kecilkan semua  

Teks -- Psalms 30:1-12 (NET)

Tampilkan Strong
Konteks
Psalm 30
30:1 A psalm– a song used at the dedication of the temple; by David. I will praise you, O Lord, for you lifted me up, and did not allow my enemies to gloat over me. 30:2 O Lord my God, I cried out to you and you healed me. 30:3 O Lord, you pulled me up from Sheol; you rescued me from among those descending into the grave. 30:4 Sing to the Lord, you faithful followers of his; give thanks to his holy name. 30:5 For his anger lasts only a brief moment, and his good favor restores one’s life. One may experience sorrow during the night, but joy arrives in the morning. 30:6 In my self-confidence I said, “I will never be upended.” 30:7 O Lord, in your good favor you made me secure. Then you rejected me and I was terrified. 30:8 To you, O Lord, I cried out; I begged the Lord for mercy: 30:9 “What profit is there in taking my life, in my descending into the Pit? Can the dust of the grave praise you? Can it declare your loyalty? 30:10 Hear, O Lord, and have mercy on me! O Lord, deliver me!” 30:11 Then you turned my lament into dancing; you removed my sackcloth and covered me with joy. 30:12 So now my heart will sing to you and not be silent; O Lord my God, I will always give thanks to you.
Paralel   Ref. Silang (TSK)   ITL  

Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · David a son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel,son of Jesse of Judah; king of Israel
 · Pit the place of the dead
 · pit the place of the dead
 · Sheol the place of the dead


Topik/Tema Kamus: House | Praise | David | PSALMS, BOOK OF | Testimony | Thankfulness | Prayer | God | Joy | Afflictions and Adversities | Hell | PIT | Life | ESCHATOLOGY OF THE OLD TESTAMENT | Hades | Psalms | Self-delusion | Dancing | Confidence | Dead | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , PBC , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 30:5 - Cometh Speedily and in due season.

Speedily and in due season.

Wesley: Psa 30:7 - Mountain My kingdom: kingdoms are usually called mountains in prophetical writings.

My kingdom: kingdoms are usually called mountains in prophetical writings.

Wesley: Psa 30:9 - Profit What wilt thou gain by it? The dust - Shall they that are dead celebrate thy goodness in the land of the living? Or, shall my dust praise thee?

What wilt thou gain by it? The dust - Shall they that are dead celebrate thy goodness in the land of the living? Or, shall my dust praise thee?

Wesley: Psa 30:11 - Sackcloth Given me occasion to put off that sackcloth, which they used to wear in times of mourning, Est 4:1; Psa 35:13; Isa 32:11; Joe 1:13.

Given me occasion to put off that sackcloth, which they used to wear in times of mourning, Est 4:1; Psa 35:13; Isa 32:11; Joe 1:13.

Wesley: Psa 30:11 - Girded With joy, as with a garment, surrounding me on every side.

With joy, as with a garment, surrounding me on every side.

Wesley: Psa 30:12 - My glory My tongue.

My tongue.

JFB: Psa 30:1 - -- Literally, "A Psalm-Song"--a composition to be sung with musical instruments, or without them--or, "Song of the dedication," &c. specifying the partic...

Literally, "A Psalm-Song"--a composition to be sung with musical instruments, or without them--or, "Song of the dedication," &c. specifying the particular character of the Psalm. Some suppose that of David should be connected with the name of the composition, and not with "house"; and refer for the occasion to the selection of a site for the temple (1Ch 21:26-30; 1Ch 22:1). But "house" is never used absolutely for the temple, and "dedication" does not well apply to such an occasion. Though the phrase in the Hebrew, "dedication of the house of David," is an unusual form, yet it is equally unusual to disconnect the name of the author and the composition. As a "dedication of David's house" (as provided, Deu 20:5), the scope of the Psalm well corresponds with the state of repose and meditation on his past trials suited to such an occasion (2Sa 5:11; 2Sa 7:2). For beginning with a celebration of God's delivering favor, in which he invites others to join, he relates his prayer in distress, and God's gracious and prompt answer. (Psa 30:1-12)

JFB: Psa 30:1 - lifted me up As one is drawn from a well (Psa 40:2).

As one is drawn from a well (Psa 40:2).

JFB: Psa 30:2 - healed me Affliction is often described as disease (Psa 6:2; Psa 41:4; Psa 107:20), and so relief by healing.

Affliction is often described as disease (Psa 6:2; Psa 41:4; Psa 107:20), and so relief by healing.

JFB: Psa 30:3 - -- The terms describe extreme danger.

The terms describe extreme danger.

JFB: Psa 30:3 - soul Or, "myself."

Or, "myself."

JFB: Psa 30:3 - grave Literally, "hell," as in Psa 16:10.

Literally, "hell," as in Psa 16:10.

JFB: Psa 30:3 - hast kept me . . . pit Quickened or revived me from the state of dying (compare Psa 28:1).

Quickened or revived me from the state of dying (compare Psa 28:1).

JFB: Psa 30:4 - remembrance The thing remembered or memorial.

The thing remembered or memorial.

JFB: Psa 30:4 - holiness As the sum of God's perfections (compare Psa 22:3), used as name (Exo 3:15; Psa 135:13).

As the sum of God's perfections (compare Psa 22:3), used as name (Exo 3:15; Psa 135:13).

JFB: Psa 30:5 - -- Relatively, the longest experience of divine anger by the pious is momentary. These precious words have consoled millions.

Relatively, the longest experience of divine anger by the pious is momentary. These precious words have consoled millions.

JFB: Psa 30:6-7 - -- What particular prosperity is meant we do not know; perhaps his accession to the throne. In his self-complacent elation he was checked by God's hiding...

What particular prosperity is meant we do not know; perhaps his accession to the throne. In his self-complacent elation he was checked by God's hiding His face (compare Psa 22:24; Psa 27:9).

JFB: Psa 30:7 - troubled Confounded with fear (Psa 2:5).

Confounded with fear (Psa 2:5).

JFB: Psa 30:8-11 - -- As in Psa 6:5; Psa 88:10; Isa 38:18, the appeal for mercy is based on the destruction of his agency in praising God here, which death would produce. T...

As in Psa 6:5; Psa 88:10; Isa 38:18, the appeal for mercy is based on the destruction of his agency in praising God here, which death would produce. The terms expressing relief are poetical, and not to be pressed, though "dancing" is the translation of a word which means a lute, whose cheerful notes are contrasted with mourning, or (Amo 5:16) wailing.

JFB: Psa 30:11 - sackcloth Was used, even by kings, in distress (1Ch 21:16; Isa 37:1) but "gladness," used for a garment, shows the language to be figurative.

Was used, even by kings, in distress (1Ch 21:16; Isa 37:1) but "gladness," used for a garment, shows the language to be figurative.

JFB: Psa 30:12 - -- Though "my" is supplied before "glory" it is better as in Psa 16:9, to receive it as used for tongue, the organ of praise. The ultimate end of God's m...

Though "my" is supplied before "glory" it is better as in Psa 16:9, to receive it as used for tongue, the organ of praise. The ultimate end of God's mercies to us is our praise to Him.

Clarke: Psa 30:1 - I will extol thee - for thou hast lifted me up I will extol thee - for thou hast lifted me up - I will lift thee up, for thou hast lifted me up. Thou hast made me blessed, and I will make thee gl...

I will extol thee - for thou hast lifted me up - I will lift thee up, for thou hast lifted me up. Thou hast made me blessed, and I will make thee glorious. Thou hast magnified me in thy mercy; and I will show forth thy praise, and speak good of thy name

I have made some remarks on this Psalm in the Introduction

In this Psalm we find seven different states of mind distinctly marked: -

1.    It is implied, in the first verse, that David had been in great distress, and nearly overwhelmed by his enemies

2.    He extols God for having lifted him up, and having preserved him from the cruelty of his adversaries, Psa 30:1-3

3.    He is brought into great prosperity, trusts in what he had received, and forgets to depend wholly on the Lord, Psa 30:4-6

4.    The Lord hides his face from him, and he is brought into great distress, Psa 30:7

5.    He feels his loss, and makes earnest prayer and supplication, Psa 30:8-10

6.    He is restored to the Divine favor, and filled with joy, Psa 30:11

7.    He purposes to glory in God alone, and to trust in him for ever, Psa 30:12

As it is impossible for any man to have passed through all these states at the same time; it is supposed that the Psalm, like many others of the same complexion, has been formed out of the memoranda of a diary. See this point illustrated in the Introduction

Clarke: Psa 30:1 - Thou hast lifted me up Thou hast lifted me up - Out of the pit into which I had fallen: the vain curiosity, and want of trust in God, that induced me to number the people....

Thou hast lifted me up - Out of the pit into which I had fallen: the vain curiosity, and want of trust in God, that induced me to number the people. Bishop Horsley translates, Because thou hast depressed me. I thank God for my humiliation and afflictions, because they have been the means of teaching me lessons of great profit and importance.

Clarke: Psa 30:2 - Thou hast healed me Thou hast healed me - Thou hast removed the plague from my people by which they were perishing in thousands before my eyes.

Thou hast healed me - Thou hast removed the plague from my people by which they were perishing in thousands before my eyes.

Clarke: Psa 30:3 - Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave - I and my people were both about to be cut off, but thou hast spared us in mercy, and given us a most g...

Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave - I and my people were both about to be cut off, but thou hast spared us in mercy, and given us a most glorious respite.

Clarke: Psa 30:4 - Sing unto the Lord, O ye saints of his Sing unto the Lord, O ye saints of his - Ye priests, who wait upon him in his sanctuary, and whose business it is to offer prayers and sacrifices fo...

Sing unto the Lord, O ye saints of his - Ye priests, who wait upon him in his sanctuary, and whose business it is to offer prayers and sacrifices for the people, magnify him for the mercy he has now showed in staying this most destructive plague

Clarke: Psa 30:4 - Give thanks at the remembrance of his holiness Give thanks at the remembrance of his holiness - " Be ye holy,"saith the Lord, "for I am holy."He who can give thanks at the remembrance of his holi...

