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Teks -- Jeremiah 37:1-21 (NET)

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Konteks
Introduction to Incidents During the Reign of Zedekiah
37:1 Zedekiah son of Josiah succeeded Jeconiah son of Jehoiakim as king. He was elevated to the throne of the land of Judah by King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon. 37:2 Neither he nor the officials who served him nor the people of Judah paid any attention to what the Lord said through the prophet Jeremiah.
The Lord Responds to Zedekiah’s Hope for Help
37:3 King Zedekiah sent Jehucal son of Shelemiah and the priest Zephaniah son of Maaseiah to the prophet Jeremiah. He told them to say, “Please pray to the Lord our God on our behalf.” 37:4 (Now Jeremiah had not yet been put in prison. So he was still free to come and go among the people as he pleased. 37:5 At that time the Babylonian forces had temporarily given up their siege against Jerusalem. They had had it under siege, but withdrew when they heard that the army of Pharaoh had set out from Egypt.) 37:6 The Lord gave the prophet Jeremiah a message for them. He told him to tell them, 37:7 “The Lord God of Israel says, ‘Give a message to the king of Judah who sent you to ask me to help him. Tell him, “The army of Pharaoh that was on its way to help you will go back home to Egypt. 37:8 Then the Babylonian forces will return. They will attack the city and will capture it and burn it down. 37:9 Moreover, I, the Lord, warn you not to deceive yourselves into thinking that the Babylonian forces will go away and leave you alone. For they will not go away. 37:10 For even if you were to defeat all the Babylonian forces fighting against you so badly that only wounded men were left lying in their tents, they would get up and burn this city down.”’”
Jeremiah is Charged with Deserting, Arrested, and Imprisoned
37:11 The following events also occurred while the Babylonian forces had temporarily withdrawn from Jerusalem because the army of Pharaoh was coming. 37:12 Jeremiah started to leave Jerusalem to go to the territory of Benjamin. He wanted to make sure he got his share of the property that was being divided up among his family there. 37:13 But he only got as far as the Benjamin Gate. There an officer in charge of the guards named Irijah, who was the son of Shelemiah and the grandson of Hananiah, stopped him. He seized Jeremiah and said, “You are deserting to the Babylonians!” 37:14 Jeremiah answered, “That’s a lie! I am not deserting to the Babylonians.” But Irijah would not listen to him. Irijah put Jeremiah under arrest and took him to the officials. 37:15 The officials were very angry at Jeremiah. They had him flogged and put in prison in the house of Jonathan, the royal secretary, which they had converted into a place for confining prisoners. 37:16 So Jeremiah was put in prison in a cell in the dungeon in Jonathan’s house. He was kept there for a long time. 37:17 Then King Zedekiah had him brought to the palace. There he questioned him privately and asked him, “Is there any message from the Lord?” Jeremiah answered, “Yes, there is.” Then he announced, “You will be handed over to the king of Babylon.” 37:18 Then Jeremiah asked King Zedekiah, “What crime have I committed against you, or the officials who serve you, or the people of Judah? What have I done to make you people throw me into prison? 37:19 Where now are the prophets who prophesied to you that the king of Babylon would not attack you or this land? 37:20 But now please listen, your royal Majesty, and grant my plea for mercy. Do not send me back to the house of Jonathan, the royal secretary. If you do, I will die there.” 37:21 Then King Zedekiah ordered that Jeremiah be committed to the courtyard of the guardhouse. He also ordered that a loaf of bread be given to him every day from the baker’s street until all the bread in the city was gone. So Jeremiah was kept in the courtyard of the guardhouse.
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Nama Orang, Nama Tempat, Topik/Tema Kamus

Nama Orang dan Nama Tempat:
 · Babylon a country of Babylon in lower Mesopotamia
 · Benjamin the tribe of Benjamin of Israel
 · Egypt descendants of Mizraim
 · Hananiah son of Heman the Levite; worship leader under Heman and David,a man who was one of King Uzziah's commanders,son of Azzur; a false prophet of Zedekiah's from Gibeon,father of Zedekiah, a prince of Judah in the time of Jehoiakim,grandfather of Irijah the sentry who falsely accused Jeremiah; the father of Shelemiah,son of Shashak of Benjamin,a man of Judah who served Nebuchadnezzar with Daniel in Babylon,son of Zerubbabel,a layman of the Bebai clan who put away his heathen wife,a man who made perfume and helped rebuild the wall of Jerusalem; son of Shelemiah,governor of the castle and over Jerusalem under Nehemiah,an Israelite chief who signed the covenant to keep God's law,a priest and head of the clan of Jeremiah under Joiakim
 · Irijah son of Shelemiah; a sentry who arrested Jeremiah
 · Israel a citizen of Israel.,a member of the nation of Israel
 · Jehoiakim son of Josiah; made king of Judah by Pharaoh Neco
 · Jehucal son of Shelemiah; one of the men who accused Jeremiah of treason
 · Jeremiah a prophet of Judah in 627 B.C., who wrote the book of Jeremiah,a man of Libnah; father of Hamutal, mother of Jehoahaz, king of Judah,head of an important clan in eastern Manasseh in the time of Jotham,a Benjamite man who defected to David at Ziklag,the fifth of Saul's Gadite officers who defected to David in the wilderness,the tenth of Saul's Gadite officers who defected to David in the wilderness,a man from Anathoth of Benjamin; son of Hilkiah the priest; a major prophet in the time of the exile,an influential priest who returned from exile with Zerubbabel, who later signed the covenant to obey the law, and who helped dedicate Nehemiah's wall,one of Saul's Gadite officers who defected to David in the wilderness
 · Jerusalem the capital city of Israel,a town; the capital of Israel near the southern border of Benjamin
 · Jonathan a man who was a descendant of Gershom son of Moses,son of Saul of Benjamin,son of the high priest Abiathar in David's time,the son of Shime-i, David's brother,son of Shammah/Shagee; one of David's military elite,son of Jada of Judah,son of Uzziah; overseer of the country treasuries for King David,a man who was uncle and counselor of King David,father of Ebed who accompanied Ezra leading the clan of Adin back from exile,a man who opposed Ezra's reforms; son of Asahel,a chief priest; son of Joiada,priest and head of the house of Malluchi under High Priest Joiakim in the time of Nehemiah,son of Shemaiah of Asaph of Levi; father of Zechariah,a man who was secretary and dungeon keeper for King Zedekiah; son of Kareah
 · Josiah the son who succeeded King Amon of Judah; the father of Jeconiah; an ancestor of Jesus,son and successor of Amon, King of Judah,son of Zephaniah; custodian of the temple treasures that were returned from Babylon
 · Judah the son of Jacob and Leah; founder of the tribe of Judah,a tribe, the land/country,a son of Joseph; the father of Simeon; an ancestor of Jesus,son of Jacob/Israel and Leah; founder of the tribe of Judah,the tribe of Judah,citizens of the southern kingdom of Judah,citizens of the Persian Province of Judah; the Jews who had returned from Babylonian exile,"house of Judah", a phrase which highlights the political leadership of the tribe of Judah,"king of Judah", a phrase which relates to the southern kingdom of Judah,"kings of Judah", a phrase relating to the southern kingdom of Judah,"princes of Judah", a phrase relating to the kingdom of Judah,the territory allocated to the tribe of Judah, and also the extended territory of the southern kingdom of Judah,the Province of Judah under Persian rule,"hill country of Judah", the relatively cool and green central highlands of the territory of Judah,"the cities of Judah",the language of the Jews; Hebrew,head of a family of Levites who returned from Exile,a Levite who put away his heathen wife,a man who was second in command of Jerusalem; son of Hassenuah of Benjamin,a Levite in charge of the songs of thanksgiving in Nehemiah's time,a leader who helped dedicate Nehemiah's wall,a Levite musician who helped Zechariah of Asaph dedicate Nehemiah's wall
 · Ma-Aseiah a Levite worship leader in David's time,son of Adaiah; a commander who helped enthrone King Joash,a man who was a recruiting officer for King Uzziah's army,son of King Ahaz,a man who was governor of Jerusalem under King Josiah,a priest descended from Jeshua who put away his heathen wife,a priest descended from Harim who put away his heathen wife,a priest descended from Pashhur who put away his heathen wife,a layman of Pahath-Moab clan who put away his heathen wife,son of Ananiah; father of Azariah who helped repair the wall,a man who stood with Ezra when he read the law to the assembly,a Levite who helped Ezra explain the reading of the law,an chief who signed the covenant to keep the law of Moses,son of Baruch of Judah; a returned exile in Jerusalem,son of Ithiel of Benjamin,a priest who helped celebrate the completion of the wall,father of Zephaniah the priest in the time of Jeremiah,a false prophet in the time of King Zedekiah of Judah,son of Shallum, a gate keeper under King Jehoiakim
 · Nebuchadrezzar the king of Babylon who took Judah into exile
 · Pharaoh the king who ruled Egypt when Moses was born,the title of the king who ruled Egypt in Abraham's time,the title of the king who ruled Egypt in Joseph's time,the title of the king who ruled Egypt when Moses was born,the title of the king who refused to let Israel leave Egypt,the title of the king of Egypt whose daughter Solomon married,the title of the king who ruled Egypt in the time of Isaiah,the title Egypt's ruler just before Moses' time
 · Shelemiah a Levite who had charge of the east gate in David's time,a layman of the Binnui Clan who put away his heathen wife,father of Hananiah who repaired part of the wall of Jerusalem,a priestly treasurer over the storehouses under Nehemiah,son of Cushi in Jehoiakim's time; grandfather of Jehudi,son of Abdeel; an officer of King Jehoiakim of Judah,father of Jehucal, messenger of King Zedekiah to Jeremiah,son of Hananiah; father of Irijah, Zedekiah's sentry
 · Zedekiah son of Chenaanah; a false prophet in the kingdom of King Ahab,son of King Josiah; made king of Judah by Nebuchadnezzar,son of King Jehoiachin,a signer of the covenant to obey the law with Nehemiah,son of Maaseiah; a false prophet in the time of King Jehoiachin,son of Hananiah; a prince of Judah in the time of Jehoiakim
 · Zephaniah the second high priest in the time of Zedekiah of Judah,son of Tahath of Kohath son of Levi,son of Cushi (Hezekiah Judah); minor prophet under King Josiah,father of Josiah, post-exile keeper of the temple treasures


