kecilkan semua  

Teks -- Psalms 76:1-12 (NET)

Tampilkan Strong
Konteks
Psalm 76
76:1 For the music director; to be accompanied by stringed instruments; a psalm of Asaph, a song. God has revealed himself in Judah; in Israel his reputation is great. 76:2 He lives in Salem; he dwells in Zion. 76:3 There he shattered the arrows, the shield, the sword, and the rest of the weapons of war. (Selah) 76:4 You shine brightly and reveal your majesty, as you descend from the hills where you killed your prey. 76:5 The bravehearted were plundered; they “fell asleep.” All the warriors were helpless. 76:6 At the sound of your battle cry, O God of Jacob, both rider and horse “fell asleep.” 76:7 You are awesome! Yes, you! Who can withstand your intense anger? 76:8 From heaven you announced what their punishment would be. The earth was afraid and silent 76:9 when God arose to execute judgment, and to deliver all the oppressed of the earth. (Selah) 76:10 Certainly your angry judgment upon men will bring you praise; you reveal your anger in full measure. 76:11 Make vows to the Lord your God and repay them! Let all those who surround him bring tribute to the awesome one! 76:12 He humbles princes; the kings of the earth regard him as awesome.
Paralel   Ref. Silang (TSK)   ITL  

Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Asaph father of Joah, Hezekiah's recorder,son of Berechiah the Levite; music minister under David,father of Zichri; a Levite ancestor of some returnees,an official over the (Persian) king's forest in Judah
 · Israel a citizen of Israel.,a member of the nation of Israel
 · Jacob the second so of a pair of twins born to Isaac and Rebeccaa; ancestor of the 12 tribes of Israel,the nation of Israel,a person, male,son of Isaac; Israel the man and nation
 · Judah the son of Jacob and Leah; founder of the tribe of Judah,a tribe, the land/country,a son of Joseph; the father of Simeon; an ancestor of Jesus,son of Jacob/Israel and Leah; founder of the tribe of Judah,the tribe of Judah,citizens of the southern kingdom of Judah,citizens of the Persian Province of Judah; the Jews who had returned from Babylonian exile,"house of Judah", a phrase which highlights the political leadership of the tribe of Judah,"king of Judah", a phrase which relates to the southern kingdom of Judah,"kings of Judah", a phrase relating to the southern kingdom of Judah,"princes of Judah", a phrase relating to the kingdom of Judah,the territory allocated to the tribe of Judah, and also the extended territory of the southern kingdom of Judah,the Province of Judah under Persian rule,"hill country of Judah", the relatively cool and green central highlands of the territory of Judah,"the cities of Judah",the language of the Jews; Hebrew,head of a family of Levites who returned from Exile,a Levite who put away his heathen wife,a man who was second in command of Jerusalem; son of Hassenuah of Benjamin,a Levite in charge of the songs of thanksgiving in Nehemiah's time,a leader who helped dedicate Nehemiah's wall,a Levite musician who helped Zechariah of Asaph dedicate Nehemiah's wall
 · Salem the city of Jerusalem,a town where Melchizedek lived
 · Selah a musical notation for crescendo or emphasis by action (IBD)
 · Zion one of the hills on which Jerusalem was built; the temple area; the city of Jerusalem; God's people,a town and citidel; an ancient part of Jerusalem


Topik/Tema Kamus: Asaph | Psalms | PSALMS, BOOK OF | Harp | Praise | Neginoth | God | Jerusalem | Fear of God | GOD, 2 | Meekness | SALEM | Anger | Victories | War | Obedience | Church | Worship | Vows | Heart | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 76:2 - Salem In Jerusalem, which was anciently called Salem.

In Jerusalem, which was anciently called Salem.

Wesley: Psa 76:2 - Zion Largely so called, as it includes Moriah, an adjoining hill.

Largely so called, as it includes Moriah, an adjoining hill.

Wesley: Psa 76:3 - There At Jerusalem.

At Jerusalem.

Wesley: Psa 76:3 - Sword Both offensive and defensive weapons.

Both offensive and defensive weapons.

Wesley: Psa 76:3 - Battle All the power of the army, which was put in battle - array.

All the power of the army, which was put in battle - array.

Wesley: Psa 76:4 - Thou O God.

O God.

Wesley: Psa 76:4 - Than The greatest kings and empires of the earth, which in prophetic writings are often compared to mountains. And they are called mountains of prey, becau...

The greatest kings and empires of the earth, which in prophetic writings are often compared to mountains. And they are called mountains of prey, because they generally were established by tyranny, and maintained by preying upon their own subjects, or other kingdoms.

Wesley: Psa 76:5 - Sleep Even a perpetual sleep.

Even a perpetual sleep.

Wesley: Psa 76:6 - Chariot The men who rode upon, and fought from chariots and horses.

The men who rode upon, and fought from chariots and horses.

Wesley: Psa 76:8 - Thou Didst execute judgment upon thine enemies, by an angel from heaven: which is said to be heard, either because it was accompanied with thunders and ear...

Didst execute judgment upon thine enemies, by an angel from heaven: which is said to be heard, either because it was accompanied with thunders and earthquakes, or because the fame of it was quickly spread abroad.

Wesley: Psa 76:8 - Feared The rest of the world were afraid to disturb Israel.

The rest of the world were afraid to disturb Israel.

Wesley: Psa 76:10 - Surely The furious attempts of thine enemies, shall cause thy people and others to praise thee for thy admirable wisdom, power, and faithfulness.

The furious attempts of thine enemies, shall cause thy people and others to praise thee for thy admirable wisdom, power, and faithfulness.

Wesley: Psa 76:11 - Vow A sacrifice of thanksgiving for this wonderful deliverance.

A sacrifice of thanksgiving for this wonderful deliverance.

Wesley: Psa 76:11 - Let all All the neighboring nations submit to the God of Israel.

All the neighboring nations submit to the God of Israel.

Wesley: Psa 76:12 - Cut off As men do their grapes in time of vintage; so the Hebrew verb implies.

As men do their grapes in time of vintage; so the Hebrew verb implies.

Wesley: Psa 76:12 - The spirit Their breath and life, as he did in the Assyrian army.

Their breath and life, as he did in the Assyrian army.

JFB: Psa 76:1-2 - -- On Neginoth--(See on Psa 4:1, title). This Psalm commemorates what the preceding anticipates: God's deliverance of His people by a signal interpositio...

On Neginoth--(See on Psa 4:1, title). This Psalm commemorates what the preceding anticipates: God's deliverance of His people by a signal interposition of power against their enemies. The occasion was probably the events narrated in 2Ki 19:35; Isa. 37:1-28. (Compare Psa 46:1-11). (Psa 76:1-12)

These well-known terms denote God's people and Church and His intimate and glorious relations to them.

JFB: Psa 76:2 - Salem (Gen 14:18) is Jerusalem.

(Gen 14:18) is Jerusalem.

JFB: Psa 76:3 - brake . . . the arrows Literally, "thunderbolts" (Psa 78:48), from their rapid flight or ignition (compare Psa 18:14; Eph 6:16).

Literally, "thunderbolts" (Psa 78:48), from their rapid flight or ignition (compare Psa 18:14; Eph 6:16).

JFB: Psa 76:3 - the battle For arms (Hos 2:18).

For arms (Hos 2:18).

JFB: Psa 76:4 - Thou God.

God.

JFB: Psa 76:4 - mountains of prey Great victorious nations, as Assyria (Isa 41:15; Eze 38:11-12; Zec 4:7).

Great victorious nations, as Assyria (Isa 41:15; Eze 38:11-12; Zec 4:7).

JFB: Psa 76:5 - slept their sleep Died (Psa 13:3).

Died (Psa 13:3).

JFB: Psa 76:5 - none . . . found . . . hands Are powerless.

Are powerless.

JFB: Psa 76:6 - chariot and horse For those fighting on them (compare Psa 68:17).

For those fighting on them (compare Psa 68:17).

JFB: Psa 76:7 - may . . . sight Contend with Thee (Deu 9:4; Jos 7:12).

Contend with Thee (Deu 9:4; Jos 7:12).

JFB: Psa 76:8-9 - -- God's judgment on the wicked is His people's deliverance (Psa 9:12; Psa 10:7).

God's judgment on the wicked is His people's deliverance (Psa 9:12; Psa 10:7).

JFB: Psa 76:10 - -- Man's wrath praises God by its futility before His power.

Man's wrath praises God by its futility before His power.

JFB: Psa 76:10 - restrain Or, "gird"; that is, Thyself, as with a sword, with which to destroy, or as an ornament to Thy praise.

Or, "gird"; that is, Thyself, as with a sword, with which to destroy, or as an ornament to Thy praise.

JFB: Psa 76:11-12 - -- Invite homage to such a God (2Ch 32:23), who can stop the breath of kings and princes when He wills (Dan 5:23).

Invite homage to such a God (2Ch 32:23), who can stop the breath of kings and princes when He wills (Dan 5:23).

Clarke: Psa 76:1 - In Judah is God known In Judah is God known - The true God revealed himself to the Jews. The Israelites, after the separation of the tribes, had the same knowledge, but t...

In Judah is God known - The true God revealed himself to the Jews. The Israelites, after the separation of the tribes, had the same knowledge, but they greatly corrupted the Divine worship; though still God was great, even in Israel.

Clarke: Psa 76:2 - In Salem also is his tabernacle In Salem also is his tabernacle - Salem was the ancient name of Zebus, afterward called Jerusalem. Here was the tabernacle set up; but afterwards, w...

In Salem also is his tabernacle - Salem was the ancient name of Zebus, afterward called Jerusalem. Here was the tabernacle set up; but afterwards, when the temple was built on Mount Zion, there was his habitation. The Psalm was evidently composed after the building of Solomon’ s temple.

Clarke: Psa 76:3 - There brake he the arrows of the bow There brake he the arrows of the bow - רשפי rishphey , the fiery arrows. Arrows, round the heads of which inflammable matter was rolled, and th...

