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Teks -- Psalms 41:1-13 (NET)

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Konteks
Psalm 41
41:1 For the music director; a psalm of David. How blessed is the one who treats the poor properly! When trouble comes, the Lord delivers him. 41:2 May the Lord protect him and save his life! May he be blessed in the land! Do not turn him over to his enemies! 41:3 The Lord supports him on his sickbed; you completely heal him from his illness. 41:4 As for me, I said: “O Lord, have mercy on me! Heal me, for I have sinned against you! 41:5 My enemies ask this cruel question about me, ‘When will he finally die and be forgotten?’ 41:6 When someone comes to visit, he pretends to be friendly; he thinks of ways to defame me, and when he leaves he slanders me. 41:7 All who hate me whisper insults about me to one another; they plan ways to harm me. 41:8 They say, ‘An awful disease overwhelms him, and now that he is bed-ridden he will never recover.’ 41:9 Even my close friend whom I trusted, he who shared meals with me, has turned against me. 41:10 As for you, O Lord, have mercy on me and raise me up, so I can pay them back!” 41:11 By this I know that you are pleased with me, for my enemy does not triumph over me. 41:12 As for me, you uphold me because of my integrity; you allow me permanent access to your presence. 41:13 The Lord God of Israel deserves praise in the future and forevermore! We agree! We agree!
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel
 · Israel a citizen of Israel.,a member of the nation of Israel


Topik/Tema Kamus: David | PSALMS, BOOK OF | God | GOOD, CHIEF | Slander | Speaking | Accusation, False | Malice | Poor | Liberality | Righteous | Afflictions and Adversities | Thankfulness | Friendship | Bed | Ingratitude | Judas | Praise | Psalms | Ambush | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 41:3 - Make his bed Give him ease and comfort, which sick men receive by the help of those who turn and stir up their bed, to make it soft and easy for them.

Give him ease and comfort, which sick men receive by the help of those who turn and stir up their bed, to make it soft and easy for them.

Wesley: Psa 41:4 - Heal The soul is said to be healed, when it is pardoned and purged.

The soul is said to be healed, when it is pardoned and purged.

Wesley: Psa 41:4 - For For I acknowledge that I have sinned.

For I acknowledge that I have sinned.

Wesley: Psa 41:6 - His heart Even when he is with me, and pretends hearty affection, his heart is devising mischief against me.

Even when he is with me, and pretends hearty affection, his heart is devising mischief against me.

Wesley: Psa 41:9 - Yea These words were literally fulfilled in David, and yet the Holy Ghost looked farther in them, even to Christ and Judas, in whom they received a fuller...

These words were literally fulfilled in David, and yet the Holy Ghost looked farther in them, even to Christ and Judas, in whom they received a fuller accomplishment.

Wesley: Psa 41:9 - Lift up A phrase implying injury, joined with insolency and contempt; taken from an unruly horse, which kicks at him that owns and feeds him.

A phrase implying injury, joined with insolency and contempt; taken from an unruly horse, which kicks at him that owns and feeds him.

Wesley: Psa 41:10 - Requite Punish them for their wicked practices; which being now a magistrate, he was obliged to do.

Punish them for their wicked practices; which being now a magistrate, he was obliged to do.

Wesley: Psa 41:11 - By this Because hitherto thou hast supported me, and prolonged my days to the disappointment of their hopes.

Because hitherto thou hast supported me, and prolonged my days to the disappointment of their hopes.

Wesley: Psa 41:12 - Settest Or, hast confirmed me in thy presence, under thine eye and special care: to minister unto thee, as a king over thy people. And in regard of his poster...

Or, hast confirmed me in thy presence, under thine eye and special care: to minister unto thee, as a king over thy people. And in regard of his posterity, the kingdom was established for ever.

Wesley: Psa 41:13 - Amen Signifies an hearty assent and approbation, and withal an earnest desire of the thing, to which it is annexed. And as the psalms are divided into five...

Signifies an hearty assent and approbation, and withal an earnest desire of the thing, to which it is annexed. And as the psalms are divided into five books, so each of them is closed with this word; the first here: the second, Psa 72:19, the third, Psa 89:52, the fourth, Psa 106:48, the last in the end of Psa 150:6, the doubling of the word shews the fervency of his spirit, in this work of praising God.

JFB: Psa 41:1-3 - -- The Psalmist celebrates the blessedness of those who compassionate the poor, conduct strongly contrasted with the spite of his enemies and neglect of ...

The Psalmist celebrates the blessedness of those who compassionate the poor, conduct strongly contrasted with the spite of his enemies and neglect of his friends in his calamity. He prays for God's mercy in view of his ill desert, and, in confidence of relief, and that God will vindicate his cause, he closes with a doxology. (Psa 41:1-13)

God rewards kindness to the poor (Pro 19:17). From Psa 41:2, Psa 41:11 it may be inferred that the Psalmist describes his own conduct.

JFB: Psa 41:1-3 - poor In person, position, and possessions.

In person, position, and possessions.

JFB: Psa 41:2 - shall be blessed Literally, "led aright," or "safely," prospered (Psa 23:3).

Literally, "led aright," or "safely," prospered (Psa 23:3).

JFB: Psa 41:2 - upon the earth Or land of promise (Psa 25:13; Psa 27:3-9, &c.).

Or land of promise (Psa 25:13; Psa 27:3-9, &c.).

JFB: Psa 41:3 - -- The figures of Psa 41:3 are drawn from the acts of a kind nurse.

The figures of Psa 41:3 are drawn from the acts of a kind nurse.

JFB: Psa 41:4 - I said I asked the mercy I show.

I asked the mercy I show.

JFB: Psa 41:4 - heal my soul (Compare Psa 30:2). "Sin and suffering are united," is one of the great teachings of the Psalms.

(Compare Psa 30:2). "Sin and suffering are united," is one of the great teachings of the Psalms.

JFB: Psa 41:5-6 - -- A graphic picture of the conduct of a malignant enemy.

A graphic picture of the conduct of a malignant enemy.

JFB: Psa 41:6 - to see me As if to spy out my case.

As if to spy out my case.

JFB: Psa 41:6 - he speaketh . . . itself Or, "he speaketh vanity as to his heart"--that is, does not speak candidly, "he gathereth iniquity to him," collects elements for mischief, and then d...

Or, "he speaketh vanity as to his heart"--that is, does not speak candidly, "he gathereth iniquity to him," collects elements for mischief, and then divulges the gains of his hypocrisy.

JFB: Psa 41:7-8 - -- So of others, all act alike.

So of others, all act alike.

JFB: Psa 41:8 - An evil disease Literally, "a word of Belial," some slander.

Literally, "a word of Belial," some slander.

JFB: Psa 41:8 - cleaveth Literally, "poured on him."

Literally, "poured on him."

JFB: Psa 41:8 - that he lieth Who has now laid down, "he is utterly undone and our victory is sure."

Who has now laid down, "he is utterly undone and our victory is sure."

JFB: Psa 41:9 - mine . . . friend Literally, "the man of my peace."

Literally, "the man of my peace."

JFB: Psa 41:9 - eat . . . bread Who depended on me or was well treated by me.

Who depended on me or was well treated by me.

JFB: Psa 41:9 - hath lifted up heel In scornful violence. As David and his fortunes typified Christ and His (compare Introduction), so these words expressed the treatment he received, an...

In scornful violence. As David and his fortunes typified Christ and His (compare Introduction), so these words expressed the treatment he received, and also that of his Son and Lord; hence, though not distinctly prophetical, our Saviour (Joh 13:18) applies them to Judas, "that the Scripture may be fulfilled." This last phrase has a wide use in the New Testament, and is not restricted to denote special prophecies.

JFB: Psa 41:10 - -- A lawful punishment of criminals is not revenge, nor inconsistent with their final good (compare Psa 40:14-15).

A lawful punishment of criminals is not revenge, nor inconsistent with their final good (compare Psa 40:14-15).

JFB: Psa 41:11-13 - favourest Or tenderly lovest me (Gen 34:19), evinced by relief from his enemies, and, farther, God recognizes his innocence by upholding him.

Or tenderly lovest me (Gen 34:19), evinced by relief from his enemies, and, farther, God recognizes his innocence by upholding him.

JFB: Psa 41:12 - settest . . . before thy face Under thy watch and care, as God before man's face (Psa 16:8) is an object of trust and love.

Under thy watch and care, as God before man's face (Psa 16:8) is an object of trust and love.

JFB: Psa 41:13 - Blessed Praised, usually applied to God. The word usually applied to men denotes happiness (Psa 1:1; Psa 32:1). With this doxology the first book closes.

Praised, usually applied to God. The word usually applied to men denotes happiness (Psa 1:1; Psa 32:1). With this doxology the first book closes.

Clarke: Psa 41:1 - Blessed is he that considereth Blessed is he that considereth - God is merciful; he will have man to resemble him: as far as he is merciful, feels a compassionate heart, and uses ...

Blessed is he that considereth - God is merciful; he will have man to resemble him: as far as he is merciful, feels a compassionate heart, and uses a benevolent hand, he resembles his Maker; and the mercy he shows to others God will show to him. But it is not a sudden impression at the sight of a person in distress, which obliges a man to give something for the relief of the sufferer, that constitutes the merciful character. It is he who considers the poor; who endeavors to find them out; who looks into their circumstances; who is in the habit of doing so; and actually, according to his power and means, goes about to do good; that is the merciful man, of whom God speaks with such high approbation, and to whom he promises a rich reward.

Clarke: Psa 41:2 - The Lord will preserve him, and keep him alive The Lord will preserve him, and keep him alive - It is worthy of remark, that benevolent persons, who consider the poor, and especially the sick poo...

The Lord will preserve him, and keep him alive - It is worthy of remark, that benevolent persons, who consider the poor, and especially the sick poor; who search cellars, garrets, back lanes, and such abodes of misery, to find them out, (even in the places where contagion keeps its seat), very seldom fall a prey to their own benevolence. The Lord, in an especial manner, keeps them alive, and preserves them; while many, who endeavor to keep far from the contagion, are assailed by it, and fall victims to it. God loves the merciful man.

Clarke: Psa 41:3 - The Lord will strengthen him The Lord will strengthen him - Good, benevolent, and merciful as he is, he must also die: but he shall not die as other men; he shall have peculiar ...

The Lord will strengthen him - Good, benevolent, and merciful as he is, he must also die: but he shall not die as other men; he shall have peculiar consolations, refreshment, and support, while passing through the valley of the shadow of death

Clarke: Psa 41:3 - Thou wilt make all his bed Thou wilt make all his bed - הפכת haphachta , thou hast turned up, tossed, and shaken it; and thou wilt do so to all his bed - thou wilt not le...

