kecilkan semua  

Teks -- Psalms 129:1-8 (NET)

Tampilkan Strong
Konteks
Psalm 129
129:1 A song of ascents. “Since my youth they have often attacked me,” let Israel say. 129:2 “Since my youth they have often attacked me, but they have not defeated me. 129:3 The plowers plowed my back; they made their furrows long. 129:4 The Lord is just; he cut the ropes of the wicked.” 129:5 May all who hate Zion be humiliated and turned back! 129:6 May they be like the grass on the rooftops which withers before one can even pull it up, 129:7 which cannot fill the reaper’s hand, or the lap of the one who gathers the grain! 129:8 Those who pass by will not say, “May you experience the Lord’s blessing! We pronounce a blessing on you in the name of the Lord.”
Paralel   Ref. Silang (TSK)   ITL  

Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Israel a citizen of Israel.,a member of the nation of Israel
 · Zion one of the hills on which Jerusalem was built; the temple area; the city of Jerusalem; God's people,a town and citidel; an ancient part of Jerusalem


Topik/Tema Kamus: Psalms | PSALMS, BOOK OF | Praise | Prayer | Wicked | SACRIFICE, IN THE NEW TESTAMENT, 1 | Hallel | Enemy | Grass | CORD | Plow | Persecution | House | Reaping | SCOURGE; SCOURGING | SHEAF; SHEAVES | Church | Mowing | God | LAP | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

Lainnya
Evidence

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Psa 129:1 - From my youth From the time that I was a people.

From the time that I was a people.

Wesley: Psa 129:4 - Righteous Faithful or merciful.

Faithful or merciful.

Wesley: Psa 129:4 - The cords Wherewith the plow was drawn. By these cords he understands all their plots and endeavours.

Wherewith the plow was drawn. By these cords he understands all their plots and endeavours.

Wesley: Psa 129:6 - House tops - Which there were flat.

tops - Which there were flat.

Wesley: Psa 129:6 - Which Having no deep root, never comes to maturity. And so all their designs shall be abortive.

Having no deep root, never comes to maturity. And so all their designs shall be abortive.

Wesley: Psa 129:8 - The blessing Which was an usual salutation given by passengers to reapers: so the meaning is, it never continues 'till the harvest comes.

Which was an usual salutation given by passengers to reapers: so the meaning is, it never continues 'till the harvest comes.

JFB: Psa 129:1-2 - -- The people of God, often delivered from enemies, are confident of His favor, by their overthrow in the future. (Psa 129:1-8)

The people of God, often delivered from enemies, are confident of His favor, by their overthrow in the future. (Psa 129:1-8)

JFB: Psa 129:1-2 - may Israel now say Or, "oh! let Israel say" (Psa 124:1). Israel's youth was the sojourn in Egypt (Jer 2:2; Hos 2:15).

Or, "oh! let Israel say" (Psa 124:1). Israel's youth was the sojourn in Egypt (Jer 2:2; Hos 2:15).

JFB: Psa 129:2 - prevailed Literally, "been able," that is, to accomplish their purpose against me (Psa 13:4).

Literally, "been able," that is, to accomplish their purpose against me (Psa 13:4).

JFB: Psa 129:3-4 - -- The ploughing is a figure of scourging, which most severe physical infliction aptly represents all kinds.

The ploughing is a figure of scourging, which most severe physical infliction aptly represents all kinds.

JFB: Psa 129:4 - the cords That is, which fasten the plough to the ox; and cutting denotes God's arresting the persecution;

That is, which fasten the plough to the ox; and cutting denotes God's arresting the persecution;

JFB: Psa 129:5-6 - -- The ill-rooted roof grass, which withers before it grows up and procures for those gathering it no harvest blessing (Rth 2:4), sets forth the utter us...

The ill-rooted roof grass, which withers before it grows up and procures for those gathering it no harvest blessing (Rth 2:4), sets forth the utter uselessness and the rejection of the wicked.

Clarke: Psa 129:1 - Many a time have they afflicted me Many a time have they afflicted me - The Israelites had been generally in affliction or captivity from the earliest part of their history, here call...

Many a time have they afflicted me - The Israelites had been generally in affliction or captivity from the earliest part of their history, here called their youth. So Hos 2:15 : "She shall sing as in the days of her youth, when she came up out of the land of Egypt."See Jer 2:2, and Eze 16:4, etc.

Clarke: Psa 129:2 - Yet they have not prevailed Yet they have not prevailed - They endeavored to annihilate us as a people; but God still preserves us as his own nation.

Yet they have not prevailed - They endeavored to annihilate us as a people; but God still preserves us as his own nation.

Clarke: Psa 129:3 - The plowers plowed upon my back The plowers plowed upon my back - It is possible that this mode of expression may signify that the people, during their captivity, were cruelly used...

The plowers plowed upon my back - It is possible that this mode of expression may signify that the people, during their captivity, were cruelly used by scourging, etc.; or it may be a sort of proverbial mode of expression for the most cruel usage. There really appears here to be a reference to a yoke, as if they had actually been yoked to the plouph, or to some kind of carriages, and been obliged to draw like beasts of burden. In this way St. Jerome understood the passage; and this has the more likelihood, as in the next verse God is represented as cutting them off from these draughts.

Clarke: Psa 129:4 - The Lord - hath cut asunder the cords of the wicked The Lord - hath cut asunder the cords of the wicked - The words have been applied to the sufferings of Christ; but I know not on what authority. No ...