There brake he the arrows of the bow - רשפי rishphey , the fiery arrows. Arrows, round the heads of which inflammable matter was rolled, and then ignited, were used by the ancients, and shot into towns to set them on fire; and were discharged among the towers and wooden works of besiegers. The Romans called them phalaricae; and we find them mentioned by Virgil, Aen. lib. ix., ver. 705: -

Sed magnum stridens contorta phalarica venit

Fulminis acta modo

On this passage Servius describes the phalarica as a dart or spear with a spherical leaden head to which fire was attached. Thrown by a strong hand, it killed those whom it hit, and set fire to buildings, etc. It was called phalarica from the towers called phalae from which it was generally projected. In allusion to these St. Paul speaks of the fiery darts of the devil, Eph 6:16, to the note on which the reader is requested to refer

Clarke: Psa 76:3 - The shield and the sword The shield and the sword - If this refers to the destruction of Sennacherib’ s army, it may be truly said that God rendered useless all their w...

The shield and the sword - If this refers to the destruction of Sennacherib’ s army, it may be truly said that God rendered useless all their warlike instruments, his angel having destroyed 185,000 of them in one night.

Clarke: Psa 76:4 - Than the mountains of prey Than the mountains of prey - This is an address to Mount Zion. Thou art more illustrious and excellent than all the mountains of prey, i.e., where w...

Than the mountains of prey - This is an address to Mount Zion. Thou art more illustrious and excellent than all the mountains of prey, i.e., where wild beasts wander, and prey on those that are more helpless than themselves. Zion was the place where God dwelt; the other mountains were the abode of wild beasts.

Clarke: Psa 76:5 - The stout-hearted are spoiled The stout-hearted are spoiled - The boasting blasphemers, such as Rab-shakeh, and his master Sennacherib, the king of Assyria

The stout-hearted are spoiled - The boasting blasphemers, such as Rab-shakeh, and his master Sennacherib, the king of Assyria

Clarke: Psa 76:5 - They have slept their sleep They have slept their sleep - They were asleep in their tent when the destroying angel, the suffocating wind, destroyed the whole; they over whom it...

They have slept their sleep - They were asleep in their tent when the destroying angel, the suffocating wind, destroyed the whole; they over whom it passed never more awoke

Clarke: Psa 76:5 - None of the men of might None of the men of might - Is not this a strong irony? Where are your mighty men? their boasted armor, etc.?

None of the men of might - Is not this a strong irony? Where are your mighty men? their boasted armor, etc.?

Clarke: Psa 76:6 - At thy rebuke At thy rebuke - It was not by any human means that this immense army was overthrown; it was by the power of God alone. Not only infantry was destroy...

At thy rebuke - It was not by any human means that this immense army was overthrown; it was by the power of God alone. Not only infantry was destroyed, but the cavalry also

Clarke: Psa 76:6 - The chariot and horse The chariot and horse - That is, the chariot horses, as well as the men, wer

The chariot and horse - That is, the chariot horses, as well as the men, wer

Clarke: Psa 76:6 - Cast into a dead sleep Cast into a dead sleep - Were all suffocated in the same night. On the destruction of this mighty host, the reader is requested to refer to the note...

Cast into a dead sleep - Were all suffocated in the same night. On the destruction of this mighty host, the reader is requested to refer to the notes on 2 Kings 19.

Clarke: Psa 76:7 - Thou, even thou, art to be feared Thou, even thou, art to be feared - The Hebrew is simple, but very emphatic: אתה נורא אתה attah nora attah , "Thou art terrible; thou art...

Thou, even thou, art to be feared - The Hebrew is simple, but very emphatic: אתה נורא אתה attah nora attah , "Thou art terrible; thou art."The repetition of the pronoun deepens the sense

Clarke: Psa 76:7 - When once thou art angry? When once thou art angry? - Literally, From the time thou art angry. In the moment thy wrath is kindled, in that moment judgment is executed. How aw...

When once thou art angry? - Literally, From the time thou art angry. In the moment thy wrath is kindled, in that moment judgment is executed. How awful is this consideration! If one hundred and eighty-five thousand men were in one moment destroyed by the wrath of God, canst thou, thou poor, miserable, feeble sinner, resist his will, and turn aside his thunder!

Clarke: Psa 76:8 - Thou didst cause judgment to be heard Thou didst cause judgment to be heard - When God declared by his prophet that the enemy should not prevail, but on the contrary be destroyed, the ea...

Thou didst cause judgment to be heard - When God declared by his prophet that the enemy should not prevail, but on the contrary be destroyed, the earth the land, and by metonymy the inhabitants of the land, were struck with astonishment and terror, so as not to be able to move. The great boaster Sennacherib, who carried terror, dismay and desolation every where, was now struck with dumb amazement; and the angel of the Almighty, in a moment, stopped the breath of those hosts in which he confided.

Clarke: Psa 76:9 - The meek of the earth The meek of the earth - The humbled or oppressed people of the land. The poor Jews, now utterly helpless, and calling upon the Lord for succor.

The meek of the earth - The humbled or oppressed people of the land. The poor Jews, now utterly helpless, and calling upon the Lord for succor.

Clarke: Psa 76:10 - Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee - The rage of Sennacherib shall only serve to manifest thy glory. The stronger he is, and the more he thre...

Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee - The rage of Sennacherib shall only serve to manifest thy glory. The stronger he is, and the more he threatens, and the weaker thy people, the more shall thy majesty and mercy appear in his destruction and their support

Clarke: Psa 76:10 - The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain - The Hebrew gives rather a different sense: "Thou shalt gird thyself with the remainder of wrath."Even a...

The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain - The Hebrew gives rather a different sense: "Thou shalt gird thyself with the remainder of wrath."Even after thou hast sent this signal destruction upon Sennacherib and his army, thou wilt continue to pursue the remnant of the persecutors of thy people; their wrath shall be the cause of the excitement of thy justice to destroy them. As a man girds himself with his girdle, that he may the better perform his work, so thou wilt gird thyself with wrath, that thou mayest destroy thy enemies. A good maxim has been taken from this verse: "God often so counterworks the evil designs of men against his cause and followers, that it turns out to their advantage and his glory; nor does he permit them to go to the extent of what they have purposed, and of what they are able to perform. He suffers them to do some mischief, but not all they would or can do."But how different is the reading of the Vulgate! Quoniam cogitatio hominis confitebitur tibi: et reliquiae cogitationis diem festum agent tibi: "The thought of man shall praise thee; and the remains of thought shall celebrate a feast day to thee."The Septuagint and the Ethiopic have understood the text in the same way. Some translate thus: "Certainly, the ferocity of the man (Sennacherib) shall praise thee: and thou shalt gird thyself with the spoils of the furious."The spoils of this great army shall be a booty for thy people. Probably this is the true notion of the place. The old Psalter renders it thus: For thoght of man sal schrife (confess) to the, and levyngs (remains) of thoght a feste day till the sal wirk. The paraphrase is curious, of which this is the substance: "When man forsakes perfitly his synne, and sithen (afterwards) rightwisness werks; it is a feste day; whenne the conscience is clered, and makes feste with the swetnes of goddes lufe, restand fra besynes of any creatur in erth: Than is God at hame with his spouse dwelland."

Clarke: Psa 76:11 - Vow, and pay unto the Lord Vow, and pay unto the Lord - Bind yourselves to him, and forget not your obligations

Vow, and pay unto the Lord - Bind yourselves to him, and forget not your obligations

Clarke: Psa 76:11 - Let all that be round about him Let all that be round about him - All the neighboring nations, who shall see God’ s judgments against his enemies, shoul

Let all that be round about him - All the neighboring nations, who shall see God’ s judgments against his enemies, shoul

Clarke: Psa 76:11 - Bring presents unto him Bring presents unto him - Give him that homage which is due unto him

Bring presents unto him - Give him that homage which is due unto him

Clarke: Psa 76:11 - That ought to be feared That ought to be feared - למורא lammora , "to the terrible One;"lest they be consumed as the Assyrians have been.

That ought to be feared - למורא lammora , "to the terrible One;"lest they be consumed as the Assyrians have been.

Clarke: Psa 76:12 - He shall cut off the spirit of princes He shall cut off the spirit of princes - Even in the midst of their conquests, he can fill them with terror and dismay, or cut them off in their car...

He shall cut off the spirit of princes - Even in the midst of their conquests, he can fill them with terror and dismay, or cut them off in their career of victory

Clarke: Psa 76:12 - He is terrible to the icings of the earth He is terrible to the icings of the earth - " He is the only Ruler of princes;"to him they must account. And a terrible account most of them will ha...

He is terrible to the icings of the earth - " He is the only Ruler of princes;"to him they must account. And a terrible account most of them will have to give to the great God; especially those who, instigated by the desire of dominion, have, in the lust of conquest which it generates, laid countries waste by fire and sword, making widows and orphans without number, and extending the empire of desolation and death

Thus all are under his dominion, and are accountable to him. Even those whom man cannot bring to justice, God will; and to judge them is one grand use of a final judgment day

Calvin: Psa 76:1 - God is known in Judah 1.God is known in Judah In the outset, we are taught that it was not by human means that the enemies of Israel were compelled to retire without accom...

1.God is known in Judah In the outset, we are taught that it was not by human means that the enemies of Israel were compelled to retire without accomplishing any thing, but by the ever-to-be-remembered aid of Jehovah. Whence came that knowledge of God and the greatness of his name which are spoken of, but because He stretched forth his hand in an extraordinary manner, to make it openly manifest that both the chosen people and the city were under his defense and protection? It is therefore asserted, that the glory of God was conspicuously displayed when the enemies of Israel were discomfited by such a miraculous interposition.

Calvin: Psa 76:2 - And his tabernacle was in Salem 2.And his tabernacle was in Salem Here the reason is assigned why God, putting the Assyrians to flight, vouchsafed to deliver the city of Jerusalem, ...