Thou wilt make all his bed - הפכת haphachta , thou hast turned up, tossed, and shaken it; and thou wilt do so to all his bed - thou wilt not leave one uneasy place in it - not one lump, or any unevenness, to prevent him from sleeping. Thou wilt do every thing, consistently with the accomplishment of the great decree, "Unto dust thou shalt return,"to give him ease, refreshment, and rest. We may sum up the privileges of the merciful man

1.    He is generally blessed, Psa 41:1

2.    He will be delivered in the time of trouble, Psa 41:1

3.    He will be preserved by a particular providence, Psa 41:2

4.    He shall be kept alive amidst infection and danger, Psa 41:2

5.    He shall be blessed on the earth in his temporal concerns, Psa 41:2

6.    His enemies shall not be able to spoil or destroy him, Psa 41:2

7.    He shall be strengthened on a bed of languishing, to enable him to bear his afflictions, Psa 41:3

8.    He shall have ease, comfort, and support in his last hours, Psa 41:3.

Clarke: Psa 41:4 - I said, Lord, be merciful unto me I said, Lord, be merciful unto me - I need thy mercy especially, because I have sinned against thee, and my sin is a deadly wound to my soul; theref...

I said, Lord, be merciful unto me - I need thy mercy especially, because I have sinned against thee, and my sin is a deadly wound to my soul; therefore heal my soul, for it has sinned against thee.

Clarke: Psa 41:5 - Mine enemies speak evil Mine enemies speak evil - It is often a good man’ s lot to be evil spoken of; to have his motives, and even his most benevolent acts, misconstr...

Mine enemies speak evil - It is often a good man’ s lot to be evil spoken of; to have his motives, and even his most benevolent acts, misconstrued.

Clarke: Psa 41:6 - And if he come to see me And if he come to see me - This may relate to Ahithophel; but it is more likely that it was to some other person who was his secret enemy, who prete...

And if he come to see me - This may relate to Ahithophel; but it is more likely that it was to some other person who was his secret enemy, who pretended to come and inquire after his health, but with the secret design to see whether death was despatching his work

Clarke: Psa 41:6 - When he goeth abroad, he telleth it When he goeth abroad, he telleth it - He makes several observations on my dying state; intimates that I am suffering deep remorse for secret crimes;...

When he goeth abroad, he telleth it - He makes several observations on my dying state; intimates that I am suffering deep remorse for secret crimes; that God is showing his displeasure against me, and that I am full of sorrow at the approach of death.

Clarke: Psa 41:7 - All that hate me whisper together against me All that hate me whisper together against me - This is in consequence of the information given by the hypocritical friend, who came to him with the ...

All that hate me whisper together against me - This is in consequence of the information given by the hypocritical friend, who came to him with the lying tongue, and whose heart gathereth iniquity to itself, which, when he went abroad, he told to others as illminded as himself, and they also drew their wicked inferences.

Clarke: Psa 41:8 - An evil disease, say they, cleaveth fast unto him An evil disease, say they, cleaveth fast unto him - דבר בליעל יצוק בו debar beliyaal yatsuk bo , a thing, word, or pestilence of Beli...

An evil disease, say they, cleaveth fast unto him - דבר בליעל יצוק בו debar beliyaal yatsuk bo , a thing, word, or pestilence of Belial, is poured out upon him. His disease is of no common sort; it is a diabolical malady

Clarke: Psa 41:8 - He shall rise up no more He shall rise up no more - His disease is incurable without a miracle; and he is too much hated of God to have one wrought for him. Some apply this ...

He shall rise up no more - His disease is incurable without a miracle; and he is too much hated of God to have one wrought for him. Some apply this to the death and resurrection of Christ; he lieth - he is dead and buried; he shall never rise again from the dead.

Clarke: Psa 41:9 - Mine own familiar friend Mine own familiar friend - This is either a direct prophecy of the treachery of Judas, or it is a fact in David’ s distresses which our Lord fo...

Mine own familiar friend - This is either a direct prophecy of the treachery of Judas, or it is a fact in David’ s distresses which our Lord found so similar to the falsity of his treacherous disciple, that he applies it to him, Joh 13:18. What we translate mine own familiar friend, איש שלומי ish shelomi , is the man of my peace. The man who, with the שלום לך shalom lecha , peace be to thee! kissed me; and thus gave the agreed-on signal to my murderers that I was the person whom they should seize, hold fast, and carry away

Clarke: Psa 41:9 - Did eat of my bread Did eat of my bread - Was an inmate in my house. Applied by our Lord to Judas, when eating with him out of the same dish. See Joh 13:18, Joh 13:26. ...

Did eat of my bread - Was an inmate in my house. Applied by our Lord to Judas, when eating with him out of the same dish. See Joh 13:18, Joh 13:26. Possibly it may refer to Ahithophel, his counsellor, the man of his peace, his prime minister; who, we know, was the strength of Absalom’ s conspiracy.

Clarke: Psa 41:10 - Raise me up Raise me up - Restore me from this sickness, that I may requite them. This has also been applied to our Lord; who, knowing that he must die, prays t...

Raise me up - Restore me from this sickness, that I may requite them. This has also been applied to our Lord; who, knowing that he must die, prays that he may rise again, and thus disappoint the malice of his enemies.

Clarke: Psa 41:11 - By this I know that thou favorest me By this I know that thou favorest me - If thou hadst not been on my side, I had perished by this disease; and then my enemies would have had cause t...

By this I know that thou favorest me - If thou hadst not been on my side, I had perished by this disease; and then my enemies would have had cause to triumph

This also has been applied to our Lord; and Calmet says it is the greatest proof we have of the divinity of Christ, that he did not permit the malice of the Jews, nor the rage of the devil, to prevail against him. They might persecute, blaspheme, mock, insult, crucify, and slay him; but his resurrection confounded them; and by it he gained the victory over sin, death, and hell.

Clarke: Psa 41:12 - Thou upholdest me Thou upholdest me - I am still enabled to show that my heart was upright before God

Thou upholdest me - I am still enabled to show that my heart was upright before God

Clarke: Psa 41:12 - Settest me before thy face for ever Settest me before thy face for ever - Thou showest that thou dost approve of me: that I stand in thy presence, under the smiles of thy approbation T...

Settest me before thy face for ever - Thou showest that thou dost approve of me: that I stand in thy presence, under the smiles of thy approbation

This also has been applied to our Lord, and considered as pointing out his mediatorial office at the right hand of God.

Clarke: Psa 41:13 - Blessed be the Lord God of Israel Blessed be the Lord God of Israel - By all these circumstances and events glory shall redound to the name of God for ever; for the record of these t...

Blessed be the Lord God of Israel - By all these circumstances and events glory shall redound to the name of God for ever; for the record of these things shall never perish, but be published from one generation to another; and it has been so

Clarke: Psa 41:13 - From everlasting, and to everlasting From everlasting, and to everlasting - מהעולם ועד העולם mehaolam vead haolam ; From the hidden time to the hidden time; from that wh...

From everlasting, and to everlasting - מהעולם ועד העולם mehaolam vead haolam ; From the hidden time to the hidden time; from that which had no beginning to that which has no end

To which he subscribes, Amen and Amen. Fiat, fiat - Vulgate. Γενοιτο, γενοιτο - Septuagint. The Chaldee says, "And let the righteous say, Amen, and Amen.""Be blessed, Lord God of Israel, from world, and in world. Be it! So be it!"- Anglo-Saxon. To which the Old Psalter approaches very nearly: Blyssed Lord God of Isrel, fra werld, and in werld: Be it done! be it done. Thus illustrated by the same, Fra werld in werld ; that es, fra the bygynnyng of this wereld, in til wereld that lastes ay. Be it done, be it done. This dubblying schews that it es at do of al men. In Latyn, it es, fiat, fiat! in Ebru , Amen Amen es writyn: tharfore that Aquila translated vere, vel fideliter, that es, sothfastly or trew

Thus ends what the Hebrews call the first book of Psalms; for the reader will recollect that this book is divided by the Jews into five books, the first of which ends with this Psalm

This doxology, Dr. Kennicott supposes, may have been added by the collector of this book; and he thinks that the division into books is not arbitrary, and that the Psalms were collected at different times by different persons. See the Introduction. There is certainly a considerable variety in the style of the several books; in the examination of which the Hebrew critic will not lose his labor

Calvin: Psa 41:1 - Blessed is he that judgeth wisely of the poor // The Lord will deliver him in the day of evil 1.Blessed is he that judgeth wisely of the poor Interpreters are generally of opinion that the exercise of kindness and compassion manifested in taki...

1.Blessed is he that judgeth wisely of the poor Interpreters are generally of opinion that the exercise of kindness and compassion manifested in taking care of the miserable, and helping them, is here commended. Those, however, who maintain that the Psalmist here commends the considerate candour of those who judge wisely and charitably of men in adversity, form a better judgment of his meaning. Indeed, the participle משכיל , maskil, cannot be explained in any other way. At the same time, it ought to be observed on what account it is that David declares those to be blessed who form a wise and prudent judgment concerning the afflictions by which God chastises his servants. We have said that he had to contend in his own heart against the perverse judgments of foolish and wicked men, because, when affliction was pressing heavily upon him, many considered that he had fallen into a desperate condition, and was altogether beyond the hope of recovery. Doubtless, it happened to him as it did to the holy patriarch Job, whom his friends reckoned to be one of the most wicked of men, when they saw God treating him with great severity. And certainly it is an error which is by far too common among men, to look upon those who are oppressed with afflictions as condemned and reprobate. As, on the one hand, the most of men, judging of the favor of God from an uncertain and transitory state of prosperity, applaud the rich, and those upon whom, as they say, fortune smiles; so, on the other hand, they act contemptuously towards the wretched and miserable, and foolishly imagine that God hates them, because he does not exercise so much forbearance towards them as he does towards the reprobate. The error of which we speak, namely, that of judging wrongfully and wickedly, is one which has prevailed in all ages of the world. The Scriptures in many places plainly and distinctly declare, that God, for various reasons, tries the faithful by adversities, at one time to train them to patience, at another to subdue the sinful affections of the flesh, at another to cleanse, and, as it were, purify them from the remaining desires of the flesh, which still dwell within them; sometimes to humble them, sometimes to make them an example to others, and at other times to stir them up to the contemplation of the divine life. For the most part, indeed, we often speak rashly and indiscriminately concerning others, and, so to speak, plunge even into the lowest abyss those who labor under affliction. To restrain such a rash and unbridled spirit, David says that they are blessed who do not suffer themselves, by speaking at random, to judge harshly of their neighbors; but, discerning aright the afflictions by which they are visited, mitigate, by the wisdom of the Spirit, the severe and unjust judgments to which we are naturally so prone. I have just adduced as an example the case of Job, whom his friends, when they saw him involved in extreme misery, hesitated not to account an outcast, and one whose case was altogether hopeless. 101 If any one endued with candour, and possessed of a humane disposition, should meet with such a case, he would regard it in the exercise of the same discretion which David here commends. As to ourselves, being admonished by this testimony of the Holy Spirit, let us learn to guard against a too precipitate judgment. We must therefore judge prudently of our brethren who are in affliction; that is to say, we must hope well of their salvation, lest, if we condemn them unmercifully before the time, this unjust severity in the end fall upon our own heads. It ought, however, especially to be observed, what indeed I have already noticed, that the object which David had in view, when he saw himself, as it were, overwhelmed by the malicious and cruel judgments which were expressed concerning him, was to fortify himself by this as a ground of consolation, lest he should sink under the temptation. If, therefore, at any time Satan should endeavor to destroy the foundation of our faith, by the rash and presumptuous judgments of men, let us also learn to have recourse to this device of wisdom, lest unawares we fall into despair. This is the proper use of the doctrine contained in this passage.