The Lord - hath cut asunder the cords of the wicked - The words have been applied to the sufferings of Christ; but I know not on what authority. No such scourging could take place in his case, as would justify the expression: -

"The ploughers made long furrows there

Till all his body was one wound.

It is not likely that he received more than thirty-nine stripes. The last line is an unwarranted assertion.

Clarke: Psa 129:5 - Let them all be confounded Let them all be confounded - They shall be confounded. They who hate Zion, the Church of God, hate God himself; and all such must be dealt with as e...

Let them all be confounded - They shall be confounded. They who hate Zion, the Church of God, hate God himself; and all such must be dealt with as enemies, and be utterly confounded.

Clarke: Psa 129:6 - As the grass upon the housetops As the grass upon the housetops - As in the east the roofs of the houses were flat, seeds of various kinds falling upon them would naturally vegetat...

As the grass upon the housetops - As in the east the roofs of the houses were flat, seeds of various kinds falling upon them would naturally vegetate, though in an imperfect way; and, because of the want of proper nourishment, would necessarily dry and wither away. If grass, the mower cannot make hay of it; if corn, the reaper cannot make a sheaf of it. Let the Babylonians be like such herbage - good for nothing, and come to nothing

Clarke: Psa 129:6 - Withereth afore it groweth up Withereth afore it groweth up - Before שלק shalak , it is unsheathed; i.e., before it ears, or comes to seed.

Withereth afore it groweth up - Before שלק shalak , it is unsheathed; i.e., before it ears, or comes to seed.

Clarke: Psa 129:8 - Neither do they which go by say Neither do they which go by say - There is a reference here to the salutations which were given and returned by the reapers in the time of the harve...

Neither do they which go by say - There is a reference here to the salutations which were given and returned by the reapers in the time of the harvest. We find that it was customary, when the master came to them into the field, to say unto the reapers, The Lord be with you! and for them to answer, The Lord bless thee! Rth 2:4. Let their land become desolate, so that no harvest shall ever more appear in it. No interchange of benedictions between owners and reapers. This has literally taken place: Babylon is utterly destroyed; no harvests grow near the place where it stood

Calvin: Psa 129:1 - They have often afflicted me from my youth 1.They have often afflicted me from my youth This Psalm was probably composed at a time when the Church of God, reduced to a state of extreme distres...

1.They have often afflicted me from my youth This Psalm was probably composed at a time when the Church of God, reduced to a state of extreme distress, or dismayed by some great danger, or oppressed with tyranny, was on the verge of total destruction. This conjecture, I conceive, is supported by the adverb of time, now, which appears to me to be emphatic. It is as if the Prophet; had said, When God’s faithful ones are with difficulty drawing their breath under the burden of temptations, it is a seasonable time for them to reflect on the manner in which he has exercised his people from the beginning, and from age to age. As soon as God has given loose reins to our enemies to do as they please we are distressed with sorrow, and our thoughts are wholly engrossed with the evils which presently harass us. Hence proceeds despair; for we do not remember that the patience of the fathers was subjected to the like trial, and that nothing happens to us which they did not experience. It is then an exercise eminently fitted to comfort true believers to look back to the conflicts of the Church in the days of old, in order thereby to know that she has always labored under the cross, and has been severely afflicted by the unrighteous violence of her enemies. The most probable conjecture which occurs to me at present is, that this Psalm was written after the Jews had returned from the Babylonish captivity, and when, having suffered many grievous and cruel injuries at the hands of their neighbors, they hadn’t length almost fainted under the tyranny of Antiochus Epiphanes. In this dark and troublous state of matters, the Prophet encourages the faithful to fortitude, nor does he address himself to a few of them only, but to the whole body without exception; and in order to their sustaining such fierce assaults, he would have them to oppose to them a hope inspired by the encouraging consideration, that the Church, by patient endurance, has uniformly proved victorious. Almost every word is emphatic. Let Israel now say, that is, let him consider the trials of the Church in ancient times, from which it may be gathered, that the people of God have never been exempted from bearing the cross, and yet that the various afflictions by which they have been tried have always had a happy issue. In speaking of the enemies of Israel simply by the pronoun they, without being more specific, the Psalmist aggravates the greatness of the evil more than if he had expressly named the Assyrians or the Egyptians. By not specifying any particular class of foes, he tacitly intimates that the world is fraught with innumerable bands of enemies, whom Satan easily arms for the destruction of good men, his object being that new wars may arise continually on every side. History certainly bears ample testimony that the people of God had not to deal with a few enemies, but that they were assaulted by almost the whole world; and farther, that they were molested not only by external foes, but also by those of an internal kind, by such as professed to belong to the Church.

