - לשאולה lisholah , headlong into hell, down into hell. The original is very emphatic

Clarke: Psa 9:17 - All the nations that forget God All the nations that forget God - They will not live in his fear. There are both nations and individuals who, though they know God, forget him, that...

All the nations that forget God - They will not live in his fear. There are both nations and individuals who, though they know God, forget him, that is, are unmindful of of him, do not acknowledge him in their designs, ways and works. These are all to be thrust down into hell. Reader, art thou forgetful of thy Maker, and of Him who died for thee?

Clarke: Psa 9:18 - The needy shall not alway be forgotten The needy shall not alway be forgotten - The needy, and the poor, whose expectation is from the Lord, are never forgotten, though sometimes their de...

The needy shall not alway be forgotten - The needy, and the poor, whose expectation is from the Lord, are never forgotten, though sometimes their deliverance is delayed for the greater confusion of their enemies, the greater manifestation of God’ s mercy, and the greater benefit to themselves.

Clarke: Psa 9:19 - Arise, O Lord Arise, O Lord - Let this be the time in which thou wilt deliver thy poor people under oppression and persecution.

Arise, O Lord - Let this be the time in which thou wilt deliver thy poor people under oppression and persecution.

Clarke: Psa 9:20 - Put them in fear Put them in fear - שיתה יהוה מורה להם shithah Yehovah morah lahem , "O Lord, place a teacher among them,"that they may know they als...

Put them in fear - שיתה יהוה מורה להם shithah Yehovah morah lahem , "O Lord, place a teacher among them,"that they may know they also are accountable creatures, grow wise unto salvation, and be prepared for a state of blessedness. Several MSS. read מורא morre , fear; but teacher or legislator is the reading of all the versions except the Chaldee. Coverdale has hit the sense, translating thus: O Lorde, set a Scholemaster over them; and the old Psalter, Sett Lorb a brynger of Law abouen tham.

Clarke: Psa 9:20 - That the nations may know themselves to be but men That the nations may know themselves to be but men - אנוש enosh ; Let the Gentiles be taught by the preaching of thy Gospel that they are weak...

That the nations may know themselves to be but men - אנוש enosh ; Let the Gentiles be taught by the preaching of thy Gospel that they are weak and helpless, and stand in need of the salvation which Christ has provided for them. This may be the spirit of the petition. And this is marked by the extraordinary note Selah; Mark well, take notice. So the term may be understood

"This whole Psalm,"says Dr. Horsley, "seems naturally to divide into three parts. The first ten verses make the First part; the six following, the Second; and the remaining four the Third

"The First part is prophetic of the utter extermination of the irreligious persecuting faction. The prophecy is delivered in the form of an Επινικιον, or song of victory, occasioned by the promise given in the fifteenth verse of the tenth Psalm; and through the whole of this song the psalmist, in the height of a prophetic enthusiasm, speaks of the threatened vengeance as accomplished

"The Second part opens with an exhortation to the people of God to praise him as the Avenger of their wrongs, and the watchful Guardian of the helpless, and, as if the flame of the prophetic joy which the oracular voice had lighted in the psalmist’ s mind was beginning to die away, the strain is gradually lowered, and the notes of triumph are mixed with supplication and complaint, as if the mind of the psalmist were fluttering between things present and to come, and made itself alternately present to his actual condition and his future hope

"In the Third part the psalmist seems quite returned from the prophetic enthusiasm to his natural state, and closes the whole song with explicit but cool assertions of the future destruction of the wicked, and the deliverance of the persecuted saints, praying for the event.

Calvin: Psa 9:1 - I will praise the Lord // I will tell of all thy marvellous works 1.I will praise the Lord David begins the psalm in this way, to induce God to succor him in the calamities with which he was now afflicted. As God co...

1.I will praise the Lord David begins the psalm in this way, to induce God to succor him in the calamities with which he was now afflicted. As God continues his favor towards his own people without intermission, all the good he has hitherto done to us should serve to inspire us with confidence and hope, that he will be gracious and merciful to us in the time to come. 158 There is, indeed, in these words a profession of gratitude for the favors which he has received from God; 159 but, in remembering his past mercies, he encourages himself to expect succor and aid in future emergencies; and by this means he opens the gate of prayer. The whole heart is taken for an upright or sincere heart, which is opposed to a double heart. Thus he distinguishes himself not only from gross hypocrites, who praise God only with their lips outwardly, without having their hearts in any way affected, but also acknowledges that whatever he had hitherto done which was commendable, proceeded entirely from the pure grace of God. Even irreligious men, I admit, when they have obtained some memorable victory, are ashamed to defraud God of the praise which is due to him; but we see that as soon as they have uttered a single expression in acknowledgement of the assistance God has afforded them, they immediately begin to boast loudly, and to sing triumphs in honor of their own valor, as if they were under no obligations whatever to God. In short, it is a piece of pure mockery when they profess that their exploits have been done by the help of God; for, after having made oblation to Him, they sacrifice to their own counsels, skill, courage, and resources. Observe how the prophet Habakkuk, under the person of one presumptuous king, wisely reproves the ambition which is common to all, (Hab 1:16.) Yea, we see that the famous generals of antiquity, who, upon returning victorious from some battle, desired public and solemn thanksgivings 160 to be decreed in their name to the gods, thought of nothing less than of doing honor to their false deities; but only abused their names under a false pretense, in order thereby to obtain an opportunity of indulging in vain boasting, that their own superior prowess might be acknowledged. 161 David, therefore, with good reason, affirms that he is unlike the children of this world, whose hypocrisy or fraud is discovered by the wicked and dishonest distribution which they make between God and themselves, 162 arrogating to themselves the greater part of the praise which they pretended to ascribe to God. He praised God with his whole heart, which they did not; for certainly it is not praising God with the whole heart when a mortal man dares to appropriate the smallest portion of the glory which God claims for himself. God cannot bear with seeing his glory appropriated by the creature in even the smallest degree, so intolerable to him is the sacrilegious arrogance of those who by praising themselves, obscure his glory as far as they can.

I will tell of all thy marvellous works Here David confirms what I have already said, that he does not treat in this psalm of one victory or one deliverance only; for he proposes to himself in general all the miracles which God had wrought in his behalf, as subjects of meditation. He applies the term marvellous not to all the benefits which he had received from God, but to those more signal and memorable deliverances in which was exhibited a bright and striking manifestation of the divine power. God would have us to acknowledge him as the author of all our blessings; but on some of his gifts he has engraven more evident marks in order the more effectually to awaken our senses, which are otherwise as if asleep or dead. David’s language, therefore, is an acknowledgement that he was preserved of God, not by ordinary means, but by the special power of God, which was conspicuously displayed in this matter; inasmuch as he had stretched forth his hand in a miraculous manner, and above the common and usual way.

Calvin: Psa 9:2 - I will rejoice and exult in thee 2.I will rejoice and exult in thee Observe how the faithful praise God sincerely and without hypocrisy, when they do not rest on themselves for happi...

2.I will rejoice and exult in thee Observe how the faithful praise God sincerely and without hypocrisy, when they do not rest on themselves for happiness, and are not intoxicated with foolish and carnal presumption, but rejoice in God alone; which is nothing else than to seek the matter of their joy from the favor of God, and from no other source, since in it perfect happiness consists. I will rejoice in thee We ought to consider how great is the difference and opposition between the character of the joy which men endeavor to find in themselves, and the character of the joy which they seek in God. David, the more forcibly to express how he renounces every thing which may keep hold of or occupy him with vain delight, adds the word exult, by which he means that he finds in God a full and an overflowing abundance of joy, so that he is not under the necessity of seeking even the smallest drop in any other quarter. Moreover, it is of importance to remember what I have previously observed, that David sets before himself the testimonies of the divine goodness which he had formerly experienced, in order to encourage himself with the more alacrity to lay open his heart 163 to God, and to present his prayers before him. He who begins his prayer by affirming that God is the great source and object of his joy, fortifies himself before-hand with the strongest confidence, in presenting his supplications to the hearer of prayer.

Calvin: Psa 9:3 - While my enemies are turned back 3.While my enemies are turned back In these words he assigns the reason why he undertakes to sing the praises of God, namely, because he acknowledges...

3.While my enemies are turned back In these words he assigns the reason why he undertakes to sing the praises of God, namely, because he acknowledges that his frequent victories had been achieved, not by his own power, nor by the power of his soldiers, but by the free favor of God. In the first part of the verse he narrates historically how his enemies were discomfited or put to flight; and then he adds, what faith alone could enable him to say, that this did not take place by the power of man or by chance, but because God fought for him, 164 and stood against them in the battle. He says, they fall, 165 and are put to flight At Thy Presence. David therefore acted wisely, when, upon seeing his enemies turn their backs, he lifted up the eyes of his mind to God, in order to perceive that victory flowed to him from no other source than from the secret and incomprehensible aid of God. And, doubtless, it is He only who guides the simple by the spirit of wisdom, while he inflicts madness on the crafty, and strikes them with amazement, — who inspires with courage the faint and timid, while he causes the boldest to tremble with fear, — who restores to the feeble their strength, while he reduces the strong to weakness, — who upholds the fainthearted by his power, while he makes the sword to fall from the hands of the valiant; - and, finally, who brings the battle to a prosperous or disastrous issue, just as he pleases. When, therefore, we see our enemies overthrown, we must beware of limiting our view to what is visible to the eye of sense, like ungodly men, who, while they see with their bodily eyes, are yet blind; but let us instantly call to our remembrance this truth, that when our enemies turn back, they are put to flight by the presence of the Lord. 166 The verbs, fall and put to flight, in the Hebrew, are in the future tense, but I have translated them in the present, because David anew presents to his own view the goodness of God which had formerly been manifested towards him.

Calvin: Psa 9:4 - NO PHRASE The Psalmist proceeds a step farther in the 4th verse, declaring that God stretched forth his hand to give him succor, because he was unrighteously a...

The Psalmist proceeds a step farther in the 4th verse, declaring that God stretched forth his hand to give him succor, because he was unrighteously afflicted by his enemies. And surely if we desire to be favored with the assistance of God, we ought to see to it that we fight under his standard. David, therefore, calls him a judge of righteousness, or, which is the same thing, a righteous judge; as if he had said, God has acted towards me according to his ordinary manner and constant principle of acting, for it is his usual way to undertake the defense of good causes. I am more inclined to render the words, Thou sittest a just judge, than to render them, O just judge, thou sittest, 168 because the form of expression, according to the first reading, is more emphatic. The import of it is this: God at length has assumed the character of judge, and is gone up into his judgment-seat to execute the office of judge. On this account he glories in having law and right on his side, and declares that God was the maintainer of his right and cause. What follows in the next verse, Thou hast destroyed [or discomfited, ] the wicked, belongs also to the same subject. When he beholds his enemies overthrown, he does not rejoice in their destruction, considered simply in itself; but in condemning them on account of their unrighteousness, he says that they have received the punishment which they deserved. Under the name of nations he means, that it was not a small number of ungodly persons who were destroyed, but great armies, yea, even all who had risen up against him from different quarters. And the goodness of God shines forth the brighter in this, that, on account of the favor which he bare to one of his servants, he spared not even whole nations. When he says, Thou hast blotted out their name for ever, it may be understood as meaning, that they were destroyed without any hope of ever being able to rise again, and devoted to everlasting shame. We could not otherwise discern how God buries the name of the ungodly with themselves, did we not hear him declare that the memory of the righteous shall be for ever blessed, (Pro 10:7.)

Calvin: Psa 9:6 - O thou enemy, desolations are come to an end for ever 6.O thou enemy, desolations are come to an end for ever This sixth verse is explained in different ways. Some read it interrogatively, viewing the le...

6.O thou enemy, desolations are come to an end for ever This sixth verse is explained in different ways. Some read it interrogatively, viewing the letter ה , as a mark of interrogation, as if David, addressing his discourse to his enemies, asked whether they had completed their work of devastation, even as they had resolved to destroy every thing; for the verb תמם , tamam, signifies sometimes to complete, and sometimes to put an end to any thing. And if we here take it in this sense, David, in the language of sarcasm or irony, rebukes the foolish confidence of his enemies. Others, reading the verse without any interrogation, make the irony still more evident, and think that David describes, in these three verses, a twofold state of matters; that, in the first place, (verse 6,) he introduces his enemies persecuting him with savage violence, and persevering with determined obstinacy in their cruelty, so that it seemed to be their fixed purpose never to desist until the kingdom of David should be utterly destroyed; and that, in the second place, (verses 7, 8) he represents God as seated on his judgment-seat, directly over against them, to repress their outrageous attempts. If this sense is admitted, the copulative, in the beginning of the seventh verse, which we have translated and, must be rendered by the adversative particle but, in this way: Thou, O enemy, didst seek after nothing except slaughter and the destruction of cities; but, at length, God has shown that he sits in heaven on his throne as judge, to put into proper order the things which are in confusion on the earth. According to others, David gives thanks to God, because, when the ungodly were fully determined to spread universal ruin around them, he put an end to their devastations. Others understand the words in a more restricted sense, as meaning that the desolations of the ungodly were completed, because God, in his just judgment, had made to fall upon their own heads the calamities and ruin which they had devised against David. According to others, David, in the 6th verse, complains that God had, for a long time, silently suffered the miserable devastation of his people, so that the ungodly, being left unchecked, wasted and destroyed all things according to their pleasure; and in the seventh verse, they think he subjoins for his consolation that God, notwithstanding, presides over human affairs. I have no objection to the view, that there is first described ironically how dreadful the power of the enemy was, when they put forth their highest efforts; and next, that there is set in opposition to it the judgment of God, which suddenly brought their proceedings to an abrupt termination, contrary to their expectation. They anticipated no such issue; for we know that the ungodly, although they may not presume openly to deprive God of his authority and dominion, yet run headlong to every excess of wickedness, not less boldly than if he were bound with fetters. 170 We have taken notice of an almost similar manner of speaking in a preceding psalm, (Psa 7:13)

This contrast between the power of the enemies of God and his people, and the work of God in breaking up their proceedings, very well illustrates the wonderful character of the succor which he granted to his people. The ungodly had set to themselves no limit in the work of doing mischief, save in the utter destruction of all things, and at the commencement complete destruction seemed to be at hand; but when things were in this state of confusion, God seasonably made his appearance for the help of his people. 171 As often, therefore, as nothing but destruction presents itself to our view, to whatever side we may turn, 172 let us remember to lift up our eyes to the heavenly throne, whence God beholds all that is done here below. In the world our affairs may have been brought to such an extremity, that there is no longer hope in regard to them; but the shield with which we ought to repel all the temptations by which we are assailed is this, that God, nevertheless, sits Judge in heaven. Yea, when he seems to take no notice of us, and does not immediately remedy the evils which we suffer, it becomes us to realize by faith his secret providence. The Psalmist says, in the first place, God sitteth for ever, by which he means, that however high the violence of men may be carried, and although their fury may burst forth without measure, they can never drag God from his seat. He farther means by this expression, that it is impossible for God to abdicate the office and authority of judge; a truth which he expresses more clearly in the second clause of the verse, He hath prepared his throne for judgment, in which he declares that God reigns not only for the purpose of making his majesty and glory surpassingly great, but also for the purpose of governing the world in righteousness.