Topik/Tema Kamus: Zedekiah | Israel | Persecution | ZEDEKIAH (2) | JEREMIAH (2) | Jeremiah | Pharaoh | Alliances | SIEGE | Shelemiah | Egyptians | CAPTIVITY | Irijah | Minister | Jerusalem | Jehucal | Armies | Hananiah | Maaseiah | Prisoners | selebihnya
Daftar Isi

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Wesley , JFB , Clarke , Calvin , Defender , TSK

Catatan Kata/Frasa
Poole , Haydock , Gill

Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki
NET Notes , Geneva Bible

Catatan Rentang Ayat
Maclaren , MHCC , Matthew Henry , Keil-Delitzsch , Constable

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Kata/Frasa (per frasa)

Wesley: Jer 37:10 - And burn it When God is resolved upon an effect, the instruments are little to be regarded. It is not the arm of flesh, but the power of God which is in that case...

When God is resolved upon an effect, the instruments are little to be regarded. It is not the arm of flesh, but the power of God which is in that case to be considered.

Wesley: Jer 37:12 - Went forth Jeremiah knowing the city would suddenly be taken, and that he could be no farther useful to the people, taking advantage of the withdrawing of the Ch...

Jeremiah knowing the city would suddenly be taken, and that he could be no farther useful to the people, taking advantage of the withdrawing of the Chaldean army, resolves to go to his own country, to Anathoth, in the crowd of people that were going out.

Wesley: Jer 37:13 - Of Benjamin The gate that looked toward the inheritance of that tribe.

The gate that looked toward the inheritance of that tribe.

Wesley: Jer 37:16 - The dungeon The Hebrew words signify some pit, or deep hole, where were some cells or apartments, in which they were wont to keep those whom they judged great mal...

The Hebrew words signify some pit, or deep hole, where were some cells or apartments, in which they were wont to keep those whom they judged great malefactors.

Wesley: Jer 37:17 - Is there Hath God revealed any thing to thee, concerning the issue of the return of the Chaldean army.

Hath God revealed any thing to thee, concerning the issue of the return of the Chaldean army.

JFB: Jer 37:1 - Coniah Curtailed from Jeconiah by way of reproach.

Curtailed from Jeconiah by way of reproach.

JFB: Jer 37:1 - whom Referring to Zedekiah, not to Coniah (2Ki 24:17).

Referring to Zedekiah, not to Coniah (2Ki 24:17).

JFB: Jer 37:2 - -- Amazing stupidity, that they were not admonished by the punishment of Jeconiah [CALVIN], (2Ch 36:12, 2Ch 36:14)!

Amazing stupidity, that they were not admonished by the punishment of Jeconiah [CALVIN], (2Ch 36:12, 2Ch 36:14)!

JFB: Jer 37:3 - Zedekiah . . . sent Fearing lest, in the event of the Chaldeans overcoming Pharaoh-hophra, they should return to besiege Jerusalem. See on Jer 21:1; that chapter chronolo...

Fearing lest, in the event of the Chaldeans overcoming Pharaoh-hophra, they should return to besiege Jerusalem. See on Jer 21:1; that chapter chronologically comes in between the thirty-seventh and thirty-eighth chapter. The message of the king to Jeremiah here in the thirty-seventh chapter is, however, somewhat earlier than that in the twenty-first chapter; here it is while the issue between the Chaldeans and Pharaoh was undecided; there it is when, after the repulse of Pharaoh, the Chaldeans were again advancing against Jerusalem; hence, while Zephaniah is named in both embassies, Jehucal accompanies him here, Pashur there. But, as Pashur and Jehucal are both mentioned in Jer 38:1-2, as hearing Jeremiah's reply, which is identical with that in Jer 21:9, it is probable the two messages followed one another at a short interval; that in this Jer 37:3, and the answer, Jer 37:7-10, being the earlier of the two.

JFB: Jer 37:3 - Zephaniah An abettor of rebellion against God (Jer 29:25), though less virulent than many (Jer 29:29), punished accordingly (Jer 52:24-27).

An abettor of rebellion against God (Jer 29:25), though less virulent than many (Jer 29:29), punished accordingly (Jer 52:24-27).

JFB: Jer 37:4 - Jeremiah . . . not put . . . into prison He was no longer in the prison court, as he had been (Jer 32:2; Jer 33:1), which passages refer to the beginning of the siege, not to the time when th...

He was no longer in the prison court, as he had been (Jer 32:2; Jer 33:1), which passages refer to the beginning of the siege, not to the time when the Chaldeans renewed the siege, after having withdrawn for a time to meet Pharaoh.