The term youth here denotes their first beginnings, 109 and refers not only to the time when God brought the people out of Egypt, but also to the time when he wearied Abraham and the patriarchs during almost their whole life, by keeping them in a condition of painful warfare. If these patriarchs were strangely driven about in the land of Canaan, the lot of their descendants was still worse during the time of their sojourning in Egypt, when they were not only oppressed as slaves, but loaded with every kind of reproach and ignominy. At their departure from that land we know what difficulties they had to encounter. If in tracing their history from that period we find seasons in which some respite was granted them, yet they were not in a state of repose for any length of time, until the reign of David. And although during his reign they appeared to be in a prosperous condition, yet soon after troubles and even defeats arose, which threatened the people of God with total destruction. In the Babylonish captivity, all hope being well-nigh extinguished, they seemed as if hidden in the grave and undergoing the process of putrefaction. After their return they obtained, with difficulty, some brief intermission to take their breath. They were certainly often put; to the sword, until the race of them was almost wholly destroyed. To prevent it, therefore, from being supposed that they had received only some slight hurt, they are justly said to have been afflicted; as if the Prophet placed them before our eyes as it were half-dead, through the treatment of their enemies, who, seeing them prostrated under their feet, scrupled not to tread upon them. If we come to ourselves, it will be proper to add the horrible persecutions, by which the Church would have been consumed a thousand times, had not God, by hidden and mysterious means, preserved her, raising her as it were from the dead. Unless we have become stupid under our calamities, the distressing circumstances of this unhappy age will compel us to meditate on the same doctrine.

When the Prophet says twice, they have afflicted me, they have afflicted me, the repetition is not superfluous, it being intended to teach us that the people of God had not merely once or twice to enter the conflict, but that their patience had been tried by continual exercises. He had said that they had commenced this conflict from their youth, intimating that they had been inured to it from their first origin, in order to their being accustomed to bear the cross. He now adds, that their being subjected to this rigorous training was not without good reason, inasmuch as God had not ceased, by a continued course, to make use of these calamities for subduing them to himself. If the exercises of the Church, during her state of childhood, were so severe, our effeminacy will be very shameful indeed, if in the present day, when the Church, by the coming of Christ, has reached the age of manhood, we are found wanting in firmness for enduring trials. Matter of consolation is laid down in the last clause, which informs us that the enemies of Israel, after having tried all methods, never succeeded in realizing their wishes, God having always disappointed their hopes, and baffled their attempts.

Calvin: Psa 129:3 - The ploughers have ploughed upon my back 3.The ploughers have ploughed upon my back 110 Here the Prophet, by an apparent similitude, embellishes his preceding statement respecting the grievo...

3.The ploughers have ploughed upon my back 110 Here the Prophet, by an apparent similitude, embellishes his preceding statement respecting the grievous afflictions of the Church. He compares the people of God to a field through which a plough is drawn. He says that the furrows were made long, so that no corner was exempted from being cut up by the ploughshare. These words vividly express the fact — that the cross has always been planted on the back of the Church, to make long and wide furrows.

In the subsequent verse a ground of consolation under the same figure is subjoined, which is, that the righteous Lord hath cut asunder the cords of the wicked The allusion is to a plough, which, as we all know, is tied with cords to the necks of the oxen. The language very aptly conveys the idea, that the wicked, — since they would never have become tired or satiated in exercising their cruelty, and also in consequence of their being well armed, — were prepared to proceed farther, but that the Lord, in a way altogether unexpected, repressed their fury, just as if a man should unyoke oxen from the plough by cutting in pieces the cords and thongs which tied them to it. Hence we perceive what is the true condition of the Church. As God would have us contentedly to take his yoke upon us, the Holy Spirit not unfitly compares us to an arable field, which cannot make any resistance to its being cut, and cleaved, and turned up by the ploughshare. Should any one be disposed to indulge in greater refinement of speculation, he might say that the field is ploughed to prepare it for receiving the seed, and that it may at length bring forth fruit. But in my opinion the subject to which the Prophet limits his attention is the afflictions of the Church. The epithet righteous, with which he honors God, must, in a suitableness to the scope of the passage, be explained as implying that, although God may seem to dissemble for a time, yet he never forgets his righteousness, so as to withhold relief from his afflicted people. Paul in like manner adduces the same reason why God will not always suffer them to be persecuted,

“Seeing it is a righteous thing with God to recompense tribulation to them that trouble you;
and to you who are troubled rest with us.” (2Th 1:6,)

It is a point worthy of special notice, that the welfare of the Church is inseparably connected with the righteousness of God. The Prophet, also, wisely teaches us that the reason why the enemies of the Church did not prevail, was because God brought to nothing their enterprises, and did not suffer them to go beyond what he had determined in his own mind.

Calvin: Psa 129:5 - All who hate Zion shall be confounded, and tutored backward 5.All who hate Zion shall be confounded, and tutored backward Whether we take this as a prayer or a promise, the Prophet has a respect to the time to...

5.All who hate Zion shall be confounded, and tutored backward Whether we take this as a prayer or a promise, the Prophet has a respect to the time to come. Since all the verbs are in the future tense, it is certainly a very appropriate interpretation to understand him as deriving from times past instruction as to what is to be hoped for in future, even to the end. In whichever way we understand the passage, he declares that the faithful have no reason to be discouraged when they behold their enemies raised on high. The grass which grows upon the house-tops is not, on account of its higher situation, more valuable than the blade of corn which in the low ground is trampled under foot; for although it stands elevated above men’s heads, it is, in the first place, unprofitable; and secondly, it quickly withers away. 114 The verb, ףלש, shalaph, 115 which we have translate comes forth, is by some rendered, is plucked up. According to this translation the sense is, that without the hand or labor of man the grass on the house-tops is dried up. But as the verb properly signifies to be brought forth, or to come forth, the meaning, in my opinion, is that the grass on the housetops, so far from continuing long in a state of freshness, withers and perishes at its first springing up, because it has no root under it, nor earth to supply it with sap or moisture for its nourishment. Whenever, then, the splendor or greatness of our enemies strikes us with fear, let us bring to our recollection this comparison, that as the grass which grows upon the house-tops, though high, is yet without root, and consequently of brief duration, so these enemies, the nearer they approach the sun by the height of their pride, shall be the sooner consumed by the burning heat, since they have no root, it being humility alone which draws life and vigor from God.