The Lord will deliver him in the day of evil Some connect these words, in the day of evil, with the preceding clause; and the reading thus suggested might indeed be admitted; but the distinction which I have followed is better adapted to the sense, and is also supported by the Hebrew accent. Thus at least the doctrine deducible from these words is susceptible of a fuller meaning, namely, that the Lord will deliver the poor in the day of his adversity. Some think that David here prays for a blessing in behalf of the upright and compassionate; as if he had said, May the Lord himself recompense them again for their kindness, if at any time it happen that they are grievously afflicted! Others suppose that David here records the language of such men from which we may come to the knowledge of their wisdom and uprightness. In my opinion, however, both are equally in error in reading this clause in the form of a desire or prayer. Whether, indeed, David speaks in his own name, or in the name of others, he briefly recommends and enjoins the kindness which we ought to exercise towards the afflicted; for although God may for a time manifest his displeasure against them, yet he will, nevertheless, be gracious to them, so that the issue will at length be happier and more joyful than the judgment we might be led to form from the present aspect of things. We now see that the sense in which I have explained this verse is much more copious and fuller of meaning, namely, that we ought to hope for salvation and deliverance from the hand of the Lord, even in the day of adversity; for otherwise, no man who had once fallen into a state of sorrow and sadness would ever be able to rise again. And this I say, because the design of the Holy Spirit in this passage is not only to exhort the faithful to be ready in showing kindness towards their brethren when they see them in affliction, but also to point out the remedy which has been provided for the mitigation of our sorrow, whenever our faith is shaken by adversity.

Calvin: Psa 41:2 - Jehovah will keep him, and preserve him in life 2.Jehovah will keep him, and preserve him in life Here David follows out the same sentiment expressed in the preceding verse, when he says that the L...

2.Jehovah will keep him, and preserve him in life Here David follows out the same sentiment expressed in the preceding verse, when he says that the Lord will keep the afflicted, whose destruction cruel and unjust men represent as inevitable. It is likewise necessary always to bear in mind the contrast which is stated between the day of evil and the blessing of deliverance. In this verse the expressions denoting restoration to life, and blessedness on the earth, are of similar import. By these expressions, David means to show that although he had been to all appearance a dead man, yet the hope of life both for himself and for all the faithful had not been extinguished. There might, it is true, appear some inconsistency in his promising himself a happy life in this world, seeing our condition here would be miserable indeed if we had not the expectation of a better state in the world to come. But the answer to this is, that as many had despaired of his recovery, he expressly declares that he will yet be restored to his former state, and will continue alive, nay, that in him there will be seen manifest tokens of the favor of God. He does not in the least exclude by these expressions the hope of a better life after death. What follows concerning the bed of sorrow has led some to form a conjecture which, in my opinion, is not at all probable. What David says of affliction in general, without determining what kind of affliction, they regard as applicable exclusively to sickness. But it is no uncommon thing for those who are sorrowful and grieved in their minds to throw themselves upon their bed, and to seek repose; for the hearts of men are sometimes more distressed by grief than by sickness. It is, certainly, highly probable that David was at that time afflicted with some very heavy calamity, which might be a token that God was not a little displeased with him. In the second clause of the verse there is some obscurity. Some understand the expression, turning the bed, in the same sense as if God, in order to give some alleviation to his servant in the time of trouble, had made his bed and arranged it, as we are wont to do to those who are sick, that they may lay themselves more softly. 102 Others hold, and, in my opinion, more correctly, that when David was restored to health, his bed, which had formerly served him as a sick couch, was turned, that is to say, changed. 103 Thus the sense would be, that although he now languish in sorrow, whilst the Lord is chastening him and training him by means of affliction, yet in a little while he will experience relief by the hand of the same God, and thus recover his strength.

Calvin: Psa 41:4 - I have said, O Jehovah! have mercy upon me 4.I have said, O Jehovah! have mercy upon me By this verse he shows that in his adversity he did not seek to soothe his mind by flattery, as the grea...

4.I have said, O Jehovah! have mercy upon me By this verse he shows that in his adversity he did not seek to soothe his mind by flattery, as the greater part of men do, who endeavor to assuage their sorrows by some vain consolation. And, certainly, the man who is guided by the Spirit of God will, when warned of God by the afflictions with which he is visited, frankly acknowledge his sins, and quietly submit to the admonitions of his brethren, nay, he will even anticipate them by a voluntary confession. David here lays down a mark by which he distinguishes himself from the reprobate and wicked, when he tells us that he earnestly entreated that his sin might not be laid to his charge, and that he had sought refuge in the mercy of God. He indeed requests that some alleviation might be granted to him under the affliction which he endured: but he rises to a higher source of relief, when he asks that through the forgiveness of his sins he might obtain reconciliation to God. Those, as we have said elsewhere, invert the natural order of things, who seek a remedy only for the outward miseries under which they labor, but all the while neglect the cause of them; acting as a sick man would do who sought only to quench his thirst, but never thought of the fever under which he labors, and which is the chief cause of his trouble. Before David, therefore, speaks at all of the healing of his soul, that is to say, of his life 104 he first says, Have mercy upon me: and with this we must connect the reason which immediately follows — for I have sinned against thee. In saying so, he confesses that God is justly displeased with him, and that he can only be restored again to his favor by his sins being blotted out. I take the particle כי , ki, in its proper and natural signification, and not adversatively, as some would understand it. He asks then that God would have mercy upon him because he had sinned. From that proceeds the healing of the soul, which he interposes between his prayer and confession, as being the effect of the compassion and mercy of God; for David expects that as soon as he had obtained forgiveness, he would also obtain relief from his affliction.

Calvin: Psa 41:5 - My enemies have spoken evil of me. To speak 5.My enemies have spoken evil of me. To speak is here used in the sense of to imprecate. In thus describing the unbecoming conduct of his enemies, ...

5.My enemies have spoken evil of me. To speak is here used in the sense of to imprecate. In thus describing the unbecoming conduct of his enemies, he seeks, as has been elsewhere said, to induce God to have mercy upon him: because the more that God sees his own people cruelly treated, he is so much the more disposed mercifully to succor them. Thus David, by his own example, stirs up and encourages us to greater confidence in God; because the more that our enemies break forth in their cruelty towards us, so much the more does it procure for us favor in the sight of God. The terms in which his enemies uttered this imprecation show how cruel their hatred had been towards him, since it could only be appeased by his destruction, and that, too, accompanied with shame and ignominy; for they wished that with his life the very remembrance of his name should also be blotted out.

Calvin: Psa 41:6 - And if he come to see me, he speaketh lies 6.And if he come to see me, he speaketh lies What is contained in this verse relates to his false and treacherous friends. Those who were his profess...

6.And if he come to see me, he speaketh lies What is contained in this verse relates to his false and treacherous friends. Those who were his professed enemies made no secret of their enmity against him, but openly persecuted him; and that he has already shown in the preceding verse. In addition to this, he now complains that many came to him with professions of attachment to him, as if they had been his friends, who, nevertheless, afterwards poured forth their malicious ill-will in secret against him. Enemies of this sort, who thus cover and conceal their malice, and insinuate themselves under the mask of a fair appearance, only for the purpose of secretly doing us mischief, are indeed much more to be feared than those who openly declare their wicked intentions. Accordingly, having complained of his open enemies, he proceeds to speak of his pretended friends, of whom he declares that they come to see him with no other design than to speak lies, and yet that they are meanwhile devising some deceitful and malicious purpose against him, nay, that they are even secretly heaping up iniquity, and, so to speak, laying it up in store in their hearts; and then he adds, that when they have gone forth from his presence, they manifest their hypocrisy and deceitfulness.

Calvin: Psa 41:7 - All they that hate me whisper together against me 7.All they that hate me whisper together against me Here he seems generally to include both classes of his enemies; those who sought to oppress him i...

7.All they that hate me whisper together against me Here he seems generally to include both classes of his enemies; those who sought to oppress him in an open manner, and in the character of avowed enemies; and those who, under the pretense of friendship, attempted to do the same thing by deceit and stratagem. Accordingly, he says that all of them took counsel together about his destruction, just as we know that wicked men hold much secret consultation respecting their intended deeds of treachery, and whisper to one another concerning them. Hence he adds the words to meditate, or plot, which he employs to denote their base conspiracies and sinful consultations.

Calvin: Psa 41:8 - An evil deed of Belial cleaved fast to him 8.An evil deed of Belial cleaved fast to him From this verse it appears that they had thus conspired together for his destruction, on the ground that...

8.An evil deed of Belial cleaved fast to him From this verse it appears that they had thus conspired together for his destruction, on the ground that they regarded him as a wicked man, and a person worthy of a thousand deaths. The insolence and arrogance which they manifested towards him proceeded from the false and wicked judgment which they had formed concerning him, and of which he made mention in the beginning of the psalm. They say, therefore, that an evil deed of Belial holds him shut up, and, as it were, bound fast. This the verb יצוק , yatsuk, properly signifies; but in translating the verse I have followed the rendering which is most commonly received, reading cleaveth fast to him, etc. This expression is by others rendered spreadeth upon him, but this interpretation seems to me to be too constrained. As to the word Belial, we have already spoken of it in the eighteenth psalm. But as grammarians maintain that it is compounded of בלי , beli, and יעל , yaäl, which signify not to rise, the expression, thing of Belial, (for so it is literally in the Hebrew,) I understand in this place as meaning an extraordinary and hateful crime, which, as we commonly say, can never be expiated, and from which there is no possibility of escape; unless, perhaps, some would rather refer it to the affliction itself under which he labored, as if his enemies had said that he was seized by some incurable malady. 105 But whatever may be as to this, his enemies regarded it as absolutely certain that God was altogether hostile to him, and would never be reconciled towards him, since he was chastising him with so much severity. When they add in the following clause, he shall never be able to rise again, 106 this clearly shows that they utterly cut off from him all hope of recovery. And certainly it was a sore temptation to David, who had in himself the testimony of a good conscience, to think that he was regarded by men as one who was pursued by the vengeance of God, nay, that they even cast him headlong into hell. But it pleased God thus to try his servant, that, trusting to the testimony of his own conscience, he should pay no regard to what men might say, or be troubled by the reproaches they might cast upon him. It was also his design to teach us, by his example, that we must seek the reward of our righteousness elsewhere than in this world, since we see with what unequal balances the world often sets itself to estimate the difference between virtue and vice.

Calvin: Psa 41:9 - Even the man of my peace 9.Even the man of my peace As the very height of all his miseries, David here declares that he had found the same treachery in some one, or, indeed, ...