Give thanks at the remembrance of his holiness - " Be ye holy,"saith the Lord, "for I am holy."He who can give thanks at the remembrance of his holiness, is one who loves holiness; who hates sin; who longs to be saved from it; and takes encouragement at the recollection of God’ s holiness, as he sees in this the holy nature which he is to share, and the perfection which he is here to attain. But most who call themselves Christians hate the doctrine of holiness; never hear it inculcated without pain; and the principal part of their studies, and those of their pastors, is to find out with how little holiness they can rationally expect to enter into the kingdom of God. O fatal and soul-destroying delusion! How long will a holy God suffer such abominable doctrines to pollute his Church, and destroy the souls of men?

Clarke: Psa 30:5 - For his anger endureth but a moment For his anger endureth but a moment - There is an elegant abruptness in these words in the Hebrew text. This is the literal translation: "For a mome...

For his anger endureth but a moment - There is an elegant abruptness in these words in the Hebrew text. This is the literal translation: "For a moment in his anger. Lives in his favor. In the evening weeping may lodge: but in the morning exultation."So good is God, that he cannot delight in either the depression or ruin of his creatures. When he afflicts, it is for our advantage, that we may be partakers of his holiness, and be not condemned with the world. If he be angry with us, it is but for a moment; but when we have recourse to him, and seek his face, his favor is soon obtained, and there are lives in that favor - the life that now is, and the life that is to come. When weeping comes, it is only to lodge for the evening; but singing will surely come in the morning. This description of God’ s slowness to anger, and readiness to save, is given by a man long and deeply acquainted with God as his Judge and as his Father.

Clarke: Psa 30:6 - In my prosperity I said, I shall never be moved In my prosperity I said, I shall never be moved - Peace and prosperity had seduced the heart of David, and led him to suppose that his mountain - hi...

In my prosperity I said, I shall never be moved - Peace and prosperity had seduced the heart of David, and led him to suppose that his mountain - his dominion, stood so strong, that adversity could never affect him. He wished to know the physical and political strength of his kingdom; and, forgetting to depend upon God, he desired Joab to make a census of the people; which God punished in the manner related in 2 Samuel 24, and which he in this place appears to acknowledge.

Clarke: Psa 30:7 - Thou didst hide thy face Thou didst hide thy face - Thou didst show thyself displeased with me for my pride and forgetfulness of thee: and then I found how vainly I had trus...

Thou didst hide thy face - Thou didst show thyself displeased with me for my pride and forgetfulness of thee: and then I found how vainly I had trusted in an arm of flesh.

Clarke: Psa 30:8 - I cried to thee, O Lord I cried to thee, O Lord - I found no help but in him against whom I had sinned. See his confession and prayer, 2Sa 24:17 (note)

I cried to thee, O Lord - I found no help but in him against whom I had sinned. See his confession and prayer, 2Sa 24:17 (note)

Clarke: Psa 30:8 - Made supplication Made supplication - Continued to urge my suit; was instant in prayer.

Made supplication - Continued to urge my suit; was instant in prayer.

Clarke: Psa 30:9 - What profit is there in my blood What profit is there in my blood - My being cut off will not magnify thy mercy. Let not the sword, therefore, come against me. If spared and pardone...

What profit is there in my blood - My being cut off will not magnify thy mercy. Let not the sword, therefore, come against me. If spared and pardoned, I will declare thy truth; I will tell to all men what a merciful and gracious Lord I have found. Hear, therefore, O Lord; Psa 30:10.

Clarke: Psa 30:11 - Thou hast turned - my mourning into dancing Thou hast turned - my mourning into dancing - Rather into piping. I have not prayed in vain. Though I deserved to be cut off from the land of the li...

Thou hast turned - my mourning into dancing - Rather into piping. I have not prayed in vain. Though I deserved to be cut off from the land of the living, yet thou hast spared me, and the remnant of my people. Thou hast taken away my sackcloth, the emblem of my distress and misery, and girded me with gladness, when thou didst say to the destroying angel, when he stood over Jerusalem ready to destroy it: "It is enough, stay now thy hand;"2Sa 24:16.

Clarke: Psa 30:12 - To the end that my glory may sing To the end that my glory may sing - The word כבוד cabod , which we here translate glory, is sometimes taken to signify the liver. Here it is su...

To the end that my glory may sing - The word כבוד cabod , which we here translate glory, is sometimes taken to signify the liver. Here it is supposed to mean the tongue; why not the heart? But does not David mean, by his glory, the state of exaltation and honor to which God had raised him, and in which he had before too much trusted; forgetting that he held it in a state of dependence on God? Now he was disciplined into a better sentiment. My glory before had sung praise to myself; in it I had rested; on it I had presumed; and intoxicated with my success, I sent Joab to number the people. Now my glory shall be employed for another purpose; it shall give thanks to God, and never be silent. I shall confess to all the world that all the good, the greatness, the honor, the wealth, prosperity, and excellence I possess, came from God alone, and that I hold them on his mere good pleasure. It is so; therefore, "O Lord my God, I will give thanks unto thee for ever.

The old Psalter translates and paraphrases the last verse thus: - That my joy syng til the, and I be noght stanged: Lord my God withouten ende I sal schryf til the. The dede and the sorrow of oure syn God turnes in til joy of remission; and scheres oway oure sekk-(drives away our distress) and umgyfs (surrounds) qwen we dye, with gladness. That oure joy syng til hym, that has gyfen us that joy; for we be "no more stanged"(stung) with conscience of syn: na drede of dede or of dome; bot withouten ende we sal loue (praise) him. Na tunge may telle na herte may thynk the mykelnes of joy that es in louing (praising) of hym in gast, and in sothfastnes,"i.e., spirit and truth

Calvin: Psa 30:1 - I will extol thee, O Jehovah! 1.I will extol thee, O Jehovah! As David had been brought, as it were, from the grave to the life-giving air, he promises to extol the name of God. I...

1.I will extol thee, O Jehovah! As David had been brought, as it were, from the grave to the life-giving air, he promises to extol the name of God. It is God who lifts us up with his own hand when we have been plunged into a profound gulf; and therefore it is our duty, on our part, to sing his praises with our tongues. By the foes who, he says, obtained no matter of rejoicing over him, we may understand both domestic and foreign enemies. Although wicked and evil disposed persons flattered him with servile adulation, they at the same time cherished secret hatred against him, and were ready to insult him as soon as an opportunity should occur. In the second verse, he concludes that he was preserved by the favor of God, alleging in proof of this, that when he was at the very point of death he directed his supplications to God alone, and that he immediately felt that he had not done so in vain. When God hears our prayers, it is a proof which enables us to conclude with certainty that he is the author of our salvation, and of the deliverance which we obtain. As the Hebrew word רפא , rapha, signifies to heal, interpreters have been led, from this consideration, to restrict it to sickness. But as it is certain, that it sometimes signifies to restore, or to set up again, and is moreover applied to an altar or a house when they are said to be repaired or rebuilt, it may properly enough mean here any deliverance. The life of man is in danger in many other ways than merely from disease; and we know that it is a form of speech which occurs every where in the Psalms, to say that David was restored to life whenever the Lord delivered him from any grievous and extreme danger. For the sake of amplification, accordingly, he immediately adds, Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave He reckoned that he could not sufficiently express in words the magnitude of the favor which God had conferred upon him, unless he compared the darkness of that period to a grave and pit, into which he had been forced to throw himself hastily, to protect his life by hiding, until the flame of insurrection was quenched. As one restored to life, therefore, he proclaims that he had been marvellously delivered from present death, as if he had been restored to life after he had been dead. And assuredly, it appears from sacred history, how completely he was overwhelmed with despair on every side.

Calvin: Psa 30:4 - Sing unto Jehovah 4.Sing unto Jehovah The better to testify his gratitude, David calls upon all the saints to join with him in singing the praises of God; and under on...

4.Sing unto Jehovah The better to testify his gratitude, David calls upon all the saints to join with him in singing the praises of God; and under one class he describes the whole body. As he had been preserved beyond all expectation, and by this instance had been instructed concerning God’s continual and infinite goodness towards all the godly, he breaks forth into this exhortation, in which he includes the general deliverance of the whole church as well as his own. He rehearses not only what God had been to himself, but also how bountifully and promptly he is accustomed to assist his people. In short, confirmed by one particular instance he turns his thoughts to the general truth. The meaning of the Hebrew term חסידים , chasidim, which we have translated meekness, by which David often describes the faithful, has been already shown in the sixteenth Psalm. Their heavenly adoption ought to excite them to the exercise of beneficence, that they may imitate their Father’s disposition,

“who maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good,” (Mat 5:45.)

There is nothing in which men resemble God more truly than in doing good to others. The memorial of his holiness, in the second clause of the verse, may refer to the tabernacle; as if David had exhorted all the children of God to go before the ark of the covenant, which was the memorial of God’s presence. The Hebrew letter 627 ל , lamed, often denotes a place. I readily subscribe, however, to their opinion, who think that memorial signifies the same thing as name; for God has assuredly rendered himself worthy of remembrance by his works, which are a bright representation of his glory, the sight of which should stir us up to praise him.

Calvin: Psa 30:5 - For his anger is only for a moment 5.For his anger is only for a moment It is beyond all controversy that life is opposed here to for a moment, and consequently signifies long cont...