Calvin: Psa 129:7 - With which the mower hath not filled his hand 7.With which the mower hath not filled his hand 116 We have here an additional confirmation of the truth, that although the wicked mount high or elev...

7.With which the mower hath not filled his hand 116 We have here an additional confirmation of the truth, that although the wicked mount high or elevate themselves, and form an extravagant opinion of their own importance, yet they continue mere grass, not bringing forth any good fruit, nor reaching a state of ripeness, but swelling only with fresh appearance. To make this obvious, the Psalmist sets them in opposition to fruit-bearing herbs, which in valleys and low grounds produce fruit for men. In fine, he affirms that they deserve to be hated or despised of all, whereas commonly every one in passing by the corn fields blesses them and prays for the harvest? 117 Farther, he has borrowed this illustration of his doctrine from the affairs of ordinary life, we are taught that whenever there is a hopeful prospect of a good harvest, we ought to beseech God, whose peculiar province it is to impart fertility to the earth, that he would give full effect to his blessing. And considering that the fruits of the earth are exposed to so many hazards, it is certainly strange that we are not stirred ‘up to engage in the exercise of prayer from the absolute necessity of these to man and beast. Nor does the Psalmist, in speaking of passers by blessing the reapers, speak exclusively of rite children of God, who are truly taught by his word that the fruitfulness of the earth is owing to his goodness; but he also comprehends worldly men in whom the same knowledge is implanted naturally. In conclusion, provided we not only dwell in the Church of the Lord, but also labor to have place among the number of her genuine citizens, we will be able fearlessly to despise all fire might of our enemies; for although they may flourish and have a great outward show for a time, yet they are but barren grass, on which the curse of heaven rests.

TSK: Psa 129:1 - Many // have they // from // may Many : or, Much. have they : Exo 1:12-14, Exo 1:22, Exo 5:7-19; Jdg 2:15, Jdg 10:8-12; 1Sa 13:19; Lam 1:3 from : Jer 2:2; Eze 23:3; Hos 2:15, Hos 11:1...

TSK: Psa 129:2 - yet they have yet they have : Psa 34:19, Psa 118:13, Psa 125:1; Job 5:19; Mat 16:18; Rom 8:35-39; Joh 16:33; Rev 12:8, Rev 12:9

TSK: Psa 129:3 - The plowers The plowers : Psa 141:7; Isa 51:23

The plowers : Psa 141:7; Isa 51:23

TSK: Psa 129:4 - The Lord // cut asunder The Lord : Ezr 9:15; Neh 9:33; Lam 1:18, Lam 3:22; Dan 9:7 cut asunder : Psa 124:6, Psa 124:7, Psa 140:5-11

TSK: Psa 129:5 - be confounded be confounded : Psa 83:4-11, Psa 122:6; Est 6:13, Est 9:5; Isa 10:12, Isa 37:22, Isa 37:28, Isa 37:29, Isa 37:35; Zec 1:14-17, Zec 12:3, Zec 12:6; 1Co...

TSK: Psa 129:6 - as the grass as the grass : Psa 37:2, Psa 92:7; Jer 17:5, Jer 17:6; Mat 13:6

TSK: Psa 129:7 - he that bindeth he that bindeth : Psa 126:6; Isa 17:10, Isa 17:11; Hos 8:7; Gal 6:8

he that bindeth : Psa 126:6; Isa 17:10, Isa 17:11; Hos 8:7; Gal 6:8

TSK: Psa 129:8 - The blessing The blessing : Psa 118:26; Rth 2:4

The blessing : Psa 118:26; Rth 2:4

kecilkan semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per Ayat)

Poole: Psa 129:3 - Ploughed upon my back // upon my back // They made long their furrows Ploughed upon my back they have not only thrown me down, and trod me under foot, but have cruelly tormented me, wounded and mangled me, and had no mo...

Ploughed upon my back they have not only thrown me down, and trod me under foot, but have cruelly tormented me, wounded and mangled me, and had no more pity upon me than the ploughman hath upon the earth which he cuts up at his pleasure. He saith,

upon my back either because they did literally scourge the captives upon their backs with such cords as are mentioned Psa 129:4 , although we do not read that the Israelitish captives were thus used by any of their enemies; or by way of allusion to that usage, which made a sort of furrows in their backs, upon which they used to lay on their strokes.

They made long their furrows they oft repeated their injuries and prolonged my torments.

Poole: Psa 129:4 - Righteous // Cut asunder the cords // cords Righteous faithful or merciful, as that word is frequently used. Cut asunder the cords wherewith the plough was drawn; by which means they were sto...

Righteous faithful or merciful, as that word is frequently used.

Cut asunder the cords wherewith the plough was drawn; by which means they were stopped in their course. So he persists in the same metaphor of a plough. By these

cords he understands all their plots and endeavours.

Poole: Psa 129:5 - -- Forced to retreat with shame and disappointment.

Forced to retreat with shame and disappointment.