9.Even the man of my peace As the very height of all his miseries, David here declares that he had found the same treachery in some one, or, indeed, in many of his greatest friends. For the change of number is very frequent in the Hebrew language, so that he may speak of several individuals as if they were only one person. Thus the meaning would be: Not only the common people, or strangers of whom I had no knowledge or acquaintance, but my greatest friends, nay, even those with whom I was most intimate, and those of my own household, whom I admitted to eat and drink with me at my table, vaunt themselves reproachfully against me. Among the Hebrews, the expression, men of peace, denotes their kinsfolk and connections; but it was a much closer alliance, and one which ought to have secured a stricter observance of the laws of friendship, to eat the bread of David in company with himself: for it is as if he had employed the appellation, My companion. 107 If, however, any would rather understand it of some particular traitor than of several persons, I have no objection to it. To lift up the heel is, in my opinion, to be understood metaphorically, and signifies to rise up disdainfully against a man who is afflicted and cast down. 108 Others explain the expression by to lay wait secretly; but the former interpretation is more appropriate, That the wicked, seeing that David was placed in embarrassed circumstances, or already prostrated in the dust, took occasion from this to assail him indirectly indeed, but, nevertheless, always with insolence; a thing which usually happens among people of a wicked and servile disposition. Christ, in quoting this passage, (Joh 13:18,) applies it to the person of Judas. And certainly we ought to understand that, although David speaks of himself in this psalm, yet he speaks not as a common and private person, but as one who represented the person of Christ, inasmuch as he was, as it were, the example after which the whole Church should be conformed — a point well entitled to our attention, in order that each of us may prepare himself for the same condition. It was necessary that what was begun in David should be fully accomplished in Christ; and, therefore, it must of necessity come to pass, that the same thing should be fulfilled in each of his members, namely, that they should not only suffer from external violence and force, but also from internal foes, ever ready to betray them, even as Paul declares that the Church shall be assailed, not only by “fightings without,” but also by “fears within,” (2Co 7:5.)

Calvin: Psa 41:10 - Do thou, O Jehovah I have mercy upon me 10.Do thou, O Jehovah I have mercy upon me From a consideration of the wrongful cruelty of his enemies, he again takes encouragement to pray. And the...

10.Do thou, O Jehovah I have mercy upon me From a consideration of the wrongful cruelty of his enemies, he again takes encouragement to pray. And there is included in what he says a tacit contrast between God and men; as if he had said, Since there is to be found no aid or help in the world, but as, on the contrary, a strange degree of cruelty, or secret malice, every where prevails, be thou, at least, O Lord! pleased to succor me by thy mercy. This is the course which ought to be pursued by all the afflicted, whom the world unjustly persecutes; that is to say, they ought not only to occupy themselves in bewailing the wrongs which are done them, but they ought also to commend their cause to God: and the more Satan endeavors to overthrow their faith, and to distract their thoughts, the more should they fix their minds attentively on God alone. In using such language, the Psalmist again ascribes his restoration to the mercy of God as its cause. What he says in the concluding clause of the verse of taking vengeance seems harsh and unaccountable. If he confessed truly and from the heart, in the preceding part of the psalm, that God was just in thus afflicting him, why does he not extend forgiveness to others, as he desires that forgiveness should be granted to himself? Surely it were a shameful abuse of the grace of God, if, after having been restored and pardoned by him, we should refuse to follow his example in showing mercy. Besides, it would have been a feeling far removed from that of humility or kindness, for David, even while he was yet in the midst of death, to have desired revenge. But here two things are to be taken into account: First, David was not as one of the common people, but a king appointed by God, and invested with authority; and, secondly, It is not from an impulse of the flesh, but in virtue of the nature of his office, that he is led to denounce against his enemies the punishment which they had merited. If, then, each individual indiscriminately, in taking vengeance upon his enemies, should allege the example of David in his own defense, it is necessary, first, to take into account the difference which subsists between us and David, by reason of the circumstances and position in which he was placed by God; 110 and, secondly, it is necessary to ascertain whether the same zeal which was in him reigns also in us, or rather, whether we are directed and governed by the same divine Spirit. David, being king, was entitled, in virtue of his royal authority, to execute the vengeance of God against the wicked; but as to us our hands are tied. In the second place, As he represented the person of Christ, so he cherished in his heart pure and holy affections: and hence it is, that, in speaking as he does in this verse, he indulged not his own angry spirit, but fulfilled faithfully the duties of the station to which he had been called of God. In short, in acting thus, he executed the righteous judgment of God, just in the same way as it is lawful for us to pray that the Lord himself would take vengeance upon the ungodly; for, as we are not armed with the power of the sword, it is our duty to have recourse to the heavenly Judge. At the same time, in beseeching him to show himself our guardian and defender, by taking vengeance on our enemies, we must do so in a calm and composed state of mind, and exercise a watchful care lest we should give too loose reins to our desires, by casting off the rule prescribed by the Spirit. As to David, the duties of his station required that he should employ means for subduing the rebellious, and that he should be truly the minister of God in inflicting punishment upon all the wicked.

Calvin: Psa 41:11 - By this I know that I have been acceptable to thee 11.By this I know that I have been acceptable to thee David now proceeds to the exercise of thanksgiving; unless, indeed, by altering the tense of th...

11.By this I know that I have been acceptable to thee David now proceeds to the exercise of thanksgiving; unless, indeed, by altering the tense of the verb, we would rather with some read this verse in connection with the preceding, in this way: In this I shall know that thou favorest me, if thou suffer not my enemies to triumph over me; but it suits much better to understand it as an expression of joy on account of some deliverance which God had vouchsafed to him. After having offered up his prayers, he now ascribes his deliverance to God, and speaks of it as a manifest and singular benefit he had received from him. It might, however, be asked, whether it is a sufficiently sure method of our coming to the knowledge of God’s love towards us, that he does not suffer our enemies to triumph over us? for it will often happen, that a man is delivered from danger, whom, nevertheless, God does not regard with pleasure; and, besides, the good-will of God towards us is known chiefly from his word, and not simply by experience. The answer to this is easy: David was not destitute of faith, but for the confirmation of it he took advantage of the helps which God had afterwards added to his word. In speaking thus, he seems to refer not only to the favor and good-will which God bears to all the faithful in common, but to the special favor which God had conferred upon him in choosing him to be king; as if he had said, Now, Lord, I am more and more confirmed in the belief that thou hast vouchsafed to adopt me to be the first-born among the kings of the earth. Thus he extends to the whole state of the realm the help of God, by means of which he had been delivered from some particular calamity.

Calvin: Psa 41:12 - And as for me, thou wilt uphold me in my integrity 12.And as for me, thou wilt uphold me in my integrity Some expound the clause thus: That, as David followed after uprightness, God had stretched out ...

12.And as for me, thou wilt uphold me in my integrity Some expound the clause thus: That, as David followed after uprightness, God had stretched out the hand to him. But this interpretation does not agree very well with a preceding sentence, in which he acknowledged that he had been justly punished by God. The calamity which had befallen him exposed him to the insult and derision of his enemies; but it is not likely that they were the authors of it: and hence, it would have been out of place to have adduced his integrity for this purpose, because the Lord is said to have respect to our integrity, when he defends us against our enemies, and delivers us from the outrage of men. We must therefore seek another meaning. The Hebrew word which we have rendered integrity might be referred to the body as well as the mind, thus: I shall continue sound, because thou wilt preserve and establish me. He seems, however, to extend the favor of God still farther; as if he had said, that he had been assisted not only once by his hand, but that, during the whole course of the period he had enjoyed prosperity, he had always been upheld in safety by the power of God. If any would rather understand by this term the piety and sincere disposition for which David was distinguished, — and this meaning would be very suitable, — it will not follow from this that David boasts of his past life, but only that he declares that, when brought to the test, or in the midst of the conflict, even although Satan and wicked men endeavored to shake his faith, he had not turned aside from the fear of God. By these words, then, he bears testimony to his patience, because, when sorely vexed and tormented, he had not forsaken the path of uprightness. If this meaning should be adopted, it must be observed, that this benefit, namely, that David continued invincible, and boldly sustained these assaults of temptation, is immediately after ascribed to God, and that for the future, David looked for preservation by no other means than by the sustaining power of God. If the language should be understood as referring to his external condition, this will be found to suit equally well the scope of the passage, and the meaning will be this, That God will never cease to manifest his favor, until he has preserved his servants in safety, even to the end. As to the form of expression, that God establishes them before his face, this is said of those whom he defends and preserves in such a manner, that he shows by evident tokens the paternal care which he exercises over them; as, on the other hand, when he seems to have forgotten his own people, he is said to hide his face from them.

Calvin: Psa 41:13 - Blessed be Jehovah, the God of Israel, for ever and ever 13.Blessed be Jehovah, the God of Israel, for ever and ever 111 Here the Psalmist confirms and repeats the expression of thanksgiving contained in a ...

13.Blessed be Jehovah, the God of Israel, for ever and ever 111 Here the Psalmist confirms and repeats the expression of thanksgiving contained in a preceding verse. By calling God expressly the God of Israel, he testifies that he cherished in his heart a deep and thorough impression of the covenant which God had made with the Fathers; because it was the source from which his deliverance proceeded. The term amen is repeated twice, to express the greater vehemence, and that all the godly might be the more effectually stirred up to praise God.

Defender: Psa 41:9 - familiar friend This prophecy was fulfilled by Judas at the last supper (Joh 13:18), confirming that the main context of the psalm is the betrayal of Christ."

This prophecy was fulfilled by Judas at the last supper (Joh 13:18), confirming that the main context of the psalm is the betrayal of Christ."

Defender: Psa 41:13 - Amen, and Amen Book 1 of the Psalms closes with this doxology. A similar doxology ends each of the five Books in the Psalms (Psa 72:18-20; Psa 89:52; Psa 106:48; Psa...

Book 1 of the Psalms closes with this doxology. A similar doxology ends each of the five Books in the Psalms (Psa 72:18-20; Psa 89:52; Psa 106:48; Psa 145:21; Psa 150:6)."

TSK: Psa 41:1 - Blessed // the poor // Lord // time of trouble (Title), This Psalm is supposed to have been written on the same occasion as the three former; and to relate to David’ s affliction, and the evil...

(Title), This Psalm is supposed to have been written on the same occasion as the three former; and to relate to David’ s affliction, and the evil treatment he received from his enemies during its continuance.