5.For his anger is only for a moment It is beyond all controversy that life is opposed here to for a moment, and consequently signifies long continuance, or the constant progress of time from day to day. David thus intimates that if God at any time chastise his people, he not only mitigates the rigour of their punishment, but is immediately appeased, and moderates his anger; whereas he prolongs his kindness and favor for a long time. And, as I have already observed, he chose rather to couch his discourse in general terms, than to speak particularly of himself, that the godly might all perceive that this continued manifestation of God’s favor belongs to them. We are hereby taught, however, with how much meekness of spirit, and with what prompt obedience he submitted his back to God’s rod. We know that from the very first bloom of youth, during almost his whole life, he was so tried by a multiplied accumulation of afflictions, that he might have been accounted miserable and wretched above all other men; yet in celebrating the goodness of God, he acknowledges that he had been lightly afflicted only for a short period, and as it were in passing. Now, what inspired him with so great meekness and equanimity of mind was, that he put a greater value upon God’s benefits, and submitted himself more quietly to the endurance of the cross, than the world is accustomed to do. If we are prosperous, we devour God’s blessings without feeling that they are his, or, at least, we indolently allow them to slip away; but if any thing sorrowful or adverse befall us, we immediately complain of his severity, as if he had never dealt kindly and mercifully with us. In short, our own fretfulness and impatience under affliction makes every minute an age; while, on the other hand, our repining and ingratitude lead us to imagine that God’s favor, however long it may be exercised towards us, is but for a moment. It is our own perversity, therefore, in reality, which hinders us from perceiving that God’s anger is but of short duration, While his favor is continued towards us during the whole course of our life. Nor does God in vain so often declare that he is merciful and gracious to a thousand generations, long-suffering, slow to anger, and ready to forgive. And as what he says by the prophet Isaiah has a special reference to the kingdom of Christ, it must be daily fulfilled,

“For a small moment have I afflicted thee, but with everlasting mercies will I gather thee,” (Isa 54:7.)

Our condition in this world, I confess, involves us in such wretchedness, and we are harassed by such a variety of afflictions, that scarcely a day passes without some trouble or grief. Moreover, amid so many uncertain events, we cannot be otherwise than full of daily anxiety and fear. Whithersoever, therefore, men turn themselves, a labyrinth of evils surrounds them. But however much God may terrify and humble his faithful servants, with manifold signs of his displeasure, he always be-sprinkles them with the sweetness of his favor to moderate and assuage their grief. If they weigh, therefore his anger and his favor in an equal balance, they will always find it verified, that while the former is but for a moment, the latter continues to the end of life; nay, it goes beyond it, for it were a grievous mistake to confine the favor of God within the boundaries of this transitory life. And it is unquestionably certain, 628 that none but those whose minds have been raised above the world by a taste of heavenly life really experience this perpetual and uninterrupted manifestation of the divine favor, which enables them to bear their chastisements with cheerfulness. Paul, accordingly, that he may inspire us with invincible patience, refers to this in 2Co 4:17,

“For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, while we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen.”

In the meantime, it is to be observed that God never inflicts such heavy and continued chastisements on his people, without frequently mitigating them, and sweetening their bitterness with some consolation. Whoever, therefore, directs his mind to meditation upon the heavenly life, will never faint under his afflictions, however long continued; and, comparing them with the exceeding great and manifold favors of God towards him, he will put such honor on the latter as to judge that God’s goodness, in his estimation, outweighs his displeasure a hundred-fold. In the second clause, David repeats the same thing figuratively: Weeping will lodge in the evening, and rejoicing shall come in the morning He does not simply mean, that the affliction would be only for one night, but that if the darkness of adversity should fall upon the people of God, as it were, in the evening, or at the setting of the sun, light would soon after arise upon them, to comfort their sorrow-stricken spirits. The amount of David’s instruction is, that were we not too headstrong, we would acknowledge that the Lord, even when he appears to overwhelm us for a time with the darkness of affliction, always seasonably ministers matter of joy, just as the morning arises after the night.

Calvin: Psa 30:6 - And in my tranquillity I had said 6.And in my tranquillity I had said This is the confession which I formerly mentioned, in which David acknowledges that he had been justly and deserv...

6.And in my tranquillity I had said This is the confession which I formerly mentioned, in which David acknowledges that he had been justly and deservedly punished for his foolish and rash security, in forgetting his mortal and mutable condition as a man, and in setting his heart too much on prosperity. By the term tranquillity, he means the quiet and flourishing state of his kingdom. Some translate the Hebrew word שלוה , shiluah, which we have rendered tranquillity, by abundance, in which sense it is often used in other places; but the word tranquillity agrees better with the context; as if David had said, When fortune smiled upon me on every side, and no danger appeared to occasion fear, my mind sunk as it were into a deep sleep, and I flattered myself that my happy condition would continue, and that things would always go on in the same course. This carnal confidence frequently creeps upon the saints when they indulge themselves in their prosperity, and so to speak, wallow upon their dunghill. 632 Hence Jeremiah (Jer 31:18) compares himself to a wild bullock before the Lord tamed him and accustomed him to the yoke. This may at first sight appear to be but a small crime, yet we may gather from its punishment how much it is displeasing to God; nor will we wonder at this when we consider the root from which it springs and the fruits which it bears. As deaths innumerable continually hover before our eyes, and as there are so many examples of change to awaken us to fear and caution, those must be bewitched with devilish pride who persuade themselves that their life is privileged above the common lot of the world. They see the whole earth jumbled together in undistinguishing variety, and its individual parts in a manner tossed hither and thither; and yet, as if they did not belong to the human race, they imagine that they shall always continue stable and liable to no changes. Hence that wantonness of the flesh, with which they so licentiously indulge their lusts; hence their pride and cruelty, and neglect of prayer. How indeed should those flee to God, who have no sense of their need to instigate or move them to that? The children of God have also a pious security of their own, which preserves their minds in tranquillity amidst the troublesome storms of the world; like David, who, although he had seen the whole world made to shake, yet leaning upon the promise of God, was bound to hope well concerning the continuance of his kingdom. But although the faithful, when raised aloft on the wings of faith, despise adversity, yet, as they consider themselves liable to the common troubles of life, they lay their account with enduring them, — are every hour prepared to receive wounds, — shake off their sluggishness, and exercise themselves in the warfare to which they know that they were appointed, - and with humility and fear put themselves under God’s protection; nor do they consider themselves safe anywhere else than under his hand. It was otherwise with David, who, when ensnared by the allurements of his prosperous state, promised himself unbroken tranquillity not from the word of God but from his own feelings. The same thing also occurred to the pious King Hezekiah, who, although lately afflicted with a sore disease, as soon as all was well and according to his wish, was hurried by the vanity of the flesh to pride and vain boasting, (2Ch 32:24.) By this we are taught to be on our guard when in prosperity, that Satan may not bewitch us with his flatteries. The more bountifully God deals with any one, the more carefully ought he to watch against such snares. It is not, indeed, probable that David had become so hardened as to despise God and defy all misfortunes, like many of the great men of this world, who, when immersed among their luxuries and surfeitings, insolently scoff at all God’s judgments; but an effeminate listlessness having come over his mind, he became more lukewarm in prayer, nor did he depend on the favor of God; in short, he put too much confidence in his uncertain and transitory prosperity.

Calvin: Psa 30:7 - O Jehovah! of thy good pleasure // Thou hast hidden thy face 7.O Jehovah! of thy good pleasure This verse describes the difference which exists between the confidence which is founded upon the word of God and t...

7.O Jehovah! of thy good pleasure This verse describes the difference which exists between the confidence which is founded upon the word of God and the carnal security which springs from presumption. True believers, when they rely upon God, are not on that account neglectful of prayer. On the contrary, looking carefully at the multitude of dangers by which they are beset, and the manifold instances of human frailty which pass before their eyes, they take warning from them, and pour out their hearts before God. The prophet now failed in duty as to this matter; because, by anchoring himself on his present wealth and tranquillity, or spreading his sails to the prosperous winds, he depended not on the free favor of God in such a manner as to be ready at any time to resign into his hands the blessings which he had bestowed upon him. The contrast should be observed between that confidence of stability which arises from the absence of trouble, and that which rests upon the gracious favor of God. When David says that strength was established to his mountain, some interpreters expound it of mount Zion. Others understand by it a stronghold or fortified tower, because in old time fortresses were usually built upon mountains and lofty places. I understand the word metaphorically to signify a solid support, and therefore readily admit that the prophet alludes to mount Zion. David thus blames his own folly, because he considered not, as he ought to have done, that there was no stability in the nest which he had formed for himself, but in God’s good will alone.

Thou hast hidden thy face Here he confesses, that, after he was deprived of God’s gifts, this served to purge his mind as it were by medicine from the disease of perverse confidence. A marvellous and incredible method surely, that God, by hiding his face, and as it were bringing on darkness, should open the eyes of his servant, who saw nothing in the broad light of prosperity. But thus it is necessary that we be violently shaken, in order to drive away the delusions which both stifle our faith and hinder our prayers, and which absolutely stupify us with a soothing infatuation. And if David had need of such a remedy, let us not presume that we are endued with so good a state of heart as to render it unprofitable for us to be in want, in order to remove from us this carnal confidence, which is as it were diseased repletion which would otherwise suffocate us. We have, therefore, no reason to wonder, though God often hides his face from us, when the sight of it, even when it shines serenely upon us, makes us so wretchedly blind.

Calvin: Psa 30:8 - O Jehovah! I cried unto thee 8.O Jehovah! I cried unto thee Now follows the fruit of David’s chastisement. He had been previously sleeping profoundly, and fostering his indolen...

8.O Jehovah! I cried unto thee Now follows the fruit of David’s chastisement. He had been previously sleeping profoundly, and fostering his indolence by forgetfulness; but being now awakened all on a sudden with fear and terror, he begins to cry to God. As the iron which has contracted rust cannot be put to any use until it be heated again in the fire, and beaten with the hammer, so in like manner, when carnal security has once got the mastery, no one can give himself cheerfully to prayer, until he has been softened by the cross, and thoroughly subdued. And this is the chief advantage of afflictions, that while they make us sensible of our wretchedness, they stimulate us again to supplicate the favor of God.

Calvin: Psa 30:9 - What profit is there in my blood? 9.What profit is there in my blood? Some explain the verse after this manner: What will it avail me to have lived, unless thou prolongest my life til...