2.And his tabernacle was in Salem Here the reason is assigned why God, putting the Assyrians to flight, vouchsafed to deliver the city of Jerusalem, and to take it under his protection. The reason is, because he had there chosen for himself a dwelling-place, in which his name was to be called upon. The amount, in short, is, first, that men had no ground to arrogate to themselves any share in the deliverance of the city here portrayed, God having strikingly showed that all the glory was his own, by displaying from heaven his power in the sight of all men; and, secondly, that he was induced to oppose his enemies from no other consideration but that of his free choice of the Jewish nation. God having, by this example, testified that his power is invincible for preserving his Church, it is a call and an encouragement to all the faithful to repose with confidence under his shadow. If his name is precious to himself, it is no ordinary pledge and security which he gives to our faith when he assures us that it is his will that the greatness of his power should be known in the preservation of his Church. Moreover, as the Church is a distinguished theater on which the Divine glory is displayed, we must always take the greatest care not to shroud or bury in forgetfulness, by our ingratitude, the benefits which have been bestowed upon it, and especially those which ought to be held in remembrance in all ages. Farther, although God is not now worshipped in the visible tabernacle, yet as by Christ he still dwells in the midst of us, yea even within us, we will doubtless experience, whenever we are exposed to danger, that under his protection we are in perfect safety. If the earthly sanctuary of Jerusalem afforded to God’s ancient people succor while it stood, we may rest assured that he will have no less care of us who live in the present day, when we consider that he has vouchsafed to choose us as his temples in which he may dwell by his Holy Spirit. Here the prophet, in speaking of Jerusalem, uses merely the name of Salem, which was the simple and uncompounded name of the city, and had been applied to it very anciently, as appears from Gen 14:18. Some think that the name in the course of time assumed its compound form, by having Jebus prefixed to Salem; for Jebus was the name by which it was afterwards known in the intervening period, as we learn from the Book of Judges, Jud 19:10, it being so called because it was inhabited by the Jebusites. But we will be more correct as to the etymology of the word, if we derive it from the verb יראה , yereh, which signifies will see, 267 because Abraham said,

“God will look out for himself a lamb for a burnt-offering,” (Gen 22:8.)

Calvin: Psa 76:3 - There he broke the arrows of the bow 3.There he broke the arrows of the bow We have here stated the particular way in which God was known in Judah. He was known by the wonderful proofs o...

3.There he broke the arrows of the bow We have here stated the particular way in which God was known in Judah. He was known by the wonderful proofs of his power, which he exhibited in preserving the city. Under these figures is described the destruction of the enemies of the chosen people. 268 They could not otherwise have been overthrown than by being despoiled of their armor and weapons of war. It is therefore said, that the arrows, the swords, and the shields, were broken, yea, all the implements of war; implying that these impious enemies of the Church were deprived of the power of doing harm. The fact indeed is, that they were wounded and slain, while their weapons remained uninjured; but this metonymy, by which what befell themselves is represented as happening to their implements of war, is not improper. Some translate the word רשפים , reshaphim, points of weapons! Properly, it should be rendered fires; 269 but it is more accurate to take it for arrows. Even birds are sometimes metaphorically so called, on account of their swiftness; and flying is attributed to arrows in Psa 91:6

Calvin: Psa 76:4 - NO PHRASE It is farther added, (verse 4th,) that God is more glorious and terrible than the mountains of prey By the mountains of prey, is meant kingdoms d...

It is farther added, (verse 4th,) that God is more glorious and terrible than the mountains of prey By the mountains of prey, is meant kingdoms distinguished for their violence and extortion. We know that from the beginning, he who exercised himself most in robbery and pillage, was the man who most enlarged his borders and became greatest. The Psalmist, therefore, here compares those great kings, who had acquired large dominions by violence and the shedding of human blood, to savage beasts, who live only upon prey, and their kingdoms to mountains covered with forests, which are inhabited by beasts inured to live by the destruction of other animals. The enemies of God’s ancient people had been accustomed to make violent and furious assaults upon Jerusalem; but it is affirmed that God greatly surpassed them all in power that the faithful might not be overwhelmed with terror.

Calvin: Psa 76:5 - The stout-hearted were spoiled, 5.The stout-hearted were spoiled, The power of God in destroying his enemies is here exalted by another form of expression. The verb אשתוללו ...

5.The stout-hearted were spoiled, The power of God in destroying his enemies is here exalted by another form of expression. The verb אשתוללו , eshtolelu, which we translate were spoiled, is derived from שלל , shalal, and the letter א , aleph, is put instead of the letter ה , he. 270 Some translate, were made fools; 271 but this is too forced. I, however, admit that it is of the same import, as if it had been said, that they were deprived of wisdom and courage; but we must adhere to the proper signification of the word. What is added in the second clause is to the same purpose, All the men of might have not found their hands 272 that is to say, they were as incapable of fighting as if their hands had been maimed or cut off. In short, their strength, of which they boasted, was utterly overthrown. The words, they slept their sleep, 273 refer to the same subject; implying that whereas before they were active and resolute, their hearts now failed them, and they were sunk asleep in sloth and listlessness. The meaning, therefore, is, that the enemies of the chosen people were deprived of that heroic courage of which they boasted, and which inspired them with such audacity; and that, in consequence, neither mind, nor heart, nor hands, none either of their mental or bodily faculties, could perform their office. We are thus taught that all the gifts and power which men seem to possess are in the hand of God, so that he can, at any instant of time, deprive them of the wisdom which he has given them, make their hearts effeminate, render their hands unfit for war, and annihilate their whole strength. It is not without reason that both the courage and power of these enemies are magnified; the design of this being, that the faithful might be led, from the contrast, to extol the power and working of God. The same subject is farther confirmed from the statement, that the chariot and the horse were cast into a deep sleep at the rebuke of God 274 This implies, that whatever activity characterised these enemies, it was rendered powerless, simply by the nod of God. Although, therefore, we may be deprived of all created means of help, let us rest contented with the favor of God alone, accounting it all-sufficient, since he has no need of great armies to repel the assaults of the whole world, but is able, by the mere breath of his mouth, to subdue and dissipate all assailants.

Calvin: Psa 76:7 - Thou, even thou, art terrible 7.Thou, even thou, art terrible The repetition of the pronoun Thou, is intended to exclude all others from what is here predicated of God, as if it...

7.Thou, even thou, art terrible The repetition of the pronoun Thou, is intended to exclude all others from what is here predicated of God, as if it had been said, Whatever power there is in the world, it at once vanishes away, and is reduced to nothing, when He comes forth and manifests himself; and, therefore, He alone is terrible. This is confirmed by the comparison added immediately after, which intimates that, although the wicked are so filled with pride as to be ready to burst with it, yet they are unable to abide the look and presence of God. But as he sometimes keeps silence, and seems merely to look on as an idle spectator, it is expressly asserted, that as soon as he begins to be angry, ruin will be near all the wicked. Although they may then for a time not only stand, but also rise above the clouds by their fury, we are here, notwithstanding, admonished that we ought to wait for the time of wrath. Let us also mark that this terror is denounced against the wicked in such a manner as that it sweetly draws all true believers to God.

Calvin: Psa 76:8 - From heaven thou hast made thy judgment to be heard 8.From heaven thou hast made thy judgment to be heard By the name of heaven, the Psalmist forcibly intimates that the judgment of God was too manif...

8.From heaven thou hast made thy judgment to be heard By the name of heaven, the Psalmist forcibly intimates that the judgment of God was too manifest to admit of the possibility of its being ascribed either to fortune or to the policy of men. Sometimes God executes his judgments obscurely, so that they seem to proceed out of the earth. For example, when he raises up a godly and courageous prince, the holy and lawful administration which will flourish under the reign of such a prince will be the judgment of God, but it will not be vividly seen to proceed from heaven. As, therefore, the assistance spoken of was of an extraordinary kind, it is distinguished by special commendation. The same remarks apply to the hearing of God’s judgment, of which the Psalmist speaks. It is more for the divine judgments to sound aloud like a peal of thunder, and to stun the ears of all men with their noise, than if they were merely seen with the eyes. There is here, I have no doubt, an allusion to those mighty thunder-claps by which men are stricken with fear. 280 When it is said, the earth was still, it is properly to be referred to the ungodly, who, being panic-struck, yield the victory to God, and dare no longer to rage as they had been accustomed to do. It is only fear which has the effect of bringing them to subjection; and, accordingly, fear is justly represented as the cause of this stillness. It is not meant that they restrain themselves willingly, but that God compels them whether they will or no. The amount is, that whenever God thunders from heaven, the tumults which the insolence of the ungodly stir up, when things are in a state of confusion, come to an end. We are, at the same time, warned of what men may expect to gain by their rebellion; for, whoever despise the paternal voice of God which is loudly uttered, must be destroyed by the bolts of his wrath.

Calvin: Psa 76:9 - When God arose to judgment 9.When God arose to judgment The great object which God had in view in executing this judgment is now declared; which was, that he might furnish a pr...

9.When God arose to judgment The great object which God had in view in executing this judgment is now declared; which was, that he might furnish a proof of his fatherly love towards all his people. He is, therefore, introduced as speaking, not with his mouth, but with his hand, that he may show to all how precious in his sight is the salvation of all who fear and love him. Under the word arise, there is a reference to the inactivity and indolency ascribed by wicked men to God, an opinion which had led them to take so much liberty to themselves. God is then said to ascend into his judgment-seat, when he plainly indicates that he exercises a special care over his Church. The design of the passage is to show that it is as impossible for God to forsake the afflicted and innocent, as it is impossible for him to deny himself. It is to be observed that he is termed Judge, because he affords succor to the poor who are unrighteously oppressed. The appellation of the meek or humble of the earth is applied to the faithful, who, subdued by afflictions, seek not high things, but, with humble groaning, patiently bear the burden of the cross. The best fruit of afflictions is, when thereby we are brought to purge our minds from all arrogance, and to bend them to meekness and modesty. When such is the effect, we may conclude with certainty that we are under the guardianship and protection of God, and that he is ready to extend his aid and favor towards us.

Calvin: Psa 76:10 - Surely the wrath of men shall praise thee 10.Surely the wrath of men shall praise thee Some understand these words as denoting, that after these enemies shall have submitted to God, they will...