Blessed : Psa 112:9; Deu 15:7-11; Job 29:12-16, Job 31:16-20; Pro 14:21, Pro 19:17; Ecc 11:1, Ecc 11:2; Isa 58:7-11; Mar 14:7; Luk 14:13, Luk 14:14; 2Co 9:8-14; Gal 2:10

the poor : or, the weak, or sick, Mat 25:34-39; Act 20:35; 1Th 5:14

Lord : Psa 34:19, Psa 37:26, Psa 37:39, Psa 37:40; Heb 6:10; Jam 2:13

time of trouble : Heb. the day of evil, Psa 37:19; Pro 16:14; Ecc 12:1; Rev 3:10

TSK: Psa 41:2 - preserve // blessed // thou wilt not preserve : Psa 33:19, Psa 91:3-7; Jer 45:4, Jer 45:5 blessed : Psa 128:1-6; 1Ti 4:8 thou wilt not : or, do not thou, Psa 27:12, Psa 37:32, Psa 37:33, ...

preserve : Psa 33:19, Psa 91:3-7; Jer 45:4, Jer 45:5

blessed : Psa 128:1-6; 1Ti 4:8

thou wilt not : or, do not thou, Psa 27:12, Psa 37:32, Psa 37:33, Psa 140:8, Psa 140:9

TSK: Psa 41:3 - strengthen // make strengthen : Psa 73:26; 2Ki 1:6, 2Ki 1:16, 2Ki 20:5, 2Ki 20:6; 2Co 4:16, 2Co 4:17; Phi 2:26, Phi 2:27 make : Heb. turn

strengthen : Psa 73:26; 2Ki 1:6, 2Ki 1:16, 2Ki 20:5, 2Ki 20:6; 2Co 4:16, 2Co 4:17; Phi 2:26, Phi 2:27

make : Heb. turn

TSK: Psa 41:4 - Lord // heal Lord : Psa 32:5, Psa 51:1-3 heal : Psa 6:2-4, Psa 103:3, Psa 147:3; 2Ch 30:18-20; Hos 6:1; Jam 5:15, Jam 5:16

TSK: Psa 41:5 - Mine // his name Mine : Psa 22:6-8, Psa 102:8 his name : Job 18:17, Job 20:7; Pro 10:7

TSK: Psa 41:6 - speaketh // when speaketh : Psa 12:2; Pro 26:24, Pro 26:25; Neh 6:1-14; Pro 26:24-26; Dan 11:27; Mic 7:5-7; Luk 11:53, Luk 11:54, Luk 20:20-23; 2Co 11:26 when : Jer 20...

TSK: Psa 41:7 - whisper // against // my hurt whisper : Pro 16:28, Pro 26:20 *marg. Rom 1:29; 2Co 12:20 against : Psa 31:13, Psa 56:5, Psa 56:6; Mat 22:15, Mat 26:3, Mat 26:4 my hurt : Heb. evil t...

whisper : Pro 16:28, Pro 26:20 *marg. Rom 1:29; 2Co 12:20

against : Psa 31:13, Psa 56:5, Psa 56:6; Mat 22:15, Mat 26:3, Mat 26:4

my hurt : Heb. evil to me

TSK: Psa 41:8 - An evil disease // and An evil disease : Heb. A thing of Belial, Psa 38:3-7; Job 2:7, Job 2:8; Luk 13:16 and : Psa 3:2, Psa 71:11; Mat 27:41-46, Mat 27:63, Mat 27:64

An evil disease : Heb. A thing of Belial, Psa 38:3-7; Job 2:7, Job 2:8; Luk 13:16

and : Psa 3:2, Psa 71:11; Mat 27:41-46, Mat 27:63, Mat 27:64

TSK: Psa 41:9 - Yea // mine own familiar friend // which // lifted up Yea : Psa 55:12-14, Psa 55:20-22; 2Sa 15:12; Job 19:19; Jer 20:10 mine own familiar friend : Heb. the man of my peace which : Deu 32:15; Oba 1:7; Joh ...

Yea : Psa 55:12-14, Psa 55:20-22; 2Sa 15:12; Job 19:19; Jer 20:10

mine own familiar friend : Heb. the man of my peace

which : Deu 32:15; Oba 1:7; Joh 13:18, Joh 13:26, Joh 13:27

lifted up : Heb. magnified

TSK: Psa 41:10 - be merciful // that be merciful : Psa 57:1, Psa 109:21 that : Psa 18:37-42, Psa 21:8-10, Psa 69:22-28, Psa 109:6-20; Luk 19:27

TSK: Psa 41:11 - because because : Psa 13:4, Psa 31:8, Psa 35:25, Psa 86:17, Psa 124:6; Jer 20:13; Col 2:15

TSK: Psa 41:12 - thou // settest thou : Psa 25:21, Psa 94:18 settest : Psa 16:11, Psa 17:15, Psa 34:15, Psa 73:23, Psa 73:24; Job 36:7; Joh 17:24

TSK: Psa 41:13 - Blessed // Amen Blessed : Psa 72:18, Psa 72:19, Psa 89:52, Psa 106:48; 1Ch 29:10; Eph 1:3; Rev 4:8, Rev 5:9-14, Rev 7:12; Rev 11:17 Amen : The LXX and Vulgate render ...

Blessed : Psa 72:18, Psa 72:19, Psa 89:52, Psa 106:48; 1Ch 29:10; Eph 1:3; Rev 4:8, Rev 5:9-14, Rev 7:12; Rev 11:17

Amen : The LXX and Vulgate render Γενοιτο , γενοιτο , Fiat , fiat . So be it! So be it! With this psalm ends the first of the five books into which the Hebrews have divided the Psalms. Num 5:22; Deu 27:15-26; 1Ki 1:36; 1Ch 16:36; Jer 28:6; Mat 6:13; 1Co 14:16; Rev 22:20

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Poole: Psa 41:2 - Keep him alive // Unto the will of his enemies Keep him alive Heb. quicken him , i.e. revive and restore him. Either he will preserve him from trouble; or if God see trouble necessary or fit for ...

Keep him alive Heb. quicken him , i.e. revive and restore him. Either he will preserve him from trouble; or if God see trouble necessary or fit for him, and therefore suffer him to fall into it, he will raise him out of it.

Unto the will of his enemies i.e. to destruction, which they earnestly desire and endeavour to procure.

Poole: Psa 41:3 - -- Either, 1. Change or overturn his bed of sickness; which is done when a man is restored to health. Or rather, 2. Give him ease and comfort, which ...

Either,

1. Change or overturn his bed of sickness; which is done when a man is restored to health. Or rather,

2. Give him ease and comfort, which sick men receive by the help of those who turn and stir their whole bed, to make it soft and easy for them; for the words foregoing and following these suppose him to be and continue in a state of sickness. Thus the Lord elsewhere compares himself to a servant, waiting upon his people at table, Luk 12:37 ; as here, to one that makes their bed; metaphors implying strange condescension.

Poole: Psa 41:4 - My soul // For I have sinned against thee My soul i.e. either, 1. Myself, to wit, my body. So it is a double synecdoche. And the soul is so taken Psa 16:10 . Or, 2. My soul properly so ca...

My soul i.e. either,

1. Myself, to wit, my body. So it is a double synecdoche. And the soul is so taken Psa 16:10 . Or,

2. My soul properly so called; which is said to be healed , when it is pardoned and purged, as 2Ch 30:20 Isa 53:5 , compared with 1Pe 2:24 Mat 13:15 , compared with Mar 4:12 Jam 5:16 . So he strikes at the root of his misery, and prays for the removal of the sin of his soul, as the cause of the disease of his body.

For I have sinned against thee: this may be added, either,

1. As a reason or motive to God; Grant this request, for I have sinned , and therefore thy grace in healing me will be more glorious and admirable. Or, for I acknowledge that I have sinned; for the act is oft put for the declaration of it, as Exo 33:13 Psa 51:5 . Or,

2. As a reason moving him thus to pray, I said, Lord, be merciful unto me: heal my soul ; and great reason I had to say so, for I have sinned against thee.

Poole: Psa 41:5 - Speak evil of me Speak evil of me vent their ill wishes against me, in the following words.

Speak evil of me vent their ill wishes against me, in the following words.

Poole: Psa 41:6 - To see me // He speaketh vanity // His heart gathereth iniquity to itself // He telleth it To see me to visit me in my sickness, according to the custom. He speaketh vanity or falsehood ; pretending sympathy with me, and friendship to me...

To see me to visit me in my sickness, according to the custom.

He speaketh vanity or falsehood ; pretending sympathy with me, and friendship to me, whilst they plot mischief in their hearts against me.

His heart gathereth iniquity to itself even when he is with me, and pretends hearty affection to me, his heart cannot forbear its customary practice of meditating and devising mischief against me; for which he watcheth and seeketh for all occasions from my speeches, or carriage, or the circumstances of my condition, which he observes.

He telleth it partly to delight his companions, and partly to encourage them to and direct them in their malicious designs against me.

Poole: Psa 41:7 - Whisper together against me Whisper together against me i.e. secretly defame me, and closely plot against me.

Whisper together against me i.e. secretly defame me, and closely plot against me.

Poole: Psa 41:8 - An evil disease // He shall rise up no more An evil disease Heb. a word or thing of Belial , i.e. either, 1. Some wicked calumny which they had raised, and which stuck close to him. Or, 2. H...

An evil disease Heb. a word or thing of Belial , i.e. either,

1. Some wicked calumny which they had raised, and which stuck close to him. Or,

2. His great wickedness, whereof this is a sign. Or rather,

3. This sore disease or mischief; either sent upon him in way of vengeance for his horrid crimes; or such as God useth to inflict upon the sons of Belial, to show that he is in truth such a one, whatsoever he pretends to the contrary.

He shall rise up no more seeing God hath begun to punish him, he will make an end of him.

Poole: Psa 41:9 - Mine own familiar friend // Hath lifted up his heel Mine own familiar friend he means either Ahithophel, or some other perfidious counsellor or courtier, who was a type of Judas, to whom therefore it i...

Mine own familiar friend he means either Ahithophel, or some other perfidious counsellor or courtier, who was a type of Judas, to whom therefore it is applied, Joh 13:18 , as David was a type of Christ in being thus betrayed. So these words were literally fulfilled in David, and yet the Holy Ghost, which dictated them, looked further in them, even to Christ and Judas, in whom they received a further and fuller accomplishment.

Hath lifted up his heel a phrase implying injury, joined with insolency and contempt; taken from an unruly horse, which kicks at him that owns and feeds him.

Poole: Psa 41:10 - Be merciful unto me // That I may requite them Be merciful unto me: they censure me grievously, and conclude my case to be desperate; but, Lord, do thou vindicate me, and confute them. That I may...

Be merciful unto me: they censure me grievously, and conclude my case to be desperate; but, Lord, do thou vindicate me, and confute them.

That I may requite them or, and I will requite them , i.e. punish them for their malicious, and perfidious, and wicked practices; which, being now a magistrate, he was obliged to revenge, Rom 13:4 ; although when he was a private person, he was so far from revenging evil, that he rendered good for it, as we see, Psa 35:12,13 , and elsewhere.

Poole: Psa 41:11 - Thou favourest me // Because mine enemy doth not triumph over me Thou favourest me bearest a good will to me, and art resolved to make good thy promises to me, and wilt plead my righteous cause against them. Becau...

Thou favourest me bearest a good will to me, and art resolved to make good thy promises to me, and wilt plead my righteous cause against them.

Because mine enemy doth not triumph over me because hitherto thou hast helped and supported me, and prolonged my days to the disappointment of their hopes and designed triumphs. This mercy I thankfully receive as a token of further mercy. Compare 1Sa 17:37 2Co 1:9,10 .

Poole: Psa 41:12 - In mine integrity // Settest me before thy face for ever In mine integrity as I have kept my integrity, so thou hast kept me in and with it. Or, for mine integrity ; because thou hast seen my innocency, no...