9.What profit is there in my blood? Some explain the verse after this manner: What will it avail me to have lived, unless thou prolongest my life till I shall have finished the course of my vocation? But this exposition seems too strained, especially as the term blood here signifies death, not life: as if David had said, What profit wilt thou derive from my death? This interpretation is farther confirmed by the following clause, where he complains that his lifeless body will then be useless for celebrating the praises of God. And he seems expressly to mention the truth of God, to intimate that it would be unsuitable to the character of God to take him out of the world by an untimely death, before God had accomplished the promise which he had made to him concerning his future heir. As there is a mutual relation between God’s promises and our faith, truth is, as it were, the medium by which God openly shows that he does not merely make liberal promises to us in words, to feed us with empty hopes, and afterwards to disappoint us. Moreover, to obtain a longer life, David draws an argument from the praises of God, to celebrate which we are born and nourished: as if he had said, For what purpose hast thou created me, O God! but that through the whole course of my life I may be a witness and a herald of thy grace to set forth the glory of thy name? But my death will cut short the continuance of this exercise, and reduce me to eternal silence. A question, however, arises here, Does not, it may be said, the death of true believers glorify God as well as their life? We answer, David speaks not simply of death, but adds a circumstance which I have already treated of in the sixth Psalm. As God had promised him a successor, the hope of living longer being taken from him, he had good reason to be afraid lest this promise should be frustrated by his death, and was therefore compelled to exclaim, What profit is there in my blood? It highly concerned the glory of God that he should be preserved alive, until by obtaining his desire, he should be able to bear witness to God’s faithfulness in completely fulfilling his promise to him. By inquiring in the end of the verse, Shall the dust praise thee? he does not mean that the dead are altogether deprived of power to praise God, as I have already shown in the sixth Psalm. If the faithful, while encumbered with a burden of flesh, exercise themselves in this pious duty, how should they desist from it when they are disencumbered, and set free from the restraints of the body? It ought to be observed, therefore, that David does not professedly treat of what the dead do, or how they are occupied, but considers only the purpose for which we live in this world, which is this, that we may mutually show forth to one another the glory of God. Having been employed in this exercise to the end of our life, death at length comes upon us and shuts our mouth.

Calvin: Psa 30:10 - Hear, O Jehovah! 10.Hear, O Jehovah! In this clause the Psalmist softens and corrects his former complaint; for it would have been absurd to expostulate with God like...

10.Hear, O Jehovah! In this clause the Psalmist softens and corrects his former complaint; for it would have been absurd to expostulate with God like one who despaired of safety, and to leave off in this fretful temper. Having asked, therefore, with tears, what profit God would derive from his death, he encourages himself to a more unconstrained manner of prayer, and, conceiving new hope, calls upon God for mercy and help. He puts God’s favor, however, in the first place, from whom alone he could expect the help which he implored.

Calvin: Psa 30:11 - Thou hast turned my mourning into dancing 11.Thou hast turned my mourning into dancing David concludes the psalm as he had begun it, with thanksgiving. He affirms that it was by the help and ...

11.Thou hast turned my mourning into dancing David concludes the psalm as he had begun it, with thanksgiving. He affirms that it was by the help and blessing of God that he had escaped safe; and he then adds, that the final object of his escape was, that he might employ the rest of his life in celebrating the praises of God. Moreover, he shows us that he was not insensible or obdurate under his afflictions, but mourned in heaviness and sorrow; and he also shows that his very mourning had been the means of leading him to pray to God to deprecate his wrath. Both these points are most worthy of our observation, in order, first, that we may not suppose that the saints are guilty of stoical insensibility, depriving them of all feeling of grief; and, secondly, that we may perceive that in their mourning they were exercised to repentance. This latter he denotes by the term sackcloth. It was a common practice among the ancients to clothe themselves with sackcloth when mourning, 633 for no other reason, indeed, than that like guilty criminals, they might approach their heavenly Judge, imploring his forgiveness with all humility, and testifying by this clothing their humiliation and dissatisfaction with themselves. 634 We know also that the orientals were addicted beyond all others to ceremonies. We perceive, therefore, that David, although he patiently submitted himself to God, was not free from grief. We also see that his sorrow was “after a godly sort,” as Paul speaks, (2Co 7:10;) for to testify his penitence he clothed himself with sackcloth. By the term dancing, he does not mean any wanton or profane leaping, but a sober and holy exhibition of joy like that which sacred Scripture mentions when David conveyed the ark of the covenant to its place, (2Sa 6:16.) If we may conjecture, however, we may gather from this, that the great danger of which David speaks in this psalm is by some improperly restricted to sickness, as it was very improbable that he would put on sackcloth when he was confined to a sick-bed. This, indeed, would not be a sufficient reason of itself, but in a doubtful case, as this is, it is not destitute of force. David therefore means, that, laying aside his mourning apparel, he returned from a state of heaviness and sorrow to joy; and this he ascribes to the grace of God alone, asserting that he had been his deliverer.

Calvin: Psa 30:12 - That my glory may sing praise to thee 12.That my glory may sing praise to thee In this verse he more fully expresses his acknowledgement of the purpose for which God had preserved him fro...

12.That my glory may sing praise to thee In this verse he more fully expresses his acknowledgement of the purpose for which God had preserved him from death, and that he would be careful to render him a proper return of gratitude. Some refer the word glory to the body, and some to the soul, or the higher powers of the mind. Others, as the pronoun my, which we have supplied, is not in the Hebrew text, prefer to translate it in the accusative case, supplying the word every man, in this way: That every man may celebrate thy glory; as if the prophet had said, This is a blessing worthy of being celebrated by the public praises of all men. But as all these interpretations are strained, I adhere to the sense which I have given. The Hebrew word כבוד , kebod, which signifies glory, it is well known, is sometimes employed metaphorically to signify the tongue, as we have seen in Psa 16:9. And as David adds immediately after, I will celebrate thy praise for ever, the context demands that he should particularly speak of his own duty in this place. His meaning, therefore, is, O Lord, as I know that thou hast preserved me for this purpose, that thy praises may resound from my tongue, I will faithfully discharge this service to thee, and perform my part even unto death. To sing, and not be silent, is a Hebrew amplification; as if he had said, My tongue shall not be mute, or deprive God of his due praise; it shall, on the contrary, devote itself to the celebration of his glory.

Defender: Psa 30:3 - the grave The "grave" here is the Hebrew sheol which is the abode of departed souls in the center of the earth. In the full sense, this verse must be a prophecy...

The "grave" here is the Hebrew sheol which is the abode of departed souls in the center of the earth. In the full sense, this verse must be a prophecy of the resurrection of Christ (Psa 16:10), with David's deliverance from his enemies considered as a type thereof (Psa 30:9)."

TSK: Psa 30:1 - at the // extol // for // hast not at the : Deu 20:5; 2Sa 5:11, 2Sa 6:20, 2Sa 7:2, 2Sa 20:3 extol : Psa 34:3, Psa 34:4, Psa 66:17, Psa 145:1; Dan 4:37 for : Psa 27:6, Psa 28:9 hast not ...

TSK: Psa 30:2 - and and : Psa 6:2, Psa 51:8, Psa 103:3, Psa 103:4, Psa 107:17-22, Psa 118:18, Psa 147:3; Gen 20:17; Exo 15:26; 2Ki 20:5; Jam 5:14, Jam 5:15

TSK: Psa 30:3 - brought // down brought : Psa 16:10, Psa 40:1, Psa 40:2, Psa 56:13, Psa 71:20, Psa 86:13 *marg. Psa 116:8; Job 33:19-22, Job 33:28; Isa 38:17, Isa 38:18; Jon 2:4-6 do...

TSK: Psa 30:4 - Sing // at the remembrance // holiness Sing : Psa 32:11, Psa 33:1-3, Psa 97:12, Psa 103:20-22, Psa 132:9, Psa 135:19-21, Psa 148:14, Psa 149:1; 1Ch 16:4; Rev 19:5, Rev 19:6 at the remembran...

Sing : Psa 32:11, Psa 33:1-3, Psa 97:12, Psa 103:20-22, Psa 132:9, Psa 135:19-21, Psa 148:14, Psa 149:1; 1Ch 16:4; Rev 19:5, Rev 19:6

at the remembrance : or, to the memorial, Psa 97:12 *marg.

holiness : Exo 15:11; Isa 6:3; Rev 4:8

TSK: Psa 30:5 - For // his anger // in his // weeping // for a night // joy // in the For : Psa 103:9, Psa 103:17; Isa 26:20, Isa 54:7, Isa 54:8, Isa 57:15, Isa 57:16; 2Co 4:17 his anger : etc. Heb. there is but a moment in his anger in...

For : Psa 103:9, Psa 103:17; Isa 26:20, Isa 54:7, Isa 54:8, Isa 57:15, Isa 57:16; 2Co 4:17

his anger : etc. Heb. there is but a moment in his anger

in his : Psa 16:11, Psa 36:7-9, Psa 63:3; Rev 22:1, Rev 22:17

weeping : Psa 6:6-9, Psa 56:8-11, Psa 126:5, Psa 126:6; Isa 38:3-5; Mat 5:4; Joh 16:20-22; 2Co 7:9, 2Co 7:10

for a night : Heb. in the evening

joy : Heb. singing

in the : Psa 46:5 *marg. Psa 59:16, Psa 143:8; Gen 32:24 *marg. Hos 6:3

TSK: Psa 30:6 - And // I shall And : Job 29:18-20; Isa 47:7, Isa 56:12; Dan 4:30; Luk 12:19; 2Co 12:7 I shall : Psa 15:5, Psa 16:8, Psa 119:117

TSK: Psa 30:7 - by thy // made // thou by thy : Psa 30:5, Psa 5:12, Psa 18:35, Psa 18:36, Psa 44:3, Psa 89:17; Job 10:12 made : etc. Heb. settled strength for my mountain, Psa 40:2; 1Ch 17:...