JFB: Jer 37:5 - -- After this temporary diversion, caused by Pharaoh in favor of Jerusalem, the Egyptians returned no more to its help (2Ki 24:7). Judea had the misfortu...

After this temporary diversion, caused by Pharaoh in favor of Jerusalem, the Egyptians returned no more to its help (2Ki 24:7). Judea had the misfortune to lie between the two great contending powers, Babylon and Egypt, and so was exposed to the alternate inroads of the one or the other. Josiah, taking side with Assyria, fell in battle with Pharaoh-necho at Megiddo (2Ki 23:29). Zedekiah, seeking the Egyptian alliance in violation of his oath, was now about to be taken by Nebuchadnezzar (2Ch 36:13; Eze 17:15, Eze 17:17).

JFB: Jer 37:7 - shall return Without accomplishing any deliverance for you.

Without accomplishing any deliverance for you.

JFB: Jer 37:8 - -- (Jer 34:22).

JFB: Jer 37:9 - yourselves Hebrew, "souls."

Hebrew, "souls."

JFB: Jer 37:10 - yet . . . they Even a few wounded men would suffice for your destruction.

Even a few wounded men would suffice for your destruction.

JFB: Jer 37:11 - broken up "gone up."

"gone up."

JFB: Jer 37:12 - Benjamin To his own town, Anathoth.

To his own town, Anathoth.

JFB: Jer 37:12 - to separate himself Margin translates, "to slip away," from a Hebrew root, "to be smooth," so, to slip away as a slippery thing that cannot be held. But it is not likely ...

Margin translates, "to slip away," from a Hebrew root, "to be smooth," so, to slip away as a slippery thing that cannot be held. But it is not likely the prophet of God would flee in a dishonorable way; and "in the midst of the people" rather implies open departure along with others, than clandestine slipping away by mixing with the crowd of departing people. Rather, it means, to separate himself, or to divide his place of residence, so as to live partly here, partly there, without fixed habitation, going to and fro among the people [LUDOVICUS DE DIEU]. MAURER translates, "to take his portion thence," to realize the produce of his property in Anathoth [HENDERSON], or to take possession of the land which he bought from Hanameel [MAURER].

JFB: Jer 37:13 - ward That is, the "guard," or "watch."

That is, the "guard," or "watch."

JFB: Jer 37:13 - Hananiah Whose death Jeremiah predicted (Jer 28:16). The grandson in revenge takes Jeremiah into custody on the charge of deserting ("thou fallest away," Jer 3...

Whose death Jeremiah predicted (Jer 28:16). The grandson in revenge takes Jeremiah into custody on the charge of deserting ("thou fallest away," Jer 38:19; Jer 52:15; 1Sa 29:3) to the enemy. His prophecies gave color to the charge (Jer 21:9; Jer 38:4).

JFB: Jer 37:15 - scribe One of the court secretaries; often in the East part of the private house of a public officer serves as a prison.

One of the court secretaries; often in the East part of the private house of a public officer serves as a prison.

JFB: Jer 37:16 - dungeon . . . cabins The prison consisted of a pit (the "dungeon") with vaulted cells round the sides of it. The "cabins," from a root, "to bend one's self."

The prison consisted of a pit (the "dungeon") with vaulted cells round the sides of it. The "cabins," from a root, "to bend one's self."

JFB: Jer 37:17 - secretly Zedekiah was ashamed to be seen by his courtiers consulting Jeremiah (Joh 12:43; Joh 5:44; Joh 19:38).

Zedekiah was ashamed to be seen by his courtiers consulting Jeremiah (Joh 12:43; Joh 5:44; Joh 19:38).

JFB: Jer 37:17 - thou shalt be delivered Had Jeremiah consulted his earthly interests, he would have answered very differently. Contrast Jer 6:14; Isa 30:10; Eze 13:10.

Had Jeremiah consulted his earthly interests, he would have answered very differently. Contrast Jer 6:14; Isa 30:10; Eze 13:10.

JFB: Jer 37:18 - What In what respect have I offended?

In what respect have I offended?

JFB: Jer 37:19 - Where are now your prophets The event has showed them to be liars; and, as surely as the king of Babylon has come already, notwithstanding their prophecy, so surely shall he retu...

The event has showed them to be liars; and, as surely as the king of Babylon has come already, notwithstanding their prophecy, so surely shall he return.

JFB: Jer 37:20 - be accepted Rather, "Let my supplication be humbly presented" (see on Jer 36:7), [HENDERSON].

Rather, "Let my supplication be humbly presented" (see on Jer 36:7), [HENDERSON].

JFB: Jer 37:20 - lest I die there In the subterranean dungeon (Jer 37:16), from want of proper sustenance (Jer 37:21). The prophet naturally shrank from death, which makes his spiritua...

In the subterranean dungeon (Jer 37:16), from want of proper sustenance (Jer 37:21). The prophet naturally shrank from death, which makes his spiritual firmness the more remarkable; he was ready to die rather than swerve from his duty [CALVIN].

JFB: Jer 37:21 - court of the prison (Jer 32:2; Jer 38:13, Jer 38:28).

JFB: Jer 37:21 - bakers' street Persons in the same business in cities in the East commonly reside in the same street.

Persons in the same business in cities in the East commonly reside in the same street.

JFB: Jer 37:21 - all the bread . . . spent Jeremiah had bread supplied to him until he was thrown into the dungeon of Malchiah, at which time the bread in the city was spent. Compare this verse...

Jeremiah had bread supplied to him until he was thrown into the dungeon of Malchiah, at which time the bread in the city was spent. Compare this verse with Jer 38:9; that time must have been very shortly before the capture of the city (Jer 52:6). God saith of His children, "In the days of famine they shall be satisfied" (Psa 37:19; Isa 33:16). Honest reproof (Jer 37:17), in the end often gains more favor than flattery (Pro 28:23).

All this was subsequent to his imprisonment in Jonathan's house, and his release on his interview with Zedekiah. The latter occurred before the return of the Chaldeans to the siege; the similar events in this chapter occurred after it.

Clarke: Jer 37:1 - And king Zedekiah the son of Josiah And king Zedekiah the son of Josiah - Of the siege and taking of Jerusalem referred to here, and the making of Zedekiah king instead of Jeconiah, se...

And king Zedekiah the son of Josiah - Of the siege and taking of Jerusalem referred to here, and the making of Zedekiah king instead of Jeconiah, see 2Ki 24:1 (note), etc., and the notes there.

Clarke: Jer 37:3 - Zedekiah - to the prophet Jeremiah Zedekiah - to the prophet Jeremiah - He was willing to hear a message from the Lord, provided it were according to his own mind. He did not fully tr...

Zedekiah - to the prophet Jeremiah - He was willing to hear a message from the Lord, provided it were according to his own mind. He did not fully trust in his own prophets.

Clarke: Jer 37:4 - Now Jeremiah came in and went out Now Jeremiah came in and went out - After the siege was raised, he had a measure of liberty; he was not closely confined, as he afterwards was. See ...

Now Jeremiah came in and went out - After the siege was raised, he had a measure of liberty; he was not closely confined, as he afterwards was. See Jer 37:16.

Clarke: Jer 37:5 - Then Pharaoh’ s army Then Pharaoh’ s army - This was Pharaoh-hophra or Apries, who then reigned in Egypt in place of his father Necho. See Eze 29:6, etc. Nebuchadne...