Calvin: Psa 9:8 - And he shall judge the world in righteousness 8.And he shall judge the world in righteousness As David has just now testified, that the power of God is not inactive, so that he dwells in heaven o...

8.And he shall judge the world in righteousness As David has just now testified, that the power of God is not inactive, so that he dwells in heaven only indulging himself in pleasures; but that it is a constantly operating power which he exercises in preserving his authority, and governing the world in righteousness and equity; so in this verse he adds the use of this doctrine, which is this, that the power of God is not shut up in heaven, but manifests itself in succouring men. The true doctrine on this subject, is not, like Epicurus, to imagine that God is a being wholly devoted to ease and pleasures, and who, satisfied with himself alone, has no care whatever about mankind, but to place him on the throne of power and equity, so that we may be fully persuaded, that although he does not immediately succor those who are unrighteously oppressed, yet there is not a moment in which he ceases to take a deep interest in them. And when he seems for a time to take no notice of things, the conclusion to which we should come most assuredly is, not that he deserts his office, but that he wishes hereby to exercise the patience of his people, and that, therefore, we should wait the issue in patience, and with tranquillity of mind. The demonstrative pronoun He, in my opinion, is of great weight. The import of it is, as if David had said, No one can deprive God of his office as Judge of the world, nor prevent him from extending his judgments to all nations. Whence it follows, that he will much more be the judge of his own people. David declares these judgments to be righteous, in order to induce us, when we are unrighteously and cruelly molested, to ask assistance from God, in the confident expectation of obtaining it; for since he judges the nations in righteousness, he will not suffer injustice and oppression always to reign with impunity in the world, nor deny his aid to the innocent.

Calvin: Psa 9:9 - And Jehovah will be a refuge for the poor 9.And Jehovah will be a refuge for the poor David here furnishes a remedy for the temptation which greatly afflicts the weak, when they see themselve...

9.And Jehovah will be a refuge for the poor David here furnishes a remedy for the temptation which greatly afflicts the weak, when they see themselves, and those who are like them, abandoned to the will of the ungodly, while God keeps silence. 173 He puts us in mind that God delays his aid, and to outward appearance forsakes his faithful ones, in order at length to succor them at a more convenient season, according to the greatness of their necessity and affliction. From this it follows, that he by no means ceases from the exercise of his office, although he suffer the good and the innocent to be reduced to extreme poverty, and although he exercise them with weeping and lamentations; for by doing this he lights up a lamp to enable them to see his judgments the more clearly. Accordingly, David expressly declares, that God interposes his protection seasonably in the afflictions of his people. The Lord will be a protection to the poor in seasonable times in trouble From this we are taught the duty of giving his providence time to make itself at length manifest in the season of need. And if protection by the power of God, and the experience of his fatherly favor, is the greatest blessing which we can receive, let us not feel so uneasy at being accounted poor and miserable before the world, but let this consolatory consideration assuage our grief, that God is not far from us, seeing our afflictions call upon him to come to our aid. Let us also observe, that God is said to be at hand in seasonable times when he succours the faithful during their affliction. 174 The Hebrew word בצרה , batsarah, which occurs in the end of the 9th verse, is understood by some as if it were the simple word which signifies defense; but here they render it metaphorically distress, denoting those trying circumstances in which a person is so closely shut up, and reduced to such extremity, that he can find no escape. I, however, think there is more probability in the opinion of those who take ב , the first letter of בצרה , batsarah, as a servile letter meaning in, which is its ordinary signification. 175 What is here said, then, is, that God assists his own people in the time of need, namely, in affliction, or when they are weighed down with it, for then assistance is most necessary and most useful.

Calvin: Psa 9:10 - NO PHRASE In the tenth verse, the Psalmist teaches us, that when the Lord delivers the righteous, the fruit which results from it is, that they themselves, and...

In the tenth verse, the Psalmist teaches us, that when the Lord delivers the righteous, the fruit which results from it is, that they themselves, and all the rest of the righteous, acquire increasing confidence in his grace; for, unless we are fully persuaded that God exercises a care about men and human affairs, we must necessarily be troubled with constant disquietude. But as most men shut their eyes that they may not see the judgments of God, David restricts this advantage to the faithful alone, and, certainly, where there is no godliness, there is no sense of the works of God. It is also to be observed, that he attributes to the faithful the knowledge of God; because from this religion proceeds, whereas it is extinguished through the ignorance and stupidity of men. Many take the name of God simply for God himself; but, as I have observed in my remarks on a preceding psalm, I think something more is expressed by this term. As God’s essence is hidden and incomprehensible, his name just means his character, so far as he has been pleased to make it known to us. David next explains the ground of this trust in God to be, that he does not forsake those who seek him God is sought in two ways, either by invocation and prayers, or by studying to live a holy and an upright life; and, indeed, the one is always inseparably joined with the other. But as the Psalmist is here treating of the protection of God, on which the safety of the godly depends, to seek God, as I understand it, is to betake ourselves to him for help and relief in danger and distress.

Calvin: Psa 9:11 - Sing unto Jehovah 11.Sing unto Jehovah David, not contented with giving thanks individually, and on his own account, exhorts the faithful to unite with him, praising G...

11.Sing unto Jehovah David, not contented with giving thanks individually, and on his own account, exhorts the faithful to unite with him, praising God, and to do this not only because it is their duty to stir up one another to this religious exercise, but because the deliverances of which he treats were worthy of being publicly and solemnly celebrated; and this is expressed more clearly in the second clause, where he commands them to be published among the nations. The meaning is, that they are not published or celebrated as they deserve, unless the whole world is filled with the renown of them. To proclaim God’s doings among the nations was indeed, as it were, to sing to the deaf; but by this manner of speaking, David intended to show that the territory of Judea was too narrow to contain the infinite greatness of Jehovah’s praises. He gives God this title, He who dwelleth in Sion, to distinguish him from all the false gods of the Gentiles. There is in the phrase a tacit comparison between the God who made his covenant with Abraham and Israel, and all the gods who, in every other part of the world except Judea, were worshipped according to the blinded and depraved fancies of men. It is not enough for persons to honor and reverence some deity indiscriminately or at random; they must distinctly yield to the only living and true God the worship which belongs to him, and which he commands. Moreover, as God had particularly chosen Sion as the place where his name might be called upon, David very properly assigns it to him as his peculiar dwelling-place, not that it is lawful to attempt to shut up, in any particular place, Him whom “the heaven of heavens cannot contain,” (1Kg 8:1.) but because, as we shall afterwards see, (Psa 132:12) he had promised to make it his rest for ever. David did not, according to his own fancy, assign God a dwelling-place there; but he understood, by a revelation from heaven, that such was the pleasure of God himself, as Moses had often predicted, (Deu 12:1.) This goes far to prove what I have said before, that this psalm was not composed upon the occasion of David’s victory over Goliath; for it was only towards the close of David’s reign that the ark of the covenant was removed to Sion according to the commandment of God. The conjecture of some that David spake by the Spirit of prophecy of the residence of the ark on Sion, as a future event, appears to me to be unnatural and forced. Farther, we see that the holy fathers, when they resorted to Sion to offer sacrifices to God, did not act merely according to the suggestion of their own minds; but what they did proceeded from faith in the word of God, and was done in obedience to his command; and they were, therefore, approved of by him for their religious service. Whence it follows, that there is no ground whatever to make use of their example as an argument or excuse for the religious observances which superstitious men have, by their own fancy, invented for themselves. Besides, it was not enough for the faithful, in those days, to depend upon the word of God, and to engage in those ceremonial services which he required, unless, aided by external symbols, they elevated their minds above these, and yielded to God spiritual worship. God, indeed, gave real tokens of his presence in that visible sanctuary, but not for the purpose of binding the senses and thoughts of his people to earthly elements; he wished rather that these external symbols should serve as ladders, by which the faithful might ascend even to heaven. The design of God from the commencement in the appointment of the sacraments, and all the outward exercises of religion, was to consult the infirmity and weak capacity of his people. Accordingly, even at the present day, the true and proper use of them is, to assist us in seeking God spiritually in his heavenly glory, and not to occupy our minds with the things of this world, or keep them fixed in the vanities of the flesh, a subject which we shall afterwards have a more suitable opportunity of discussing more fully. And as the Lord, in ancient times, when he called himself, He who dwelleth in Sion, intended to give his people full and solid ground of trust, tranquillity, and joy; so even now, after the law has come out of Sion, and the covenant of grace has flowed to us from that fountain, let us know and be fully persuaded, that wherever the faithful, who worship him purely and in due form, according to the appointment of his word, are assembled together to engage in the solemn acts of religious worship, he is graciously present, and presides in the midst of them.

Calvin: Psa 9:12 - For in requiring blood 12.For in requiring blood In the original, it is bloods, in the plural number, and, therefore, the relative which follows immediately after, And r...

12.For in requiring blood In the original, it is bloods, in the plural number, and, therefore, the relative which follows immediately after, And remembereth THEM, may very properly be referred to that word in this way, He requireth bloods, and remembereth them. But as it is sufficiently common in Hebrew to invert the order of the antecedent and the relative, and to put them before the word to which it refers, 176 some explain it of the poor, thus: In requiring blood, he hath remembered them, namely, the poor, of whom he speaks a little after. As to the sum and substance of the matter, it is of small importance in which of these ways we explain the relative; but the former is, in my view, the more natural explanation. There is here a repetition of what the Psalmist had said a little before, that we ought especially to consider God’s power, as it is manifested in the mercy which he exercises towards his servants, who are unrighteously persecuted by wicked men. From the numerous works of God, he selects one which he commends as especially worthy of being remembered, namely, his work in delivering the poor from death. God sometimes leaves them in his holy providence to be persecuted by men; but at length he takes vengeance for the wrongs inflicted upon them. The words which David uses denote a continued act; but I have no doubt that he intends from those examples, which he has related in the preceding part of the psalm, to lead men to acknowledge that God requireth innocent blood, and remembers the cry of his people.

He again insists on what I adverted to before, that God does not always put a stop to injuries so speedily as we would wish, nor break the attempts of the wicked at the first, but rather withholds and delays his assistance, so that it may seem that we cry to him in vain, a truth which it is of importance for us to understand; for if we measure the help of God according to our senses, our courage will ever and anon fail us, and in the end our hope will be entirely extinguished, and will give place to despondency and despair. We would fondly wish him, as I have said, to stretch forth his hand to a distance, and drive back the troubles which he sees to be prepared for us; yet he seems to take no notice, and does not prevent the blood of the innocent from being shed. Let this consolatory consideration, however, sustain us, that he will at length actually show how precious our blood was in his sight. If it is objected, that God’s assistance comes too late, after we have endured all calamities, I answer, God delays to interfere no longer than he knows it to be of advantage for us to be humbled under the cross, and if he chooses rather to take vengeance after we have suffered outrage, than to aid us previous to the infliction of evil, it is not because he is not always willing and ready to succor us; but because he knows it is not always a proper time for manifesting his grace. By the way, it is a striking evidence, not only of his fatherly love towards us, but of the blessed immortality which is the portion of all the children of God, that he has a care about them even after they are dead. Were he always by his grace to prevent affliction from befalling us, who is there amongst us who would not be wholly attached to the present life? When, however, he avenges our death, from this it appears that, though dead, we still remain alive in his presence. For he does not, after the manner of men, hold in estimation the memory of those whom he could not preserve alive, 177 but he actually shows that he cherishes in his bosom, and gives protection to those who seem to be no more, viewing them according to the flesh. And this is the reason why David says that he remembereth blood when he requireth it; for although he may not presently deliver his servants from the swords of the wicked, yet he suffers not their murder to pass unpunished. To the same purpose is the last clause He forgetteth not the cry of the afflicted God may not show, by granting instant deliverance or relief, that he lends an immediate ear to the complaints of his servants; but at length he proves unanswerably that he has regarded them. Express mention is made of crying, to encourage all who desire to experience God as their deliverer and protector, to direct their wishes, groanings, and prayers to him.

Calvin: Psa 9:13 - Have mercy upon me, O Jehovah 13.Have mercy upon me, O Jehovah I think that this is the second part of the psalm. Others, however, are of a different opinion, and consider that Da...

13.Have mercy upon me, O Jehovah I think that this is the second part of the psalm. Others, however, are of a different opinion, and consider that David, according to his frequent practice, while giving thanks to God for the deliverance wrought for him, mingles with his thanksgiving an account of what had been the matter of his prayer in the extremity of his distress; and examples of the same kind, I confess, are every where to be met with in the Psalms. But when I consider all the circumstances more attentively, I am constrained to incline to the other opinion, namely, that in the commencement he celebrated the favors conferred upon him in order to make way for prayer; and the psalm is at last concluded with a prayer. He does not, therefore, in passing here insert the prayers which he had formerly made in the midst of his dangers and anxieties; but he purposely implores help from God at the present time, 178 and asks that He, whom he had often experienced as his deliverer, would continue the exercise of the same grace towards him. His enemies, perhaps, whom he had already vanquished on various occasions, having gathered new courage, and raised new forces, made a desperate effort, as we often see those who are driven to despair rush upon their enemies just with the greater impetuosity and rage. It is indeed certain, that David, when he offered this prayer, was seized with the greatest fear; for he would not, on account of a small matter, have called upon God to witness his affliction in the way he here does. It ought to be observed, that while he humbly betakes himself to the mercy of God, he bears, with a patient and submissive mind, the cross which was laid upon him. 179 But we ought chiefly to mark the title which he gives to God, calling him his lifter up from the gates of death; for we could not find a more appropriate expression than to lift up for the Hebrew word מרומם , meromem. By this the Psalmist, in the first place, strengthens his faith from his past experience, inasmuch as he had often been delivered from the greatest dangers. And, in the second place, he assures himself of deliverance, even in the very jaws of death; because God is accustomed not only to succor his servants, and to deliver them from their calamities by ordinary means, but also to bring them from the grave, even after all hope of life is cut off; for the gates of death is a metaphorical expression, denoting the utmost perils which threaten destruction, or rather, which lay the grave open before us. In order, therefore, that neither the weight of the calamities which we presently endure, nor the fear of those which we see impending over us, may overwhelm our faith, or interrupt our prayers, let us call to our remembrance that the office of lifting up his people from the gates of death is not ascribed to God in vain.