In mine integrity as I have kept my integrity, so thou hast kept me in and with it. Or, for mine integrity ; because thou hast seen my innocency, notwithstanding all the calumnies of mine enemies; and thou hast promised and usest to afford thy protection to the innocent and upright.

Settest me before thy face for ever or, hast confirmed or established me in thy presence (i.e. either under thine eye and special care; or to minister unto thee, not only in thy temple, but as a king over thy people, or in that land, where thou art peculiarly present) for ever ; either,

1. Properly; and so this was done to David, either in his own person, partly here, and partly in the next life ; or in regard of his posterity, in whom the kingdom was established for ever. Or,

2. For my whole life, or for a long time, as that phrase is commonly used.

Poole: Psa 41:13 - From everlasting, and to everlasting From everlasting, and to everlasting or, from age to age , as long as the world lasts, and to all eternity. Amen signifies a hearty assent and app...

From everlasting, and to everlasting or, from age to age , as long as the world lasts, and to all eternity. Amen signifies a hearty assent and approbation, and withal an earnest desire and confidence, of the thing to which it is annexed. And as the Psalms are divided into five books, so each of them is closed with this word; the first here, the second Ps 72 , the third Ps 89 , the fourth Ps 106 , the last in the end of Ps 150 : the doubling of the word shows the fervency of his spirit in this work of praising God.

Haydock: Psa 41:1 - -- The fervent desire of the just after God: hope in afflictions.

The fervent desire of the just after God: hope in afflictions.

Haydock: Psa 41:1 - Understanding // Core Understanding. See Psalm xxxi. (Menochius) --- Core, who composed, (Tirinus) or sung (Menochius) most of the psalms in this second part. (Tirinu...

Understanding. See Psalm xxxi. (Menochius) ---

Core, who composed, (Tirinus) or sung (Menochius) most of the psalms in this second part. (Tirinus) ---

Pieces of a joyful nature were generally assigned to them, according to the Jews and St. Jerome, Psalm lxxxiv. (Menochius) ---

They were descendants of the famous schismatic, the miraculous preservation of whose innocent children teaches us, that the good will not be punished with the guilty, and that we must be raised above this earth, lest hell devour us, Numbers xvi. 31., and xxvi. 10. (Worthington) ---

The sentiments of the captives, (Calmet) and of every sincere Christian, are here expressed. (St. Augustine) ---

David may have been the author, (Calmet) as it is generally believed. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 41:2 - Waters Waters. This was sung at the baptism of Catechumens, (St. Augustine) teaching them to thirst after heaven. (Haydock) --- The hart being infected w...

Waters. This was sung at the baptism of Catechumens, (St. Augustine) teaching them to thirst after heaven. (Haydock) ---

The hart being infected with poison, thirsts exceedingly, as sinners must do for pardon. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 41:3 - Strong // El Strong. Most Bibles before Clement VIII read "fountain." (Calmet) --- El signifies both God and strong. (Berthier) --- The Levites desired earn...

Strong. Most Bibles before Clement VIII read "fountain." (Calmet) ---

El signifies both God and strong. (Berthier) ---

The Levites desired earnestly to serve God in his temple; Christians must wish to appear before him in heaven, (Calmet) when they will be free from temptations. Idols may destroy, but they cannot give life. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 41:4 - Bread // God Bread. Ovid imitates this: Cura dolorque animi lachrymæque alimenta fuere. (Met. x.) --- The tears of compunction obtain the remission of sin. ...

Bread. Ovid imitates this: Cura dolorque animi lachrymæque alimenta fuere. (Met. x.) ---

The tears of compunction obtain the remission of sin. (St. Jerome) ---

God . Thus the idolaters derided those who could not point at their God. (Haydock) ---

The Babylonians had conquered all the surrounding nations, and despised their deities. (Calmet) ---

The wicked laugh at the just, who are for a time in distress, comforting themselves with weeping. (Worthington) ---

Those who saw David wandering (Haydock) in the mountains, at a distance from the tabernacle, might ask him what religion or God he followed. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 41:5 - These // I shall // Feasting These sarcasms fill me with grief, (Calmet) while the solemn ceremonies of religion, which, I remember, where observed in the temple, cause my heart ...

These sarcasms fill me with grief, (Calmet) while the solemn ceremonies of religion, which, I remember, where observed in the temple, cause my heart to overflow with joy. (Berthier) ---

I shall. Protestants, "I had gone with the multitude; I went with them to the house of God with the voice of joy and praise; with a multitude that kept holiday." Yet the holidays of the Catholic Church are now ridiculed by many. (Protestants) (Haydock) ---

The original may have several other meanings. The tabernacle may here designate the musach of Levites, 4 Kings xvi. 18. (Calmet) ---

Feasting. Some such religious feasts were prescribed, Deuteronomy xii. 12. (Haydock) ---

David was not permitted to build the temple, nor to enter the tabernacle: but he speaks of heaven. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 41:6 - My countenance My countenance. Hebrew, "his," as Aquila, &c., read. (Calmet) --- Yet as the words are repeated, (ver. 12.) there seems to be a fault in the text,...

My countenance. Hebrew, "his," as Aquila, &c., read. (Calmet) ---

Yet as the words are repeated, (ver. 12.) there seems to be a fault in the text, (Berthier) owing to v, "his" being taken in here, instead of explaining it by and, ver. 7. (Haydock) ---

The arrangement of the letters in the Vulgate is preferable. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 41:7 - Little hill Little hill of Sion. I hope that I shall soon again behold the fertile regions along the Jordan. (Calmet) --- But these hills of Hermon, &c., are ...

Little hill of Sion. I hope that I shall soon again behold the fertile regions along the Jordan. (Calmet) ---

But these hills of Hermon, &c., are nothing when compared with heaven: They serve only to remind us of our banishment. (Berthier) ---

The difficulties of our present abode, hemmed in on all sides, teach us to place our hopes in heaven. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 41:8 - Flood-gates Flood-gates. The Hebrews imagined there were immense reservoirs of water above, (Calmet) which might serve to drown the earth, as at the deluge, Gen...

Flood-gates. The Hebrews imagined there were immense reservoirs of water above, (Calmet) which might serve to drown the earth, as at the deluge, Genesis vii. 11. Both heaven and earth seemed to be armed against the psalmist. (Haydock) ---

One affliction succeeded another, (Calmet) and God appeared to have abandoned his servants to temptations. But he enables them to come off with victory, and fills them with more joy in their trials: so that they may sing in heart, and pray. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 41:9 - Night // Mercy Night. In affliction, as well as in prosperity, we must praise the Lord. Roman Septuagint, "in the night he will manifest it." --- Mercy. (Haydo...

Night. In affliction, as well as in prosperity, we must praise the Lord. Roman Septuagint, "in the night he will manifest it." ---

Mercy. (Haydock) ---

This is very beautiful, but not agreeable with the original. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 41:11 - Whilst Whilst. Protestants As, "with a sword in my bones, mine enemies reproach me." (Haydock) --- Thus the martyrs were tortured and upbraided. (Calm...

Whilst. Protestants As, "with a sword in my bones, mine enemies reproach me." (Haydock) ---

Thus the martyrs were tortured and upbraided. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 41:12 - Countenance Countenance. To whom I look up with confidence. (Menochius) --- The just are comforted with the hope of God's sight. (Worthington)

Countenance. To whom I look up with confidence. (Menochius) ---

The just are comforted with the hope of God's sight. (Worthington)

Gill: Psa 41:1 - Blessed is he that considereth the poor // the Lord will deliver him in time of trouble Blessed is he that considereth the poor,.... Not the poor of the world in common, nor poor saints in particular, but some single poor man; for the wo...

Blessed is he that considereth the poor,.... Not the poor of the world in common, nor poor saints in particular, but some single poor man; for the word is in the singular number, and designs our Lord Jesus Christ, who, in Psa 40:17, is said to be "poor and needy": and so read the Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and Ethiopic versions here; who became poor for our sakes, that we might be enriched by his poverty; being born of poor parents, educated in a mean manner, and in public life was ministered to by others: the word q here used signifies one that is attenuated, weak, and exhausted either of his substance or strength, or both; as Christ was in his state of humiliation, when he was emptied of his riches, and, though Lord of all, had not where to lay his head; and whose strength was dried up like a potsherd, when he suffered on the cross; and indeed at best he was encompassed with weaknesses and infirmities: and in this his low estate he is to be wisely considered, or attended to with wisdom and understanding; and he may be said wisely to consider him, who considers how great a person he is, that came into such a low estate for us; not a mere man, but above angels and men, that has all the perfections of deity in him, is the eternal Son of God, truly and properly God, and the Creator of all things, and Governor of the universe; which consideration will engage to and encourage faith and hope in him, lead to adore his wonderful grace, and to admire his condescension and humility in becoming poor and weak; as also who considers that the poverty of Christ was for our sakes, and that we might be made rich with the riches of grace and glory; and considers it so as not to be offended with it; see Mat 11:6; and which may serve to support us under all meanness and infirmity, and in whatsoever estate saints may come into; and likewise who considers him in his offices which he exercised in that his estate as the apostle and high priest of our profession; and him in his exalted state in heaven; see Heb 12:3; in a word, he wisely considers him, who believes in him as his Saviour, prizes him as the pearl of great price, cleaves close unto him, and follows him wherever he goes; who desires to know more of him, is concerned for his honour, interest, kingdom and glory, and pities his poor members, and freely and bountifully communicates to them; and so the Targum,

"blessed is the man that wisely considers the afflictions of the poor, that he may have mercy on him;''

and such an one is an happy man, and the following things said of him prove him to be so;

the Lord will deliver him in time of trouble: or "in the evil day" r; out of all his trouble, temporal and spiritual, of body and soul; in every time of affliction, private and personal; or in a time of public calamity; perhaps reference may be had to the time of Jerusalem's destruction, which was a time of great tribulation, Mat 24:21; when those who did not consider Christ in his poor and low estate, but despised and rejected him, were destroyed; and such as did were saved from that calamity: and it may also include the day of judgment, which is the evil day, unto which the wicked are reserved, and when they will be punished with everlasting destruction; but then those that consider Christ, and believe in him, will be saved from wrath. Some s take these words, with what follows in the two next verses, as a prayer, and as delivered by him that visits the sick, for his comfort; and so Joseph Kimchi interprets it of an honourable man visiting a sick man, and instructing and comforting him with such words as these, that "the Lord will deliver him", &c.

Gill: Psa 41:2 - The Lord will preserve him and keep him alive // and he shall be blessed upon the earth // and thou wilt not deliver him into the will of his enemies The Lord will preserve him and keep him alive,.... Amidst a thousand deaths, to which he is exposed for making a profession of his faith in Christ; se...