Then Pharaoh’ s army - This was Pharaoh-hophra or Apries, who then reigned in Egypt in place of his father Necho. See Eze 29:6, etc. Nebuchadnezzar, hearing that the Egyptian army, on which the Jews so much depended, was on their march to relieve the city, suddenly raised the siege, and went to meet them. In the interim Zedekiah sent to Jeremiah to inquire of the Lord to know whether they might consider themselves in safety.

Clarke: Jer 37:7 - Pharaoh’ s army - shall return to Egypt Pharaoh’ s army - shall return to Egypt - They were defeated by the Chaldeans; and, not being hearty in the cause, returned immediately to Egyp...

Pharaoh’ s army - shall return to Egypt - They were defeated by the Chaldeans; and, not being hearty in the cause, returned immediately to Egypt, leaving Nebuchadnezzar unmolested to recommence the siege.

Clarke: Jer 37:10 - For though ye had smitten the whole army For though ye had smitten the whole army - Strong words; but they show how fully God was determined to give up this city to fire and sword, and how ...

For though ye had smitten the whole army - Strong words; but they show how fully God was determined to give up this city to fire and sword, and how fully he had instructed his prophet on this point.

Clarke: Jer 37:12 - Jeremiah went forth Jeremiah went forth - At the time that Nebuchadnezzar had raised the siege, and gone to meet the Egyptian army

Jeremiah went forth - At the time that Nebuchadnezzar had raised the siege, and gone to meet the Egyptian army

Clarke: Jer 37:12 - Go into the land of Benjamin Go into the land of Benjamin - To Anathoth, his native city

Go into the land of Benjamin - To Anathoth, his native city

Clarke: Jer 37:12 - To separate himself thence To separate himself thence - "To receive a portion thereof among the people;"- Blayney: who supposes that Jeremiah went to receive a portion of the ...

To separate himself thence - "To receive a portion thereof among the people;"- Blayney: who supposes that Jeremiah went to receive a portion of the proceeds of his patrimony at Anathoth, which had, previously to the siege, been in the hands of the Chaldeans. The siege being now raised, he thought of looking thus after his own affairs. The Chaldee is to the same sense. "He went that he might divide the inheritance which he had there among the people."Dahler translates, ‘ He went to withdraw himself from the siege, as many others of the inhabitants."I believe he went to withdraw himself from a city devoted to destruction, and in which he could no longer do any good.

Clarke: Jer 37:13 - Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans - Thou art a deserter, and a traitor to thy country. As he had always declared that the Chaldeans should take the...

Thou fallest away to the Chaldeans - Thou art a deserter, and a traitor to thy country. As he had always declared that the Chaldeans should take the city, etc., his enemies took occasion from this to say he was in the interest of the Chaldeans, and that he wished now to go to them, and betray the place.

Clarke: Jer 37:15 - And smote him And smote him - Without any proof of the alleged treachery, without any form of justice

And smote him - Without any proof of the alleged treachery, without any form of justice

Clarke: Jer 37:15 - In prison to the house of Jonathan In prison to the house of Jonathan - In Asiatic countries there is an apartment in the houses of the officers of the law, to confine all the accused...

In prison to the house of Jonathan - In Asiatic countries there is an apartment in the houses of the officers of the law, to confine all the accused that are brought before them. Jonathan was a scribe or secretary, and had a prison of this kind in his house.

Clarke: Jer 37:16 - Entered into the dungeon, and into the cabins Entered into the dungeon, and into the cabins - The dungeon was probably a deep pit; and the cabins or cells, niches in the sides, where different m...

Entered into the dungeon, and into the cabins - The dungeon was probably a deep pit; and the cabins or cells, niches in the sides, where different malefactors were confined. See Blayney.

Clarke: Jer 37:17 - Is there any word from the Lord? Is there any word from the Lord? - Is there any farther revelation

Is there any word from the Lord? - Is there any farther revelation

Clarke: Jer 37:17 - There is: - thou shalt be delivered There is: - thou shalt be delivered - What bold faithfulness! And to a king, in whose hands his life now lay.

There is: - thou shalt be delivered - What bold faithfulness! And to a king, in whose hands his life now lay.

Clarke: Jer 37:19 - Where are now your prophets Where are now your prophets - They told you that the Chaldeans should not come; I told you they would. According to my word the Chaldeans are come, ...

Where are now your prophets - They told you that the Chaldeans should not come; I told you they would. According to my word the Chaldeans are come, and are departed only for a short time.

Clarke: Jer 37:20 - Cause me not to return to the house of Jonathan Cause me not to return to the house of Jonathan - He had been ill used in this man’ s custody, so as to endanger his life, the place being cold...

Cause me not to return to the house of Jonathan - He had been ill used in this man’ s custody, so as to endanger his life, the place being cold, and probably unhealthy.

Clarke: Jer 37:21 - Then Zedekiah - the court of the prison Then Zedekiah - the court of the prison - Was contiguous to the king’ s house, where the prisoners could readily see their friends

Then Zedekiah - the court of the prison - Was contiguous to the king’ s house, where the prisoners could readily see their friends

Clarke: Jer 37:21 - Give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers' street Give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers' street - From the public stores; which he received till all the provisions were spent.

Give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers' street - From the public stores; which he received till all the provisions were spent.

Calvin: Jer 37:1 - King Zedekiah, The Prophet tells us here, that after Jeconiah the king had been led into exile, the Jews had not on that account repented, though God had as it were...

The Prophet tells us here, that after Jeconiah the king had been led into exile, the Jews had not on that account repented, though God had as it were forced them to return to him; for it was so severe a chastisement, that to become worse was an evidence of monstrous stupidity. Jeremiah, however, says that they were not reformed by that punishment; for Zedekiah, who had succeeded Jeconiah, rejected sound doctrine, and did not obey the counsel of the Prophet.

But we must bear in mind the history of that time, that we may understand the meaning of the Prophet: the Jews made Jeconiah king in the place of his father, but in the third month the army of the king of Babylon came. Then Jeconiah surrendered himself to them of his own accord. Now the Prophet had said, that there would be no legitimate successor to Jehoiakim; and this was fulfilled, though his son was set on the throne, for a three months’ reign was so unimportant that it was deemed as nothing. And when Nebuchadnezzar saw that the people could hardly be kept in order without a king, he made Mattaniah king, whom he called Zedekiah. And he immediately revolted to the Egyptians and made a treaty with them, in order that he might shake off the yoke of the king of Babylon. Hence the Prophet says, that though Zedekiah had been taught by the example of Jehoiakim and of his nephew Jeconiah, he yet became nothing the better, he does not shnply blame his ingratitude: it is indeed certain that he had been severely reproved by the Prophet for having acted perfidiously towards the King Nebuchadnezzar, for he ought to have kept faith with him to the last. He feigned a reason of his own for revolting from him; no new cause had occurred; but it was only that he might be exempt from tribute, and also lest the malevolent should object to him that he reigned by permission, and that. he was the slave of another king. As, then, he saw that his reign would be exposed to many reproaches, except he revolted from the king of Babylon, he made a treaty with the Egyptians. This deserved reproof: but the Prophet speaks here generally of his obstinate wickedness, and also of that of the whole people.

King Zedekiah, he says, the son of Josiah, reigned instead of Coniah Here the word, Jeconiah, is curtailed, as it is probable, for the sake of degrading him; and we have seen that this has been the common opinion. He is then called Coniah by way of reproach, when yet his full name was Jeconiah. He says that Zedekiah was made king by Nebuchadnezzar: hence his perfidy and ingratitude became manifest. It is added, that he hearkened not to the word of Jehovah, nor his servants, nor his people I have said that Zedekiah was condemned, not simply because he obeyed not the Prophet by keeping faith with the King Nebuchadnezzar, but also because he retained the superstitions of his fathers, and corrupted the true worship of God, and would not be called back to the doctrine of the Law.