Calvin: Psa 9:14 - That I may recount 14.That I may recount David’s meaning simply is, that he will celebrate the praises of God in all assemblies, and, wherever there is the greatest c...

14.That I may recount David’s meaning simply is, that he will celebrate the praises of God in all assemblies, and, wherever there is the greatest concourse of people, (for at that time it was the custom to hold assemblies at the gates of cities;) but, at the same time, there seems to be an allusion to the gates of death, of which he has just spoken, as if he had said, After I am delivered from the grave, I will do my endeavor to bear testimony, in the most public manner, to the goodness of God, manifested in my deliverance. As, however, it is not sufficient to utter the praises of God with our tongues, if they do not proceed from the heart, the Psalmist, in the last clause of the verse, expresses the inward joy with which he would engage in this exercise, And that I may rejoice in thy salvation; as if he had said, I desire to live in this world for no other purpose than to rejoice in having been preserved by the grace of God. Under the name of daughter, as is well known, the Jews meant a people or city, but he here names the city from its principal part, namely, Sion.

Calvin: Psa 9:15 - The heathen are sunk 15.The heathen are sunk David being now raised up to holy confidence, triumphs over his enemies. In the first place, he says metaphorically, that the...

15.The heathen are sunk David being now raised up to holy confidence, triumphs over his enemies. In the first place, he says metaphorically, that they were taken in their own craftiness and snares. He next expresses the same thing without figure, that they were snared in their own wickedness. And he affirms that this happened not by chance, but was the work of God, and a striking proof of his judgment. When he compares his enemies to hunters or fowlers, it is not without having just ground for doing so. The wicked, it is true, often commit violence and outrage, yet in deceits and cunning artifices they always imitate their father Satan, who is the father of lies, and, therefore, whatever ingenuity they have, they employ it in practising wickedness and in devising mischief. As often, therefore, as wicked men cunningly plot our destruction, let us remember that it is no new thing for them to lay nets and snares for the children of God. At the same time, let us comfort ourselves from the reflection, that whatever they may attempt against us, the issue is not in their power, and that God will be against them, not only to frustrate their designs, but also to surprise them in the wicked devices which they frame, and to make all their resources of mischief to fall upon their own heads.

Calvin: Psa 9:16 - The Lord is known in executing judgment 16.The Lord is known in executing judgment The reading of the words literally is this, The known Lord has done judgment. This manner of speech is a...

16.The Lord is known in executing judgment The reading of the words literally is this, The known Lord has done judgment. This manner of speech is abrupt, and its very brevity renders it obscure. It is therefore explained in two ways. Some explain it thus:- God begins then to be known when he punishes the wicked. But the other sense suits the passage better, namely, that it is a thing obvious and manifest to all that God executes the office of judge, as often as he ensnares the wicked in their own maliciousness. In short, whenever God turns back upon themselves whatever schemes of mischief they devise, David declares that in this case the divine judgment is so evident, that what happens can be ascribed neither to nature nor to fortune. If God, therefore, in this way manifestly display, at any time, the power of his hand, let us learn to open our eyes, that from the judgments which he executes upon the enemies of his Church our faith may be confirmed more and more. As to the word Higgaion, which properly signifies meditation, I cannot at present assign a better reason why it has been inserted than this, that David intended to fix the minds of the godly in meditation upon the judgments of God. The word Selah was intended to answer the same purpose, and as I have said before, regulated the singing in such a manner as to make the music correspond to the words and the sentiment.

Calvin: Psa 9:17 - The wicked shall be turned into hell 17.The wicked shall be turned into hell Many translate the verb in the optative mood, Let the wicked be turned into hell, as if it were an imprecat...

17.The wicked shall be turned into hell Many translate the verb in the optative mood, Let the wicked be turned into hell, as if it were an imprecation. But, in my judgment, David here rather confirms himself and all the godly with respect to the future, declaring that whatever the wicked may attempt, it will have a termination disastrous to themselves. By the word turn he means that the issue will be far otherwise than what they imagine; for there is implied in it a tacit contrast between the height of their presumption and the depth of their fall. As they have no fear of God, they exalt themselves above the clouds; and then, as if they had “made a covenant with death,” according to the language of Isaiah, (Isa 28:15) they become so much the more arrogant and presumptuous. But when we see them raging without apprehension of danger, the prophet warns us that their madness carries them headlong, so that, at length, they fall into the grave, from which they thought themselves to be a great way off. Here, then, is described to us the sudden and unexpected change, by which God, when he pleases, restores to order things which were in confusion. When, therefore, we see the wicked flying aloft devoid of all fear, let us, by the eyes of faith, behold the grave which is prepared for them; and rest assured that the hand of God, although it is unseen, is very near, which can turn them back in the midst of their course in which they aim at reaching heaven, and make them tumble into hell in a moment. The meaning of the Hebrew word שאולה , sheolah, is doubtful, but I have not hesitated to translate it hell 180 I do not find fault with those who translate it the grave, but it is certain that the prophet means something more than common death, otherwise he would here say nothing else with respect to the wicked than what would also happen to all the faithful in common with them. Though then, he does not speak in express terms of eternal destruction, but only says, They shall be turned into the grave, yet, under the metaphor of the grave, he intimates that all the ungodly shall perish, and that the presumption with which, by every unlawful means, they raise themselves on high to trample righteousness under foot, and to oppress the innocent, shall bring upon them ruin and perdition. The faithful, also, it is true, descend into the grave, but not with such fearful violence as plunges them into it without hope of coming out again. So far is this from being the case, that even when shut up in the grave, they dwell already in heaven by hope.

Calvin: Psa 9:18 - For the poor shall not always be forgotten 18.For the poor shall not always be forgotten The assertion that God will not forsake the poor and afflicted for ever, is a confirmation of the prece...

18.For the poor shall not always be forgotten The assertion that God will not forsake the poor and afflicted for ever, is a confirmation of the preceding sentence. By it he intimates, that they may indeed seem to be forsaken for a time. Let us, therefore, remember that God has promised his assistance to us, not in the way of preventing our afflictions, but of at length succouring us after we have been long subdued under the cross. David speaks expressly of hope or expectation, thereby to encourage us to prayer. The reason why God seems to take no notice of our afflictions is, because he would have us to awaken him by means of our prayers; for when he hears our requests, (as if he began but then to be mindful of us,) he stretches forth his powerful hand to help us. David again repeats that this is not done immediately, in order that we may persevere in hoping well, even although our expectations may not be instantly gratified.

Calvin: Psa 9:19 - Arise, O Jehovah 19.Arise, O Jehovah When David beseeches God to arise, the expression does not strictly apply to God, but it refers to external appearance and to our...

19.Arise, O Jehovah When David beseeches God to arise, the expression does not strictly apply to God, but it refers to external appearance and to our senses; for we do not perceive God to be the deliverer of his people except when he appears before our eyes, as it were sitting upon the judgment-seat. There is added a consideration or reason to induce God to avenge the injuries done to his people, namely, that man may not prevail; for when God arises, all the fierceness 182 of the ungodly must immediately fall down and give way. Whence is it that the wicked become so audaciously insolent, or have so great power to work mischief, if it is not because God is still, and gives them loose reins? But, as soon as he shows some token of his judgment, he immediately puts a stop to their proud tumults, 183 and breaks their strength and power with his nod alone. 184 We are taught, by this manner of praying, that however insolently and proudly our enemies may boast of what they will do, yet they are in the hand of God, and can do no more than what he permits them; and farther, that God can doubtless, whenever he pleases, render all their endeavors vain and ineffectual. The Psalmist, therefore, in speaking of them, calls them man. The word in the original is אנוש , enosh, which is derived from a root signifying misery or wretchedness, and, accordingly, it is the same thing as if he had called them mortal or frail man. Farther, the Psalmist beseeches God to judge the heathen before his face God is said to do this when he compels them, by one means or another, to appear before his judgment-seat. We know that unbelievers, until they are dragged by force into the presence of God, turn their backs upon him as much as they can, in order to exclude from their minds all thought of him as their Judge.

Calvin: Psa 9:20 - Put them in fear, O Jehovah 20.Put them in fear, O Jehovah The Septuagint translates מורה , morah, [νομοθέτης,] a lawgiver, deriving it from ירה , yarah, ...

20.Put them in fear, O Jehovah The Septuagint translates מורה , morah, [νομοθέτης,] a lawgiver, deriving it from ירה , yarah, which sometimes signifies to teach. 185 But the scope of the passage requires that we should understand it of fear or dread; and this is the opinion of all sound expositors. Now, it is to be considered of what kind of fear David speaks. God commonly subdues even his chosen ones to obedience by means of fear. But as he moderates his rigour towards them, and, at the same time, softens their stony hearts, so that they willingly and quietly submit themselves to him, he cannot be properly said to compel them by fear. With respect to the reprobate, he takes a different way of dealing. As their obduracy is inflexible, so that it is easier to break than to bend them, he subdues their desperate obstinacy by force; not, indeed, that they are reformed, but, whether they will or no, an acknowledgement of their own weakness is extorted from them. They may gnash their teeth and boil with rage, and even exceed in cruelty wild beasts, but when the dread of God seizes upon them, they are thrown down with their own violence, and fall with their own weight. Some explain these words as a prayer that God would bring the nations under the yoke of David, and make them tributaries to his government; but this is a cold and forced explanation. The word fear comprehends in general all the plagues of God, by which is repulsed, as by the heavy blows of a hammer, 186 the rebellion of those who would never obey him except by compulsion.

There follows next the point to which the nations must be brought, namely, to acknowledge themselves to be mortal men. This, at first sight, seems to be a matter of small importance; but the doctrine which it contains is far from being trifling. What is man, that he dares of himself to move a finger? And yet all the ungodly run to excess as boldly and presumptuously as if there were nothing to hinder them from doing whatever they please. It is certainly through a distempered imagination that they claim to themselves what is peculiar to God; and, in short, they would never run to so great excess if they were not ignorant of their own condition. David, when he beseeches God to strike the nations with terror, that they may know that they are men, 187 does not mean that the ungodly will profit so much under the rods and chastisements of God as to humble themselves truly and from the heart; but the knowledge of which he speaks just means an experience of their own weakness. His language is as if he had said, Lord, since it is their ignorance of themselves which hurries them into their rage against me, make them actually to experience that their strength is not equal to their infatuated presumption, and after they are disappointed of their vain hopes, let them lie confounded and abased with shame. It may often happen that those who are convinced of their own weakness do not yet reform; but much is gained when their ungodly presumption is exposed to mockery and scorn before the world, that it may appear how ridiculous was the confidence which they presumed to place in their own strength. With respect to the chosen of God, they ought to profit under his chastisements after another manner. It becomes them to be humbled under a sense of their own weakness, and willingly to divest themselves of all vain confidence and presumption. And this will be the case if they remember that they are but men. Augustine has well and wisely said, that the whole humility of man consists in the knowledge of himself. Moreover, since pride is natural to all, God requires to strike terror into all men indiscriminately, that, on the one hand, his own people may learn to be humble, and that, on the other hand, the wicked, although they cease not to elevate themselves above the condition of man, may be put back with shame and confusion.

Defender: Psa 9:8 - judge the world in righteousness Paul apparently refers to this promise in Act 17:31, which refers to the resurrected Christ as the coming Judge."

Paul apparently refers to this promise in Act 17:31, which refers to the resurrected Christ as the coming Judge."

Defender: Psa 9:13 - liftest me up When this psalm is understood as a Messianic psalm, this verse becomes a glorious promise of the resurrection of the Son whose death had been engineer...

When this psalm is understood as a Messianic psalm, this verse becomes a glorious promise of the resurrection of the Son whose death had been engineered by His enemies."

Defender: Psa 9:16 - Higgaion "Higgaion" is a Hebrew term of uncertain meaning. Combined with "Selah," the intent is probably to call for exultant meditation of marvelous truths ju...

"Higgaion" is a Hebrew term of uncertain meaning. Combined with "Selah," the intent is probably to call for exultant meditation of marvelous truths just revealed."

TSK: Psa 9:1 - praise // with my // show praise : Psa 7:17, Psa 34:1-4, Psa 103:1, Psa 103:2, Psa 145:1-3, Psa 146:1, Psa 146:2; 1Ch 29:10-13; Isa 12:1; Heb 13:15; Rev 5:9-14 with my : Psa 86...

TSK: Psa 9:2 - I will be // O thou I will be : Psa 5:11, Psa 27:6, Psa 28:7, Psa 43:4, Psa 92:4, Psa 97:12; Hab 3:17, Hab 3:18; Phi 4:4 O thou : Psa 7:17, Psa 56:2, Psa 56:3, Psa 83:18,...

TSK: Psa 9:3 - they shall they shall : Psa 68:1, Psa 68:2, Psa 76:7, Psa 80:16; Isa 64:3; 2Th 1:9; Rev 6:12-17, Rev 20:11

TSK: Psa 9:4 - For // maintained // right For : Psa 16:5, Psa 140:12 maintained : etc. Heb. made my judgment right : Heb. in righteousness, Psa 45:6, Psa 45:7, Psa 47:8, Psa 89:14, Psa 96:13, ...

For : Psa 16:5, Psa 140:12

maintained : etc. Heb. made my judgment

right : Heb. in righteousness, Psa 45:6, Psa 45:7, Psa 47:8, Psa 89:14, Psa 96:13, Psa 98:9; Isa 11:4; 1Pe 2:23

TSK: Psa 9:5 - rebuked // destroyed // put out rebuked : Psa 2:1, Psa 2:8, Psa 2:9, Psa 78:55, Psa 79:10, Psa 149:7; 1Sa 17:45-51; 2Sa 5:6-16, 2Sa 8:1-15; 2Sa 10:6-9, 2Sa 21:15-22, 2Sa 22:44-46; Re...