TSK: Psa 30:8 - unto unto : Psa 34:6, Psa 77:1, Psa 77:2, Psa 130:1, Psa 130:2; 1Co 12:8, 1Co 12:9; Phi 4:6, Phi 4:7

TSK: Psa 30:9 - What What : Psa 6:5, Psa 88:10-12, Psa 115:17, Psa 115:18, Psa 118:17; Ecc 9:10; Isa 38:18

TSK: Psa 30:10 - Hear // be thou Hear : Psa 51:1, Psa 51:2, Psa 143:1, Psa 143:7-9 be thou : Psa 28:7, Psa 54:4

TSK: Psa 30:11 - turned // dancing // girded turned : Psa 30:5, Psa 126:1, Psa 126:2; Gen 37:35, Gen 45:28; 2Ch 20:3, 2Ch 20:9, 2Ch 20:12, 2Ch 20:27, 2Ch 20:28; Est 9:22; Isa 25:8; Psa 30:3; Isa ...

TSK: Psa 30:12 - my glory // and // I will my glory : that is, my tongue, or my soul, Psa 16:9, Psa 57:8; Gen 49:6 and : Luk 19:40; Act 4:20 I will : Psa 13:6, Psa 71:14, Psa 71:23, Psa 145:2, ...

my glory : that is, my tongue, or my soul, Psa 16:9, Psa 57:8; Gen 49:6

and : Luk 19:40; Act 4:20

I will : Psa 13:6, Psa 71:14, Psa 71:23, Psa 145:2, Psa 146:1, Psa 146:2; Rev 4:8, Rev 4:9, Rev 7:12

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Psa 30:1 - the dedication of the house // Lifted me up // To rejoice over me A Psalm and Song ; or, A Psalm of Song ; i.e. either, 1. A Psalm to be sung with the voice to an instrument. Or, 2. A Psalm of joy and praise; for...

A Psalm and Song ; or, A Psalm of Song ; i.e. either,

1. A Psalm to be sung with the voice to an instrument. Or,

2. A Psalm of joy and praise; for so this is. And this Hebrew word schir may be here taken not simply for a song, but for a joyful song , as it is Gen 31:27 Exo 15:1 Psa 33:3 42:8 Pro 25:20 Isa 30:29 Amo 8:3,10 . At the dedication of the house of David; either,

1. At the dedication of the temple, called the house, or that house, eminently and emphatically. So the Chaldee paraphrast and the Hebrew doctors understand it. And then the last words, of David , are to be joined with the first, a Psalm and Song . But this seems not probable, because the temple was not built by David, nor in his days, although he might prescribe a Psalm to be used afterwards upon that occasion. Or,

2. At the dedication of David’ s house, which was built, 2Sa 5:11 , and doubtless was dedicated, as God had commanded. See Deu 20:5 Neh 12:27 . Or,

3. At the second dedication of David’ s house, after it had been polluted by Absalom and his concubines. But there is no law of God for any re-dedication of houses in such cases, nor any evidence that David did so. And indeed it seems strange, if this Psalm was made upon this occasion, or upon any of these dedications here mentioned, that there should not be one line in it suitable to that occasion. Others therefore make these words,

the dedication of the house not to note the matter of this Psalm or Song ; but either,

1. The name of the tune to which this song was sung, which was the same that David used at the dedication of his house; and so this gives us a reason why the word Song is added to that of Psalm , and why this Psalm was called the Song of the dedication . Or,

2. The time when it was sung; which was at the dedication of David’ s house. For such dedications were performed in a very solemn manner, with divers rites and prayers, and praises to God, as the nature of that business required. And it seems probable from the matter of this Psalm, compared with the title, that David had about this time been delivered from some eminent distresses, and particularly from some dangerous sickness; for which he here gives thanks to God, taking advantage of this public and solemn occasion.

The psalmist praiseth God for deliverance out of great danger, Psa 30:1-3 ; and exhorteth others to do the same, Psa 30:4,5 . He acknowledgeth to God that his prayer was heard, and him-self girded with gladness, Psa 30:6-11 . He will give thanks to God for ever, Psa 30:12 .

Lifted me up or, drawn up , to wit, out of the deep pit, or waters; to which great dangers and afflictions are frequently compared.

To rejoice over me which they both desired and confidently expected an occasion to do.

Poole: Psa 30:2 - -- i.e. Delivered me from the fears and troubles of my mind, which are oft compared to diseases, and from very dangerous distempers of my body.

i.e. Delivered me from the fears and troubles of my mind, which are oft compared to diseases, and from very dangerous distempers of my body.

Poole: Psa 30:3 - Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave // Thou hast kept me alive // To the pit Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave my deliverance is a kind of resurrection from the grave, upon the very brink whereof I was. Thou hast ke...

Thou hast brought up my soul from the grave my deliverance is a kind of resurrection from the grave, upon the very brink whereof I was.

Thou hast kept me alive: this he adds to explain the former phrase, which was ambiguous.

To the pit i.e. into the grave, which is oft called the pit , as Psa 28:1 69:15 88:4 Isa 38:17 .

Poole: Psa 30:4 - -- Or, at the mention , &c.; when you call to mind, or when others celebrate, as I do, this day, the holiness of God’ s nature; which he demonstr...

Or, at the mention , &c.; when you call to mind, or when others celebrate, as I do, this day, the holiness of God’ s nature; which he demonstrates by his works, by his faithfulness, care, and kindness towards his holy ones.

Poole: Psa 30:5 - His anger endureth but a moment // In his favour is life // Life // Joy cometh in the morning His anger endureth but a moment commonly the afflictions which he sends upon his people are short, and last but for a few moments of their lives. In...

His anger endureth but a moment commonly the afflictions which he sends upon his people are short, and last but for a few moments of their lives.

In his favour is life or, life , i.e. our whole life, is in his favour , i.e. he heapeth his favours upon them, for the greatest part of their present lives, and in the next life, which endures for ever; of which the Chaldee paraphrast expounds this place. And indeed without the consideration of eternal life, the difference between the duration of the afflictions and of the happiness of God’ s people, were neither so evident nor considerable as David here makes it.

Life is oft put for a long and happy time, as Psa 34:12 133:3 Pro 3:2 ; and for an eternal and immortal duration, 2Ti 1:10 Jam 1:12 . And in civil affairs estates for life are opposed to those that are but for a short time.

Joy cometh in the morning i.e. it comes speedily and in due season.

Poole: Psa 30:6 - -- I thought myself past all danger of further changes, forgetting my own frailty, and the uncertainty of all worldly things.

I thought myself past all danger of further changes, forgetting my own frailty, and the uncertainty of all worldly things.

Poole: Psa 30:7 - Thou hast made my mountain to stand strong // mountain // Thou didst hide thy face Thou hast made my mountain to stand strong thou hast so firmly settled me in my kingdom; which he calls his mountain partly because kingdoms are us...

Thou hast made my mountain to stand strong thou hast so firmly settled me in my kingdom; which he calls his

mountain partly because kingdoms are usually called mountains in prophetical writings, as Psa 46:3,4 Isa 2:2 Jer 51:25 Dan 2:34,35,44,45 ; and partly with respect to Mount Zion, where he built his royal palace, the dedication whereof is mentioned in the title of the Psalm.

Thou didst hide thy face i.e. withdraw thy favour and help, and I was quickly brought into such distresses of body, and anxiety of mind, that I saw the vanity of all my carnal confidences.

Poole: Psa 30:9 - What profit is there // In my blood // When I go down to the pit What profit is there to wit, unto thee? as the latter part of the verse explains it. What wilt thou gain by it? In my blood i.e. in my violent deat...

What profit is there to wit, unto thee? as the latter part of the verse explains it. What wilt thou gain by it?

In my blood i.e. in my violent death, as blood is frequently used, as Gen 37:26 Num 35:33 Jos 20:3 1Sa 25:26,33 Mt 27:6 .

When I go down to the pit when I die. See Poole "Psa 30:3" . Shall they that are dead, or gone down into the dust, celebrate thy faithfulness and goodness in the land of the living? Or shall my dust or dead corpse praise thee? No, Lord, shouldst thou cut me off in the beginning of my reign, thy name would lose the praises which many will return to thee for my life, and be exposed to reproaches, as if thou hadst not kept thy word with me; and I should lose those opportunities of praising thy name, and serving my generations, which I prize above my life.

Poole: Psa 30:11 - Put off my sackcloth // With gladness Having related his prayer, he now declares the gracious answer which God gave him. Put off my sackcloth i.e. given me occasion to put off that sac...

Having related his prayer, he now declares the gracious answer which God gave him.

Put off my sackcloth i.e. given me occasion to put off that sackcloth, which they used to wear in times of mourning. See Est 4:1 Psa 35:13 Isa 32:11 Joe 1:13 .

With gladness either with garments of gladness or rejoicing; or with joy, as with a garment surrounding me on every side; as he is for the like reason said to be girded with strength , Psa 18:32 .

Poole: Psa 30:12 - My glory My glory my soul; or rather, my tongue, to which both singing and silence most properly belong. See Poole "Psa 7:5" ; See Poole "Psa 16:9" .

My glory my soul; or rather, my tongue, to which both singing and silence most properly belong. See Poole "Psa 7:5" ; See Poole "Psa 16:9" .

PBC: Psa 30:7 - -- 4. True believers may have the assurance of their salvation divers ways shaken, diminished, and intermitted; as Song 5:2-3,6 by negligence in preservi...

4. True believers may have the assurance of their salvation divers ways shaken, diminished, and intermitted; as Song 5:2-3,6 by negligence in preserving of it, by Ps 51:8,12,14 falling into some special sin, which woundeth the conscience and grieveth the Spirit, by some sudden or Ps 116:11; 77:7-8; 31:22 vehement temptation, or by God’s withdrawing the Ps 30:7 light of his countenance, and suffering even such as fear him to walk in darkness and to have no light; yet are they never destitute of the 1Jo 3:9 seed of God, and life Lu 22:32 of faith, that love of Christ and the bretheren, that sincerity of heart and conscience of duty, out of which, by the operation of the Spirit, this assurance may in due time be Ps 42:5,11 revived, and by the which in the mean time they are La 3:26-31 preserved from utter despair. (From London Confession of 1689)

See PBtop: PERSEVERANCE AND PRESERVATION

Haydock: Psa 30:1 - Heart // Vessel A prayer of a just man under affliction. Heart, past recovery. Protestants, "dead man out of mind." (Haydock) --- Vessel means, "any thing." (C...