Poole: Psa 129:6 - The house-tops // Which withereth afore it groweth up The house-tops there were flat, and therefore more capable of grass or green corn growing between the stones than ours are. Which withereth afore it...

The house-tops there were flat, and therefore more capable of grass or green corn growing between the stones than ours are.

Which withereth afore it groweth up which having no deep root, never comes to maturity. And so all their designs shall be abortive, and never come to perfection.

Poole: Psa 129:8 - -- Which was a usual salutation given by passengers to reapers, as Rth 2:4 . So the meaning is, It never continues till the harvest comes.

Which was a usual salutation given by passengers to reapers, as Rth 2:4 . So the meaning is, It never continues till the harvest comes.

Haydock: Psa 129:1 - -- A prayer of a sinner trusting in the mercies of God. The 6th penitential psalm.

A prayer of a sinner trusting in the mercies of God. The 6th penitential psalm.

Haydock: Psa 129:1 - Canticle // Depths Canticle. David might compose it after his sin, though it might suit the captives, and all sinners, as well as the souls in purgatory. (Berthier) -...

Canticle. David might compose it after his sin, though it might suit the captives, and all sinners, as well as the souls in purgatory. (Berthier) ---

It has long been recited in their behalf. (Worthington) ---

Depths of the prison of expiation, or from this vale of misery, (Berthier) captivity, (Calmet) and from the bottom of my heart. (St. Chrysostom)

Haydock: Psa 129:3 - Mark // It // Jupiter, exiguo tempore inermis erit Mark. Hebrew, "observe or keep." --- It. Hebrew, "who shall stand upright, (Calmet) or make opposition." (Haydock) --- We all stand in need of ...

Mark. Hebrew, "observe or keep." ---

It. Hebrew, "who shall stand upright, (Calmet) or make opposition." (Haydock) ---

We all stand in need of mercy, as none can stand before the rigours of divine justice. (Worthington) Si quoties homines peccant, sua fulmina mittat

Jupiter, exiguo tempore inermis erit. (Trist. ii. ) (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 129:4 - Law Law. That promises of pardon contained therein. (Worthington) --- Hebrew is now different from what the ancient interpreters read. (Calmet) --- ...

Law. That promises of pardon contained therein. (Worthington) ---

Hebrew is now different from what the ancient interpreters read. (Calmet) ---

"Therefore shalt thou be feared." (Montanus) (Haydock) ---

Symmachus and Theodotion agree with us.

Haydock: Psa 129:5 - Word Word. And promises that the captivity should end, (Calmet) and sin be remitted. (Haydock)

Word. And promises that the captivity should end, (Calmet) and sin be remitted. (Haydock)

Haydock: Psa 129:6 - From From. Or Hebrew, "more than the morning watch; yea, more than the morning watch." I expect my deliverance with greater eagerness than sentinels d...

From. Or Hebrew, "more than the morning watch; yea, more than the morning watch." I expect my deliverance with greater eagerness than sentinels do the return of morning. All the day and night long I am filled with these sentiments. (Calmet) ---

The hope of penitents resembles the watches of the day, which are more comfortable than those of the night. (Worthington)

Haydock: Psa 129:7 - Redemption Redemption. Our Saviour affords the greatest consolation. (Worthington) --- He will save the people, Matthew i. 21., and 1 John ii. 2. (Berthier)

Redemption. Our Saviour affords the greatest consolation. (Worthington) ---

He will save the people, Matthew i. 21., and 1 John ii. 2. (Berthier)

Gill: Psa 129:1 - Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth // may Israel now say Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth,.... That is, the enemies of Israel, afterwards called "ploughers". This may be understood of literal...

Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth,.... That is, the enemies of Israel, afterwards called "ploughers". This may be understood of literal Israel, the posterity of Jacob; whose youth was the beginning of their constitution as a nation and church, or the first times of it; when they were greatly distressed by their enemies, and from thenceforward; as in Egypt, where, and in places near it, they were afflicted four hundred years, according to a prophecy given to Abraham their ancestor, and where their lives were made bitter with hard bondage; and in the times of the Judges, by several neighbouring nations, which was the time of their youth, or their settlement in Canaan; and afterwards in the times of their kings, particularly in the times of Ahaz king of Judah, by the Edomites and Philistines, and by Tiglathpileser, king of Assyria; and in the times of Hoshea, king of Israel, by Salmaneser, who carried away captive, ten tribes; and in the times of Jeconiah and Zedekiah, kings of Judah, by Nebuchadnezzar, who carried captive to Babylon the tribes of Judah and Benjamin. And the psalmist, by a spirit of prophecy, might have a further respect to the distresses of Israel in the times of Antiochus and the Maccabees, when the temple was profaned, the altar demolished, and the daily sacrifice made to cease, and many good men lost their lives; to which times the apostle may be thought to have regard, Heb 11:35; and also to their last affliction by the Romans, the greatest of all; and their present captivity, and deliverance from it;