TSK: Psa 9:6 - O thou // destructions // thou hast // memorial O thou : etc. or, The destructions of the enemy are come to a perpetual end, and their cities hast thou destroyed, etc. Psa 7:5, Psa 8:2; Exo 15:16; M...

O thou : etc. or, The destructions of the enemy are come to a perpetual end, and their cities hast thou destroyed, etc. Psa 7:5, Psa 8:2; Exo 15:16; Mic 7:8, Mic 7:10

destructions : Psa 46:9; Exo 14:13; Isa 10:24, Isa 10:25, Isa 14:6-8; Nah 1:9-13; 1Co 15:26, 1Co 15:54-57; Rev 20:2

thou hast : 1Sa 30:1, 1Sa 31:7; Isa 10:6, Isa 10:7, Isa 10:13, Isa 10:14, Isa 14:17, Isa 37:26; Jer 51:25

memorial : 2Ki 19:25; Isa 14:22, Isa 14:23; Jer 51:62-64

TSK: Psa 9:7 - But // he hath But : Psa 90:2, Psa 102:12, Psa 102:24-27; Heb 1:11, Heb 1:12, Heb 13:8; 2Pe 3:8 he hath : Psa 50:3-5, Psa 103:19; Rev 20:11

TSK: Psa 9:8 - -- Psa 50:6, Psa 94:15, Psa 96:13, Psa 98:9, Psa 99:4; Gen 18:25; Isa 11:4, Isa 11:5; Act 17:31; Rom 2:5, Rom 2:6, Rom 2:16; Rev 20:12, Rev 20:13

TSK: Psa 9:9 - The Lord // be a refuge // in times The Lord : Psa 18:2, Psa 32:7, Psa 37:39, Psa 46:1, Psa 48:3, Psa 62:8, Psa 91:1, Psa 91:2, Psa 142:4; Deu 33:27; Pro 18:10; Isa 4:5, Isa 4:6, Isa 8:1...

TSK: Psa 9:10 - know // put // hast know : Psa 91:14; Exo 34:5-7; 1Ch 28:9; Pro 18:10; Joh 17:3; 2Co 4:6; 2Ti 1:12; 1Jo 2:3, 1Jo 5:20 put : Psa 5:11, Psa 57:1, Psa 146:5, Psa 146:6; Isa ...

TSK: Psa 9:11 - Sing // which // declare Sing : Psa 33:1-3, Psa 47:6, Psa 47:7, Psa 96:1, Psa 96:2, Psa 148:1-5, Psa 148:13, Psa 148:14 which : Psa 78:68, Psa 132:13, Psa 132:14; Isa 12:6, Is...

TSK: Psa 9:12 - When // he forgetteth // humble When : Gen 9:5; 2Ki 24:4; Isa 26:21; Mat 23:35; Luk 11:50, Luk 11:51; Rev 6:9, Rev 6:10, Rev 16:6 he forgetteth : Psa 10:14, Psa 10:17, Psa 22:24, Psa...

TSK: Psa 9:13 - Have // consider // thou Have : Psa 51:1, Psa 119:132 consider : Psa 13:3, Psa 25:19, Psa 119:153, Psa 142:6; Neh 9:32; Lam 1:9, Lam 1:11 thou : Psa 30:3, Psa 56:13, Psa 86:13...

TSK: Psa 9:14 - That // in the gates // daughter // I will That : Psa 51:15, Psa 79:13, Psa 106:2 in the gates : Psa 22:22, Psa 22:25, Psa 35:18, Psa 42:4, Psa 109:30, Psa 109:31, Psa 116:18, Psa 116:19, Psa 1...

TSK: Psa 9:15 - -- Psa 7:15, Psa 7:16, Psa 35:8, Psa 37:15, Psa 57:6, Psa 94:23; Pro 5:22, Pro 22:8

TSK: Psa 9:16 - known // wicked // Higgaion known : Psa 48:11, Psa 58:10, Psa 58:11, Psa 83:17, Psa 83:18; Exo 7:5, Exo 14:4, Exo 14:10, Exo 14:31; Deu 29:22-28; Jos 2:10, Jos 2:11; Jdg 1:7; 1Sa...

TSK: Psa 9:17 - The wicked // forget The wicked : Pro 14:32; Isa 3:11, Isa 5:14; Mat 25:41-46; Rom 2:8, Rom 2:9; 2Th 1:7-9; Rev 20:15, Rev 21:8 forget : Psa 44:17, Psa 44:20, Psa 50:22, P...

TSK: Psa 9:18 - For the // expectation For the : Psa 9:12, Psa 12:5, Psa 72:4, Psa 72:12-14, Psa 102:17, Psa 102:20, Psa 109:31; Luk 1:53, Luk 6:20; Jam 2:5 expectation : Pro 23:18, Pro 24:...

TSK: Psa 9:19 - Arise // let not // let the Arise : Psa 3:7, Psa 7:6, Psa 10:12, Psa 44:23, Psa 44:26, Psa 68:1, Psa 68:2, Psa 74:22, Psa 74:23, Psa 76:8, Psa 76:9, Psa 80:2; Isa 42:13, Isa 42:1...

TSK: Psa 9:20 - Put // may Put : Psa 76:12; Exo 15:16, Exo 23:27; Deu 2:25; Jer 32:40; Eze 30:13 may : Psa 82:6, Psa 82:7; Isa 31:3; Eze 28:2, Eze 28:9; Act 12:22, Act 12:23

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Poole: Psa 9:1 - Muth-labben // With my whole heart // all Muth-labben also seems to be another title of some song, or tune, or instrument; of which we must and may be content to be ignorant, as the Jewish do...

Muth-labben also seems to be another title of some song, or tune, or instrument; of which we must and may be content to be ignorant, as the Jewish doctors also are. Some render it, upon the death of his son , to wit, Absalom, or of one called Labben ; or, of the middle man , or the man that stood between the two armies, to wit, Goliath, who is so called in the Hebrew text, 1Sa 17:4 . But none of these suit with the design and matter of the Psalm, which is more general, and relates to his former manifold dangers, and the deliverance which God had graciously given him out of them. And that of Goliath agrees not with Psa 9:14 , where there is mention of praising God in Zion, which then and long after was in the hands of the Jebusites.

David resolveth to praise God, Psa 9:1,2 , for executing judgment upon his enemies, Psa 9:3-8 . God is a refuge to the oppressed, Psa 9:9,10 . David calls the people of Israel to praise the Lord, Psa 9:11,12 . He prayeth him to consider his trouble, Psa 9:13 , that he might have cause to praise him, Psa 9:14 . The heathen, by God’ s judgment, fall into the snare they made for others, Psa 9:15,16 . The portion of the wicked that forget God, Psa 9:17 . A promise of mercy to the needy and poor, Psa 9:18 ; and a prayer for judgment on the ungodly, Psa 9:19,20 .

With my whole heart i.e. with a sincere, and affectionate, and united heart. I will discourse in the general of thy manifold wonders wrought for me, and for thy church and people formerly. The particle

all is here, as it is oft elsewhere, taken in a restrained sense.

Poole: Psa 9:2 - In thee In thee i.e. in thy favour and help vouschafed to me.

In thee i.e. in thy favour and help vouschafed to me.

Poole: Psa 9:3 - -- When they are discomfited and put to flight, they shall not save themselves by flight, and reserve themselves to do further mischief, but shall stum...

When they are discomfited and put to flight, they shall not save themselves by flight, and reserve themselves to do further mischief, but shall stumble as it were at gall-traps by thee laid in their way, and shall be pursued, and overtaken, and cut off, upon thy appearance against them. One angry look of thine is able to confound and destroy them. Heb. from thy face , because thou didst march in the head of our armies, and against them. They could not stand before thee. So he ascribes the honour of his victories to God only, and to his presence and assistance.

Poole: Psa 9:4 - My right and my cause // Thou satest in the throne // Judging right My right and my cause i.e. my righteous cause against thine and mine enemies. Thou satest in the throne thou didst judge and give sentence for me. ...

My right and my cause i.e. my righteous cause against thine and mine enemies.

Thou satest in the throne thou didst judge and give sentence for me.

Judging right or, O righteous Judge , or, as a just judge .

Poole: Psa 9:5 - Rebuked // The heathen // Their name Rebuked i.e. punished, as Psa 6:1 ; or destroyed, as it is explained in the next clause. The heathen to wit, the Philistines and other heathen nati...

Rebuked i.e. punished, as Psa 6:1 ; or destroyed, as it is explained in the next clause.

The heathen to wit, the Philistines and other heathen nations, who did from time to time molest David, or the people of Israel.

Their name either that fame and honour which they had gained by their former exploits, but now utterly lost by their shameful defeats; or their very memorial, as it fared with Analek.

Poole: Psa 9:6 - Destructions // are come to a perpetual end This is a sudden apostrophe to the enemies of God’ s people, Philistines, Amorites, or other nations, who had formerly made great havoc and was...

This is a sudden apostrophe to the enemies of God’ s people, Philistines, Amorites, or other nations, who had formerly made great havoc and waste among them.

Destructions are come to a perpetual end; thou hast destroyed the Israelitish nation utterly and irrecoverably, and, as it follows, their defenced cities, and their very name and memory, according to thy own desire. So it is a sarcasm or irony, a usual figure in Scripture and all authors, whereby the quite contrary is signified, to wit, that they were not only frustrated of their desires and hopes of destroying the Israelites, but were also subdued, and in a great part destroyed by them. Or this verse may be understood of the great waste and ruin which God’ s enemies had brought upon Israel before this time; which is here remembered, to make the Israelites more thankful for their later or present deliverances. Or it may be taken as a prophecy of the future calamities which the enemies should by God’ s permission bring upon Israel, of which he speaks as of a thing past and done, after the manner of the prophets. But this place is otherwise rendered in the margin of our Bibles, and by divers others, the destructions of the enemy which may be understood either,

1. Actively, which they caused; or,

2. Passively, which they felt

are come to a perpetual end or, are fully and finally completed. Thou hast destroyed cities ; either,

1. Thou, O God, who is oft understood and couched in a pronoun in this manner, thou hast destroyed their cities. Or rather,

2. Thou, O enemy; as may be gathered both from the foregoing clause, where it is so expressed; and from the next verse, where it follows by way of opposition to this, But the Lord , &c. Their memorial is perished with them ; the places and people are utterly extinct.

Poole: Psa 9:7 - He hath prepared Though cities and people may perish for ever, yet the Lord abides for ever; which is sufficient for the enemies’ terror, and for the comfort o...

Though cities and people may perish for ever, yet the Lord abides for ever; which is sufficient for the enemies’ terror, and for the comfort of his church.

He hath prepared or established, by his immutable purpose, and his irrevocable promise.

Poole: Psa 9:8 - The world The world not you only, but all the enemies of his people, and all the men of the world.

The world not you only, but all the enemies of his people, and all the men of the world.

Poole: Psa 9:9 - -- God will not only judge the world at the last day, and then give sentence for his people against their enemies, but even at present he will give the...

God will not only judge the world at the last day, and then give sentence for his people against their enemies, but even at present he will give them his protection.

Poole: Psa 9:10 - They that know // Thou hast not forsaken // Them that seek thee They that know i.e. that thoroughly understand and duly consider. Thy name , i.e. thy nature and perfections, thy infinite power, and wisdom, and fa...

They that know i.e. that thoroughly understand and duly consider. Thy name , i.e. thy nature and perfections, thy infinite power, and wisdom, and faithfulness, and goodness; which make a person a most fit and proper object for trust. The name of God is most frequently put for God, as he hath manifested himself in his word and works, as Deu 28:58 Psa 7:17 20:1 Pro 18:10 , &c.

Thou hast not forsaken the experience of thy faithfulness to thy people in all ages is a just ground for their confidence.

Them that seek thee i.e. that seek help and relief from thee by fervent prayer, mixed with faith, or trust in God, as is expressed in the former clause.

Poole: Psa 9:11 - Which dwelleth in Zion // Among the people Which dwelleth in Zion whose special and gracious presence is there; for there was the ark at this time. Among the people i.e. to the heathen natio...

Which dwelleth in Zion whose special and gracious presence is there; for there was the ark at this time.

Among the people i.e. to the heathen nations, that they also may be brought to the knowledge and worship of the true God.

Poole: Psa 9:12 - For blood // He remembereth them // The humble For blood Heb. bloods ; the bloodshed or murder of his innocent and holy ones; which though he may connive at for a season, yet he will certainly ca...

For blood Heb. bloods ; the bloodshed or murder of his innocent and holy ones; which though he may connive at for a season, yet he will certainly call the authors of it to a very severe account, and avenge it upon them.

He remembereth them either,

1. The humble, as it follows, or the oppressed, Psa 9:9 , that trust in him, and seek to him, Psa 9:10 , whom he seemed to have forgotten. Or,

2. The bloods last mentioned, for that noun and this pronoun are both of the masculine gender; and then remembering is put for revenging or punishing, as it is Deu 25:17,19 Ne 6:14 Jer 14:10 44:21 , and oft elsewhere.

The humble or meek , as this word, which is used also Zec 9:9 , is translated Mat 21:5 , who do not, and cannot, and will not avenge themselves, but commit their cause to me, as the God to whom vengeance belongeth. Or, afflicted or oppressed ones .

Poole: Psa 9:13 - Consider my trouble // From the gates of death // Gates // the gates of death Consider my trouble to wit, compassionately and effectually, so as to bring me out of it. From the gates of death from the brink or mouth of the gr...

Consider my trouble to wit, compassionately and effectually, so as to bring me out of it.

From the gates of death from the brink or mouth of the grave, into which I was dropping, being as near death as a man is to the city that is come to the very gates of it. And so the phrase is used Psa 107:18 Isa 38:10 , and in other authors of whom see my Latin Synopsis .

Gates elsewhere signify power and policy, because the gates of cities were places both of counsel and strength; but

the gates of death are never so taken in Scripture.

Poole: Psa 9:14 - In the gates // Of the daughter of Zion // I will rejoice In the gates i.e. in the great assemblies, which were usually in the gates. Compare Pro 31:31 Isa 3:26 . These gates he elegantly opposeth to the for...

In the gates i.e. in the great assemblies, which were usually in the gates. Compare Pro 31:31 Isa 3:26 . These gates he elegantly opposeth to the former, and declareth that if he be brought off them, he will go into these.