A prayer of a just man under affliction.

Heart, past recovery. Protestants, "dead man out of mind." (Haydock) ---

Vessel means, "any thing." (Calmet) ---

A broken pot is thrown away. (Menochius)

Haydock: Psa 30:1 - Ecstacy Ecstacy. This word is not in Hebrew nor in some of the best Greek copies. (Theodoret) --- It seems to be taken from ver. 23., (Calmet) and intimat...

Ecstacy. This word is not in Hebrew nor in some of the best Greek copies. (Theodoret) ---

It seems to be taken from ver. 23., (Calmet) and intimates that the just may recite this psalm in the latter times, (Worthington) when they shall be in the greatest perplexity. (Haydock) ---

David composed it when he was obliged to flee from court, (1 Kings xix. 1., and xxvii. 1.; Calmet) or in the desert of Moan, seeing himself in the most imminent danger; (1 Kings xxiii. 25.; Kimchi; Du Pin) though some refer this psalm to the conspiracy of Absalom, (Theodoret; Menochius) or to the unpremeditated fall of David, (Eusebius) or to the captives. (St. Chrysostom) ---

Our Saviour repeated part of ver. 6., upon the cross; and he may perhaps be the object of the whole psalm. The Church prescribes only the six first verses to be recited at Complin. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 30:2 - Justice Justice. Symmachus, "mercy." Thou art the judge between us. (Calmet) --- How grievous soever I may be afflicted, yet I trust in thee. (Worthingt...

Justice. Symmachus, "mercy." Thou art the judge between us. (Calmet) ---

How grievous soever I may be afflicted, yet I trust in thee. (Worthington) ---

"I fear that confusion which lasts for ever." (St. Augustine) (Du Hamel)

Haydock: Psa 30:3 - A God // Refuge A God. Hebrew, "a rock of strength." Septuagint, "a God who holdeth his shield over me," Greek: uperaspisten. (Haydock) --- Refuge. Hebrew, ...

A God. Hebrew, "a rock of strength." Septuagint, "a God who holdeth his shield over me," Greek: uperaspisten. (Haydock) ---

Refuge. Hebrew, "fortress." (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 30:4 - Nourish Nourish. Hebrew, guide. (Haydock) --- Symmachus, "take care of me." (Calmet)

Nourish. Hebrew, guide. (Haydock) ---

Symmachus, "take care of me." (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 30:5 - Snare Snare. The order to appear at court, after Saul had manifested his ill-will, could be considered in no other light. (Calmet)

Snare. The order to appear at court, after Saul had manifested his ill-will, could be considered in no other light. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 30:6 - Spirit // Redeemed Spirit. Hebrew, ruach. Our Saviour determines the signification of this word, and shews that the saints of the Old Testament believed that the so...

Spirit. Hebrew, ruach. Our Saviour determines the signification of this word, and shews that the saints of the Old Testament believed that the soul survived after its separation from the body, which some commentators have unguardedly said could not be clearly proved. This text may be applicable both to David and to Jesus Christ in a literal sense, as nothing contradictory would ensue, no more than from the prediction, out of Egypt I have called my son, being verified both in the Israelites and in the Messias; as both may truly be styled sons of God, though in a different sense. It is not so with that other prophecy, Behold a virgin, &c., which some say related both to the wife of the prophet and to the blessed Virgin: which cannot be, as they would not both have children, and still remain virgins. When two literal senses are admitted, they must not be contradictory. The verb is here in the future, both in Hebrew, Septuagint, and in the common Greek of the New Testament; (Luke xxiii. 46.) though some manuscripts of the latter have the present tense, which is adopted by Protestants, &c. (Berthier) ---

David commits his cause to God, being convinced that his promises would not be in vain. St. Stephen said in like manner, Lord receive my spirit; (Acts vii. 58.) and "the saints use this prayer when they leave the body," (St. Jerome; Calmet) as well as on any other important occasion, particularly when they receive the holy sacrament. (Worthington) ---

Redeemed, by freeing me from many dangers. The resurrection of Christ might be called a redemption; for which he had paid the price. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 30:7 - Vanities Vanities. Idols, (Calmet) superstitious practices, (Hammond) and lies. It may refer to Saul, who performed his promises so ill, and neglected the l...

Vanities. Idols, (Calmet) superstitious practices, (Hammond) and lies. It may refer to Saul, who performed his promises so ill, and neglected the laws which he had made against witches. (Calmet) ---

Protestants, "I have hated them that regard lying vanities." (Haydock) ---

The ancient interpreters, with St. Jerome, seem not to have seen the i, which changes the second into the first person, though here it would be less agreeable to the context. This i would appear unnecessary, if the present Hebrew were correct. (Berthier) (Houbigant)

Haydock: Psa 30:8 - Humility Humility. Hebrew, "affliction, thou hast known the tribulations of my soul." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) --- Thou hast often rescued me from my enemie...

Humility. Hebrew, "affliction, thou hast known the tribulations of my soul." (St. Jerome) (Haydock) ---

Thou hast often rescued me from my enemies; and canst thou behold my present distress without pity? (Calmet) ---

when God knows his friend to be in misery, he does not fail to relieve him. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 30:9 - Place Place. The psalms were commonly composed after the danger was over. David had escaped the lance and the servants of Saul. (Calmet)

Place. The psalms were commonly composed after the danger was over. David had escaped the lance and the servants of Saul. (Calmet)

Haydock: Psa 30:10 - Belly Belly, or entrails. (Menochius) (Lamentations i. 20., and Ecclesiasticus li. 29.) (Haydock) --- David was filled with indignation at the conduct ...

Belly, or entrails. (Menochius) (Lamentations i. 20., and Ecclesiasticus li. 29.) (Haydock) ---

David was filled with indignation at the conduct of his enemies. (Calmet) ---

Both soul and body felt the effects of his great sorrow, (Haydock) which pervaded every part. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 30:11 - Poverty Poverty. Septuagint have read ani instead of haoni, "my iniquity," which seems less accurate, as David had not offended Saul. Symmachus has "ma...

Poverty. Septuagint have read ani instead of haoni, "my iniquity," which seems less accurate, as David had not offended Saul. Symmachus has "malice," (Calmet) or "ill-treatment," Greek: kakosin. (Haydock) ---

We may form some judgment of David's distress, from his being obliged to eat the consecrated bread at Nobe. (Calmet) ---

Yet without making any change to the Hebrew, we may explain it in the sense of the Vulgate, as ave signifies to be "bent down." (Berthier) ---

"Chastisements waste my strength." (Pr. disc.) ---

Jesus was a man of sorrows. (Berthier)

Haydock: Psa 30:12 - Among // Fear // Omnia fortunæ sunt inimica malæ Among. Literally, "above;" super. (Haydock) --- Houbigant would exchange l for m, in Hebrew "to all," &c., which seems more agreeable to the...

Among. Literally, "above;" super. (Haydock) ---

Houbigant would exchange l for m, in Hebrew "to all," &c., which seems more agreeable to the sequel, and does not contradict the Vulgate. (Berthier) ---

David complains that none of his enemies were treated so severely as himself, (Haydock) though they were very wicked. (Menochius) ---

They all looked upon him with disdain, and even his friends fled from him. This is the picture of the world. A man fallen into distress is the object of general contempt. (Calmet) ---

Yet we ought rather to remember that such a one is sacred: sacra res est miser: and that he ought to excite our compassion. (Haydock) ---

Fear. People are afraid to have it known that they were ever acquainted with me, (Calmet) lest they should be involved in my misery. (Haydock) ---

My friends dare not converse with me. (Worthington) Si male res cedit, superest tibi nullus amicus:

Omnia fortunæ sunt inimica malæ. (Lucian Anthol.)

If fortune frown, no friend dares shew his face,

All flee the wretched, and abhor their place.

Gill: Psa 30:1 - I will extol thee, O Lord // for thou hast lifted me up // and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me I will extol thee, O Lord,.... Or "lift thee up on high" k. The Lord is high in his name, he is the most High; and in his nature, there is none beside...

I will extol thee, O Lord,.... Or "lift thee up on high" k. The Lord is high in his name, he is the most High; and in his nature, there is none besides him, nor like unto him; and in place, he dwells in the high and holy place; he is above all, angels and men; he is above all gods; he is the King of kings, and Lord of lords; he cannot be higher than he is: to extol him, therefore, is to declare him to be what he is; to exalt him in high praises of him, which the psalmist determined to do, for the following reasons;

for thou hast lifted me up; or "drawn me up", or "out" l; from the pit of nature; the low estate of unregeneracy; the pit wherein is no water: the horrible pit, the mire and clay of sin and misery, in which all men, while unconverted, are; and out of which they cannot lift themselves, being without strength, yea, dead in sin: this is God's work; he takes out of this pit, he draws out of it by his efficacious grace; he raises up the poor out of the dust, and lifts up the beggar from the dunghill; and this is an instance of his grace and mercy, and requires a new song of praise: or this may regard some great fall by sin, from which he was restored, through the grace and power of God; or deliverance from great troubles, compared to waters, out of which he was drawn, Psa 18:16; and was lifted up above his enemies; and agrees very well with his being brought to his palace and throne again, upon the defeat of Absalom;

and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me; as Satan does over unregenerate sinners, when he possesses their hearts, and keeps the house and goods in peace; and as the men of the world do over fallen saints, when forsaken by the Lord, and afflicted by him, and are under the frowns of his providence; but the conspirators against David were not suffered to succeed and rejoice over him, which they otherwise would have done; and for this he praises the Lord.

Gill: Psa 30:2 - O Lord my God, I cried unto thee // and thou hast healed me O Lord my God, I cried unto thee,.... In the time of his distress and trouble; and whither should he go but unto his covenant God and Father? and t...