The disobedience then, mentioned here, extended to the whole Law of God, or to the two tables; for the Jews had then become degenerate together with their king; they did not purely worship God, but polluted themselves and the Temple by impious and filthy superstitious, and they were also libidinous, avaricious, cruel, violent, and dishonest, and had thus cast off the whole teaching of the Law. And this was a proof of strange blindness, as they had before their eyes the calamities of the city and the reproach to which their king had been subjected; for as we have already said, his sons had been slain in his presence, his own eyes had been pulled out, and he was bound with chains, after having been judged guilty of a capital offense. Such an example ought surely to have terrified Zedekiah and all the rest, so as to make thenl at length wise, and to seek reconciliation with God. But the Prophet says, that they did not hearken to the word of Jehovah

He mentions the king, then his counsellors, and in the third place, the whole people; as though he had said, that this madness was found not only in the king, but also in his counsellors and in the whole community, so that no one was excusable. He then begins with the head, even the king himself, and shews also that his counsellots were nothing better, and afterwards adds the common people, in whom the fault seems to have been less; for we know that the lower orders go astray through want of wisdom and ignorance. But the Prophet here shews that even the lowest of the people were disobedient to God.

We ought to notice especially the words, that they hearkened not to the word of Jehovah which he had spoken by Jeremiah For he intimates, that though God did not appear from heaven, it was sufficient to condemn the unbelieving, that he spoke by his Prophets. There was, then, no reason why the wicked should make evasions and say, that it was not their purpose to reject God and his doctrine, but that they only refused deference to mortals, and would not regard the words of men as heavenly oracles. This evasion availed them nothing, for God would have them to hearken to his servants. Though he did not shew himself from heaven, nor addressed them in a visible form, it was yet enough that he had once for all testified, that after the promulgation of the Law, there would always be Prophets among the people, and had commanded them to be reverently attended to. Nor could the Jews avail themselves of that evasion, which the ungodly commonly resorted to, that they could not distinguish between true and false Prophets; for if they had examined the doctrine of Jeremiah, they would have found that it had certain marks by which they could have easily seen that it was altogether consistent with the Law. That they then rejected the Prophet and his heavenly doctrine, was a proof of their obstinacy and contempt, but not through ignorance. It follows, —

Calvin: Jer 37:3 - NO PHRASE Jeremiah had briefly explained what was the state of the city and the land, that though they had been already severely chastised by God’s scourges,...

Jeremiah had briefly explained what was the state of the city and the land, that though they had been already severely chastised by God’s scourges, they yet remained obstinate in their wickedness. He now adds, that messengers were sent to him by King Zedekiah, when danger arose from the Chaldeans; and it is probable that this message came to Jeremiah when the siege was raised, or if the siege still continued, it was at a time when the Jews, no doubt, flattered themselves with the hope of receiving some aid, while yet they saw that the power of the king of Babylon was very great. For though they hoped for some help from the Egyptians, they were yet perplexed, and fear constrained the king to send messengers to the Prophet Jeremiah. But it appears from the answer that the Egyptians were already in arms, and had also come out for the purpose of raising the siege, and driving the Chaldeans from Judea. We hence see that the king was, in a measure, elated with vain confidence, seeing that the Egyptians were coming with a strong army to assist him, and yet he was full of anxiety, as the ungodly must ever be: while they seek to confirm themselves in a state of security, they are still tossed here and there, for God’s judgment is upon them. They are fearful, though they try to shake off fear. Hence Zedekiah, though he thought that he should soon be freed from all danger, yet could not wholly divest himself of anxiety, and therefore sent to Jeremiah: for the ungodly are wont to seek God, but not in earnest; they wish to discharge the outward duty, but they bring neither faith nor repentance, by which alone access to God is opened.

Calvin: Jer 37:4 - NO PHRASE But Jeremiah tells us that he was then at liberty, coming in and going out among the people It may be that he had been in prison, but that after th...

But Jeremiah tells us that he was then at liberty, coming in and going out among the people It may be that he had been in prison, but that after the rage of the king and of the people had cooled, he might have been set free. It is hence said that he was among the people, that is set at liberty, and at his own disposal, so that he could safely walk through the city; for to come and to go implies that he was free to follow his own business. He is said to come and to go who undertakes this or that concern as he pleases; for men, we know, are not engaged always in the same thing, but do various things as necessity requires. Such, then, was the condition of Jeremiah; he enjoyed common liberty. It is then added, that he was not as yet cast into prison, as it happened soon after. It is further said, that the army of Pharaoh was come out from Egypt to give aid to the Jews, and that thus the siege was raised, for the Chaldeans went forth to meet the Egyptians. At this time, then, Jeremiah received an answer from God. It seems not, therefore, probable that the messengers were sent, when the report spread through the city of the coming of the enemy, but rather when the city was relieved, for the condition of the people was still doubtful, as the liberty of the city and the land depended on the uncertain issue of the war. The Chaldeans had not yet come unto an engagement with the Egyptians. A victory gained by Pharaoh would have given the prospect of peace and safety to Zedekiah and the whole people; but if the Chaldeans gained the day, they saw that the greatest danger was at hand, for they would then be deprived of every assistance.

It was in this state of things that Zedekiah sent messengers to Jeremiah, to solicit his prayers. Thus we see that hypocrites are driven by the fear of God, whom yet they proudly despise, to seek his aid when forced to do so; nor is this done, that they may appear to do so before men, but because God brings them to such straits, that they cannot but feel that they stand in need of his help. They wish, indeed, as I have said, to obliterate every recollection of God, and were they also able to do so, they would rob him of all power and authority; but as they are forced, willing or unwilling, to know that God so reigns in heaven that the whole world is subject to his power, necessity constrains them formally to pray, and, in a manner, to conciliate his favor, or, at least, to try to do so. But as I have already said, they ought to begin with repentance and faith. Hypocrites withdraw themselves as far as they can, both from the promises of God and from the duty of repentance. They so seek God that they at the same time shun him.

We must also observe, that Zedekiah felt himself so guilty, that he could not pray himself. As, then, he was conscious of his own unworthiness, he put the Prophet, as it were, between himself and God, that he might suppliantly intercede for him. This also is what the faithful often do, for they seek aid here and there that they may be more readily heard by God; and this they do according to God’s command. But there is a great difference between the godly and hypocrites. The true worshippers of God, as I have said, are not content with their own prayers, but ask others to join them, while, at the same time, they pray God themselves. But hypocrites, what do they do? As they think that an access is forbidden them, and know that they are unworthy of being heard by God, they substitute others in their place to pray for them. Thus they do not seek themselves to know whether God will be propitious to them; and though they wish the whole world to pray for them, they do not yet pray themselves. Such, then, was the sottishhess of Zedekiah, who asked the holy Prophet to pray for him to God, while he himself was lying torpid in his own dregs; for he did not acknowledge that he was suffering a just punishment, nor had he recourse to the true remedy, that is, to return to God’s favor, to embrace his mercy and the promises of salvation. All these principal things he omitted, and only attended to what is, as they say, accessory.