10.Surely the wrath of men shall praise thee Some understand these words as denoting, that after these enemies shall have submitted to God, they will yield to him the praise of the victory; being constrained to acknowledge that they have been subdued by his mighty hand. Others elicit a more refined sense, That when God stirs up the wicked, and impels their fury, he in this way affords a most illustrious display of his own glory; even as he is said to have stirred up the heart of Pharaoh for this very purpose, (Exo 14:4; Rom 9:17.) Understood in this sense, the text no doubt contains a profitable doctrine, but this being, I am afraid, too refined an explanation, I prefer considering the meaning simply to be, that although at first the rage of the enemies of God and his Church may throw all things into confusion, and, as it were, envelop them in darkness, yet all will at length redound to his praise; for the issue will make it manifest, that, whatever they may contrive and attempt, they cannot in any degree prevail against him. The concluding part of the verse, The remainder of wrath thou wilt restrain, may also be interpreted in two ways. As the word חגר , chagar, signifies to gird, some supply the pronoun thee, and give this sense, All the enemies of the Church are not yet overthrown; but thou, O God! wilt gird thyself to destroy those of them who remain. The other interpretation is, however, the more simple., which is, that although these enemies might not cease to breathe forth their cruelty, yet God would effectually restrain them, and prevent them from succeeding in the accomplishment of their enterprises. 281 Perhaps, also, it would not be unsuitable to explain the verb thus, Thou wilt gather into a bundle, as we say in French, “ Tu trousseras,” i.e., Thou wilt truss or pack up. Let us therefore learn, while the wicked would involve in obscurity and doubt the providence of God, to wait patiently until he glorify himself by bringing about a happier state of things, and trample under foot their infatuated presumption, to their shame and confusion. But if new troubles arise from time to time, let us remember that it is his proper office to restrain the remainder of the wrath of the wicked, that they may not proceed to greater lengths. Meanwhile, let us not be surprised if we observe fresh outrages every now and then springing forth; for, even to the end of the world, Satan will always have partisans or agents, whom he will urge forward to molest the children of God.

Calvin: Psa 76:11 - Vow and pay to Jehovah your God 11.Vow and pay to Jehovah your God The faithful are now exhorted to the exercise of gratitude. As under the law the custom prevailed among the Jews o...

11.Vow and pay to Jehovah your God The faithful are now exhorted to the exercise of gratitude. As under the law the custom prevailed among the Jews of vowing sacrifices for singular blessings which God had conferred upon them, by which they solemnly acknowledged that their safety depended solely upon him, and that to him they were entirely indebted for it, they are called anew to engage in this exercise of religion; and by the word pay it is intended to inculcate steadfastness, — to teach them that they should not make merely a sudden and inconsiderate acknowledgement, but that they should also testify at all times that the remembrance of their deliverance was deeply fixed in their hearts. Their most important business, no doubt, was seriously to reflect with themselves that God was the author of their salvation; but still it is to be observed, that the solemn profession of religion, by which every man stimulates not only himself but also others to the performance of their duty, is far from being superfluous. In the second clause, those addressed seem to be the neighboring nations; as if it had been said, that such a special manifestation of the goodness of God was worthy of being celebrated even by foreign and uncircumcised nations. 282 But it appears to me, that the sense most agreeable to the context is, that these words are addressed either to the Levites or to all the posterity of Abraham, both of whom are not improperly said to be round about God, both because the tabernacle was pitched in the midst of the camp so long as the Israelites traveled in the wilderness, and also because the resting-place assigned for the ark was mount Zion, whither the people were accustomed to resort from all the surrounding parts of the country. And the Levites had intrusted to them the charge of the temple, and were appointed to keep watch and ward round about it. The word למורא , lammora, is referred to God by the majority of interpreters, and they translate it terrible. The term fear is, however, sometimes taken in a passive sense for God himself. 283 If it is applied to the Gentiles and to irreligious men, 284 the sense will be, that they shall be tributaries to God; because, being stricken with fear, they shall no longer dare to offer him any resistance. But it is more probable that this word has a reference to God, whom the prophet justly declares to be worthy of being feared, after having given such a remarkable proof of his power.

Calvin: Psa 76:12 - He will cut off 12.He will cut off 285 the spirit of princes. As the Hebrew word בצר , batsar, occasionally signifies to strengthen, some think it should b...

12.He will cut off 285 the spirit of princes. As the Hebrew word בצר , batsar, occasionally signifies to strengthen, some think it should be so translated in this passage. But as in the two clauses of the verse the same sentiment is repeated, I have no doubt that by the first clause is meant that understanding and wisdom are taken away from princes; and that by the second, God is represented in general as terrible to them, because he will cast them down headlong from their loftiness. As the first thing necessary to conduct an enterprise to a prosperous issue is to possess sound foresight, in which the people of God are often deficient from the great perplexity in which they are involved in the midst of their distresses, while, on the other hand, the ungodly are too sharp-sighted in their crafty schemes; it is here declared that it is in the power of God to deprive of understanding, and to inflict blindness on those who seem to surpass others in acuteness and ingenuity. The majority of princes being enemies to the Church of God, it is expressly affirmed, that He is sufficiently terrible to subdue all the kings of the earth. When it is said, that their spirit is cut off, or taken away from them, it is to be limited to tyrants and robbers whom God infatuates, because he sees that they apply all their ingenuity and counsels to do mischief.

Defender: Psa 76:2 - Salem This is the only place in the Old Testament where the name of "Jerusalem" ("the City of Peace") is abbreviated to "Salem" (or simply "Peace"). Since t...

This is the only place in the Old Testament where the name of "Jerusalem" ("the City of Peace") is abbreviated to "Salem" (or simply "Peace"). Since this psalm is looking forward to the millennium when God "shall speak peace" (Zec 9:10) to all nations, and "out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem" (Isa 2:3), the city may then be known simply as Salem. It is true that Melchizedek was called "the king of Salem" in the days of Abraham (Gen 14:18), but this was probably a theophany, not referring to an earthly city at all but to the heavenly city (see notes on Heb 7:2)."

Defender: Psa 76:10 - wrath of man In ways beyond our present comprehension, God will receive greater glory in eternity because He has allowed sin and human rebellion for a season than ...

In ways beyond our present comprehension, God will receive greater glory in eternity because He has allowed sin and human rebellion for a season than if He had never permitted it at all. We shall know Him as Savior as well as Creator if He allows it just for a season and "the remainder of wrath thou shall restrain.""

TSK: Psa 76:1 - A Psalm // of Asaph // In Judah // his A Psalm : This Psalm is entitled in the Septuagint, which is followed by the Vulgate and Appollinarius, Ωδη προς τον Ασσυριον ,...

A Psalm : This Psalm is entitled in the Septuagint, which is followed by the Vulgate and Appollinarius, Ωδη προς τον Ασσυριον , ""An ode against the Assyrian;""and it is considered by many of the best commentators to have been composed by Asaph after the defeat of Sennacherib.

of Asaph : or, for Asaph

In Judah : Psa 48:1-3, Psa 147:19, Psa 147:20; Deu 4:7, Deu 4:8, Deu 4:34-36; Act 17:23; Rom 2:17-29, Rom 3:1, Rom 3:2

his : Psa 98:2, Psa 98:3, Psa 148:13, Psa 148:14; 1Ch 29:10-12; 2Ch 2:5, 2Ch 2:6; Dan 3:29, Dan 4:1, Dan 4:2

TSK: Psa 76:2 - Salem // dwelling Salem : Gen 14:18; Heb 7:1, Heb 7:2 dwelling : Psa 132:13, Psa 132:14; 2Ch 6:6; Isa 12:6

TSK: Psa 76:3 - There There : Psa 46:9; 2Ch 14:12, 2Ch 14:13, 2Ch 20:25, 2Ch 32:21; Isa 37:35, Isa 37:36; Eze 39:3, Eze 39:4, Eze 39:9, Eze 39:10

TSK: Psa 76:4 - mountains mountains : Jer 4:7; Eze 19:1-4, Eze 19:6, Eze 38:12, Eze 38:13; Dan 7:4-8, Dan 7:17-28

TSK: Psa 76:5 - stouthearted // they // and stouthearted : Job 40:10-12; Isa 46:12; Dan 4:37; Luk 1:51, Luk 1:52 they : Psa 13:3; Isa 37:36; Jer 51:39; Nah 3:18 and : Isa 31:8; Eze 30:21-25

TSK: Psa 76:6 - At thy // both // dead At thy : Psa 18:15, Psa 80:16, Psa 104:7; Exo 15:1, Exo 15:21 both : Exo 14:27, Exo 14:28, Exo 15:4-6, Exo 15:10; 2Sa 10:18; Isa 37:36; Eze 39:20; Nah...

TSK: Psa 76:7 - even thou // who // when even thou : Psa 89:7; Jer 10:7-10; Mat 10:28; Rev 14:7, Rev 15:4 who : Psa 90:11; Nah 1:6; 1Co 10:22; Rev 6:16, Rev 6:17 when : Psa 2:12

TSK: Psa 76:8 - didst // still didst : Exo 19:10; Jdg 5:20; 2Ch 32:20-22; Eze 38:20-23 still : Psa 46:10; 2Ch 20:29, 2Ch 20:30; Hab 2:20; Zec 2:13

TSK: Psa 76:9 - When // to save When : Psa 9:7-9, Psa 72:4, Psa 82:2-5; Isa 11:4; Jer 5:28 to save : Psa 25:9, Psa 149:4; Zep 2:3; Mat 5:5; 1Pe 3:4

TSK: Psa 76:10 - Surely // remainder Surely : Gen 37:18-20, Gen 37:26-28, Gen 50:20; Exo 9:16, Exo 9:17, Exo 15:9-11, Exo 18:11; Dan 3:19, Dan 3:20; Act 4:26-28; Rev 11:18 remainder : Psa...

TSK: Psa 76:11 - Vow // let all // unto him Vow : Psa 50:14, Psa 119:106; Num 30:2; Ecc 5:4-6 let all : Psa 68:29, Psa 89:7; Deu 16:16; 2Ch 32:22, 2Ch 32:23 unto him : Heb. to fear, Gen 31:42

TSK: Psa 76:12 - He shall // terrible He shall : Psa 2:5, Psa 2:10, Psa 48:4-6, Psa 68:12, Psa 68:35; Jos 5:1; 2Ch 32:21; Zep 3:6 terrible : Isa 13:6-8, Isa 24:21; Rev 6:15, Rev 19:17-21

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Psa 76:1 - Is great Or, for Asaph . Either it was composed by the prophet Asaph; or composed by David, or some other holy prophet of God, and committed to Asaph, or to ...