The Lord will preserve him and keep him alive,.... Amidst a thousand deaths, to which he is exposed for making a profession of his faith in Christ; see 2Co 1:10; or this may refer to his spiritual life, which is hid and preserved in Christ, in whom he believes; and is safe and secure; because Christ lives he shall live also, and shall never die the second death, nor be hurt by it, but shall have everlasting life;

and he shall be blessed upon the earth; with temporal blessings; for whatever he has, be it more or less, he has it with the blessing of God, and as a blessing of the covenant, and in love, and so is a blessing indeed: and with spiritual blessings; with peace, pardon, righteousness, and a right and title to eternal glory and happiness; and he will be blessed in the new earth, in which righteousness will dwell, and where he will dwell, live, and reign with Christ a thousand years;

and thou wilt not deliver him into the will of his enemies; not into the will of Satan, that roaring lion who would devour him if he might; nor of wicked men, and furious persecutors, whose wrath the Lord makes to praise him; and the remainder of it is restrained by him; some read these words as a prayer, "do not thou deliver him", &c. see Psa 27:12; so Pagninus, Montanus, Junius and Tremellius, Ainsworth, and others.

Gill: Psa 41:3 - The Lord will strengthen him upon the bed of languishing // thou wilt make all his bed in his sickness The Lord will strengthen him upon the bed of languishing,.... When on a sick bed, or a death bed, where he lies languishing, and ready to expire; when...

The Lord will strengthen him upon the bed of languishing,.... When on a sick bed, or a death bed, where he lies languishing, and ready to expire; when his natural strength, spirits, and heart fail him, then the Lord strengthens him with strength in his soul; and is the strength of his heart, and his portion for ever. The Targum is,

"the Word of the Lord shall help him in his life, and shall appear to him on the bed of his illness, to quicken him;''

thou wilt make all his bed in his sickness; or "all his bed thou hast turned" or "wilt turn in his sickness" t; meaning not the recovery of him from a bed of sickness to a state of health, which is the sense given by many; much less a turning him from a state of ease and rest into trouble and distress; but making him easy and comfortable on a bed of sickness; which, in a literal sense, is done when a sick person's bed is turned or made, or he is turned upon it from side to side; so the Lord, by the comforts of his Spirit, makes a sick and death bed easy to them that believe in Christ, and often puts that triumphant song into their mouths in their dying moments, "O death! where is that sting?" &c. 1Co 15:55; and this is the peaceful end and blissful state of such who wisely consider Christ and believe in him; low estate, through the sins of his the insults of his enemies, and the treachery of one of his disciples, is described in the following verses.

Gill: Psa 41:4 - I said, Lord, be merciful unto me // heal my soul // for I have sinned against thee I said, Lord, be merciful unto me,.... See Gill on Psa 40:11; heal my soul; not that it was diseased with sin in such sense as the souls of other m...

I said, Lord, be merciful unto me,.... See Gill on Psa 40:11;

heal my soul; not that it was diseased with sin in such sense as the souls of other men are; but it is to be understood as a petition for comfort while bearing the sins of others, and which Christ as man stood in need of when in the garden and on the cross; so healing signifies comfort in trouble, as in Isa 57:18;

for I have sinned against thee; or "unto thee", or "before thee", as the Targum; not that any sin was committed by him in his own person, but he having all the sins of his people on him, which he calls his own, Psa 40:12; he was treated as a sinner, and as guilty before God, Isa 53:12; and so the words may be read, "for I am a sinner unto thee" u; I am counted as one by thee, having the sins of my people imputed to me; and am bound unto thee, or under obligation to bear the punishment of sin; or thus, "for I have made an offering for sin unto thee" w, so the word is used, Lev 6:26; and so it might be rendered in Lev 5:7; and perhaps may be better rendered so in Lev 4:3; and be understood, not of the sin of the anointed priest, but of his offering a sacrifice for the soul that sinned through ignorance, Psa 41:2, which offering is directed to: and then the sense here is, heal me, acquit me, discharge me, and deliver me out of this poor and low estate in which I am; for I have made my soul an offering for sin, and thereby have made atonement for all the sins of my people laid upon me; and accordingly he was acquitted and justified, 1Ti 3:16.

Gill: Psa 41:5 - Mine enemies speak evil of me // when shall he die // and his name perish Mine enemies speak evil of me,.... That is, the Jews, who were enemies to his person, people, doctrines and ordinances, and would not have him to reig...

Mine enemies speak evil of me,.... That is, the Jews, who were enemies to his person, people, doctrines and ordinances, and would not have him to reign over them; these spake evil of him, charged him with being a glutton and a winebibber; said he had a devil, and was a Samaritan; imputed his miracles to diabolical influence; branded his doctrine with blasphemy, and spoke against his religion and worship, and wished him ill, saying,

when shall he die; they had a good will to assassinate him privately, but upon mature deliberation they consulted and determined to take what advantage they could against him, and deliver him up to the Roman governor; they feared, should he go on and succeed, through his doctrines and miracles, as he did, it would go ill with them; and they concluded, could he be brought to death, it would clearly appear to the common people that he was not the Messiah; though this was the very thing he came into the world for, and which he himself was very desirous of; because hereby, and hereby only, the salvation of his people could be brought about; and though this was a thing foretold in prophecy, yet it seems as if Christ's enemies the Jews, and Satan himself, were ignorant of it, and of its virtue and use to save men; however, though it was an ill wish in them, it was well for us that he did die, though the consequence is not as they wished;

and his name perish? that is, the fame of his doctrine and miracles, the memory of him and his worthy deeds, particularly his Gospel, which so fully expresses the glory of his person and grace; yea, he himself, for they hoped that upon his death he would come into general disgrace, that his name would never be mentioned but with reproach, that his Gospel would be no more preached, and that he would be accursed of God and men: in all which they were sadly disappointed; for, upon his resurrection from the dead, he had a name given him above every name; his memory became precious to thousands; an ordinance was appointed to remember him to the end of the world in all his churches; his Gospel was ordered to be preached to all the world, as it was; and he himself is blessed for evermore.

Gill: Psa 41:6 - And if he come to see me // he speaketh vanity // his heart gathereth iniquity to itself // when he goeth abroad, he telleth it And if he come to see me,.... Meaning anyone of his enemies, when they came, as pretended, to pay him a friendly visit. A late learned writer x inter...

And if he come to see me,.... Meaning anyone of his enemies, when they came, as pretended, to pay him a friendly visit. A late learned writer x interprets this of Absalom, who visited his father when he had the smallpox, which he thinks, after mentioned, of which his enemies expected he would die, when Absalom pretended great concern for his life; though he, with others, were plotting against him, should he live, to destroy him;

he speaketh vanity; lies and falsehoods, in an hypocritical manner, with a double heart; his mouth and his heart not agreeing together; see Mat 22:16;

his heart gathereth iniquity to itself; amasses to itself greater treasures of wickedness still, thought that itself is desperately wicked, and very wickedness: this is to be understood of the enemies of Christ observing his words and actions, and laying them up, with a wicked intention, against a proper time;

when he goeth abroad, he telleth it; as in the instances concerning giving tribute to Caesar, destroying the temple, and saying he was the son of God, Mat 22:17; compared with Luk 23:2; compared with Mat 26:60, compared with Joh 19:5.

Gill: Psa 41:7 - All that hate me whisper together against me // against me do they devise my hurt All that hate me whisper together against me,.... That is, they privately conspired against him; see Mat 22:15; against me do they devise my hurt; ...

All that hate me whisper together against me,.... That is, they privately conspired against him; see Mat 22:15;

against me do they devise my hurt; not only to take away his name and credit, but his life.

Gill: Psa 41:8 - An evil disease, say they, cleaveth fast unto him // and now that he lieth, let him rise up no more An evil disease, say they, cleaveth fast unto him,.... Not any bodily one, of which they might hope he would die; much less any foul disease, the dis...

An evil disease, say they, cleaveth fast unto him,.... Not any bodily one, of which they might hope he would die; much less any foul disease, the disease of sin; but, as the phrase may be rendered, "a word of Belial" y; that is, a wicked charge or accusation; a charge of sin brought against him by the sons of Belial, as of blasphemy and sedition, which they concluded would be fastened upon him, and stick by him, and in which they should succeed to their wishes; or else the shameful punishment the death of the cross, inflicted on him, which they fancied would fix an indelible mark of infamy and scandal on him, since cursed is he that hangeth on a tree;

and now that he lieth, let him rise up no more; has much as he was dead, of which they had full proof, and was laid in the grave, his tomb watched, and the stone rolled to it sealed; they thought all was safe, and it was all over with him, that he would never rise again, as he had given out, and his disciples incapable of committing a fraud they afterwards accused them with: this, according to the above learned writer, see Psa 41:6, was said by Absalom, as he thinks Ahithophel is the person designed in Psa 41:9.

Gill: Psa 41:9 - Yea, mine own familiar friend // in whom I trusted // which did eat of my bread // hath lifted up his heel against me Yea, mine own familiar friend,.... Or, "the man of my peace" z; who did live peaceably with him, and ought always to have done so; whom he treated as ...

Yea, mine own familiar friend,.... Or, "the man of my peace" z; who did live peaceably with him, and ought always to have done so; whom he treated as his friend, as the rest of the apostles; calling him to that high office, and ordaining him to it, and qualifying him for it; and whom he called by the name of friend, when he came to betray him; Judas is meant;

in whom I trusted; with the bag and the money in it, both for the sustenance of his own family, the apostles, and for the relief of the poor, Joh 12:6;

which did eat of my bread; of his bread in common with the rest of the apostles; and who was eating with him when he gave the sign who should betray him; and who seems to have eaten of the bread in the Lord's supper: even this same person

hath lifted up his heel against me; by supplanting him, dealing hypocritically with him, and betraying him into the hands of his enemies: the metaphor is either taken from an unruly horse throwing his rider, and then ungenerously spurning at him, and trampling on him; or from wrestlers, who seek to supplant and trip up each other's heels; which shows the ingratitude, baseness, and treachery of Judas; see Joh 13:18.

Gill: Psa 41:10 - But thou, O Lord, be merciful unto me, and raise me up // that I may requite them But thou, O Lord, be merciful unto me, and raise me up,.... Not from a bed of illness, nor from a state of poverty and want; but from the dead: it was...

But thou, O Lord, be merciful unto me, and raise me up,.... Not from a bed of illness, nor from a state of poverty and want; but from the dead: it was by the will of his divine Father that he suffered death, and it was to him he made satisfaction and reconciliation for the sins of his people, by his sufferings and death; and therefore it was but a reasonable request, that, having done this, he should be raised from the dead: besides, his Father had promised it, and he had believed it; so that this prayer was a prayer of faith, founded upon a divine promise; and the resurrection of Christ is for the most part ascribed to God the Father as his act; though not to the exclusion of the Son, who had power, as to lay down his life, so to take it up again; and though the resurrection of Christ from the dead is not only an act of power, but also of justice, he having paid his people's debts, atoned for their sins, and satisfied law and justice, it was but right and equitable that he should be discharged from the prison of the grave, and set free; yet here it is requested as an act of mercy, grace, and kindness; for, by doing it, it would appear that his Father's wrath was taken away from him, and that he had turned himself from the fierceness of his anger to him, and that he was well pleased with his righteousness and sacrifice; besides, it was giving him glory, as well as rolling away the reproach he lay under; and, however, it was in mercy to his body the church, whom he represented, since it was for their justification; nay, their regeneration is influenced by it; and so is the resurrection of their bodies, of which Christ's resurrection is the pledge and pattern. The end Christ had in view in making the request follows;

that I may requite them: not "him", Judas, last mentioned; for justice pursued and overtook him; he destroyed himself, and was gone to his own place, before Christ's resurrection from the dead; but them, the Jews, as a body; his enemies that spoke ill of him, wished ill to him, conspired against him, to take away his life, and did bring him to the dust of death: and this his requital of them, after his resurrection, was either of good for evil, by ordering his disciples to preach his Gospel, first at Jerusalem, to those very persons who were concerned in his death, many of whom were converted, baptized, and added to the church; or of evil, for their evil to him, which had its accomplishment in part, at the destruction of Jerusalem, and will more fully at the day of judgment, when they that have pierced him shall see him come in the clouds of heaven.