Now as to the time, we ought carefully to notice that it was when the Egyptians came to raise the siege. Thus God for a time permitted hypocrites to be deceived by a fortunate event; for the Jews then began to praise their own prudence in forming a league with the Egyptians, for that kingdom, as it is well known, was powerful, and at the same time populous, so that a large army could be raised. As, then, they saw that their treaty turned out beneficially to them, they, no doubt, assumed to themselves great credit, and thus their boldness increased. But God, however, so touched their liearts, that they continued in suspense, and, by turns, greatly feared: for Zedekiah would not have sent to Jeremiah, except, constrained by some great necessity; and yet, as it has been said, success might have inebriated him; but God rendered him anxious, so as to feel that the prayer of the Prophet was needed.

Calvin: Jer 37:7 - NO PHRASE Now follows the answer: Jeremiah says that the word of Jehovah came to him, and that he was to tell the messengers of Zedekiah, that the Chaldeans wo...

Now follows the answer: Jeremiah says that the word of Jehovah came to him, and that he was to tell the messengers of Zedekiah, that the Chaldeans would shortly return. He then says, Behold the army of Pharaoh, which has come forth to deliver you, shall return to their own land; that is, being compelled to do so, the Egyptians being either conquered in battle or smitten with fear, and returning of their own accord to secure themselves in their own cities. The Prophet says, that no advantage could be expected from the Egyptians, for the soldiers of Pharaoh would return to their own land; and then he adds, and the Chaldeans shall return and fight against this city, until they take and burn it This was a hard answer, and Zedekiah was, no doubt, greatly exasperated at hearing the message, and also very angry with the Prophet, who thus dared plainly to threaten the city and the people with final ruin. But here the Prophet disregarded the pride of the king, for it was necessary for him to obey God’s command, he therefore boldly performed his office; and, at the same time, he touched the king Zedekiah to the quick, say to the king who sent you to inquire of me, etc

The word דרש daresh, means indeed to ask in general, but the Prophet means here that he was to inquire; and yet this was not said before; for he only told us that messengers had been sent to ask him to pray for the safety of the king and the people. But Scripture, we know, often omits one of the two things that are included; and we may easily conclude, that the king had not only sent to Jeremiah to pray, but also to bring some favorable prophecy from the Lord. For why did he apply to him rather than to the chief priest or some others, except that he knew him to be the true Prophet of God? Then Zedekiah requested Jeremiah to pray, but he tried also to draw from him some favorable prophecy, by which he might be relieved. Hence Jeremiah indirectly reproved him, because he feignedly sent to him as though he was ready to hear whatever God might declare by the mouth of his servant, — “He sent you to inquire of me; he is mistaken, for he will not get what he seeks; for thus saith God, ‘The Egyptians shall avail you nothing, and the Chaldeans shall return and take and burn the city.’”

We now perceive that when hypocrites pretend in a circuitous way to seek God, they do not obtain what they wish; for God justly disappoints them, inasmuch as they do not come to him with sincere hearts and desires; for they wish to transform God into their own nature and character, and they bend not themselves to his service nor submit to his word. Thus it comes that God will not answer their prayers; but the faithful, who seek God sincerely and from the heart, always find him propitious; and though he may not hear them immediately, yet he really shews that he cares for their safety. But hypocrites, whose confidence God regards with disdain, deserve that it should be empty and vain. This, then, is the reason why the Prophet gave such a severe answer to Zedekiah and his messengers. It now follows, —

Calvin: Jer 37:9 - NO PHRASE The Prophet confirms the former verse, and it was indeed necessary that this should be added, for though Zedekiah might not have divested himself of ...

The Prophet confirms the former verse, and it was indeed necessary that this should be added, for though Zedekiah might not have divested himself of all anxiety and fear, he must yet have been moved by that prophecy, and thus he might have become more hardened in his obduracy, as it is the case with hypocrites; who, when they find that they can gain nothing, become furious against God, and run on headlong in their course. This might then have been the case with Zedekiah and also the Jews; hence Jeremiah adds, by way of confirmation, Elate not your hearts, or, Deceive not yourselves; that is, on account of the report respecting the Egyptian army. Thus he told the Jews that they had no reason to expect any alleviation. And the reason is added, For if, he says, ye had smitten, the Chaldeans so that few remained, yet they would rise up every one from his tent, and burn this city

Calvin: Jer 37:10 - NO PHRASE The Prophet shews how foolishly and absurdly the Jews acted, in casting their eyes on fortunate events, and thus forming their opinions. He therefore...

The Prophet shews how foolishly and absurdly the Jews acted, in casting their eyes on fortunate events, and thus forming their opinions. He therefore exhorts them to cease to rely on such a confidence as would deceive them; for he says, that though they gained many battles, and the war turned on their side, yet they could not escape final ruin, for they had to do with God. It was hence the same thing, as though he had said, that they were not to judge by their state at that time, as to what it would be, because God was at war with them; and therefore if God had resolved to destroy them, though there were no enemy, yet he could by one breath slay them all. And for the same reason he concludes that he could employ the Chaldeans, Though few in number remained, and even wounded, yet riley would rise up from their tents, and set the buildings of Jerusalem on fire. This city, therefore, shall be burnt; ask not by whom or when: God will in this work employ the Chaldeans, for he hath so determined.

We may hence conclude, that the Jews had been for a time victorious, at least had successfully repelled their enemies in their attacks on the city; for the Prophet would not have said this, had he not seen that the Jews entertained hope of deliverance on account of some success they had in the war. He therefore says, that all this was of no importance, for their city was to perish by fire. But the principle which I have mentioned must be borne in mind, for Jeremiah took it as granted that the destruction of the city Jerusalem was not to be effected by the forces of the King Nebuchadnezzar, neither by the power or number of his army, nor by the valor of his soldiers, but by the judgment of God. Since it is so, he says, though few remained, and they wounded, even lying as half dead, yet they will rise up every one from his tent, that is, not together, nor in a regular order, nor under a banner, as soldiers are wont to do, but each one, though no comrade were near, though scattered here and there, would yet rise up from his tent. He intimates, in short, that though the contest were only with shadows, they yet could not escape that extreme vengeance which God had threatened. Hence he says, they shall rise up every one from his tent, and burn this city

Now he says not that the Chaldeans would take possession of the city, he speaks not of the assault, but only of the burning, he hence intimates, that though the Chaldeans might have in themselves no power to hurt them, yet it was sufficient that they were armed by God, for the purpose of setting fire to the houses, like women and children, who often burn whole cities and villages; for in this case there is no need of valor or of any great skill. So then God declares, that though the Chaldeans might not be prepared to fight, yet they were strong enough, yea, even though they were lying down and half-dead after having been wounded. This is the meaning.

Calvin: Jer 37:12 - NO PHRASE Here Jeremiah tells us how, and on what occaision, he was cast into prison. He had said shortly before, that he was in the middle of the people, or a...

Here Jeremiah tells us how, and on what occaision, he was cast into prison. He had said shortly before, that he was in the middle of the people, or among them; but now he gives an account of the cruelty of the princes, that they not only cast him into prison, but even into a grave, for they put him, as we shall see, in a dungeon, so that it was a miracle that he did not die there; and this was not done only once; but we shall hereafter see, before the end of the chapter, that he was unhumanly treated, so that he was afraid to return to the same place, lest it should prove fatal to him. He mentions the time when this was done, that is, when the Chaldean army went forth to meet the Egyptians. He was then free to leave the city: no one before could have gone out, because the gates were closed, and the city was also surrounded by enemies. It was then, he says, that he went out, that he might go to the land of Benjamin, where, as it has elsewhere appeared, he was born.