Of the daughter of Zion either,

1. Of Jerusalem, so called also Isa 1:8 Zec 9:9 , because at this time it was subject to Zion; which at this time was the seat of the king’ s palace, and of the ark. For cities or towns belonging or subject unto any metropolis are commonly called its daughters , as Jos 15:45 2Ch 13:19 Psa 48:11 ; as the chief cities are called mothers , as 2Sa 20:19 Gal 4:26 . Or,

2. Of the people who live in, or belong to, or meet together for civil and religious matters in Zion. For cities are as it were mothers to their people, giving them birth and breeding, and therefore the people are commonly called their daughters. So the names of the daughters of Egypt , Jer 46:11 , and of Edom , Lam 4:21,22 , and of Tyre , Psa 45:12 , and of Babel , Psa 137:8 , and of Jerusalem , Lam 2:13,15 Mic 4:8 , are put for the people of those places.

I will rejoice to wit, with spiritual joy and thanksgiving; else it were no fit motive to be used to God in prayer.

Poole: Psa 9:15 - -- Fallen into that destruction which they designed to bring upon us.

Fallen into that destruction which they designed to bring upon us.

Poole: Psa 9:16 - The Lord is known // By the judgment which he executeth // Higgaion The Lord is known or, hath made himself known , or famous even among his enemies, by his most wise counsels and wonderful works. By the judgment wh...

The Lord is known or, hath made himself known , or famous even among his enemies, by his most wise counsels and wonderful works.

By the judgment which he executeth upon the wicked, as it followeth.

Higgaion is either a musical term, or a note of attention, a kind of behold , intimating that the matter deserves deep and frequent meditation, or consideration, as the word signifies.

Poole: Psa 9:17 - Into hell // All the nations // That forget God Into hell either 1. Into the grave which is oft called sheol , into which they are said to be turned , or to return , because they were made of o...

Into hell either

1. Into the grave which is oft called sheol , into which they are said to be turned , or to return , because they were made of or taken out of the dust, Ecc 12:7 . Or,

2. Into the place of eternal perdition; which also is sometimes called sheol , as Pro 15:24 , and elsewhere. For he seems to speak here of those punishments which are peculiar to the wicked, whereas the grave is common to good and bad. And as, Psa 9:8 , he seems to speak of the last and general judgment of all the world, so this verse may be understood of the general punishment of all persons and nations consequent upon it. And into this place wicked men may be said to be turned back, or to return; either,

1. Because it is their own proper place, Act 1:25 , to which they belong, and from which they have their original and their wicked qualities, as being of their father the devil, Joh 8:44 ; in which respect the locusts (who are by all interpreters understood to be living men) are said to come out of the bottomless pit , Rev 9:2,3 . Or,

2. Because they had set themselves as it were in battle array against God, and were beaten back and driven from his presence into their graves, and into hell itself.

All the nations whom their great numbers and power cannot protect from God’ s wrath.

That forget God that do not consider nor regard God, nor his precepts, nor his threatenings and judgments, but go on securely and presumptuously in their oppressive and wicked courses.

Poole: Psa 9:18 - The needy shall not alway be forgotten // Shall not perish The needy shall not alway be forgotten though God for a time may seem to neglect or forget them, and suffer their enemies to triumph over them. Shal...

The needy shall not alway be forgotten though God for a time may seem to neglect or forget them, and suffer their enemies to triumph over them.

Shall not perish which negative particle is fitly understood out of the former clause, as it is Psa 1:5 44:18 Isa 23:4 28:27,28 .

Poole: Psa 9:20 - -- Subdue their proud and insolent spirits, and strike them with terror, or with some terrible judgment. But men, Heb. weak, and miserable, and mortal...

Subdue their proud and insolent spirits, and strike them with terror, or with some terrible judgment. But men, Heb. weak, and miserable, and mortal men , and therefore altogether unable to oppose the omnipotent and eternal God. This he saith, because wicked men, when they are advanced to great power and majesty, are very prone to forget their own frailty, and to carry themselves as if they were gods. See Isa 31:3 Eze 30:7,8 Da 5:21 .

PBC: Psa 9:9 - -- See Philpot: THE REFUGE OF THE OPPRESSED

See Philpot: THE REFUGE OF THE OPPRESSED

Haydock: Psa 9:1 - Poor // Tribulation The church praiseth God for his protection against her enemies. Poor. Hebrew ladac, "the oppressed," (St. Jerome) "broken with grief." (Calmet) ...

The church praiseth God for his protection against her enemies.

Poor. Hebrew ladac, "the oppressed," (St. Jerome) "broken with grief." (Calmet) ---

Tribulation. God's assistance is requisite both in prosperity and adversity. He generally manifests his power only, when all human succour proves useless. (Haydock) ---

Thus he acted at the Red Sea, and when he sent delivers to Israel. Our Saviour came at the time appointed, when he was most wanted. (Theodoret) (Galatians iv. 4.) (Calmet) ---

"We are often oppressed with tribulation, and yet it is not the due time; that so we may be helped by the desire of being set free." (St. Gregory) ---

Thus the delay is for our advantage. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:1 - The hidden things of the son // Lamnatseach The hidden things of the son. The humility and sufferings of Christ, the Son of God; and of good Christians, who are his sons by adoption; and c...

The hidden things of the son. The humility and sufferings of Christ, the Son of God; and of good Christians, who are his sons by adoption; and called hidden things, with regard to the children of this world, who know not the value and merit of them. (Challoner) ---

It may also signify, "to Ben, the master of music, over the young women." See 1 Paralipomenon xv. 18. (Calmet; Menochius) ---

These authors have joined almuth, which St. Jerome, &c., read as two words, " on the death of the son." Protestants, "upon Muth Labben." David might allude to the death of Absalom, or of some of his other children. But he has his Son, Christ, the conqueror of death and hell, principally in view, as this psalm sings of victory over nations. His incarnation and the afflictions of Christians are hidden in God. (Worthington) ---

Lamnatseach has generally a preposition, l, al, &c., after it, which might induce us to prefer rendering "death," before "secrets or young women." (Haydock) ---

But al may be understood, as it is found [in] Psalm xlv., where all have, "for the secrets." In Hebrew, this psalm is divided (Berthier) at ver. 22nd, and formerly it seems at the 17th. (Calmet) ---

This division is arbitrary, and of no consequence for the understanding of the psalms. (Berthier) ---

It would be well if there were no more serious controversy between Catholics and Protestants. The Jews agree with neither. Some unite the 1st and 2nd, as Kimchi does the 114th and 115th. (Amama) ---

What is here rendered a psalm for David, is the same in the Hebrew and Septuagint as has been before expressed of David, Psalm iii. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 9:2 - Praise // To thee // Wonders Praise and thanks, or I will confess. (Worthington) --- To thee. Hebrew, "to the." David had received many favours from God, and he has testifie...

Praise and thanks, or I will confess. (Worthington) ---

To thee. Hebrew, "to the." David had received many favours from God, and he has testified his gratitude, and shewn how we ought to praise God, (St. Jerome; Calmet) with soul and body. (Berthier; Worthington) ---

Wonders; victories gained over the neighbouring nations, so that Israel was at peace and liberty to transport the ark to Sion, 1 Paralipomenon xv.

Haydock: Psa 9:4 - Back Back; routed. After Saul's family was taken off, none durst oppose David. They saw that the Lord had set him on the throne. (Calmet) --- Only aft...

Back; routed. After Saul's family was taken off, none durst oppose David. They saw that the Lord had set him on the throne. (Calmet) ---

Only after his sin, rebels began to molest him. (Haydock) ---

The Fathers explain this of the devil and his agents. (St. Jerome) ---

God repelleth the enemy, when man is not able to resist. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:5 - Justice Justice, or rightly. (Calmet) --- God alone always discerns what is just. (St. Chrysostom) --- Man overcomes the devil, with the assistance of Go...

Justice, or rightly. (Calmet) ---

God alone always discerns what is just. (St. Chrysostom) ---

Man overcomes the devil, with the assistance of God's grace. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:6 - Name // Ever Name, or destroy them. The name is often put for the thing itself. Yet many of those nations who once made such a noise, are now quite forgotten. ...

Name, or destroy them. The name is often put for the thing itself. Yet many of those nations who once made such a noise, are now quite forgotten. No traces of them can be found. (Haydock) ---

The Egyptians and Chanaanites had been exterminated. (Calmet) ---

Ever, for all eternity, as long as God shall reign, ver. 8, 40, or Psalm x. 16. This shews that he speaks of the latter times, and of the final destruction of idolatry, by the preaching of apostolic men, (Berthier) and by the last fire. For some will be so infatuated as to uphold it[idolatry] even to the end. (Haydock) ---

We have even reason to fear that it[idolatry] will again become more general, (Pastorini; Apocalypse) as faith shall decrease. Jesus Christ and his apostles gave it however (Haydock) a mortal wound, so that in the fifth age[century] many of its mysteries were quite forgotten. (Theodoret; Sts. Augustine and Jerome) (Calmet) ---

They took the towns, or the souls, of many from the strong-armed, Luke xi. 21. (Berthier) ---

All sinners may be here styled Gentiles, because they were generally wicked. If their reputation survive here for a while, it will certainly perish in the future world. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:7 - Swords // Frameæ // Their // Noise // Cities Swords. "My enemies have sunk under the sword." (Syriac) (Haydock) --- Frameæ is a German word for "javelins," pointed with iron, which they mi...

Swords. "My enemies have sunk under the sword." (Syriac) (Haydock) ---

Frameæ is a German word for "javelins," pointed with iron, which they might either throw, or use in close fight. (Tacitus) ---

It is often put for a sword. Et martii frameam. (Juvenal xiii.) ---

The weapons of the enemy being exhausted, they are forced to yield. ---

Their. Hebrew, &c., "the." ---

Noise, as swiftly. These fierce nations are fallen like a huge Colossus. (Calmet) ---

Hebrew, "they themselves," or "with them." ---

Cities, &c.

Haydock: Psa 9:8 - In judgment In judgment. St. Jerome, "to judge." (Haydock)

In judgment. St. Jerome, "to judge." (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 9:9 - World // Justice World. This globe must give place to new heavens and earth, (Berthier) after its inhabitants have been judged. (Haydock) --- Justice. Men may ...

World. This globe must give place to new heavens and earth, (Berthier) after its inhabitants have been judged. (Haydock) ---

Justice. Men may be corrupt judges, but God cannot. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:11 - Know Know, with love. Such are always heard. What wonder if others be rejected, who flee from God? (St. Chrysostom and St. Augustine) (Calmet) --- Th...

Know, with love. Such are always heard. What wonder if others be rejected, who flee from God? (St. Chrysostom and St. Augustine) (Calmet) ---

The learned often trust too much to their own knowledge, whereas God has made choice of the simple, Matthew xi. 25. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 9:12 - Ways Ways, ( studia ) "favours," (Haydock) works, &c. (Calmet) --- This was done by the apostles. (St. Augustine) --- Men ought chiefly to study the p...

Ways, ( studia ) "favours," (Haydock) works, &c. (Calmet) ---

This was done by the apostles. (St. Augustine) ---

Men ought chiefly to study the precepts of God. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:13 - Their Their, may be omitted, as it would seem to refer to the Gentiles. God declares that he will demand the blood of all that shed it without authority...

Their, may be omitted, as it would seem to refer to the Gentiles. God declares that he will demand the blood of all that shed it without authority, Genesis ix. 5. (Haydock) ---

He had punished the Chanaanites, &c., for their cruelty, as he did afterwards the persecutors of his Church. If the names of Herod, Nero, &c., be infamous in history for their sanquinary proceedings, they are not less so on account of the judgments which God exercised upon them, even in this world. (Calmet) See Lactantius, de Mort. Persec. (Haydock) ---

God avengeth the blood of his martyrs. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:14 - Enemies Enemies. Israel has been so long under oppression.

Enemies. Israel has been so long under oppression.

Haydock: Psa 9:15 - Death // Daughter Death, from the most imminent dangers. (Haydock) --- Daughter. In the places where the inhabitants of Sion assembled, (Berthier) or publicly in...

Death, from the most imminent dangers. (Haydock) ---

Daughter. In the places where the inhabitants of Sion assembled, (Berthier) or publicly in the Church. (Worthington) ---

In hell, the damned would wish to die. (Theodoret) ---

The gates of death may also signify sin, (Origen) and the bad example of parents. (St. Jerome)

Haydock: Psa 9:16 - Hid Hid. These are the enemies of salvation. (Berthier) --- The nations which had oppressed the Jews found their fortifications and arms turned agains...

Hid. These are the enemies of salvation. (Berthier) ---

The nations which had oppressed the Jews found their fortifications and arms turned against themselves, (Calmet) which is often the case of the wicked. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:17 - Hands Hands. Caught in the very act, so that he cannot deny the crime. Here we find in Hebrew (Calmet) higaion sela, which St. Jerome renders, "by medi...

Hands. Caught in the very act, so that he cannot deny the crime. Here we find in Hebrew (Calmet) higaion sela, which St. Jerome renders, "by meditation for ever." (Haydock) ---

Septuagint, Symmachus, and some Latin copies, "a canticle of the psalm's division," Greek: diapsalmatos. Here perhaps the psalm ended. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 9:18 - Hell Hell; shall die, or be lost. ( Convertantur. ) Literally, "Let," &c. But it may be properly explained as a prediction, or menace. (Haydock) --- ...

Hell; shall die, or be lost. ( Convertantur. ) Literally, "Let," &c. But it may be properly explained as a prediction, or menace. (Haydock) ---

"Those who are devoid of God's justice, return to the dominion of the devil." (Robertson, Lexic.) ---

Zeal, and not revenge, prompts David to speak thus. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 9:19 - Not perish Not perish. Hebrew does not express the negation, but it must be understood. (Berthier) --- Protestants supply it from the former part of the vers...

Not perish. Hebrew does not express the negation, but it must be understood. (Berthier) ---

Protestants supply it from the former part of the verse. The expectation of the just will not be frustrated.

Haydock: Psa 9:20 - Man Man. Hebrew enosh, (Haydock) "weak," sinful "man." (Berthier) -- Gentiles, or all notorious sinners. The Jews despised the Gentiles, as the Ro...

Man. Hebrew enosh, (Haydock) "weak," sinful "man." (Berthier) -- Gentiles, or all notorious sinners. The Jews despised the Gentiles, as the Romans did all barbarians. (Worthington)

Gill: Psa 9:1 - I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole, heart // I will show forth all thy marvellous works I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole, heart,.... This is what is called in the New Testament making melody in the heart, or singing with grace i...