Gill: Psa 41:11 - By this I know that thou favourest me // because mine enemy doth not triumph over me By this I know that thou favourest me,.... Or "delightest in me" z; as he did, both as his Son and his servant; in his obedience, sufferings, and deat...

By this I know that thou favourest me,.... Or "delightest in me" z; as he did, both as his Son and his servant; in his obedience, sufferings, and death, whereby his counsels were accomplished, his covenant ratified, and the salvation of his people procured; and which delight and well pleasedness in him was the ground of his deliverance from the power of death and the grave; see Psa 18:19; the token by which Christ knew this was,

because mine enemy doth not triumph over me; Judas could not; he was too short lived, he was quickly taken away, and all the woes fall upon him imprecated on him, Psa 109:6; nor the Jews; for though they were highly delighted when they had fastened him to the cross, and when he was dead, and laid in the grave; yet they could not sing their jubilee song over him until the third day was past; for they knew he had given out that he should rise again the third day; on which day he did rise, and his apostles preached that he was alive, and through him the resurrection of the dead, to their great grief, vexation, and mortification: nor did Satan, the enemy of Christ, personal and mystical, triumph over him; not in the wilderness, where, after he had tempted him, he was obliged to leave him; nor in the garden, and his agony there, where he was strengthened by an angel; nor even on the cross; for on that Christ himself triumphed over Satan and his principalities, whom he spoiled, and destroyed the devil and all his works; and, at his ascension to heaven, led captivity captive, and gave gifts to men, in token of triumph, and went forth, in the ministration of the Gospel, conquering, and to conquer; turning men from the power of Satan, and causing his servants to triumph in him, while they were in every place diffusing the savour of his knowledge.

Gill: Psa 41:12 - And as for me, thou upholdest me in mine integrity // and settest me before thy face for ever And as for me, thou upholdest me in mine integrity,.... In the innocence of his nature, being free from sin, original and actual; in the uprightness o...

And as for me, thou upholdest me in mine integrity,.... In the innocence of his nature, being free from sin, original and actual; in the uprightness of his life and conversation before God and men; and in the perfection of his obedience and sacrifice, whereby he brought in a perfect righteousness, made complete atonement, and obtained full salvation and redemption for his people; and, because of all this, Jehovah the Father upheld him in his sufferings, as man and Mediator, that he failed not, and was not discouraged: or rather the sense is, that by several things which turned up in Providence, as the disagreement of the witnesses, declaration of his judge, and the confession of Judas his betrayer, he was cleared of the charges brought against him, and his innocence was maintained, and he upheld in it; but especially this was done by raising him from the dead, when he was openly acquitted, discharged, and justified, and declared to be the Holy One of God, 1Ti 3:16;

and settest me before thy face for ever; after his resurrection, he was introduced into the presence of his Father, and was made glad with his countenance; where he sits before him as the Angel of his presence, and appears in the presence of God in the behalf of his people; is the Lamb in the midst of the throne, as though he had been slain; where his person, blood, righteousness, and sacrifice, are ever in view for their acceptance, and where he ever lives to make intercession for them; for here he will continue until the time of the restitution of all things.

Gill: Psa 41:13 - Blessed be the Lord God of Israel // from everlasting, and to everlasting // Amen and Amen Blessed be the Lord God of Israel,.... Which is said, either by the Messiah, on account of the delight his Father had in him; the favour he had shown...

Blessed be the Lord God of Israel,.... Which is said, either by the Messiah, on account of the delight his Father had in him; the favour he had shown him in raising him from the dead, maintaining his innocence, and exalting him at his own right hand; and for all the blessings of grace the whole Israel of God enjoyed through him: or else by the church, who is meant by Israel, the Lord is the God of in a covenant way; who, hearing such things done to her Lord and head, breaks out into an exclamation of praise, and ascribes blessing and glory to God for them, which is due to him;

from everlasting, and to everlasting; that is, throughout all ages, world without end, Eph 3:21.

Amen and Amen; which word, as Kimchi observes, signifies confirmation; and the doubling of it is for the greater confirmation of what is expressed. Here ends the first part of the book of Psalms, which is divided into five parts by the Jews a.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 41:1 That is, the one who has been kind to the poor. The prefixed verbal form could be taken as jussive of prayer (“may the Lord deliver,” see ...

NET Notes: Psa 41:2 Heb “do not give him over to the desire of his enemies” (see Ps 27:12).

NET Notes: Psa 41:3 Heb “all his bed you turn in his illness.” The perfect is used here in a generalizing sense (see v. 1) or in a rhetorical manner to emphas...

NET Notes: Psa 41:4 In vv. 4-10 the psalmist recites the prayer of petition and lament he offered to the Lord.

NET Notes: Psa 41:5 Heb “and his name perish.”

NET Notes: Psa 41:6 Heb “he goes outside and speaks.”

NET Notes: Psa 41:7 Heb “together against me they whisper, all those who hate me.” The Hitpael of לָחַשׁ (lakhash) refers ...

NET Notes: Psa 41:8 Heb “and he who lies down will not again arise.”

NET Notes: Psa 41:9 The language of this verse is applied to Judas Iscariot in John 13:18.

NET Notes: Psa 41:10 The cohortative with prefixed vav (ו) here indicates purpose or result (“Then I will repay them”) after the preceding imperatives.

NET Notes: Psa 41:11 Heb “shout.”

NET Notes: Psa 41:12 Heb “and you cause me to stand before you permanently.”

NET Notes: Psa 41:13 Heb “surely and surely” (אָמֵן וְאָמֵן [’amen vÿ’...

Geneva Bible: Psa 41:1 "To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David." Blessed [is] he that ( a ) considereth the poor: the LORD will deliver him in time of trouble. ( a ) Not c...

Geneva Bible: Psa 41:3 The LORD will strengthen him upon the ( b ) bed of languishing: thou wilt make all his ( c ) bed in his sickness. ( b ) When for sorrow and grief of ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 41:5 Mine enemies ( d ) speak evil of me, When shall he die, and his name perish? ( d ) That is, curse me and cannot have their cruel hate quenched but wi...

Geneva Bible: Psa 41:6 And if he come to see [me], he speaketh ( e ) vanity: his heart gathereth iniquity to itself; [when] he goeth abroad, he telleth [it]. ( e ) For pret...

Geneva Bible: Psa 41:8 ( f ) An evil disease, [say they], cleaveth fast unto him: and [now] that he lieth he shall rise up no more. ( f ) The enemies thought by his sharp p...

Geneva Bible: Psa 41:9 Yea, mine own familiar friend, in whom I trusted, which did eat of my bread, ( g ) hath lifted up [his] heel against me. ( g ) As David felt this fal...

Geneva Bible: Psa 41:12 And as for me, thou upholdest me ( h ) in mine integrity, and settest me before thy ( i ) face for ever. ( h ) Meaning, either in prosperity of life ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 41:13 Blessed [be] the LORD God of Israel from everlasting, and to everlasting. ( k ) Amen, and Amen. ( k ) By this repetition he stirs up the faithful to ...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 41:1-4 - --The people of God are not free from poverty, sickness, or outward affliction, but the Lord will consider their case, and send due supplies. From his L...

MHCC: Psa 41:5-13 - --We complain, and justly, of the want of sincerity, and that there is scarcely any true friendship to be found among men; but the former days were no b...

Matthew Henry: Psa 41:1-4 - -- In these verses we have, I. God's promises of succour and comfort to those that consider the poor; and, 1. We may suppose that David makes mention o...

Matthew Henry: Psa 41:5-13 - -- David often complains of the insolent conduct of his enemies towards him when he was sick, which, as it was very barbarous in them, so it could not ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 41:1-3 - -- (Heb.: 41:2-4) The Psalm opens by celebrating the lot, so rich in promises, of the sympathetic man. דּל is a general designation of the poor (e....

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 41:4-6 - -- (Heb.: 41:5-7) He, the poet, is treated in his distress of soul in a manner totally different from the way just described which is so rich in promi...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 41:7-9 - -- (Heb.: 41:8-10) Continuation of the description of the conduct of the enemies and of the false friend. התלחשׁ , as in 2Sa 12:19, to whisper t...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 41:10-12 - -- (Heb.: 41:11-13) Having now described their behaviour towards him, sick in soul and body as he is, so devoid of affection, yea, so malignantly host...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 41:13 - -- (Heb.: 41:14) The closing doxology of the First Book, vid., Introduction. Concerning בּרוּך vid., Psa 18:47. The expression "from aeon to aeon...

Constable: Psa 41:1-13 - --Psalm 41 David assured the godly in this psalm that those who help the needy would experience deliveranc...

Constable: Psa 41:1-2 - --1. God's blessings on the merciful 41:1-3 41:1 This verse succinctly states the lesson this whole psalm teaches. God blesses people who take care of t...

Constable: Psa 41:3-8 - --2. God's punishment of the treacherous 41:4-9 David continued to address the congregation of Israel, but presented the alternative to caring for the h...

Constable: Psa 41:9-12 - --3. God's deliverance of the upright 41:10-13 41:10 David had asked God to restore his health so he might repay his enemies. This may seem to be an unw...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 41:4 How to Confront Sinners When David sinned with Bathsheba, he broke all of the Ten Commandments. He coveted his neighbor’s wife, lived a lie, stole ...

Evidence: Psa 41:9 Messianic prophecy : This was fulfilled in Mar 14:10 .

Evidence: Psa 41:13 Read how Spurgeon used the Law. See Gal 3:19 footnote.

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 41 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 41:1, The recompence of the charitable; Psa 41:4, David complains of his enemies’ treachery; Psa 41:10, He flees to God for succour...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

Poole: Psalms 41 (Pendahuluan Pasal) THE ARGUMENT The occasion of this Psalm was manifestly some sore disease or affliction which God had inflicted upon David, and which gave his enemi...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 41 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 41:1-4) God's care for his people. (Psa 41:5-13) The treachery of David's enemies.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 41 (Pendahuluan Pasal) God's kindness and truth have often been the support and comfort of the saints when they have had most experience of man's unkindness and treachery...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 41 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 41 To the chief Musician, a Psalm of David. In this psalm is a prophecy concerning Christ, and concerning Judas Iscariot, as ...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


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