Calvin: Jer 37:13 - NO PHRASE But he then adds, that he was intercepted by the prefect of the ward in the gate of Benjamin That gate had its name from its situation, for a part ...

But he then adds, that he was intercepted by the prefect of the ward in the gate of Benjamin That gate had its name from its situation, for a part of Jerusalem belonged to the tribe of Benjamin; and hence it was not strange that the gate which led to the heritage of the tribe of Benjamin was so called. There then was Jeremiah intercepted by Irijah, the prefect of the ward, and not without a grievous charge, that he was escaping to the Chaldeans. The Prophet attempted to clear himself, but with no effect; for an opinion had prevailed, that he was already in league with the enemies. He thus gained nothing by defending himself, but was taken to the princes, the king’s counsellors.

This passage teaches us that God’s servants cannot escape without being exposed to many calumnies and false suspicions. Jeremiah might at the beginning have evaded this, and according to the perception of the flesh, his exemption or immunity might have been viewed as lawful, for there was now before his eyes the danger, not only of losing his life, but also of his name and reputation, which, to ingenuous and wise men, is of much more value. Had Jeremiah then chosen to evade, he might have made this pretense, — “I am indeed ready to offer my life as a sacrifice a hundred times, but what will it avail me, if I am to be regarded as a revolter?” For he must have thus exposed the very name of God to many blasphemies: they might have said,” This is the Prophet who boasted that he had been sent from above, but he is now become perfidious and a traitor to his own countw, and has tried to deliver up the city into the hands of enemies.” Jeremiah then might have shaken off this burden laid on him; but it was nccessary for him to bear this reproach, with which he was falsely charged. Faithful teachers ought indeed to remove, as far as they can, all calumnies, and to check the wicked and malicious, so that they may not have the occasion to speak evil; but when they have done all, they will not yet exempt themselves from calumny; for their words and their deeds will be misconstrued. Thus Jeremiah was loaded with false charges; for all had persuaded themselves, that as he had so much extolled the power of King Nebuchadnezzar, he had been hired by him for the purpose of depressing the people by fear; and it may be that the violent among them did wilfully and knowingly make his case to appear worse to the ignorant, even by false reports. As then this conviction respecting him prevailed everywhere, he was apprehended as a revolter, as he was going out of the city.

But he says, that he intended to go into the land of Benjamin, so as to separate himself. The verb חלק , chelak, means to divide, to scatter, to dissipate; and hence some have given this meaning, that he went into the land of Benjamin in order to divide his heritage; but this seems harsh and forced. They add, “In the midst of the people,” as though Jeremiah wished to make his land common, and to give it to the people: but in this explanation there is nothing probable or suitable. I therefore doubt not but that Jeremiah sought this as a quiet place, as it is understood by most interpreters, he then went forth towards the land of Benjamin, that he might separate himself; that is, that he might be secluded there in the midst of his people. It is, indeed, a brief mode of speaking, but the meaning is not ambiguous, that he might be there, where he might separate himself from the people, as the places were distant from one another. 107 For he was tired with the city, because he saw that he spent his labor in vain. Some think that he was afraid of being cast into prison, because he had just announced a command greatly disliked; but it is more probable that, he was worn out with weariness, because he saw that he made no impression on men so hard and refractory. Hence then it was, that he wished to withdraw from the presence of the whole people.

Then follows what we have already mentioned, that he was taken in the gate by the keeper Irijah, as though he were revolting to the Chaldeans. We have stated how this suspicion arose, even because he had faithfillly proclaimed the commands of God. We hence see how God tried his servant, when he thus constrained him to speak, so that his words became suspected. And hence also we may gather how thoroughly fixed in the minds of men was that false opinion, for Jeremiah was not heard in his own defense. He indeed said openly that he was not fleeing away, nay, that this was a false charge. It is a lie, he says, I am not fleeing to the Chaldeans

I have already reminded you that the verb נפל nuphal, found here, means properly to fall, but it is to be taken here metaphorically, as signifying to fall away, or to incline to another side. Thou then fallest away or inclinest to the Chaldeans, which was the same thing as to revolt. We see that the Prophet was not charged with a common offense, for it would have been the highest to forsake his own country and to pass over to the enemies: it would have been better for him to die a hundred deaths. But, as I have already said, the servants of God ought to be so courageous as to despise the slanders of the unprincipled, and, when it so pleases God, to prepare themselves for patience whenever any reproach is to be undergone, only let their conscience be always clear before God and angels; and let also their integrity confute all slanders, and let them disprove them too, provided there be those who can bear to hear them: but if a defense be not always admitted, let them patiently bear this indignity. And this also we ought to notice, that God’s servants, though ready to clear themselves of crimes ascribed to them, and to defend their innocence at the peril of life, are yet often repelled and condemned unheard. This is, indeed, a great indignity; but yet as Jeremiah met with such a treatment, it ought not at this day to appear to us unendurable or new. It now follows —

Calvin: Jer 37:15 - NO PHRASE Here Jeremiah pursues the same narrative, and shews how unjustly he was treated, for he found no equity at the hands of the princes any more than in ...

Here Jeremiah pursues the same narrative, and shews how unjustly he was treated, for he found no equity at the hands of the princes any more than in the keeper of the ward. He was no doubt prepared to defend himself before them, and sufficient proof was ready at hand, only he would have had to speak to the deaf. But here he shews by one word that the liberty of speaking was precluded, for a furious madness seized them that they would not hear him. And here we may notice how much opposed is wrath to just and peaceable decisions; for if we wish to be right and equitable judges, self-government is especially necessary. When, therefore, our minds are inflamed with anger or wrath, it is impossible that any rectitude or humanity should prevail. So Jeremiah complains that he was oppressed, because the princes boiled with rage, so that they suffered him not to give the explanation which he had prepared.

He then adds, that they smote him They no doubt ordered their servants to smite him; for it would have been more than strange, had the princes themselves risen up to strike the Prophet with their fists, or to smite him with their hands. It is then probable that he was smitten by their orders and at their bidding. This is the reason, if I mistake not, why some have given this rendering, “They caused him to be smitten.” But he is often said to have killed a man, who has ordered him to be killed, while he himself had not touched him with his finger. Even so Jeremiah was smitten by the princes, because they had commanded him to be smitten. And this passage shews also, as in a glass, how miserable would be the condition of God’s servants, were he not to sustain them by the power of his Spirit. For here is a holy Prophet overwhelmed with unjust accusations and also reproaches, and the princes abstained not from stripes, and at last he was cast into a pit. Whenever, then, such, a thing happens to us, let us cast our eyes on Jeremiah, and let it not be grievous to us to follow the steps of the holy Prophet; nor let us think it hard to endure the trials with which God was pleased to exercise him. They put him, he says, in the house, and then the word is changed, the prison, האסור easur, but; the same thing is meant. It now follows what sort of prison it was —

Calvin: Jer 37:16 - NO PHRASE The particle כי , ki, is to be taken here as an adverb of time, as I think, though interpreters have not observed this, When Jeremiah, he says,...