may Israel now say; this now refers to the time of redemption, as Arama observes, whether at their return from Babylon, or at their future conversion; then reviewing their former troubles ever since they were a people, may say as before. This may be applied to mystical Israel, or to the church of God in Gospel times, which, in its infancy, and from its youth upwards, has been afflicted, many a time, and by many enemies; first, by the unbelieving Jews, who killed the Lord Jesus, and persecuted his apostles and members; then by Rome Pagan, under the ten persecutions of so many emperors; and afterwards by Rome Papal, the whore of Babylon, who many a time been drunk with the blood of the saints and martyrs of Jesus. Yea, this may be applied to the Messiah, one of whose names is Israel, Isa 49:3; who was a man of sorrows, and acquainted with griefs all his days, even from his youth, Isa 53:3; he was the "Aijeleth Shahar", the hind of the morning, Psa 22:1, title; hunted by Herod in his infancy, Mat 2:13; and obliged to be carried into Egypt for safety when a child, from whence he was called, Hos 11:1; and ever after was more or less afflicted by his enemies, men or devils, in mind or body; and at last endured great sufferings, and death itself. It may moreover be applied to every Israelite indeed, to every true believer and member of Christ; conversion is their time of youth; they are first newborn babes, and then young men; as soon as regenerated, they are afflicted with the temptations of Satan, the reproaches and persecutions of men; which are many, though no more than necessary, and it is the will of God should be, and all for their good.

Gill: Psa 129:2 - Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth // yet they have not prevailed against me Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth,.... This is repeated for the confirmation of it, to excite attention to it, and to express the vehem...

Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth,.... This is repeated for the confirmation of it, to excite attention to it, and to express the vehement affection of the speaker;

yet they have not prevailed against me; the Egyptians could not prevail against literal Israel; the more they were afflicted, the more they grew and multiplied; in the times of the Judges, one after another were raised up as deliverers of them; neither the Assyrians, Chaldeans, nor Romans, nor any other, have been able to cut them off from being a nation; they continue to this day: the enemies of the church of Christ, even the gates of hell, have not been able to prevail against it, being built upon a rock, so as to extirpate and destroy it, neither by open and cruel persecutors, nor by secret and fraudulent heretics; nor could the enemies of the Messiah prevail against him, for though they brought him to the dust of death, they could not hold him in it; and they themselves, through his death, were conquered by him, as sin, Satan, the world, and death itself; nor can the enemies of the saints prevail against them, God being on their side, Christ making them more than conquerors, the Spirit in them being greater than he that is in the world.

Gill: Psa 129:3 - The ploughers ploughed upon my back // they made long their furrows The ploughers ploughed upon my back,.... "Sinners", as the Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and Arabic versions, render it; such that plough iniquity, and s...

The ploughers ploughed upon my back,.... "Sinners", as the Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and Arabic versions, render it; such that plough iniquity, and sow wickedness, Job 4:8; which may be understood of their carrying Israel captive, when they put yokes and bonds upon their necks, as upon oxen when they plough, as Arama interprets it; or it may design the destruction of their high places, signified by the back, such as the temple, the royal palace, and houses of their nobles, burnt with fire; yea, it was predicted that Zion should be ploughed as a field, Mic 3:12; and the Jews say that Turnus Rufus, the Roman general, as they call him, did plough up Jerusalem. The Syriac version is, "they whipped" their whips or scourges; with which many of the Israelites were scourged in the times of the Maccabees, Heb 11:36. And the Messiah himself, who gave his back to the smiters, and was buffeted and scourged by them, Isa 50:6; and many of his apostles and followers, Mat 10:17. The Targum renders it

"upon my body;''

and Aben Ezra says the phrase is expressive of contempt and humiliation, and compares with it Isa 51:23;

they made long their furrows; which signify afflictions, and the pain their enemies put them to, and the distress they gave them; as no affliction is joyous, but grievous, but like the rending and tearing up the earth with the plough; and also the length and duration of afflictions; such were the afflictions of Israel in Egypt and in Babylon, and of the church of God under Rome Pagan and Papal; but, as the longest furrows have an end, so have the most lasting afflictions. The Syriac version is, "they prolonged their humiliation", or "affliction"; Kimchi says the meaning is,

"they would give us no rest from servitude and bondage.''

Gill: Psa 129:4 - The Lord is righteous // he hath cut asunder the cords of the wicked The Lord is righteous,.... Or gracious and merciful; hence acts of mercy are called righteousness in the Hebrew language; the Lord has compassion on ...

The Lord is righteous,.... Or gracious and merciful; hence acts of mercy are called righteousness in the Hebrew language; the Lord has compassion on his people under their afflictions, and delivers them; or is faithful to his promises of salvation to them, and just and righteous to render tribulation to them that trouble them, and take vengeance upon them;

he hath cut asunder the cords of the wicked: alluding to the cords with which the plough is fastened to the oxen, which being cut, they cannot go on ploughing; or to the cords of whips, which when, cut cannot be used to any purpose: it designs the breaking of the confederacies of wicked men against the people of God; the confounding their counsels and schemes, and disappointing their devices; so that they cannot perform their enterprises, or carry their designs into execution, or go on with and finish their intentions. The Targum renders it,

"the chains of the wicked;''

see Isa 5:18.

Gill: Psa 129:5 - Let them all be confounded // and turned back // that hate Zion Let them all be confounded,.... Or "ashamed": as all the enemies of God's people will be sooner or later, either in this world, or however when Christ...