O Lord my God, I cried unto thee,.... In the time of his distress and trouble; and whither should he go but unto his covenant God and Father?

and thou hast healed me: either of some bodily disease that attended him; for the Lord is the physician of the body, as well as of the soul; and that either immediately, or by giving a blessing to means used; and the glory of such a mercy should be given to him: or else of soul diseases, which are natural and hereditary, epidemical, nauseous, mortal, and incurable, but by the grace of God and blood of Christ; and the healing: of them either respects the pardon of them at first conversion; for healing diseases, and forgiving iniquities, signify one and the same thing; or else fresh discoveries and applications of pardoning grace, after falls into sin, which are an healing backslidings, and restoring comforts; and this is God's work; none can heal but himself, and he does it effectually, universally, and freely, and which calls for thankfulness, Psa 103:1; or this may be understood in a civil sense, of restoring him to his house, his throne and kingdom, and the peace of it.

Gill: Psa 30:3 - O Lord, thou hast brought up my soul from the grave // thou hast kept me alive // that I should not go down to the pit O Lord, thou hast brought up my soul from the grave,.... When his life being in danger, was near unto it, Job 33:22; otherwise the soul dies not, nor ...

O Lord, thou hast brought up my soul from the grave,.... When his life being in danger, was near unto it, Job 33:22; otherwise the soul dies not, nor does it lie and sleep in the grave; or "thou hast brought up my soul from hell" m; that is, delivered him from those horrors of conscience and terrors of mind, by reason of sin, which were as hell itself unto him; see Psa 116:3;

thou hast kept me alive: preserved his corporeal life when in danger, and maintained his spiritual life; and quickened him by his word, under all his afflictions, and kept him from utter and black despair;

that I should not go down to the pit; either of the grave or hell. There is in this clause a "Keri" and a "Cetib"; a marginal reading, and a textual writing: according to the latter it is, "from them that go down to the pit"; which some versions n follow; that is, thou hast preserved me from going along with them, and being where and as they are: our version follows the former; the sense is the same.

Gill: Psa 30:4 - Sing unto the Lord, O ye saints of his // and give thanks at the remembrance of his holiness Sing unto the Lord, O ye saints of his,.... Such to whom he has been gracious and merciful, and has blessed with pardoning grace, and justifying right...

Sing unto the Lord, O ye saints of his,.... Such to whom he has been gracious and merciful, and has blessed with pardoning grace, and justifying righteousness, adoption, and a right to eternal life; and who are holy godly persons; in whose hearts principles of grace and holiness are formed; and who are kind and bountiful to others: all which the word o here used signifies: and these are the Lord's; they are set apart for him, and they are sanctified by him; and therefore should sing his praises, both vocally, and with melody in their hearts;

and give thanks at the remembrance of his holiness; which is essential to him, and in which he is glorious; and which appears in all his ways and works of providence and grace, and both in the redemption and sanctification of his people; and besides this, there is the holiness of Christ, which is imputed to his saints, and the sanctification of the Spirit, which is wrought in them; and at the remembrance of each of these it highly becomes them to give thanks to the Lord, since hereby they are made meet to be partakers of his kingdom and glory.

Gill: Psa 30:5 - For his anger endureth but a moment // in his favour is life // weeping may endure for a night // but joy cometh in the morning For his anger endureth but a moment,.... Anger is not properly in God, he being a simple, uncompounded, immovable, and unchangeable being; nor is it ...

For his anger endureth but a moment,.... Anger is not properly in God, he being a simple, uncompounded, immovable, and unchangeable being; nor is it ever towards his people in reality, unless anger is distinguished from wrath, and is considered as consistent with his everlasting and invariable love to them; but only in their apprehension, he doing those things which in some respects are similar to those which men do when they are angry; he turns away from them and hides his face, he chides, chastises, and afflicts, and then they conclude he is angry; and when he returns again and takes off his hand, manifests his pardoning love, and comforts them, then they understand it that his anger is turned away from them; for in this improper sense of it, and as his children conceive of it, it is but for a moment, or a very short time: he forsakes them but for a moment, and their light afflictions endure no longer, Isa 54:7;

in his favour is life; by which is meant his free love and favour in Christ towards his people; and designs either the duration of it, that it lives and always is, even when he seems to be angry, and that it lasts as long as life does, yea, to all eternity; neither death nor life can separate from it; or the object of it, God delighting not in the death but the life of a sinner; or rather the effects of it, it is what makes the present life to be properly life, and really comfortable; without it men may be said rather to be dead than to live, notwithstanding all enjoyments; and therefore it is better than life, abstracted from it, Psa 63:3; it quickens the soul in a spiritual sense, and makes grace lively; it invigorates faith, encourages hope, and makes love to abound, and it issues in eternal life;

weeping may endure for a night; the allusion is to the time when afflictions are usually most heavy and pressing upon persons, when they most feel them, or, however, are free from diversion, and at leisure to bemoan themselves; and may point at the season of weeping, and cause of it, the night of affliction, or of darkness and desertion, and denotes the short continuance of it; weeping is here represented as a person, and as a lodger, for the word may be rendered "lodge" p; but then it is as a wayfaring man, who continues but for a night; see Isa 17:14;

but joy cometh in the morning; alluding to the time when all nature is fresh and gay, when man rises cheerful from his rest, darkness removes, light breaks forth, and the sun rises and sheds its beams, and everything looks pleasant and delightful; moreover, the mercies of God are new every morning, which cause joy, and call for thankfulness; and especially it is a time of joy after weeping and darkness, when the sun of righteousness arises with healing in his wings; as it will be to perfection in the resurrection morn, when the dead in Christ will rise first, and be like to him, and reign with him for evermore.

Gill: Psa 30:6 - And in my prosperity // I said, I shall never be moved And in my prosperity,.... Either outward prosperity, when he was settled in his kingdom, and as acknowledged king by all the tribes of Israel, and had...

And in my prosperity,.... Either outward prosperity, when he was settled in his kingdom, and as acknowledged king by all the tribes of Israel, and had gotten the victory over all his enemies, and was at rest from them round about; or inward and spiritual prosperity, having a spiritual appetite for the word, being in the lively exercise of grace, growing in it, and in the knowledge of Christ; favoured with communion with God, having flesh discoveries of pardoning grace and mercy, corruptions being subdued, the inward man renewed with spiritual strength, and more fruitful in every good word and work. This being the case,

I said, I shall never be moved; so in outward prosperity men are apt to sing a requiem to themselves, and fancy it will always be thus with them, be in health of body, and enjoying the affluence of temporal things, and so put away the evil day in one sense and another from them; and even good men themselves are subject to this infirmity, Job 29:18; and who also, when in comfortable frames of soul, and in prosperous circumstances in spiritual things, are ready to conclude if will always be thus with them, or better. Indeed they can never be moved as to their state and condition with respect to God; not from his heart, where they are set as a seal; nor out of the arms of Christ, and covenant of grace; nor out of the family of God; nor from a state of justification and grace; but they may be moved as to the exercise of grace and discharge of duty, in which they vary; and especially when they are self-confident, and depend upon their own strength for the performance of these things, and for a continuance in such frames, which seems to have been David's case; and therefore he corrects himself, and his sense of things, in Psa 30:7.

Gill: Psa 30:7 - Lord, by thy favour thou hast made my mountain to stand strong // thou didst hide thy face, and I was troubled Lord, by thy favour thou hast made my mountain to stand strong,.... The psalmist found himself mistaken, and acknowledges it; that as it was not owing...

Lord, by thy favour thou hast made my mountain to stand strong,.... The psalmist found himself mistaken, and acknowledges it; that as it was not owing to his own merit that he enjoyed the prosperity that he did, so neither was the continuance of it owing to his goodness, power, and strength, but to the free grace and favour of God; as the church of God is compared to a mountain, and the several individuals of believers are like to Mount Zion, so the soul of a child of God may be called his mountain, which is made strong by the Lord as to its state in Christ, being set on him, the Rock of ages, and sure foundation, where it is safe and secure; and as to its grace, whenever it is in any strong exercise, which is altogether owing to the favour of God, and continues as long as he pleases;

thou didst hide thy face, and I was troubled; the Lord may hide his face from his people, and yet their state be safe; their mountain stands strong in that respect; yet this generally produces a change of frames; it gives trouble, and faith and hope become feeble and languid in their acts and exercises; this shows the changeableness of frames, that they are not to be depended upon; that they are entirely owing to the pleasure of God, and that rejoicing only should be in him: very likely some regard is had to the affair of Absalom's rebellion, which came unawares, unthought of, when David was in the greatest prosperity and security.

Gill: Psa 30:8 - I cried to thee, O Lord // and unto the Lord I made supplication I cried to thee, O Lord,.... In his trouble, when the Lord had hid his face from him, and he was sensible that he had departed from him: he was not st...

I cried to thee, O Lord,.... In his trouble, when the Lord had hid his face from him, and he was sensible that he had departed from him: he was not stupid and unaffected with it; nor did he turn his back upon God, and seek to others; but he cried after a departing God, which showed love to him, and some degree of faith in him, by looking again towards his holy temple, and waiting upon him until he returned;

and unto the Lord I made supplication; in the most humble manner; entreating his grace and mercy, and that he would again show him his face and favour.

Gill: Psa 30:9 - What profit is there in my blood // when I go down to the pit // shall the dust praise thee What profit is there in my blood?.... Should that be shed, and he die by the hands of his enemies, through divine permission: death is not profitable...