I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole, heart,.... This is what is called in the New Testament making melody in the heart, or singing with grace in the heart, Eph 5:19; and yet does not signify mere mental singing, but vocal singing, the heart joining therein; for the word here used for praise signifies to confess, to speak out, to declare openly the praises of God in the public congregation, as David elsewhere determines to do, Psa 111:1; the heart ought to, be engaged in every, part of divine service and worship, whether in preaching or in hearing, or in prayer, or in singing of praise; and the whole heart also: sometimes God has nothing of the heart in worship, it is removed far from, him, and gone after other objects; and sometimes it is divided between God and the creature; hence the psalmist prays that God would unite his heart to fear him, and then he should praise him with all his heart, with all that was within him, with all the powers and faculties of his soul; see Psa 86:11. This phrase is not expressive of the perfection of this duty, or of performing it in such manner as that there would be no imperfection in it, or sin attending it; for good men fail in all their performances, and do nothing good without sin; hence provision is made for the iniquities of holy things; but of the heartiness and sincerity of it; and in such a sincere and upright manner the psalmist determines, in the strength of divine grace, to praise the Lord;

I will show forth all thy marvellous works; such as the creation of all things out of nothing, and the bringing them into the form and order in which they are by the word of God; and in which there is such a display of the power and wisdom of God; and particularly the formation of man out of the dust of the earth, in the image, and after the likeness of God; the sustentation of the whole world of creatures in their being, the providential care of them all, the preservation of man and beast; and especially the work of redemption: it is marvellous that God should think of redeeming sinful men; that he should fix the scheme of it in the way he has; that he should pick upon his own Son to be the Redeemer; that ungodly men, sinners, the chief of sinners, and enemies, should be the persons redeemed; and that not all the individuals of human nature, but some out of every kindred, tongue, people, and nation: as also the work of grace, which is a new creation, and more marvellous than the old; a regeneration, or a being born again, which is astonishing to a natural man, who cannot conceive how this can be; a resurrection from the dead, or a causing dry bones to live; a call of men out of darkness into marvellous light; and it is as wondrous how this work is preserved amidst so many corruptions of the heart, temptations of Satan, and snares of the world, as that it is; to which may be added the wonderful works yet to be done, as the setting up of the kingdom of Christ, the destruction of antichrist, the resurrection of the dead, the last judgment, and the eternal glory and happiness of the saints; and doubtless the psalmist may have respect to the many victories which he, through the divine power, obtained over his enemies; and particularly the marvellous one which was given him over Goliath with a stone and sling: these the psalmist determined to make the subject of his song, to dwell and enlarge upon, to show forth unto others, and to point out the glories, beauties, and excellency of them: and when he says "all" of them, it must be understood of as many of them as were within the compass of his knowledge, and of as much of them as he was acquainted with; for otherwise the marvellous works of God are infinite and without number, Job 5:9.

Gill: Psa 9:2 - I will be glad and rejoice in thee // I will sing praise to thy name, O thou most High I will be glad and rejoice in thee,.... Not in himself, in any attainments or works of his; not in his wisdom, riches, and strength, nor in his warlik...

I will be glad and rejoice in thee,.... Not in himself, in any attainments or works of his; not in his wisdom, riches, and strength, nor in his warlike exploits, but in the Lord; not in second causes, in horses and chariots, in armies, and in the courage and valour of men, but in God, as the author of deliverance, victory, and salvation; not in God only as the God of nature and providence, but as the God of all grace, and as his covenant God and Father; and because of the blessings of this covenant, as forgiveness of sin, a justifying righteousness, &c. for he rejoiced not in his own righteousness, but in the righteousness of Christ, as well as in his person, grace, and sacrifice; so the Chaldee paraphrase renders it, "I will be glad and rejoice", במימרך, "in thy Word", the Logos, the essential Word of God, of whom there were many types, promises, and prophecies in the former dispensation; two words being here used express the greatness of this joy, and especially the latter word denotes a very vehement joy, a joy unspeakable and full of glory; such as arises from a sight of Christ the object, and which the psalmist had now in view; and this was not a carnal and worldly joy, but joy in the Holy Ghost;

I will sing praise to thy name, O thou most High; that is, to the glory of his name, his being, and perfections, as displayed in his marvellous works, and in the revelation of his word, and especially in his son; and under the character of the "most high" God, the supreme Being over all creatures, angels and men; see Psa 7:17.

Gill: Psa 9:3 - When mine enemies are turned back When mine enemies are turned back,.... As the Philistines were, when Goliath their champion was dead; and as the men that came to apprehend Christ, Da...

When mine enemies are turned back,.... As the Philistines were, when Goliath their champion was dead; and as the men that came to apprehend Christ, David's antitype, went backwards and fell to the ground, through the superior power of Christ; and as sin, Satan, and the world, and at last antichrist, are made to retreat from the Lord's people, who are more than conquerors over them through Christ that has loved them. "They shall fall and perish at thy presence"; they shall stumble at one thing or another which divine Providence will throw in their way to hinder them from executing their designs, and so fall before them they meant to destroy, and perish at the presence of God as wax melteth before the fire; see Psa 27:2; so antichrist shall be consumed with the breath of Christ's mouth, and the brightness of his coming, 2Th 2:8; and this is the ground and foundation of the psalmist's joy, and rejoicing, and singing praise to God as it will be the reason of the joy of saints in the latter day, Rev 18:22.

Gill: Psa 9:4 - For thou hast maintained my right and my cause // thou sittest in the throne judging right For thou hast maintained my right and my cause,.... Or vindicated and established his righteous cause; God had pleaded and defended it, and by the fli...

For thou hast maintained my right and my cause,.... Or vindicated and established his righteous cause; God had pleaded and defended it, and by the flight, fall, and ruin of his enemies, had clearly made it appear that his cause was just and good;

thou sittest in the throne judging right; God has not only a throne of grace on which he sits, and from whence he distributes grace and mercy to his people, but he has a throne of judgment, and which is prepared for it, as in Psa 9:7; where he sits as the Judge of all the earth, and will do right; nor can he do otherwise, though his judgments are not always manifest in the present state of things; and the vindication of the psalmist's innocence and uprightness is another reason of his joy and gladness.

Gill: Psa 9:5 - Thou hast rebuked the Heathen // thou hast destroyed the wicked // thou hast put out their name for ever and ever Thou hast rebuked the Heathen,.... The people of the Philistines, as the Targum and Kimchi explain it, though some Jewish writers a understand it of A...

Thou hast rebuked the Heathen,.... The people of the Philistines, as the Targum and Kimchi explain it, though some Jewish writers a understand it of Amalek the chief of the Heathen nations; but it rather refers to Gospel times, and to the rebukes of the Heathen, by the preaching of the Gospel, for their idolatry and superstition; and especially to the latter day, and to the rebukes of the antichristian states, the Papists who are called Gentiles; which will be with flames of fire, and will issue in their utter extirpation, upon which a profound peace and prosperity will succeed in the Christian churches, according to Isa 2:4; which is a prophecy of those times;

thou hast destroyed the wicked; the wicked man; for it is in the singular number, "labben", as Aben Ezra observes, or who is meant by him; Goliath, according to the Targum and Kimchi; or Esau, as other Jewish writers b, that is, his posterity the Edomites; and each of these were figures of antichrist, the man of sin, the wicked one, whom Christ will slay with the breath of his lips, Isa 11:4;

thou hast put out their name for ever and ever; that is, the glory and reputation of their name, a good and honourable one, which they sought to transmit to the latest posterity; for though the names of wicked men may continue, as Pharaoh, Judas, and others; yet they continue with a scandal and reproach upon them that shall never be wiped off, their names rot and stink; see Pro 10:7; the whole of this denotes the utter ruin and shameful end of the enemies of Christ and his church, and which is matter of joy to the saints.

Gill: Psa 9:6 - O thou enemy // destructions are come to a perpetual end // and thou hast destroyed cities // their memorial is perished with them O thou enemy,.... Which some understand of Goliath, though we do not read of any desolations made by him, nor of any cities destroyed by him; nor by t...

O thou enemy,.... Which some understand of Goliath, though we do not read of any desolations made by him, nor of any cities destroyed by him; nor by the Israelites upon his death, and the flight of the Philistines on that account; Jarchi interprets it of Esau and his posterity, who shall be destroyed in future time, to which he applies, Eze 35:9; other Jewish writers c think Amalek is intended, whose destruction they suppose will be in the days of the Messiah, and then will this Scripture be fulfilled: and as these all prefigured antichrist, as before observed, he seems to be designed, and not Satan, as some Christian interpreters have thought, that enemy of Christ, personal and mystical, of the church, and every true believer; and so is antichrist, he opposes himself to God, and all that is called God; he is one that is contrary to Christ, as his name signifies, to his persons, offices, grace, and kingdom; who blasphemes the name of God, his tabernacle, and his saints;

destructions are come to a perpetual end; which may be understood either of the destructions and desolations made by antichrist, the havoc he has made in the world, treading under foot the holy city, the church, destroying the earth and the inhabitants of it, the bodies, souls, and estates of men; but now the psalmist prophetically declares the end of them to be come, his forty two months, or one thousand two hundred and sixty days or years, will be up, and he will go on no more desolating and destroying; see Rev 11:2; or of the destructions and desolations made upon him by the pouring out of the seven vials upon the antichristian states, upon the seat of the beast, and upon both Pope and Turk, the eastern and western antichrist; when in the issue the beast, and the false prophet with him, will be taken and cast alive into a lake of fire; see Rev 19:20; and so this phrase denotes that the destruction of antichrist will be consummate, his ruin will be complete, and there will be an utter end of him. Some, instead of "desolations", by the change of a point read חרהות, "swords", and Ben Labrat or R. Donesh says d that he found it so written in an ancient book; and so reads Jarchi, though he takes notice of the other reading also; and so read the Septuagint, Syriac, Arabic, and Ethiopic versions; and then the sense is, swords shall fail, they shall be no more made use of to destroy men with, they shall be beaten into ploughshares; for upon the destruction of the man of sin there will be a profound peace in the world; see Isa 2:4. Some e read these words interrogatively, "are destructions come to a perpetual end?" that is, which the enemy antichrist designed to bring upon the people of God? no, they are not; he may imagine they are, when the two witnesses are slain; and may think he has then made an entire slaughter, and a complete destruction of the saints; but he will be mistaken, these witnesses will rise again, and ascend up to heaven in the sight of their enemies, and to the great terror of them, Rev 11:10;

and thou hast destroyed cities, or "hast thou destroyed cities?" that is, as antichrist threatened and intended, namely, to destroy all the cities and churches of Christ; but, alas! he will never be able to do it, they are built on a rock against which the gates of hell can never prevail: but it is better to read the words affirmatively, and interpret them not of the enemy, but of God, and of him destroying the cities of the enemy; for, at the pouring out the seventh and last vial, the great city, the whole antichristian jurisdiction, will be divided into three parts, and utterly perish; and the cities of the Pagan and Mahometan nations will fall, and particularly Babylon the great city will come in remembrance before God, and be utterly destroyed, Rev 16:19;

their memorial is perished with them; they shall not be returned or built any more, but shall be like a millstone cast into the sea, and be found no more at all, Eze 35:9. Some f read this clause by way of interrogation as the others, "is their memorial perished with them?" no, the righteous are in everlasting remembrance, even those churches which the Romish antichrist has made havoc of, as the Albigenses and Waldenses; the memory of them is still precious.

Gill: Psa 9:7 - But the Lord shall endure for ever // he hath prepared his throne for judgment But the Lord shall endure for ever,.... When antichrist is entirely ruined, his cities destroyed, and the memorial of them perished, then "shall the L...

But the Lord shall endure for ever,.... When antichrist is entirely ruined, his cities destroyed, and the memorial of them perished, then "shall the Lord sit for ever" g, as the words may be rendered; that is, as a Jewish writer h paraphrases them, in rest and quiet. The words may be expressive of the unchangeableness and eternity and power of God; the Chaldee paraphrase of them is, מימרא דיי, "the Word of the Lord is for ever; his habitation is in the highest heavens". And they may very well be interpreted of Christ, the essential Word of God, who is the unchangeable, everlasting, and almighty God; and who sits King for ever, and must sit at God's right hand, in the highest heavens, until all his enemies are made his footstool; and to him most properly do the following things in this verse Psa 9:8 belong:

he hath prepared his throne for judgment; for the administration of judgment in this world, for the particular judgment after death, and for the general judgment after the resurrection of the dead; which seems by what follows to be chiefly meant, and which will come on after the destruction of antichrist; and all things are preparing for it; the day is appointed in which God will judge the world; Christ is ordained to be the Judge of quick and dead; devils and ungodly men are reserved to the judgment of the great day; the throne is ready, which will be a white one, Rev 20:11; denoting the purity, justice, and uprightness of the Judge, who himself is at the door.

Gill: Psa 9:8 - And he shall judge the world in righteousness // he shall minister judgment to the people in uprightness And he shall judge the world in righteousness,.... The word תבל, rendered "world", is, as Ben Melech well observes, a general name for all the coun...

And he shall judge the world in righteousness,.... The word תבל, rendered "world", is, as Ben Melech well observes, a general name for all the countries of the habitable world; and so shows that it is the universal judgment that is here spoken of; and which will be carried on and finished with the utmost righteousness, and according to the strictest rules of justice and equity; and is therefore called the righteous judgment of God, Rom 2:5; see Psa 96:13;

he shall minister judgment to the people in uprightness; which signifies the same with the former clause, unless by the "world" there, should be meant the wicked of the world; and by the "people" here, the people of God; to whom the righteous Judge will give the crown of righteousness.

Gill: Psa 9:9 - The Lord also will be a refuge for the oppressed // a refuge in times of trouble The Lord also will be a refuge for the oppressed,.... The poor and weak, such as have no might nor power, and are thrown down and trampled upon, as th...

The Lord also will be a refuge for the oppressed,.... The poor and weak, such as have no might nor power, and are thrown down and trampled upon, as the word i signifies; and such are the people of God. They are oppressed with the burden of sin; they are bowed down with Satan and his temptations; and are sometimes pressed out of measure, and above their strength, with the persecutions of men; they are trodden under foot by antichrist, or otherwise are borne down with a variety of sorrows and afflictions; but the Lord is a refuge for them. The Chaldee paraphrase renders it as before, "the Word of the Lord", the eternal Logos, the Son of God: he is a refuge for poor sensible sinners, fleeing from wrath to come; being typified by the cities of refuge, whither the manslayer fled from the avenger of blood: he is the strong hold for the prisoners of hope to turn into; his name is a strong tower and place of defence for oppressed saints; he is a refuge when all others fail, and at all times, in the day of affliction, and in the hour of death, and at judgment;

a refuge in times of trouble; of which the saints have many, as when God hides his face, when corruptions prevail, when grace is low in exercise, and temptations are strong, yet even then Christ is the refuge from the storm; the salvation of his people is of him, and he is their strength in every time of trouble; see Isa 25:4.