Let them all be confounded,.... Or "ashamed": as all the enemies of God's people will be sooner or later, either in this world, or however when Christ shall come in the clouds of heaven; or let them be disappointed of their views, aims, and ends, when they will be confounded, as disappointed persons are;

and turned back; from pursuing their designs and accomplishing them; as the Assyrian monarch was, who had a hook put into his nose, and a bridle in his lips, and was turned back by the way he came, Isa 37:29;

that hate Zion; the inhabitants of Zion, who are called out of the world, and separated from the men of it, and therefore hated by them; the King of Zion, the Messiah, whom they will not have to reign over them; the doctrines of the Gospel, the word that comes out of Zion, to which they are utter enemies; and the laws and ordinances of Zion, the discipline of God's house, which they cannot bear to be under and submit unto.

Gill: Psa 129:6 - Let them be as the grass upon the housetops // which withereth afore it groweth up Let them be as the grass upon the housetops,.... The tops of the houses in Judea were flat, and so grass grew upon them, being covered with plaster o...

Let them be as the grass upon the housetops,.... The tops of the houses in Judea were flat, and so grass grew upon them, being covered with plaster of terrace; though it was but small and weak, and being on high was exposed to the scorching sun, and soon withered b; and Menochius says c he saw such roofs in the island of Corsica, flat, and having earth upon them, smoothed and pressed, on which grass grew of its own accord; but being burnt up in summertime by the sun, soon withered, as here said. But what Olaus Magnus d relates is somewhat extraordinary; that, in the northern Gothic countries, they feed their cattle on the tops of houses, especially in a time of siege; he describes their houses as built of stone, high and large, and covered with rafters of fir and bark of birch; upon which is laid grass earth, cut out of the fields foursquare, and sowed with barley or oats, so that their roofs look like green meadows; and that what is sown, and the grass that grows thereon, might not wither before plucked up, they very constantly and diligently water it; but in the eastern countries, which are hot, and have but little rain, grass could not retain its verdure long, as follows;

which withereth afore it groweth up; to any height, the usual height of grass: or, "before it is plucked up", as the Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, and Arabic versions; and so Jarchi. And this was their usual way of gathering in their corn; and which continues to this day, as Mr. Maundrell e affirms, who was an eyewitness to it in many places; where they plucked it up by handfuls from the roots, leaving the most fruitful fields as naked as if nothing had grown on them; and this they did for the sake of the straw, which was generally very short, and necessary for the sustenance of cattle; to which he thinks there is here a manifest allusion; but not corn, but grass, is here spoken of. The Targum is,

"before it flourisheth, an east wind cometh, blows upon it, and it is withered;''

and to the same purpose the Syriac version,

"which when the wind comes upon it, it fades and withers.''

This expresses the high and elevated state and condition of wicked men, the pride and haughtiness of their hearts; yet their weakness and frailty, and the danger they are exposed unto, through the wrath and vengeance of God upon them; when they consume and wither away like grass on the housetops, and never come to the happiness they are hoping and wishing for; see Isa 37:27.

Gill: Psa 129:7 - Wherewith the mower filleth not his hand // nor he that bindeth sheaves his bosom Wherewith the mower filleth not his hand,.... Such grass never rises high enough to be mowed, nor is of that account to have such pains taken with it;...

Wherewith the mower filleth not his hand,.... Such grass never rises high enough to be mowed, nor is of that account to have such pains taken with it; nor the quantity so large as to fill a mower's hand, and carry it away in his arms;

nor he that bindeth sheaves his bosom; when corn is mowed or reaped, the binders come and gather it up in their arms, and bind it in sheaves, and then bring it into the barn; but nothing of this kind is done with grass on the housetops. This represents the insignificancy and worthlessness of wicked men; who, when the harvest comes, the end of the world, will not be gathered in by the reapers, the angels, into Christ's garner into heaven as the wheat, the righteous will; but like the tares and chaff will be cast into unquenchable fire, Mat 3:12.

Gill: Psa 129:8 - Neither do they which go by say, the blessing of the Lord be upon you // we bless you in the name of the Lord Neither do they which go by say, the blessing of the Lord be upon you,.... As was usual with passengers, when they went by where mowers, and reapers,...

Neither do they which go by say, the blessing of the Lord be upon you,.... As was usual with passengers, when they went by where mowers, and reapers, and binders, were at work in the field in harvest time; who used to wish the presence and blessing of God with them, and upon their labours; and who returned the salutation, as may be seen in Boaz and his reapers, Rth 2:4;

we bless you in the name of the Lord; which is either a continuation of the blessing of the passengers, or the answer of the reapers to them; so the Targum,

"nor do they answer them, "we bless you",'' &c.

The sense is, that those wicked men would have no blessing on them, from God nor men; that no God speed would be wished them; but that they were like the earth, that is covered with briers and thorns; which is nigh unto cursing, and its end to be burned.

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Psa 129:1 The precise significance of this title, which appears in Pss 120-134, is unclear. Perhaps worshipers recited these psalms when they ascended the road ...

NET Notes: Psa 129:4 The background of the metaphor is not entirely clear. Perhaps the “ropes” are those used to harness the ox for plowing (see Job 39:10). Ve...

NET Notes: Psa 129:6 The Hebrew verb שָׁלַף (shalaf) normally means “to draw [a sword]” or “to pull.” BDB 1025 ...

NET Notes: Psa 129:8 The perfect verbal form is used for rhetorical effect; it describes an anticipated development as if it were already reality.

Geneva Bible: Psa 129:1 "A Song of degrees." Many a time have they afflicted me from my youth, may ( a ) Israel now say: ( a ) The Church now afflicted should remember how h...