What profit is there in my blood?.... Should that be shed, and he die by the hands of his enemies, through divine permission: death is not profitable to a man's self by way of merit; it does not atone for sin, satisfy justice, and merit heaven; even the death of martyrs, and of such who shed their blood, died in the cause of Christ, and for his sake, is not meritorious; it does not profit in such sense: there is profit in no blood but in the blood of Christ, by which peace is made, pardon procured, and redemption obtained. Indeed death is consequentially profitable to good men; it is an outlet of all sorrows and afflictions, and the inlet of joy and happiness; it is the saints' passage to heaven, and upon it they are immediately with Christ, and rest from their labours: nor is there profit in the blood of the saints to them that shed it; for when inquisition is made for it, vengeance will be taken on them who have shed it, and blood will be given them to drink, as will be particularly to antichrist: nor is there any profit in it to the Lord himself; which seems to be what is chiefly designed, since it is used by the psalmist as an argument with him in prayer, that he might not be left by him, and to his enemies, so as to perish, since no glory could accrue to God by it from them; they would not give him thanks for it, but ascribe it to themselves, and say their own hand had done it; so far, the psalmist suggests, would his death be from being profitable to God, that it would rather be a loss to the interest of religion; since he had not as yet fully restored religion, and settled the pure worship of God in order, and made the preparations for the building the house of God he intended. God may be glorified in the death of his people; either by their dying in the faith of interest in him; or by suffering death for his name's sake; but, in a strict sense, there is nothing either in life or death in which man can be profitable unto God; see Job 22:2; some understand this of life; because the life is in the blood: as if the sense was, of what advantage is life to me? it would have been better for the if I had never been born, had had no life and being at all, if I must for ever be banished from thy presence, and go down to the pit of hell, which they suppose is designed in the following phrase;

when I go down to the pit; though the grave seems rather to be meant, and the former sense is best;

shall the dust praise thee? that is, men, whose original is dust, being reduced to dust again, as the body at death, when laid in the grave, and corrupted there, is; this lifeless dust cannot praise the Lord: the soul indeed dies not with the body; nor does it sleep in the grave with it; nor is it unemployed in heaven; but is continually engaged in the high praises of God: but the sense of the psalmist is, that should he die, and be buried, and be reduced to dust, he should no more praise the Lord in the land of the living, among men, to the glory of divine grace and goodness; so that this revenue of his glory would be lost. Shall it declare thy truth? either the truth of the Gospel, which lies in the word of God; or rather the faithfulness of God in the performance of his promises; see Psa 40:10.

Gill: Psa 30:10 - Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon me // Lord, be thou my helper Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon me,.... By lifting up the light of his countenance again upon him; by manifesting and applying his pardoning grace t...

Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon me,.... By lifting up the light of his countenance again upon him; by manifesting and applying his pardoning grace to him, and by delivering him out of all his afflictions;

Lord, be thou my helper; in this time of trouble; for he knew that vain was the help of man; and he was entirely in the right to betake himself to the Lord, who was able to help him, when none else could.

Gill: Psa 30:11 - Those hast turned for me my mourning into dancing // thou hast put off my sackcloth // and girded me with gladness Those hast turned for me my mourning into dancing,.... This, with what follows, expresses the success he had in seeking the Lord by prayer and supplic...

Those hast turned for me my mourning into dancing,.... This, with what follows, expresses the success he had in seeking the Lord by prayer and supplication; there was a sudden change of things, as it often is with the people of God; sometimes they are mourning by reason of sin, their own and others; or on account of afflictions; or because of spiritual decays; or through the temptations of Satan; or, as it was the case of the psalmist now, because of the hidings of God's face; but this mourning is exchanged for joy and gladness when the Lord discovers his pardoning love, revives his work in their souls, takes off his afflicting hand from them, rebukes the tempter, and delivers out of his temptations, and shows himself, his grace and favour;

thou hast put off my sackcloth; which was used in mourning for relations, and in times of calamity and distress, and as a token of humiliation and repentance, Gen 37:34;

and girded me with gladness; by these phrases the same thing is signified as before; see Isa 61:3.

Gill: Psa 30:12 - To the end that my glory may sing praise to thee, and not be silent // O Lord my God, I will give thanks unto thee for ever To the end that my glory may sing praise to thee, and not be silent,.... Meaning either his soul, the more noble and glorious part of him; or the mem...

To the end that my glory may sing praise to thee, and not be silent,.... Meaning either his soul, the more noble and glorious part of him; or the members of his body, his tongue, which is the glory of it, and with which he glorified God; see Psa 16:9; compared with Act 2:26, this was the end that was to be answered by changing the scene of things; and which was answered;

O Lord my God, I will give thanks unto thee for ever; to the end of life, as long as he had a being, and to all eternity, Psa 104:33. Jerom interprets the whole psalm of the resurrection of Christ.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 30:1 Or “rejoice.”

NET Notes: Psa 30:2 You healed me. Apparently the psalmist was plagued by a serious illness that threatened his life. See Ps 41.

NET Notes: Psa 30:3 Heb “you kept me alive from those descending into the pit.” The Hebrew noun בוֹר (bor, “pit, cistern”)...

NET Notes: Psa 30:4 Heb “to his holy remembrance.” The noun זֵכֵר (zekher, “remembrance”) here refers to the name of...

NET Notes: Psa 30:5 Heb “in the evening weeping comes to lodge, but at morning a shout of joy.” “Weeping” is personified here as a traveler who lo...

NET Notes: Psa 30:6 In my self-confidence I said… Here the psalmist begins to fill in the background of the crisis referred to in the earlier verses. He had been ar...

NET Notes: Psa 30:7 Heb “you hid your face.” The idiom “hide the face” can mean “ignore” (see Pss 10:11; 13:1; 51:9) or, as here, carr...

NET Notes: Psa 30:8 The prefixed verbal forms in v. 8 are probably preterites; the psalmist recalls that he prayed in his time of crisis.

NET Notes: Psa 30:9 According to the OT, those who descend into the realm of death/Sheol are cut off from God’s mighty deeds and from the worshiping covenant commun...

NET Notes: Psa 30:10 Heb “be a helper to me.”

NET Notes: Psa 30:11 Covered me with joy. “Joy” probably stands metonymically for festive attire here.

NET Notes: Psa 30:12 Or “forever.”

Geneva Bible: Psa 30:1 "A Psalm [and] Song [at] the dedication of the ( a ) house of David." I will extol thee, O LORD; ( b ) for thou hast lifted me up, and hast not made m...

Geneva Bible: Psa 30:2 O LORD my God, I cried unto thee, and thou hast ( c ) healed me. ( c ) Restored from the rebellion of Absalom.

Geneva Bible: Psa 30:3 O LORD, thou hast brought up my ( d ) soul from the grave: thou hast kept me alive, that I should not go down to the pit. ( d ) Meaning, that he esca...

Geneva Bible: Psa 30:4 Sing unto the LORD, O ye ( e ) saints of his, and give thanks at the remembrance of his holiness. ( e ) The word signifies them who have received mer...

Geneva Bible: Psa 30:6 And in my ( g ) prosperity I said, I shall never be moved. ( g ) I put too much confidence in my quiet state as in (Jer 31:18; 2Ch 32:24-25).

Geneva Bible: Psa 30:7 LORD, by thy favour thou hast made my ( h ) mountain to stand strong: thou didst hide thy face, [and] I ( i ) was troubled. ( h ) I thought you had e...

Geneva Bible: Psa 30:9 What profit [is there] in my blood, when I go down to the pit? Shall the ( k ) dust praise thee? shall it declare thy truth? ( k ) David means that t...

Geneva Bible: Psa 30:12 To the end that [my] ( l ) glory may sing praise to thee, and not be silent. O LORD my God, I will give thanks unto thee for ever. ( l ) Because you ...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Psa 30:4 - A Libation To Jehovah The Two Guests His anger endureth but a moment; in His favour is life: weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.'--Psalm 30:5. A...

MHCC: Psa 30:1-5 - --The great things the Lord has done for us, both by his providence and by his grace, bind us in gratitude to do all we can to advance his kingdom among...

MHCC: Psa 30:6-12 - --When things are well with us, we are very apt to think that they will always be so. When we see our mistake, it becomes us to think with shame upon ou...

Matthew Henry: Psa 30:1-5 - -- It was the laudable practice of the pious Jews, and, though not expressly appointed, yet allowed and accepted, when they had built a new house, to ...

Matthew Henry: Psa 30:6-12 - -- We have, in these verses, an account of three several states that David was in successively, and of the workings of his heart towards God in each of...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 30:1-3 - -- (Heb.: 30:2-4) The Psalm begins like a hymn. The Piel דּלּה (from דּלה , Arab. dlâ , to hold anything long, loose and pendulous, whether...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 30:4-5 - -- (Heb.: 30:5-6) Psa 30:4 call upon all the pious to praise this God, who after a short season of anger is at once and henceforth gracious. Instead o...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 30:6-7 - -- (Heb.: 30:7-8) David now relates his experience in detail, beginning with the cause of the chastisement, which he has just undergone. In ואני ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 30:8-10 - -- (Heb.: 30:9-11) Nevertheless he who is thus chastened prayed fervently. The futures in Psa 30:9, standing as they do in the full flow of the narrat...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 30:11-12 - -- (Heb.: 30:12-13) In order to express the immediate sequence of the fulfilling of the prayer upon the prayer itself, the otherwise (e.g., Psa 32:5) ...

Constable: Psa 30:1-12 - --Psalm 30 David had emerged from an experience of chastening by the Lord for some sin he had committed an...

Constable: Psa 30:1-4 - --1. David's deliverance from God's chastening 30:1-5 The psalmist began by acknowledging the Lord's deliverance of him, and he called on the congregati...

Constable: Psa 30:5-9 - --2. The reason for David's discipline 30:6-10 30:6 David had evidently become self-confident and had forgotten his complete dependence on the Lord (cf....

Constable: Psa 30:10-11 - --3. David's thanksgiving for God's mercy 30:11-12 The psalmist described the change God had broug...

buka semua
Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 30 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 30:1, David praises God for his deliverance; Psa 30:4, He exhorts others to praise him by example of God’s dealings with him. Or, ...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 30 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 30:1-5) Praise to God for deliverance. (Psa 30:6-12) Others encouraged by his example.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 30 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This is a psalm of thanksgiving for the great deliverances which God had wrought for David, penned upon occasion of the dedicating of his house of ...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 30 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 30 A Psalm [and] Song [at] the dedication of the house of David. This is the first time that a psalm is called a song; some p...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


TIP #26: Perkuat kehidupan spiritual harian Anda dengan Bacaan Alkitab Harian. [SEMUA]
dibuat dalam 0.40 detik
dipersembahkan oleh
bible.org - YLSA