Or, for Asaph . Either it was composed by the prophet Asaph; or composed by David, or some other holy prophet of God, and committed to Asaph, or to his posterity; it being usual to put the parent’ s name for his children, of which I have formerly given divers instances. The special. and immediate occasion of this Psalm was unquestionably some eminent deliverance vouchsafed by God to his people of Israel, and especially to Jerusalem, which the psalmist thought fit to celebrate; but which and when it was is both needless to inquire, and hard to determine.

A declaration of God’ s majesty and gracious presence in his church, Psa 76:1-5 . At his rebuke the enemy spoils, and by his arm the meek are saved, Psa 76:6-10 . An exhortation to serve him with reverence, Psa 76:11,12 .

God’ s people do not worship an unknown God, as the Athenians did, Act 17:23 , but one who hath made himself known, not only by his word and ordinances, but also by the glorious effects of his wisdom and power on their behalf, and against their potent and malicious enemies.

Is great i.e. famous and renowned, and greatly to be praised and admired.

Poole: Psa 76:2 - In Salem // Zion In Salem in Jerusalem, which was anciently called Salem , Gen 14:18 Heb 7:1 . Zion largely so called, as it includes Moriah, an adjoining hill, or...

In Salem in Jerusalem, which was anciently called Salem , Gen 14:18 Heb 7:1 .

Zion largely so called, as it includes Moriah, an adjoining hill, or another branch of the same hill.

Poole: Psa 76:3 - There // The arrows // The battle There i.e. in Judah, or at or near Jerusalem. The arrows Heb. the sparks ; the sparkling arrows, bright and shining, swift and piercing, like spar...

There i.e. in Judah, or at or near Jerusalem.

The arrows Heb. the sparks ; the sparkling arrows, bright and shining, swift and piercing, like sparks of fire. The bow, the shield, and the sword ; both offensive and defensive weapons, so as they could neither hurt God’ s people, nor save themselves from ruin.

The battle the force and fury of the battle, and all the power of the army, which was put in battle-array.

Poole: Psa 76:4 - Thou // Than the mountains of prey Thou O God; to whom he directeth his speech here, as also Psa 76:6-8 . Than the mountains of prey either, 1. Than the greatest kings and emperors ...

Thou O God; to whom he directeth his speech here, as also Psa 76:6-8 .

Than the mountains of prey either,

1. Than the greatest kings and emperors of the earth, which in prophetical writings are oft compared to mountains, as Psa 46:2,3 Isa 41:15 Jer 51:25 Hab 3:6 . And they are called mountains of prey, because then they generally were established by tyranny, and maintained by preying upon their own subjects, or other inferior kingdoms. Or,

2. (which amounts to the same thing) Than the most powerful enemies of thy people, upon whom they used and now desired and expected to prey; such persons being oft expressed by the name of mountains, as Psa 144:5 Zec 4:7 , &c.

Poole: Psa 76:5 - Are spoiled // Their sleep Are spoiled of all that glory and advantage which they either had already gotten, or further expected, from the success of their present expedition, ...

Are spoiled of all that glory and advantage which they either had already gotten, or further expected, from the success of their present expedition, which they promised to themselves. They became a prey to those upon whom they hoped to prey.

Their sleep even a perpetual sleep, as Jer 51:39,57 , or the sleep of death , Psa 13:3 ; called their sleep emphatically , as being peculiar to them and such-like men, and not that sleep which is common to the good and bad. Their death he seems to call sleep , because they were slain in the night, when they had composed themselves to rest and sleep, and so passed insensibly from one sleep to another. For it is thought by many that this Psalm was composed upon the occasion of that prodigious slaughter of the Assyrians in Judah, 2Ki 19:35 . None have found their hands ; they had no more strength in or use of their hands against the destroying angel, than they who have no hands.

Poole: Psa 76:6 - The chariot and horse The chariot and horse the men who rode upon and fought from chariots and horses, who fight with most advantage, and usually have most courage; and mu...

The chariot and horse the men who rode upon and fought from chariots and horses, who fight with most advantage, and usually have most courage; and much more unable were their footmen to resist or avoid the stroke.

Poole: Psa 76:7 - Stand in thy sight Stand in thy sight to wit, to contend with thee. Standing is here opposed to flight or failing before the enemy. See Jos 7:12 Dan 8:4 .

Stand in thy sight to wit, to contend with thee. Standing is here opposed to flight or failing before the enemy. See Jos 7:12 Dan 8:4 .

Poole: Psa 76:8 - -- Thou didst execute judgment upon thine enemies by an angel sent from heaven; which is said to be heard, either because that was accompanied with ter...

Thou didst execute judgment upon thine enemies by an angel sent from heaven; which is said to be heard, either because that was accompanied with terrible thunders and earthquakes, which was not unusual in the descent of an angel, as Mat 28:2 , and elsewhere; or because the fame of it was quickly spread abroad in the land, and in the world. The effect of this terrible judgment was, that the rest of the world were afraid to invade or disturb the land and people of Israel, and chose rather to sit still in their own territories.

Poole: Psa 76:9 - When God arose to judgement // To save all the meek of the earth When God arose to judgement when God, who for a season had sat still, began to bestir and show himself against his enemies. Or, after God had risen ...

When God arose to judgement when God, who for a season had sat still, began to bestir and show himself against his enemies. Or, after God had risen , &c. Or, because God did arise , &c.

To save all the meek of the earth to save all the godly persons (who are oft called meek ones, as hath been noted again and again) in Israel, for whose sakes God wrought this great deliverance, which reached to all the people of the land.

Poole: Psa 76:10 - The wrath of man shall praise thee // The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain // the remainder of wrath thou shalt gird thyself with The wrath of man shall praise thee the blasphemous speeches and furious attempts of thine enemies shall serve thy glory, and cause thy people and oth...

The wrath of man shall praise thee the blasphemous speeches and furious attempts of thine enemies shall serve thy glory, and cause thy people and others to praise and magnify thee for that admirable wisdom, and power, and faithfulness, and goodness which thou shalt discover upon that occasion.

The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain thou shalt prevent and disappoint the succeeding malicious designs of thine enemies, who will meditate revenge for those shameful and terrible overthrows. Or,

the remainder of wrath thou shalt gird thyself with i.e. put it on as an ornament, which the girdle was; thou shalt adorn thyself with it, as a conqueror doth with the spoils of his enemies.

Poole: Psa 76:11 - Vow // All that be round about him // Him that ought to be feared Vow a sacrifice of thanksgiving; either at this time, for this wonderful deliverance; or hereafter, in all your future straits and troubles. Let this...

Vow a sacrifice of thanksgiving; either at this time, for this wonderful deliverance; or hereafter, in all your future straits and troubles. Let this experience encourage you to make such vows to God with confidence of success. But when God hath accepted your vows, and given you the desired deliverance, forget not to pay your vows.

All that be round about him either,

1. All the tribes of Israel, who have the benefit of this mercy. Or rather,

2. All the neighbouring nations on every side, to whom the fame of this mighty work of God shall come, I advise them for the future, if they love themselves, to cease from all hostilities against God or his people, and to submit themselves to the God of Israel.

Him that ought to be feared whom though they do not love, yet they see and feel that they have great reason to fear and to seek his favour.

Poole: Psa 76:12 - Cut off // The spirit of princes Cut off as men do their grapes in time of vintage, as the Hebrew verb implies, to wit, suddenly, violently, and irresistibly. This is all which they ...

Cut off as men do their grapes in time of vintage, as the Hebrew verb implies, to wit, suddenly, violently, and irresistibly. This is all which they shall get by opposing him, and therefore it is their wisdom to bring presents to him.

The spirit of princes either,

1 Their courage. Or rather,

2. Their breath and life, as he did in the Assyrian army.

PBC: Psa 76:10 - -- God lets sinful man’s wrath go so far, uses it for His own purposes, and then restrains the remainder. If God so chose, he could always keep men fro...

God lets sinful man’s wrath go so far, uses it for His own purposes, and then restrains the remainder. If God so chose, he could always keep men from sinning against Him. When Sarah was in danger because of Abraham’s lapse of faith, Abimelech was going to take her to be one of his wives, but God protected her. The only reason that Abimelech did not defile her, as God later said to him, was that " I also withheld thee from sinning against me: therefore suffered I thee not to touch her." God could always do that if He desired to do so.

See PBtop: GOD IS SOVEREIGN

Haydock: Psa 76:1 - Inventions The faithful have recourse to God in trouble of mind, with confidence in his mercy and power. Inventions. Protestants, "doings," (Haydock) or the s...

The faithful have recourse to God in trouble of mind, with confidence in his mercy and power.

Inventions. Protestants, "doings," (Haydock) or the secrets of Providence, (Calmet) and his "affections." (St. Augustine) ---

The just find an interest in all his works, (Berthier) as the work together for their salvation, Romans viii. 28. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 76:1 - Idithun Idithun. Hebrew, "upon Idithun," was not formerly in the text. (St. Jerome) --- It may be the name of an instrument, (Bellarmine) or tune, (Muis) ...

Idithun. Hebrew, "upon Idithun," was not formerly in the text. (St. Jerome) ---

It may be the name of an instrument, (Bellarmine) or tune, (Muis) or this master of music and Asaph might sing alternately. There is nothing certain; (Menochius) though some would hence conclude, that Asaph was the author. The occasion of the psalm is also unknown, and may be applied to all the afflicted servants of God, (Berthier) or to the captives. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 76:2 - To God To God. These repetitions denote fervour, (Calmet) and that God alone must be the object of our desire. (St. Augustine)

To God. These repetitions denote fervour, (Calmet) and that God alone must be the object of our desire. (St. Augustine)

Haydock: Psa 76:3 - Deceived // Comforted Deceived, in my expectations, as I prayed with mind and body continually. (Worthington) --- Good works are a strong recommendation. "They cry, tho...