Geneva Bible: Psa 129:4 The LORD [is] ( b ) righteous: he hath cut asunder the cords of the wicked. ( b ) Because God is righteous, he cannot but plague his adversary, and d...

Geneva Bible: Psa 129:6 ( c ) Let them be as the grass [upon] the housetops, which withereth afore it groweth up: ( c ) The enemies who lift themselves high, and as it were ...

Geneva Bible: Psa 129:8 ( d ) Neither do they which go by say, The blessing of the LORD [be] upon you: we bless you in the name of the LORD. ( d ) That is, the wicked will p...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

MHCC: Psa 129:1-4 - --The enemies of God's people have very barbarously endeavoured to wear out the saints of the Most High. But the church has been always graciously deliv...

MHCC: Psa 129:5-8 - --While God's people shall flourish as the loaded palm-tree, or the green and fruitful olive, their enemies shall wither as the grass upon the house-top...

Matthew Henry: Psa 129:1-4 - -- The church of God, in its several ages, is here spoken of, or, rather, here speaks, as one single person, now old and gray-headed, but calling to re...

Matthew Henry: Psa 129:5-8 - -- The psalmist, having triumphed in the defeat of the many designs that had been laid as deep as hell to ruin the church, here concludes his psalm as ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 129:1-2 - -- Israel is gratefully to confess that, however much and sorely it was oppressed, it still has not succumbed. רבּת , together with רבּה , has ...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 129:3-5 - -- Elsewhere it is said that the enemies have driven over Israel (Psa 66:12), or have gone over its back (Isa 51:23); here the customary figurative lan...

Keil-Delitzsch: Psa 129:6-8 - -- The poet illustrates the fate that overtakes them by means of a picture borrowed from Isaiah and worked up (Psa 37:27): they become like "grass of t...

Constable: Psa 107:1--150:6 - --V. Book 5: chs. 107--150 There are 44 psalms in this section of the Psalter. David composed 15 of these (108-110...

Constable: Psa 129:1-8 - --Psalm 129 God had delivered Israel from her enemies. The psalmist praised Him for doing so and then aske...

Constable: Psa 129:1-4 - --1. A tribute to past deliverance 129:1-4 129:1-2 This psalm begins as Psalm 124 did by calling on the pilgrim Israelites to speak for the nation. The ...

Constable: Psa 129:5-8 - --2. A petition for future deliverance 129:5-8 The psalmist encouraged the Israelite pilgrims to p...

buka semua
Tafsiran/Catatan -- Lainnya

Evidence: Psa 129:3 To see how the theory of evolution clashes with the facts, see Act 14:15 footnote.

buka semua
Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Hebrew title of this book is Tehilim ("praises" or "hymns"), for a leading feature in its contents is praise, though the word occurs in the title ...

JFB: Psalms (Garis Besar) ALEPH. (Psa 119:1-8). This celebrated Psalm has several peculiarities. It is divided into twenty-two parts or stanzas, denoted by the twenty-two let...

TSK: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) The Psalms have been the general song of the universal Church; and in their praise, all the Fathers have been unanimously eloquent. Men of all nation...

TSK: Psalms 129 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Psa 129:1, An exhortation to praise God for saving Israel in their great afflictions; Psa 129:5, The haters of the church are cursed. Th...

Poole: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) OF PSALMS THE ARGUMENT The divine authority of this Book of PSALMS is so certain and evident, that it was never questioned in the church; which b...

Poole: Psalms 129 (Pendahuluan Pasal) THE ARGUMENT This Psalm contains a joyful and thankful remembrance of the church’ s former and manifold calamities from barbarous enemies, and...

MHCC: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) David was the penman of most of the psalms, but some evidently were composed by other writers, and the writers of some are doubtful. But all were writ...

MHCC: Psalms 129 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Psa 129:1-4) Thankfulness for former deliverances. (Psa 129:5-8) A believing prospect of the destruction of the enemies of Zion.

Matthew Henry: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of Psalms We have now before us one of the choicest and most excellent parts of all the Old Te...

Matthew Henry: Psalms 129 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This psalm relates to the public concerns of God's Israel. It is not certain when it was penned, probably when they were in captivity in Babylon, o...

Constable: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book in the Hebrew Bible is Tehillim, which means...

Constable: Psalms (Garis Besar) Outline I. Book 1: chs. 1-41 II. Book 2: chs. 42-72 III. Book 3: chs. 73...

Constable: Psalms Psalms Bibliography Allen, Ronald B. "Evidence from Psalm 89." In A Case for Premillennialism: A New Consensus,...

Haydock: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE BOOK OF PSALMS. INTRODUCTION. The Psalms are called by the Hebrew, Tehillim; that is, hymns of praise. The author, of a great part of ...

Gill: Psalms (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO PSALMS The title of this book may be rendered "the Book of Praises", or "Hymns"; the psalm which our Lord sung at the passover is c...

Gill: Psalms 129 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 129 A Song of degrees. This psalm was written in later times, after many of the distresses of Israel; very probably upon the ...

Advanced Commentary (Kamus, Lagu-Lagu Himne, Gambar, Ilustrasi Khotbah, Pertanyaan-Pertanyaan, dll)


TIP #07: Klik ikon untuk mendengarkan pasal yang sedang Anda tampilkan. [SEMUA]
dibuat dalam 0.33 detik
dipersembahkan oleh
bible.org - YLSA