Gill: Psa 9:10 - And they that know thy name // will put their trust in thee // for thou, Lord, hast not forsaken them that seek thee And they that know thy name,.... As proclaimed in the Gospel, a God gracious and merciful, and forgiving sin; and as in Christ, in whom his name is, a...

And they that know thy name,.... As proclaimed in the Gospel, a God gracious and merciful, and forgiving sin; and as in Christ, in whom his name is, and in whom he is the God of love, grace, and mercy, though out of him a consuming fire; or the name of Christ himself, the Word of the Lord, who is the refuge of saints and sinners; his name Jesus, a Saviour: such who know him to be the able, willing, complete, all sufficient, and everlasting Saviour; who know his power and faithfulness to keep what is committed to him; and who know him not merely notionally and speculatively, and in a professional way only, but affectionately, spiritually, and experimentally: such

will put their trust in thee; as they have great reason to do; and the more they know of the grace and mercy of God in Christ, and of the ability and suitableness of Christ as a Saviour, the more strongly will they place their trust and confidence in him;

for thou, Lord, hast not forsaken them that seek thee: who are first sought out by God in the effectual calling, and then under the influence and direction of his grace and Spirit seek him in Christ, where he is only to be found; and seek Christ and his righteousness above all things else, and with their whole hearts, and diligently; and seek to Christ alone for life and salvation, and continue seeking the Lord, by prayer and supplication, for whatever they stand in need of; these God does not forsake: he may sometimes hide his face from them, as he does from his own children, and did from his own Son, yet he never forsakes them totally and finally; nor will he forsake the work of his own hands, which he has wrought in them, but will perfect it; he will never leave them so as that they shall perish by sin, Satan, or any enemy; he will not forsake them in life, nor at death, but will be the strength of their hearts, and their portion for ever.

Gill: Psa 9:11 - Sing praises to the Lord, which dwelleth in Zion // declare among the people his doings Sing praises to the Lord, which dwelleth in Zion,.... The psalmist having determined in the strength of grace to praise the Lord himself, and show for...

Sing praises to the Lord, which dwelleth in Zion,.... The psalmist having determined in the strength of grace to praise the Lord himself, and show forth all his marvellous works, and given his reasons for it, both with respect to himself in particular, and with respect to the people of God in general, here calls upon others to engage in the same work; the Lord is not only to be praised, which may be done by celebrating the perfections of his nature, and the works of his hands; by giving him thanks for mercies temporal and spiritual, and by living to his glory; but his praises are to be sung by a modulation of the voice in musical notes, as the word used signifies; see Son 2:12; where the same word is used of the singing of birds; and this is to be done by the saints jointly, in concert together, as Paul and Silas in prison sang the praises of God; and there is great reason why they should join together in this work, since they share the blessings of divine grace in common together; and it is their duty to stir up one another to this service, as well as to other parts of worship: and this perfectly agrees with the exhortation to the saints, and the work they shall be employed in at the fall of Babylon, or destruction of antichrist, Rev 14:1. Jehovah, to whom praises are to be sung, is described as the inhabitant of Zion, the ark and tabernacle being there before the temple was built, which were symbols of the divine Presence. The Targum paraphrases it, "who causeth his Shechinah to dwell in Zion"; as many of the Jewish writers interpret this psalm of Goliath, a doubt arises here about it, since in the days of Saul, and at the time of Goliath's death, Zion was in the hands of the Jebusites, and the ark of God was not there till many years afterwards; to this it is replied, that David might compose this psalm upon that occasion not immediately at that time, but after he was king of Israel, and when the ark was brought to Zion; or that he said this by a prophetic spirit, foreseeing that, God would dwell there; and Kimchi observes, that it was everywhere a received tradition among the people of Israel that the sanctuary would be built there; but however this be, certain it is that the church of God goes by the name of Zion frequently; see Psa 2:6, Heb 12:22. God by his essence and power is everywhere, he fills heaven and earth, and cannot be contained in either; his glorious presence is in heaven; his gracious presence is in his church and among his people; where they dwell he dwells, and where he dwells they dwell: hence the church is called by the same name as the Lord is here, the inhabitant of Zion, Isa 12:6; and this description of him points out the place where his praises are to be sung, in Zion; who are to sing them, the members of the church; and the reason why, because the Lord dwells in Zion; and is there a refuge for his people, and protects them;

declare among the people his doings; what God does for the souls of men is not only to be declared among the people of God, Psa 66:16; but also among the people of the world, when a suitable opportunity offers; and especially in the public ministry of the word; partly that the name of God may be exalted, his grace, goodness, and mercy be displayed; and partly that it might be the means of the conversion of God's chosen ones among them, Psa 96:2; though it may be here his doings in providence are meant, his special providential care of his church and people, and his vengeance on their enemies, on Babylon; for upon the ruin of antichrist, the judgments of God, his providential dispensations towards his church and people, will be made manifest, and all nations will be called upon to fear and worship him; see Jer 50:28; the word k which is here used signifies such deeds and actions as are the effects of thought and counsel, and which are purposely and industriously done; and whatsoever is done by the Lord, whether in a way of grace or providence, is done after the counsel of his own will; as he thought so it is, as he purposes so it comes to pass, and all things are done well and wisely, and answer the ends and designs of them.

Gill: Psa 9:12 - When he maketh inquisition for blood // he remembereth them // he forgetteth not the cry of the humble When he maketh inquisition for blood,.... The Arabic version renders it, "he remembers him that seeks their blood"; that is, the wicked man, that lies...

When he maketh inquisition for blood,.... The Arabic version renders it, "he remembers him that seeks their blood"; that is, the wicked man, that lies in wait for innocent blood, and whose feet are swift to shed it; the man of sin, who is bloodthirsty; who drinks up the blood of the saints like water, and has been made drunk with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus, him will God remember, and take vengeance on, in his own time: but rather this is to be understood of God himself, seeking for the blood of his saints: he knows where it is, though ever so privily shed, as he did Abel's; yet, to show his strict care and accurate notice of it, he is represented as searching for it, and finding it out by secret search, Jer 2:34. And it is the same phrase with "requiring" blood, and expresses a demand of satisfaction for it; and declares the vengeance that God will take on account of it: he requires the blood of every man at the hand of him by whom it is shed, Gen 9:5; especially the blood of the righteous, Mat 23:35; particularly the blood of the martyrs of Jesus, shed by the Romish antichrist; he will make inquisition for that, and will find in Babylon the blood of the prophets and saints, and of all that are slain on earth; and will avenge the blood of his servants at her hand, and give her blood to drink, Rev 18:24;

he remembereth them; either the "righteous", as the Targum paraphrases it, whose blood has been shed; or else the wicked, who shed their blood: God will remember them and their sins; which, for some time, may seem not to have been taken notice of by him, and will pour out his wrath, and inflict just punishment on them; see Rev 16:19;

he forgetteth not the cry of the humble: the "Cetib", or writing of the text, is עניים, "afflicted"; the "Keri", or marginal reading, is ענוים, "humble"; so the Masorah and Targum read: both may be taken into the sense: afflicted persons are generally humble, afflictions make them humble; God's people are an afflicted people; afflicted with sin, with Satan, with the world, with antichrist and his followers: and they are an humble people; grace makes them humble, and a sense of their sin and unworthiness keeps them so: and this is a proper character of the followers of Jesus. These in their distress cry to the Lord, as the Israelites did in Egypt under their bondage and, pressures: yea, their blood cries after death, as Abel's did, and as the blood of the martyrs of Christ does, whose souls under the altar cry for vengeance, Rev 6:9; and God is not unmindful of their cry; however he may seem to be, he takes notice of it, and wilt in his own time avenge his elect, which cry unto him day and night.

Gill: Psa 9:13 - Have mercy upon me, O Lord // consider, my trouble which I suffer of them that hate me // thou that liftest me up from the gates of death Have mercy upon me, O Lord,.... The psalmist proceeds to petitions on his own account in this verse: the ends he proposes by the fulfilling of them ar...

Have mercy upon me, O Lord,.... The psalmist proceeds to petitions on his own account in this verse: the ends he proposes by the fulfilling of them are mentioned in the next. A good man, a man called by the grace of God, though he has obtained mercy of the Lord, yet still stands in need of more, of fresh discoveries of pardoning grace and mercy, of merciful supplies, of merciful support, and merciful deliverances from enemies, inward and outward: and such an one flees to God, and not to the creature; and pleads, not his own dignity, righteousness, or merit, but the mercy of God;

consider, my trouble which I suffer of them that hate me; or "see my affliction because of mine enemies" l; look upon me under it with an eye of pity and compassion, and help and deliver me; and look upon mine enemies that give me this trouble, and take vengeance on them;

thou that liftest me up from the gates of death; the house appointed for all living; that is, from the power of it, when just upon the brink of it; when near it, as a person is to an house, when he is at the gates of it; either through sickness, or some violent distemper of body, as Hezekiah was; or through some imminent danger in battle, as David was when engaged with Goliath; when everyone thought, as Kimchi observes, that he should fall by his hand: or it may be this may have respect to his being raised up from the death of sin, and delivered from the power of darkness; to his being brought out of the horrible pit and miry clay of an unregenerate state, and set upon the rock of salvation; which is a lifting up indeed, an exaltation from a very low to a very high estate: and this the psalmist takes notice of to encourage his faith; and makes use of it as an argument with God, that as he had dealt so graciously and bountifully with him, he would still show mercy to him, and look upon him under his affliction.

Gill: Psa 9:14 - That I may show forth all thy praise // in the gates of the daughter of Zion // I will rejoice in thy salvation That I may show forth all thy praise,.... That is, all thy bounties and acts of goodness, deserving of praise; even as many of them as he had an exper...

That I may show forth all thy praise,.... That is, all thy bounties and acts of goodness, deserving of praise; even as many of them as he had an experience of, and which came within his knowledge; and as much of them as he was capable of observing: for otherwise the instances of divine grace and goodness are so many, that they cannot be reckoned up in order, nor God be praised for them, in the present state of things, as he should; See Gill on Psa 9:1;

in the gates of the daughter of Zion: it was usual with the Hebrews to represent a chief city as a mother city, and the towns and villages, and places adjacent, as daughters; and so, as Zion or Jerusalem signifies the church of God in general, or the mother church, Gal 4:26; so "the daughter" of Zion may mean a particular church: the Targum renders it the congregation of Zion; and "the gates" of it are the public ordinances of divine worship in it; and the sense is, that the psalmist desired to show forth the praises of God in the most public manner in the congregation and assembly of the saints;

I will rejoice in thy salvation, or "that I may rejoice in thy salvation" m: meaning either temporal salvation and deliverance from enemies, wrought by God for him, which would be matter of joy to him; or spiritual salvation, which may be called God's salvation, because contrived by him in the council of peace, and secured by him in the covenant of grace, and wrought out by his Son in the fulness of time, and applied by his Spirit at conversion. And a gracious man rejoices in this salvation more because it is the Lord's than because it is his own; or he rejoices more because of the glory of God, which is displayed in it, than because of his own advantage and happiness by it.

Gill: Psa 9:15 - The Heathen are sunk into the pit that they made // in the net which they laid is their own foot taken The Heathen are sunk into the pit that they made,.... The psalmist having determined to praise the Lord, and called upon others to join with him in i...

The Heathen are sunk into the pit that they made,.... The psalmist having determined to praise the Lord, and called upon others to join with him in it, here enters upon it: for, as Jarchi and Aben Ezra observe, this is תהלה "the praise" he was desirous to show forth, which is occasioned by the destruction of God's enemies, and the deliverance of his people: by "the Heathen" are meant not the Philistines, as Kimchi interprets it, who thought to cause Israel to fall, and fell themselves; but this is spoken prophetically of the nations of the earth, who have joined in the idolatry of antichrist, the Gentiles, by whom the holy city has been trodden under foot; even the several antichristian states, that will be destroyed by the pouring out of the seven vials, and especially the last, at the battle of Armageddon; and which will be brought on by themselves, with a design to destroy the whole kingdom and interest of Christ, but will issue in their utter ruin, which this phrase is expressive of; see Rev 18:3. The metaphor is taken from hunters, who dig pits for the wild beasts to fall into, that they may the more easily take them, into which they fall themselves; see Psa 7:15. Wicked men are mischievous and crafty, but sometimes they are taken in their own craftiness;

in the net which they laid is their own foot taken; which may signify the same thing as before, that the mischief they design for others falls upon themselves; only as the former phrase denotes their utter destruction like the sinking of a millstone in the sea, by which the irrecoverable ruin of Babylon is expressed, Rev 18:21; this may design the restraint and hinderance of them from doing the evil they would; their feet are entangled, that they cannot run to shed blood; and their hands are held, that they cannot perform their enterprise; and their wrath in restrained and made to praise the Lord. The metaphor is taken from fowlers, who lay nets and snares for birds, and cover them that they may not be seen, but fall into them unawares; see Psa 124:7.

Gill: Psa 9:16 - The Lord is known by the judgment which he executeth // the wicked is snared in the work of his own hands // Higgaion. Selah The Lord is known by the judgment which he executeth,.... The judgment which God will execute upon antichrist, and the antichristian powers, will be...