Deceived, in my expectations, as I prayed with mind and body continually. (Worthington) ---

Good works are a strong recommendation. "They cry, though we be silent." Many have recourse to the great for assistance, and few to God. Yet in isto invenio omnia. (St. Jerome) ---

Hebrew is variously translated, and may have been altered. "My hand fell in the night, and ceased not." Symmachus and St. Jerome come near to the Vulgate. (Calmet) ---

They have, "and does not cease," which would be the case, if the person were deceived or rejected. (Berthier) ---

Protestants, "my sore ran," &c. (Haydock) ---

But this seems rather violent. (Calmet) ---

Comforted. By any worldly advantages. (Menochius) ---

Joy can come from God alone. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 76:4 - Delighted Delighted. Hebrew, "cried out," which many explain through sorrow. But the Septuagint seem rather to take it in a different sense, as well as the s...

Delighted. Hebrew, "cried out," which many explain through sorrow. But the Septuagint seem rather to take it in a different sense, as well as the swooning, which might proceed from ecstatic joy (Berthier) at the thought of God. The alternate sorrows and joys of the just are well described. They are seldom allowed to continue long in the same state. Protestants, "I complained, and my spirit was overwhelmed. Selah." St. Jerome, "I spoke within myself," exercising myself in meditation. (Haydock) ---

I was sometimes in such distress, that nothing seemed capable of giving me any comfort. But I relied on God, and was in an ecstacy. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 76:5 - My eyes My eyes. Vatican Septuagint, Arabic, and St. Augustine read, "my enemies," but our Vulgate follows the edition of Aldus and Complutensian (Berthier)...

My eyes. Vatican Septuagint, Arabic, and St. Augustine read, "my enemies," but our Vulgate follows the edition of Aldus and Complutensian (Berthier) very frequently, which here agree better with the Hebrew, "I hindered my eyes from looking up;" (St. Jerome; Symmachus) or, "thou hast kept the watches of my eyes," (Aquila) hindering me from sleeping; (Haydock) so that I did not watch three hours only, like the sentinels, but all night. (Calmet) ---

The sudden address to God seems incorrect. (Berthier) ---

I rose before the usual time, yet did not utter my sentiments, (Worthington) being quite oppressed both with grief and joy. (Haydock) ---

I durst not speak, as I was convinced that thy judgments were right. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 76:6 - Of old // Years Of old. And the favours which had been heaped on the nation. (Calmet) --- Years. Both past and future times; (Haydock) yea, eternity itself, the...

Of old. And the favours which had been heaped on the nation. (Calmet) ---

Years. Both past and future times; (Haydock) yea, eternity itself, the great occupation of life. (St. Augustine) (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 76:7 - Heart // Scopebam Heart. Septuagint have read differently from the present [Hebrew]. (Berthier) --- Hebrew, "I recollected my canticle in the night, and communed wi...

Heart. Septuagint have read differently from the present [Hebrew]. (Berthier) ---

Hebrew, "I recollected my canticle in the night, and communed with my own heart, and my spirit sought to the bottom;" or, "I swept, (or directed, scopebam ) my spirit," (St. Jerome) from all things unbecoming. Septuagint Greek: Eskallon. "I dug and harrowed" it by earnest meditation, to extract the weeds, and make it fit to receive the divine seed, (St. Jerome, here and ep. ad Sun.) and to bring forth fruit; (Haydock) or I swept to discover the precious jewel (Berthier) of salvation. (Haydock) ---

Scopebam, is not deemed a good Latin word; but seems to be derived from Greek: skopeo, "I consider or direct my aim;" though some think it means rather," I swept," Isaias xiv. 23. Hugo reads scopabam. (Calmet) ---

I diligently examined my conscience, (Worthington) and left nothing unturned, like the woman in the gospel who sought the groat. [Luke xv. 8.] (Menochius) ---

Hebrew yechapes, may also mean, "my spirit is set free, " to say what might seem too bold, Will God, &c. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 76:9 - Ever Ever. Hebrew adds, "is his word ineffectual?" which the Vatican Septuagint neglects, (Berthier) though gamar omer be thus rendered in other editio...

Ever. Hebrew adds, "is his word ineffectual?" which the Vatican Septuagint neglects, (Berthier) though gamar omer be thus rendered in other editions. "Has he completely fulfilled his word," which may be the true sense, consumabitur verbum. (St. Jerome) (Haydock) ---

"Will he execute this threat from generation?" &c. (Calmet) ---

God will never abandon his Church, (Worthington) though he may chastise his people. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 76:10 - Mercies? Mercies? Turning the waters another way, (Muis; Calmet) or going against his natural inclination. Vincit illum misericordia sua. (St. Jerome)

Mercies? Turning the waters another way, (Muis; Calmet) or going against his natural inclination. Vincit illum misericordia sua. (St. Jerome)

Haydock: Psa 76:11 - Begun // Now have I begun Begun. By God's grace, I now perceive that my thoughts were wrong. (Worthington) --- I see that we are chastised on account of our sins; (Theodore...

Begun. By God's grace, I now perceive that my thoughts were wrong. (Worthington) ---

I see that we are chastised on account of our sins; (Theodoret) but now I hope for better things. (Tirinus) (Genebrard) ---

Hebrew may have this (Berthier) and many other meanings. (Calmet) ---

Protestants, "I said this is my infirmity. But I will remember the years of right," &c. De Dieu, "To pray, this is mine; to change the right hand, is of the most High." (Calmet) ---

All comfort and every good resolution must come from him. Challothi is derived from eel, by the Septuagint, and from chala, (Haydock) "he is sick," by others. Who will assert that the former are not the most ancient and learned interpreters? The sequel shews that the psalmist begins to entertain better hopes. (Berthier) ---

Now have I begun to follow wisdom, and to amend my life. St. Anthony advised all to make this resolution every morning. (Tirinus)

Haydock: Psa 76:12 - Beginning Beginning. In favour of Israel, or rather of all the just from Abel. (Haydock)

Beginning. In favour of Israel, or rather of all the just from Abel. (Haydock)

Gill: Psa 76:1 - In Judah is God known // his name is great in Israel In Judah is God known,.... God is to be known, and is made known, by his works of creation, and by his providences, and particularly by his judgments ...

In Judah is God known,.... God is to be known, and is made known, by his works of creation, and by his providences, and particularly by his judgments in the whole world, even among the Gentiles; and he was made known by his word and ordinances, his statutes and his judgments, among the Jews, to whom these were specially given; and he is made known by his Spirit, and in his Son in a spiritual and saving manner to such who are Jews inwardly, or the true circumcision: moreover this may be understood of Christ, God manifest in the flesh, and regard his appearance in human nature in the land of Judea; he was, according to prophecy, of the tribe of Judah as man, and was born in Bethlehem, a city in that tribe, where David was, and of the family of David, that formerly lived there: and he was made known by John the Baptist, who came preaching in the wilderness of Judea, and by his being baptized of him in Jordan; by his own ministry and miracles in that land, and by the preaching of his apostles in the several cities of it, he was known in person to many; and by the fame of his doctrine and miracles to more, though seemingly but to few:

his name is great in Israel; he himself is great, for his name is himself, being the great God, and possessed of all divine perfections; his offices and titles are great, he is a great Saviour, a great High Priest, a great Prophet risen up in Israel, a great King, add the great Shepherd of the sheep; his works which make him known are great, his works of creation and providence, in which he is jointly concerned with his Father; the mighty works he did on earth, and especially the great work of our redemption; and his Gospel, which is called his name, Act 9:15, brings glad tidings of great and good things; by means of which, and the wonderful things he did in the land of Israel, his fame was spread about in it, for he was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel; here his marvellous works were done, and his Gospel first preached, which afterwards went into all the earth.

Gill: Psa 76:2 - In Salem also is his tabernacle // and his dwelling place in Zion In Salem also is his tabernacle,.... That is, in Jerusalem, as the Targum expresses it, where the tabernacle of Moses and the ark of the covenant were...

In Salem also is his tabernacle,.... That is, in Jerusalem, as the Targum expresses it, where the tabernacle of Moses and the ark of the covenant were, and afterwards the temple of Solomon, which the Targum here calls the house of the sanctuary; and may be interpreted of the human nature of Christ, the true tabernacle which God pitched, and not man, in which the divine word when he was made flesh dwelt or tabernacled among the Jews at Jerusalem, and in other parts of Judea, Heb 8:2. Salem or Jerusalem often signifies the church of God in Gospel times, in the midst of which Christ resides, and where he grants his gracious presence, Heb 12:22 and in the New Jerusalem the tabernacle of God will be with men, and he will dwell among them, Rev 21:2. The Septuagint translate the word, and render it, "in peace", as in Heb 7:2, the God of peace dwells among those that live in peace, 2Co 13:11,

and his dwelling place in Zion; where the ark was brought by David, and the temple was built by Solomon, into which, as rebuilt by Zerubbabel, Christ came, and here he preached; a figure of the church, which is his habitation.

Gill: Psa 76:3 - There brake he the arrows of the bow // the shield, and the sword, and the battle // Selah There brake he the arrows of the bow.... The Targum is, "there brake he the arrows and the bows of the people that make war;'' the word רשפי...

There brake he the arrows of the bow.... The Targum is,

"there brake he the arrows and the bows of the people that make war;''

the word רשפי, translated "arrows", signifies "sparks or coals of fire"; see Job 5:7 and is used of arrows, because they fly swiftly, as sparks do, or because of their brightness, or because fiery; so we read of "the fiery darts of Satan", Eph 6:16, and perhaps they may be meant here: when Christ our Lord suffered near Jerusalem, he spoiled principalities and powers, and broke their strength and might, and made peace by the blood of his cross, in which he triumphed over them; for the destroying of these instruments of war with what follow:

the shield, and the sword, and the battle, is expressive of making wars to cease, and causing peace; and may include the peace which was all the world over at the birth of Christ, and was foretold and expressed in much such language as here, Zec 9:9, and also that which was made by his sufferings and death, and which was published in his Gospel by his apostles, whom he sent forth unarmed, whose weapons were not carnal, but spiritual; and likewise the spiritual peace he gives to his people, quenching the fiery darts of Satan, and delivering them from the archers that shoot at them, and sorely grieve them; as well as that peace which shall be in the world and churches in the latter day; see Psa 46:11,

Selah. See Gill on Psa 3:2.