The Lord is known by the judgment which he executeth,.... The judgment which God will execute upon antichrist, and the antichristian powers, will be a means of making known his name, his glory, his perfections, in all the earth; as his wisdom, power, justice, and goodness; see Exo 9:16. The destruction of antichrist will be the Lord's doing, and it will be a righteous one; it will be a just retaliation; as he has killed with the sword, multitudes of his followers shall be killed with the sword; as he has led captive, he shall be taken captive at the battle of Armageddon; as he has burnt, many of the martyrs of Jesus, he shall be cast into the lake of fire burning with brimstone. Some read these words as two sentences, "The Lord is known; he hath executed judgment" n: the latter of these refers not to the ministration of justice in the providential government of the world, or at the last day in the general judgment; but to the judgment of the great whore, or antichrist, at which time the Lord will be known in his Gospel in all the world; the earth will be tilled with the knowledge of him, and he, and he alone, will be exalted; his name will be great and glorious throughout the earth; all shall know him, from the least to the greatest; and their knowledge of him will be very clear and comprehensive;

the wicked is snared in the work of his own hands; not Goliath, as Kimchi thinks, who was slain by David with his own sword, though this was true of him in the letter and type; but the wicked one, the man of sin and son of perdition, antichrist, whose coming is after the working of Satan, with all craftiness and wily stratagems, called the depths of Satan, Rev 2:24; but his own sins shall take him, and he shall be holden with the cords of his iniquities, and be rewarded double for all his sins; what is before figuratively expressed is here literally declared; or, "he hath snared the wicked in or by the work of his hands" o, that is, God.

Higgaion. Selah; of the latter of these words; see Gill on Psa 3:2; the former signifies "meditation"; Jarchi paraphrases it נהגה, "let us meditate on this, selah"; Aben Ezra interprets it, "I will show forth this in truth"; the Chaldee paraphrase is, "the righteous shall rejoice for ever"; the note of Kimchi and Ben Melech is, "this salvation is to us meditation and praise"; upon the whole the sense seems to be this, that God's judgments upon antichrist, and the antichristian states, and the deliverance of his people from their yoke and tyranny, are things worthy of the meditation of the saints, and afford just matter of joy, praise, and thanksgiving.

Gill: Psa 9:17 - The wicked shall be turned into hell // and all the nations that forget God The wicked shall be turned into hell,.... Some render it, "shall return to the grave" p, to the earth, the original dust from whence they came; but th...

The wicked shall be turned into hell,.... Some render it, "shall return to the grave" p, to the earth, the original dust from whence they came; but this is common to all men, to the righteous as well as the wicked; rather שאול here signifies the place of torment, commonly called hell, where devils and damned spirits are; hither the souls of the wicked go immediately upon their departure from their bodies, Luk 16:23; and after the judgment is over, they will be remanded thither in soul and body; and their damnation is called the destruction of soul and body in hell; which will consist in an everlasting separation from God, and in a sense of his wrath and fiery indignation: and though this is true of all the wicked, yet here that wicked one, antichrist, and his wicked followers, are chiefly designed; even the beast and false prophet, who shall be cast alive into the lake of fire burning with brimstone, Rev 19:20;

and all the nations that forget God; which is not to be understood of the Pagan nations, though they may be said to forget God, since he is to be known by the light of nature, and yet they worship idols, the works of their hands; but the Papal nations, who adore the pope of Rome as God on earth, worship angels and saints departed, and images of gold and silver, and wood and stone. It may be applied to every wicked man who forgets there is a God who sees and knows all things, and to whom men are accountable; see Psa 50:22.

Gill: Psa 9:18 - For the needy shall not always be forgotten // the expectation of the poor shall not perish for ever For the needy shall not always be forgotten,.... The people of God are poor and needy for the most part; they are so in things temporal, and they are ...

For the needy shall not always be forgotten,.... The people of God are poor and needy for the most part; they are so in things temporal, and they are poor in spirit, or in things spiritual, of which they are sensible; their needs are many, and frequently return; but God has provided a throne of grace for them to come to for help in time of need, and he will supply all their wants out of the fulness of grace in Christ; nor is he unmindful of them, and of his covenant with them; strictly speaking, they are never forgotten by him, being engraven on his hands, and set as a seal on his heart; but they sometimes seem to be so both to themselves and others, Psa 42:3; and they may continue so long; God may seem for a long time to take no notice of them, but suffer them to lie under affliction and persecution; the holy city is trodden under foot forty two months, or one thousand two hundred and sixty days, that is, so many years; so long the witnesses prophesy in sackcloth, so long the church is in the wilderness, and so long will be the reign of antichrist, Rev 11:2; but as great Babylon will come up in remembrance before God, and he will remember her sins, and render her double; the set time to favour his poor and needy will come, and he will arise and have mercy on them, and bring them into a glorious and comfortable state and condition;

the expectation of the poor shall not perish for ever; the negative particle, though not in the original text, is rightly supplied from the preceding clause, as it is by the Targum, Jarchi, Aben Ezra, and Kimchi, and as the sense requires; and the expectation of Christ's poor ones is not only a supply of grace here and eternal happiness hereafter; but they expect a glorious state of the church on earth, and that Christ will descend in person from heaven, and his tabernacle will be among men; and that they shall be kings and priests, and possess the kingdom, and reign with Christ a thousand years; and though these things may seem to be deferred, and their expectation put off to a length of time, yet it shall not perish for ever; there will be a performance of the things promised and expected.

Gill: Psa 9:19 - Arise, O Lord // let not man prevail // let the Heathen be judged in thy sight Arise, O Lord,.... To the destruction of thine enemies, and the salvation of thy people; See Gill on Psa 7:6; let not man prevail; the man of sin, ...

Arise, O Lord,.... To the destruction of thine enemies, and the salvation of thy people; See Gill on Psa 7:6;

let not man prevail; the man of sin, antichrist, that is, let him not always prevail; he is the little horn that was to prevail against the saints, and has prevailed, Dan 7:21; but he shall not always prevail; this petition will be heard and answered; for though he shall cast down many thousands, he shall not be "strengthened" by it, Dan 11:12; where the same word is used as here; the Lamb at last shall overcome him and his ten kings, his supporters, and all that shall aid and assist him, Rev 17:14;

let the Heathen be judged in thy sight; that is, the antichristian nations that adhere to the man of sin, let them be judged and punished in the sight of God, the Judge of all the earth, whose eyes are as a flame of fire; compare with this Joe 3:12.

Gill: Psa 9:20 - Put them in fear, O Lord // that the nations may know themselves to be but men // Selah Put them in fear, O Lord,.... Who are, a bold, impudent, fearless generation of men; who, like the unjust judge, neither fear God nor regard men, ther...

Put them in fear, O Lord,.... Who are, a bold, impudent, fearless generation of men; who, like the unjust judge, neither fear God nor regard men, therefore the psalmist prays that God would inject fear into them, who only can do it; and this will be done at Babylon's destruction, when the antichristian kings, merchants, and seafaring men, will stand afar off for fear of her torment, Rev 18:10;

that the nations may know themselves to be but men; and not God, and have no power against him; see Isa 31:3; the sense is, that the antichristian nations, who oppose themselves to Christ and his people, may know that they are but frail, mortal, miserable men, as the word q signifies; and that he who is at the head of them, the man of sin, is no other, though he exalts himself above all that is called God, 2Th 2:4; or these words are a prayer for the conversion of many among the nations, and may be rendered, "put, O Lord, fear in them" r; that is, the true grace of fear, "that the nations may know" themselves, their sin and guilt and danger, and know God in Christ, and Christ, and the way of salvation by him; for at the word "know" should be a stop, concluding a proposition, since the accent "athnach" is there; and then follows another, "they are men. Selah": destitute of the fear and grace of God, are capable of it, but cannot give it to themselves.

Selah; on this word; see Gill on Psa 3:2.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 9:1 The cohortative forms in vv. 1-2 express the psalmist’s resolve to praise God publicly.

NET Notes: Psa 9:2 Heb “[to] your name, O Most High.” God’s “name” refers metonymically to his divine characteristics as suggested by his n...

NET Notes: Psa 9:3 Or “perish”; or “die.” The imperfect verbal forms in this line either emphasize what typically happens or describe vividly the...

NET Notes: Psa 9:4 Heb “you sat on a throne [as] one who judges [with] righteousness.” The perfect verbal forms in v. 4 probably allude to a recent victory (...

NET Notes: Psa 9:5 Heb “their name you wiped out forever and ever.” The three perfect verbal forms in v. 5 probably refer to a recent victory (definite past ...

NET Notes: Psa 9:6 Heb “it has perished, their remembrance, they.” The independent pronoun at the end of the line is in apposition to the preceding pronomina...

NET Notes: Psa 9:7 Heb “he establishes for justice his throne.”

NET Notes: Psa 9:8 Heb “the peoples.” The imperfect verbal forms in v. 8 either describe God’s typical, characteristic behavior, or anticipate a future...

NET Notes: Psa 9:9 Heb “[he is] an elevated place for times in trouble.” Here an “elevated place” refers to a stronghold, a defensible, secure po...

NET Notes: Psa 9:10 Heb “the ones who seek you.”

NET Notes: Psa 9:11 Heb “declare among the nations his deeds.”

NET Notes: Psa 9:12 Heb “the cry for help of the oppressed.” In this context the “oppressed” are the psalmist and those he represents, whom the ho...

NET Notes: Psa 9:13 Heb “one who lifts me up.”

NET Notes: Psa 9:14 Heb “in your deliverance.”

NET Notes: Psa 9:15 The hostility of the nations against God’s people is their downfall, for it prompts God to intervene and destroy them. See also Ps 7:15-16.

NET Notes: Psa 9:16 This is probably a technical musical term.

NET Notes: Psa 9:17 Heb “forget.” “Forgetting God” refers here to worshiping false gods and thereby refusing to recognize his sovereignty (see als...

NET Notes: Psa 9:18 Heb “the hope of the afflicted does [not] perish forever.” The negative particle is understood by ellipsis; note the preceding line. The i...

NET Notes: Psa 9:19 Or “prevail.”

NET Notes: Psa 9:20 Heb “let the nations know they [are] man[kind]”; i.e., mere human beings (as opposed to God).

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:1 "To the chief Musician upon Muthlabben, A Psalm of David." I will praise [thee], O LORD, with my ( a ) whole heart; I will shew forth all thy marvello...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:4 For ( b ) thou hast maintained my right and my cause; thou satest in the throne judging right. ( b ) However the enemy seems for a time to prevail ye...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:6 ( c ) O thou enemy, destructions are come to a perpetual end: and thou hast destroyed cities; their memorial is perished with them. ( c ) A derision ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:9 The LORD also will be a refuge for the ( d ) oppressed, a refuge in times of trouble. ( d ) Our miseries are meant to cause us to feel God's present ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:12 ( e ) When he maketh inquisition for blood, he remembereth them: he forgetteth not the cry of the humble. ( e ) Though God does not suddenly avenge t...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:14 That I may shew forth all thy praise in the ( f ) gates of the daughter of Zion: I will rejoice in thy salvation. ( f ) In the open assembly of the C...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:15 The heathen are ( g ) sunk down in the pit [that] they made: in the net which they hid is their own foot taken. ( g ) For God overthrows the wicked i...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:16 ( h ) The LORD is known [by] the judgment [which] he executeth: the wicked is snared in the work of his own hands. Higgaion. Selah. ( h ) The mercy o...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:18 For the needy shall not alway be forgotten: the expectation ( i ) of the poor shall [not] perish for ever. ( i ) God does not promise to help us befo...

Geneva Bible: Psa 9:20 Put them in fear, O LORD: [that] the nations may know themselves [to be but] ( k ) men. Selah. ( k ) Which they cannot learn without the fear of your...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 9:1-10 - --If we would praise God acceptably, we must praise him in sincerity, with our whole heart. When we give thanks for some one particular mercy, we should...

MHCC: Psa 9:11-20 - --Those who believe that God is greatly to be praised, not only desire to praise him better themselves, but desire that others may join with them. There...

Matthew Henry: Psa 9:1-10 - -- The title of this psalm gives a very uncertain sound concerning the occasion of penning it. It is upon Muth-labben, which some make to refer to th...

Matthew Henry: Psa 9:11-20 - -- In these verses, I. David, having praised God himself, calls upon and invites others to praise him likewise, Psa 9:11. Those who believe God is grea...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:1-2 - -- (Heb.: 9:2-3) In this first strophe of the Psalm, which is laid out in tetrastichs-the normative strophe-the alphabetical form is carried out in th...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:3-4 - -- (Heb.: 9:4-5) The call upon himself to thanksgiving sounds forth, and the ב -strophe continues it by expressing the ground of it. The preposition...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:5-6 - -- (Heb.: 9:6-7) The strophe with ג , which is perhaps intended to represent ד and ה as well, continues the confirmation of the cause for thanks...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:7-8 - -- (Heb.: 9:8-9) Without a trace even of the remembrance of them the enemies are destroyed, while on the other hand Jahve endureth for ever. This stro...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:9-10 - -- (Heb.: 9:10-11) Thus judging the nations Jahve shows Himself to be, as a second ו -strophe says, the refuge and help of His own. The voluntative ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:11-12 - -- (Heb.: 9:12-13) Thus then the z-strophe summons to the praise of this God who has done, and will still do, such things. The summons contains a mora...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:13-14 - -- (Heb.: 9:14-15) To take this strophe as a prayer of David at the present time, is to destroy the unity and hymnic character of the Psalm, since tha...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:15-16 - -- (Heb.: 9:16-17) And, as this ט -strophe says, the church is able to praise God; for it is rescued from death, and those who desired that death mi...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:17-18 - -- (Heb.: 9:18-19) Just as in Psa 9:8. the prospect of a final universal judgment was opened up by Jahve's act of judgment experienced in the present,...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 9:19-20 - -- (Heb.: 9:20-21) By reason of the act of judgment already witnessed the prayer now becomes all the more confident in respect of the state of things ...

Constable: Psa 9:1-20 - --Psalm 9 The Septuagint translators combined Psalms 9 and 10 into one psalm even though they are separate...

Constable: Psa 9:1-11 - --1. Praise for righteous judgment 9:1-12 This first section speaks of God as the righteous Judge in whom the afflicted may hope. 9:1-2 In view of the a...

Constable: Psa 9:12-19 - --2. Petition for present deliverance 9:13-20 Since God had proved faithful to uphold the afflicted righteous in the past, David called on Him to delive...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 9:8 See Act 17:31 .

Evidence: Psa 9:17 How wrong it is for us to forget the One who gave us life. When nations, like individuals, forget God, they therefore die in their sins and reap His g...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 9 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 9:1, David praises God for executing judgment; Psa 9:11, He incites others to praise him; Psa 9:13, He prays that he may have cause t...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 9 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 9:1-10) David praises God for protecting his people. (Psa 9:11-20) And for cause to praise him.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 9 (Pendahuluan Pasal) In this psalm, I. David praises God for pleading his cause, and giving him victory over his enemies and the enemies of his country (Psa 9:1-6), an...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 9 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 9 To the chief Musician upon Muthlabben, a Psalm of David. Some, take "muthlabben" to be the name of the tune to which this p...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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