Gill: Psa 76:4 - Thou art more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey. Thou art more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey. Which is to be understood not of Zion, as some interpret it; though it is true that t...

Thou art more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey. Which is to be understood not of Zion, as some interpret it; though it is true that the mountain of Zion, or the church of Christ, his kingdom and interest, shall in the latter day be more glorious and excellent than all other mountains, kingdoms, and interests; see Isa 2:2, but of God or Christ before spoken of; and so the Targum,

"bright, to be feared, art thou, O God, to be praised from the house of thy sanctuary.''

Christ, who is God over all, is "bright" z, splendid, and glorious, in his divine nature, being the brightness of his Father's glory, and the express image of his person: and "excellent" in his office as Mediator, and in all his works as such; and in human nature, at he is exalted at his Father's right hand, far above all principality, power, might, and dominion, signified here by "mountains of prey": the kingdoms of this world, because of their eminence and strength, are compared to mountains: see Isa 41:15 and may be called "mountains of prey", in allusion to mountains inhabited by beasts of prey, as lions and leopards; see Son 4:8 because obtained and possessed by tyranny and oppression. Christ is more glorious and excellent than the kings of the earth; he is higher than they, and is King of kings; he is richer than they, the earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof, the world, and they that dwell therein; he is wiser than they, by him kings reign, and princes decree justice; he is more powerful than they, and all must submit to him, and all will serve him hereafter; and his kingdom will be greater than theirs, more large and more lasting; it will be an everlasting one, and reach from sea to sea, and even to the ends of the earth.

Gill: Psa 76:5 - The stout hearted are spoiled // they have slept their sleep // and none of the men of might have found their hands The stout hearted are spoiled,.... The Assyrian army, its officers and generals, that came up against Jerusalem, with great resolution and courage, an...

The stout hearted are spoiled,.... The Assyrian army, its officers and generals, that came up against Jerusalem, with great resolution and courage, and with daring impiety and blasphemy against the God of heaven, as Rabshakeh and others; these were spoiled, and their armour and riches became a prey to those they thought to have made a prey of. So principalities and powers were spoiled by Christ upon the cross, and Satan, the strong man armed, has in the conversion of a sinner his armour taken from him, and his spoils divided by him that is stronger than he; and such as are stouthearted, and far from true righteousness, are stripped of their own, and made willing, in the day of Christ's power upon them, to submit to his; and as for antichrist, whose look is more stout than his fellows, that exalts himself above all that is called God, and opens his mouth in blasphemy against him and his followers, he shall be destroyed with the breath of Christ's mouth, and the brightness of his coming: or "the stout hearted have spoiled themselves" a; as the Midianites did, or gave themselves for a prey; so the Targum,

"the stouthearted have cast off from them the weapons of war;''

threw away their armour, and ran away, such of them as were not destroyed by the angel. It is observable, that the Hebrew word, translated "spoiled", is in the Syriac form:

they have slept their sleep: the sleep of death, as did the Assyrians when smitten by the angel, which was done in the night, when probably they were fast asleep, and so never awoke more, as the Babylonians, Jer 51:57. So Jezebel, or the Romish antichrist, shall be cast into a bed, and her children killed with death, Rev 2:22. Death is often in Scripture signified by a sleep, both the death of the righteous and of the wicked; but there is a difference between the one and the other; wherefore the death of the wicked here is called "their sleep"; the one sleep in Jesus, in his arms, and under his guardianship, the other not; to the one death is a true and proper rest from toil and labour, to the other only a cessation from doing mischief, Job 3:17, the one rests in hopes of a glorious resurrection, the other not; the one will awake in Christ's likeness, and to everlasting life; the other in the image of Satan, and to everlasting shame and contempt:

and none of the men of might have found their hands; none of the valiant soldiers in the Assyrian army could find their hands to fight their enemies, or defend themselves; as men in a deep sleep cannot find their hands to do anything, and are as if they had none, and still less in a dead sleep. The Targum is,

"they were not able to lay hold on their armour with their hands.''

This was the case of them that were killed; and as for those that remained alive, they were struck with such a panic, that their hearts could not endure, nor their hands be strong when God thus dealt with them; and so it will be with the antichristian army at the battle of Armageddon; and so it is with the wicked at death, they cannot find their hands so as to prevent it; and when it has seized upon them, they cannot find their hands to do any more mischief.

Gill: Psa 76:6 - At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob // both the chariot and horse are cast into a dead sleep At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob,.... The God of Jacob personally, and of his posterity, the children of Israel, and of the church, often so called who r...

At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob,.... The God of Jacob personally, and of his posterity, the children of Israel, and of the church, often so called who rebukes his people in love, but his enemies with furious rebukes, with rebukes in flames of fire; with such he rebukes the Heathen, destroys the wicked, and puts out their name for ever:

both the chariot and horse are cast into a dead sleep; that is, the riders in chariots and on horses; such there were doubtless in the Assyrian army, it being usual to have such in great armies. Kimchi observes, that the word נרדם, translated "cast into a dead sleep", is in the singular number, and interprets it of the king, the head of the men of might: but Sennacherib, king of Assyria, was not slain, he departed to his own country; wherefore he applies it to Gog and Magog, the chief prince of Meshech and Tubal, Eze 39:1 and may very well be understood of the head of the apostasy, the king of the bottomless pit, the beast or false prophet, who being destroyed, the flesh of his captains and horsemen shall be the food of the fowls of the air, at the supper of the great God, Rev 19:17.

Gill: Psa 76:7 - Thou, even thou, art to be feared // and who may stand in thy sight when once thou art angry Thou, even thou, art to be feared,.... By his own people with reverence and godly fear, because of his greatness and goodness; and to be dreaded by hi...

Thou, even thou, art to be feared,.... By his own people with reverence and godly fear, because of his greatness and goodness; and to be dreaded by his enemies; which seems to be the sense here, as appears by what follows:

and who may stand in thy sight when once thou art angry? or "from the moment thou art angry" b; so the Targum, from the "time", and Jarchi, from the "hour": that is, as soon as ever his anger begins, when it is kindled but a little, and how much less when it burns in its full strength? there is no standing before his justice, and at his judgment seat, with boldness and confidence, and so as to succeed, or come off acquitted, without having on his righteousness; and much less is there any standing before his wrath and fury, when his hand takes hold on judgment to execute it; see Nah 1:6.

Gill: Psa 76:8 - Thou didst cause judgment to be heard from heaven // the earth feared, and was still Thou didst cause judgment to be heard from heaven,.... When an angel was sent down from heaven, and destroyed the Assyrian army, a judgment of God upo...

Thou didst cause judgment to be heard from heaven,.... When an angel was sent down from heaven, and destroyed the Assyrian army, a judgment of God upon them; at which time some think there was a violent clap of thunder, which is the voice of God: and it may refer to the judgments which God has decreed to execute on the antichristian states, the seven vials of his wrath he will pour upon them; for all decrees, as Aben Ezra on the place observes, come from heaven; or to the last judgment, when Christ the Judge shall descend from heaven, the voice of the archangel shall be heard, the last trumpet shall sound, the dead in their graves shall hear it, and rise and stand before the judgment seat, and hear the sentence pronounced:

the earth feared, and was still: or "trembled, and was quiet" c; that is, again: some think there was an earthquake when the angel smote the Assyrian camp, but was quickly over. It may regard the panic the other nations were in when they heard of it, and therefore were still and quiet, and never offered to give the Israelites any disturbance. Some understand this of the remainder of the army that escaped with Sennacherib; these were seized with fear, and quickly withdrew, and silently departed into their own land. Aben Ezra observes it as the sense of some, "the earth feared", these are the wicked; "and was still", they are the righteous; so the Targum,

"the land of the people feared, the land of Israel was still;''

reference may be had to the consternation, fear, and dread, that will fall on them that escape the judgments inflicted on the antichristian party, Rev 11:13 and the fear and silence that will attend the last and awful judgment; see Zec 2:13.

Gill: Psa 76:9 - When God arose to judgment // to save all the meek of the earth // Selah When God arose to judgment,.... He may sometimes seem to be asleep, and to defer judgment, but he will arise and hasten it in his own time, and will t...

When God arose to judgment,.... He may sometimes seem to be asleep, and to defer judgment, but he will arise and hasten it in his own time, and will take vengeance on all his and his people's enemies, as he did upon the army of the Assyrians, and will upon the antichristian powers, and upon all the wicked, and at the same time will save his own people, as follows:

to save all the meek of the earth; the quiet in the land, who are afflicted in this world, despised by the men of it, are lowly and humble, and mean in their own eyes; these the Lord takes notice of and cares for them, he will beautify them with salvation; these, all of them, even everyone of them, shall be saved in him with an everlasting salvation; this verse is by some connected with the preceding; so Kimchi, "the earth feared, and was still, when God arose to judgment", &c. and by others, as R. Moses and Aben Ezra, with the following.

Selah. See Gill on Psa 3:2.

Gill: Psa 76:10 - Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee // the remainder of wrath shall thou restrain Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee,.... Either the wrath which comes from God, and has man for its object; and that either as it regards the pe...

Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee,.... Either the wrath which comes from God, and has man for its object; and that either as it regards the people of God; so the Targum,

"when thou art angry with thy people, thou hast mercy on them, and they shall confess unto thy name;''

or praise thee; see Isa 12:1, they are deserving of the wrath of God, but are not appointed to it, and are delivered from it by Christ, who bore it for them as their representative; by which as the justice of God is glorified, it is matter of praise to them; when the law enters into their consciences, it works wrath there, which being removed by the application of pardoning grace, is an occasion of praise to God; and whereas, under afflictive dispensations, they apprehend and deprecate the wrath of God, when they are delivered from them their mouths are filled with songs of praise: or, as it regards wicked men, so it came forth upon the old world, and drowned it; upon Sodom and Gomorrah, and reduced them to ashes; upon Pharaoh and the Egyptians, in the plagues inflicted on them; all which turned to the praise and glory of God; of the last instance, see Rom 9:17, it came upon the wicked Jews to the uttermost in the destruction of their nation, city, and temple; and upon Rome Pagan, in the entire demolition of it as such; and so it will come upon Rome Papal, which will be attended with great joy, praise, and thanksgiving in the saints; see Rev 11:17 or else this is to be understood of the wrath which is in man, and comes forth from him, and has him for its subject; which though it does not work the righteousness of God, yet the righteousness of God is glorified both in checking and punishing it; and the more it rages and burns against the people of God, the greater reason have they to praise the Lord when delivered from it; see Psa 124:1, so the wrath of the Assyrian monarch, and of railing and blaspheming Rabshakeh, gave the people of the Jews a greater occasion to praise the Lord for their wonderful deliverance; so the wrath of men against Christ, his church and people, his ministers, Gospel, and ordinances, will all turn to the glory of his name, when in the issue it will be seen that these are established, overcoming all the rage and malice of men:

the remainder of wrath shall thou restrain: that which remains in a man's breast, he has not yet vented, God can and does keep in, that it may not break forth; this very likely was verified in Sennacherib, who might breathe revenge, and threaten the Jews with a second visit; but was prevented by a sudden and violent death. Some read the words, "the remainder of wraths thou wilt gird" d; that is, those that remain, and are not destroyed through the rage and fury of men, God will gird with strength to defend themselves, and resist their enemies that may rise up against them, or with gladness, because of deliverance from them; see Psa 18:32. Some understand this of the wrath of God, which he has in reserve and store for wicked men, and render the words thus, with the remainder of wrath wilt thou gird thyself e; and so come forth like an armed man, clad with zeal, and arrayed with the garments of wrath and vengeance; see Isa 49:17.

Gill: Psa 76:11 - Vow, and pay unto the Lord your God // let all that be round about him // bring presents unto him that ought to be feared Vow, and pay unto the Lord your God,.... Not monastic vows, which the Papists would infer from these and such like words; nor ceremonial ones, but spi...

Vow, and pay unto the Lord your God,.... Not monastic vows, which the Papists would infer from these and such like words; nor ceremonial ones, but spiritual sacrifices of praise and thanksgiving, such as men sometimes make in times of distress, or when delivered, Psa 66:13 and which when vowed ought to be paid, Ecc 5:4, not to creatures, angels, or saints, but to God, from whom the mercy desired must be expected, and from whence it comes, Psa 50:14, these words are an address to such who were delivered from wrath, either of God or man:

let all that be round about him; who surround the throne of his grace, gather together in his house to attend his word and ordinances, who are his servants, and constantly and faithfully adhere to him; among whom he grants his presence, they are near to him, and he to them. It is a periphrasis of the assembly of the saints; see Psa 89:7. The Targum is,

"all ye that dwell round about his sanctuary;''

the allusion is to the situation of the camp of Israel, and the tabernacle in the wilderness, Num 2:1 compare with this Rev 4:4,

bring presents unto him that ought to be feared, or "to the fear" f, which is one of the names of God; see Gen 31:42 and who is and ought to be the object of the fear and reverence of men; the "presents", to be brought to him are the sacrifices of prayer and praise, yea, the whole persons, the souls and bodies, of men; see Psa 72:10, compare with this 2Ch 32:22. The Targum is,

"let them bring offerings into the house of the sanctuary of the terrible One;''

of him that is to be feared, with a godly fear by good men, and to be dreaded by evil men, as follows.

Gill: Psa 76:12 - He shall cut off the spirit of princes // he is terrible to the kings of the earth He shall cut off the spirit of princes,.... The pride of their spirits, as the Targum, humble their proud spirits, and bring them down; or dispirit th...

He shall cut off the spirit of princes,.... The pride of their spirits, as the Targum, humble their proud spirits, and bring them down; or dispirit them, take away their courage from them, upon which they flee apace to rocks and mountains to cover them; or confound them, blast their schemes, and carry their counsel headlong, and even take away their breath, or life; which he can as easily do as a man can cut off a bunch of grapes from the vine, as the word g here used signifies; the destruction of the wicked is expressed by cutting down the vine of the earth, and casting it into the winepress of God's wrath, Rev 14:17,

he is terrible to the kings of the earth; as he was to the king of Assyria, when he sent his angel, and destroyed his army; and as he has been to others in all ages; so he will be to the kings of the earth that have committed fornication with the whore of Rome, who will be in the utmost panic at the time of her destruction, Rev 18:9, and who will themselves be overcome by the Lamb, Rev 16:14. The Targum is, he is to be feared above all the kings of the earth.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 76:1 Heb “name,” which here stands metonymically for God’s reputation.

NET Notes: Psa 76:2 Heb “and his place of refuge is in Salem, and his lair in Zion.” God may be likened here to a lion (see v. 4).

NET Notes: Psa 76:3 This verse may allude to the miraculous defeat of the Assyrians in 701 b.c. (see Isa 36-37).

NET Notes: Psa 76:4 Heb “radiant [are] you, majestic from the hills of prey.” God is depicted as a victorious king and as a lion that has killed its victims.

NET Notes: Psa 76:5 Heb “and all the men of strength did not find their hands.”

NET Notes: Psa 76:6 Heb “he fell asleep, and [the] chariot and [the] horse.” Once again (see v. 5) “sleep” refers here to the “sleep” ...

NET Notes: Psa 76:7 Heb “and who can stand before you from the time of your anger?” The Hebrew expression מֵאָז (me’az, &#...

NET Notes: Psa 76:8 “The earth” stands here by metonymy for its inhabitants.

NET Notes: Psa 76:10 Heb “the rest of anger you put on.” The meaning of the statement is not entirely clear. Perhaps the idea is that God, as he prepares for b...

NET Notes: Psa 76:11 The phrase “all those who surround him” may refer to the surrounding nations (v. 12 may favor this), but in Ps 89:7 the phrase refers to G...

NET Notes: Psa 76:12 Heb “[he is] awesome to the kings of the earth.”

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:1 "To the chief Musician on Neginoth, A Psalm [or] Song of Asaph." In Judah [is] God ( a ) known: his name [is] great in Israel. ( a ) He declares that...

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:2 In ( b ) Salem also is his tabernacle, and his dwelling place in Zion. ( b ) Which later was called Jerusalem.

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:4 Thou [art] more glorious [and] excellent than ( c ) the mountains of prey. ( c ) He compares the kingdom full of extortion and rapine to the mountain...

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:5 The stouthearted are spoiled, they have slept their sleep: and none of the men of might have ( d ) found their hands. ( d ) God has taken their spiri...

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:7 Thou, [even] thou, [art] to be feared: and who may stand in thy ( e ) sight when once thou art angry? ( e ) God with a look is able to destroy all th...

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:9 When God arose to judgment, to ( f ) save all the meek of the earth. Selah. ( f ) To avenge the wrongs done to your Church.

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:10 Surely the ( g ) wrath of man shall praise thee: the remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain. ( g ) For the end will show that the enemy was able to b...

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:11 Vow, and pay unto the LORD your God: let all that be ( h ) round about him bring presents unto him that ought to be feared. ( h ) That is, the Levite...

Geneva Bible: Psa 76:12 He shall ( i ) cut off the spirit of princes: [he is] terrible to the kings of the earth. ( i ) The Hebrew word signifies "to vintage or gather grape...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 76:1-6 - --Happy people are those who have their land filled with the knowledge of God! happy persons that have their hearts filled with that knowledge! It is th...

MHCC: Psa 76:7-12 - --God's people are the meek of the earth, the quiet in the land, that suffer wrong, but do none. The righteous God seems to keep silence long, yet, soon...

Matthew Henry: Psa 76:1-6 - -- The church is here triumphant even in the midst of its militant state. The psalmist, in the church's name, triumphs here in God, the centre of all o...

Matthew Henry: Psa 76:7-12 - -- This glorious victory with which God had graced and blessed his church is here made to speak three things: - I. Terror to God's enemies (Psa 76:7-9...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 76:1-3 - -- In all Israel, and more especially in Judah, is Elohim known (here, according to Psa 76:2 , participle, whereas in Psa 9:17 it is the finite verb),...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 76:4-6 - -- The "mountains of prey,"for which the lxx has ὀρέων αἰωνίων ( טרם ?), is an emblematical appellation for the haughty posses...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 76:7-9 - -- Nahum also (Psa 1:6) draws the same inference from the defeat of Sennacherib as the psalmist does in Psa 76:8. מאז אפּך (cf. Rth 2:7; Jer 44:...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 76:10-12 - -- The fact that has just been experienced is substantiated in Psa 76:10 from a universal truth, which has therein become outwardly manifest. The rage ...

Constable: Psa 73:1--89:52 - --I. Book 3: chs 73--89 A man or men named Asaph wrote 17 of the psalms in this book (Pss. 73-83). Other writers w...

Constable: Psa 76:1-12 - --Psalm 76 In this psalm Asaph praised God for His power. He had destroyed the wicked and delivered the go...

Constable: Psa 76:1-2 - --1. The manifestation of God's judgment 76:1-3 God made His great name known in Israel by defeati...

Constable: Psa 76:3-9 - --2. The justice of God's judgment 76:4-10 76:4-6 The description of God as resplendent pictures Him as radiating light. He illuminates and glorifies by...

Constable: Psa 76:10-11 - --3. The fearful character of God's judgments 76:11-12 Since God is such a fearful Judge, His peop...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 76:8 QUESTIONS & OBJECTIONS " Could you be wrong in your claims about Judgment Day and the existence of hell?" The existence of hell and the surety of ...

buka semua
Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 76 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 76:1, A declaration of God’s majesty in the church; Psa 76:11, An exhortation to serve him reverently. Psa 4:1, Psa 54:1, Psa 61:1...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 76 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 76:1-6) The psalmist speaks of God's power. (Psa 76:7-12) All have to fear and to trust in him.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 76 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This psalm seems to have been penned upon occasion of some great victory obtained by the church over some threatening enemy or other, and designed ...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 76 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 76 To the chief Musician on Neginoth, A Psalm or Song of Asaph. The Targum is, "by the hand of Asaph:'' concerning "neg...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


TIP #10: Klik ikon untuk merubah tampilan teks alkitab menjadi per baris atau paragraf. [SEMUA]
dibuat dalam 0.89 detik
dipersembahkan oleh
bible.org - YLSA