The particle כי , ki, is to be taken here as an adverb of time, as I think, though interpreters have not observed this, When Jeremiah, he says, came into the house of the pit or dungeon, or of the prison. The word בור means also sometimes the grave, but is to be taken here for a pit or a deep place: he means that it was a dark and filthy prison. And he adds, and to the dwellings I know not why some have rendered it, “victualling houses;” for the word החניות , echeniot, means narrow prisons, which we call at this day cachots: 108 he was therefore cast into a dungeon, where there were narrow places, that, the holy man had no space either freely to rise or to stand or to sit down, or to he down. Then the Prophet shews that he was so confined by the straitness of the place, that he could hardly sit or lay down or stand erect.; and he says that he was there many days. 109

We must notice the circumstances of the case: It was a thing cruel enough in itself, that an innocent man, after having been beaten, should be thrust into prison: but when a dark and deep prison was chosen, and when he was confined to a narrow place, as though he was in fetters, it was a great addition to the indignity offered to him. Since then the holy Prophet was so atrociously treated, let us not think it strange, when the same thing at this day is endured by God’s children, and for the same cause, even for bearing testimony to celestial truth. When the length of time is added, it increased the evil; for he was not retained in prison for a few days or for a month, but until the city was taken; not indeed in that prison, for the king, as we shall presently see, removed him into the ccurt of the prison. He was, however, the second time cast into a filthy prison, as though he was destined to die; thence he was afterwards removed also by the order of the king. But the Prophet says, that he was in that dungeon many days. It now follows —

Calvin: Jer 37:17 - NO PHRASE From these words we learn, that King Zedekiah, though he had not obeyed good and wise counsels, nor even God and his truth, was not yet one of the wo...

From these words we learn, that King Zedekiah, though he had not obeyed good and wise counsels, nor even God and his truth, was not yet one of the worst, for of his own self he called the Prophet to him, and wished to find out whether he could in any way appease God. There is here, in short, a description given of the character of Zedekiah: he was unwilling to submit to God and his word, and yet he was not so cruel as to become enraged against the Prophet; nor had he wholly cast away all fear of God, all concern for religion, and all regard for prophetic teaching. For he no doubt sent for Jeremiah as God’s true servant, and in some degree honored him, and wished God to be propitious to himself. But this is usually the case with hypocrites: they would willingly be reconciled with God, but at the same time they wish to remain free, that is, to retain their own sinful dispositions; in short, they wish so to live as that God should give place to them, and allow them to sin as they please. Such was Zedekiah, and yet he had not reached to the highest pitch of impiety, for as yet he had some regard for the Prophet; nor was he so savage and cruel as his counsellors. He then called him to himself and asked him privately, that he might not depart, as we shall see in another place, in any measure from his royal dignity: for he simply asked the Prophet not to speak openly, because he would thus lose his own authority.

He then asked him in secret, because he had been perplexed. He wished indeed for some favorable answer, but he hardly dared to hope for it; and therefore he led the Prophet to a secret place, and asked him without any being a witness, Is there, he said, a word from God? Some explain this, as though Zedekiah had asked whether the prophecies of Jeremiah were true, as though he had said, “What thou hast hitherto spoken, has it come from God?” but this is no suitable explanation; on the contrary, he asked, Whether the Prophet had lately received any word from God? He wished then for some new message, and to hear something respecting the future deliverance of the city: for he was no doubt persuaded that Jeremiah had been hitherto discharging the office of a Prophet, as it became him; for he did not ask him as a common man, nor did he regard him as an impostor, but inquired whether there was a word from God. True is what I before stated, that hypocrites always seek God’s favor in a foolish way; for they would have God to gratify their sinful lusts, but God cannot deny himself. Hence Zedekiah, though he shewed apparently some regard for religion, yet foolishly asked, Whether there was a word from Jehovah? that is, Whether any message had been lately made known to Jeremiah? He answered, There is, even this, Thou shalt be delivered into the hand of the Chaldeans

Here we may notice the boldness of the Prophet; he had not been broken down by all the evils he had met with, but ever faithfully performed the office committed to him. He therefore answered the king honestly, though not without danger, Thou shalt be delivered, he said, into the hands of the Chaldeans: for he had hardly come out of prison, where he had been buried as in a grave, and we shall see that the prison had been to him like death; and the Prophet was not divested of infirmity and fear, as he will presently shew; yet fear did not prevent him from faithfully performing the office committed to him. Though the Prophet dreaded the sufferings of the prison, though he also feared death, he yet overcame all these feelings, and presented his life as a sacrifice, when he openly and boldly answered the king, that the Chaldeans would shortly be conquerors, and make him a captive. Then follows the expostulation which the Prophet made to the king —

Calvin: Jer 37:18 - NO PHRASE Though the Prophet had spoken what was displeasing to the king, he yet complains that wrong had been done to him, as he had been cast into prison; an...

Though the Prophet had spoken what was displeasing to the king, he yet complains that wrong had been done to him, as he had been cast into prison; and thus he shews that he had been unjustly condemned for having threatened ruin to the city and destruction to the kingdom, because he was constrained to do this by the obligations of his office. Hence the Prophet shews that he had not sinned in this — that he had proclaimed God’s commands, however bitter they were to the king and to the people.

This passage deserves special notice: earthly princes are so proud, that as soon as they order anything, they wish every dispute about their authority to be suspended; for they will have their own ordinances to be counted laws, and their own decrees to be sacred and authoritative; and yet we know, that by following their own wills, they decree often what is wholly unjust and inconsistent with everything that is reasonable. This passage then, as I have said, deserves special notice; for Jeremiah boldly declares that he had not sinned, because he had threatened the king, displeased his counsellors, inveighed against the impiety of the people, and denounced utter ruin on the city and the Temple. He then denies that in all this he had done anything wrong. So also Daniel said,

“Against God and the king have I not sinned,” (Dan 6:22)

and yet he had disregarded the king’s decree, and firmly refused by an impious flattery to put the king in the place of God: he however denied that he had done anything wrong against the king, because his decree was unjust and wicked. Let us then bear in mind, that though princes may in bear their decrees to be disregarded by us, they are yet not absolved before God and his angels, and also that we can boldly, openly, and with a full mouth, as they say, assert our innocence, when religion constrains us, and when it is not lawful to obey the impious and unjust edicts of kings. He afterwards adds —

Calvin: Jer 37:19 - NO PHRASE Here Jeremiah, taking confidence, advances to a higher ground; for he reprobates the folly of Zedekiah, because he had given ear to the false prophet...

Here Jeremiah, taking confidence, advances to a higher ground; for he reprobates the folly of Zedekiah, because he had given ear to the false prophets and their flatteries. But this he did, that he might more fully confirm his own innocence, as though he had said, “I indeed am grievously blamed, because I threatened ruin to the city and the Temple; but what if the Lord had constrained me to do so? and it is evident that I was commissioned by God, and that I alleged nothing without authority; for I have always declared what has happened, and events have proved that I was sent from above, when I announced to you what was to be. But where are your prophets? for they have been always flattering you; and it has happened through their falsehoods, that ye have not returned to the right way. It was yet in your power to be reconciled to God, when I at first warned you; and all my labor and endeavors were for this end, that you might anticipate God’s wrath by a willing repentance. Since then your prophets have deceived you, and the event now clearly proves this, know, O king, that I have been sent from above.”

We thus see that Jeremiah was not so anxious about his life, but that he always remained stedfast to his purpose; and thus he turned not aside from making an honest profession of the truth, so as to provide for his own safety, as they do, who are fearful and think that they act prudently, when they are compliant and try to please men opposed to them at the expense of truth. This was not done by Jeremiah. He had indeed a regard for his life, as we shall now see; but he went on in the discharge of his office, and valued the truth communicated to him from above more than hundred lives. It is then with reference to this that he says, Where are your prophets? as though he had said, “You see that you have all been deceived by their false prophecies.” It follows —

Calvin: Jer 37:20 - NO PHRASE This verse shews that Jeremiah was not destitute of human feelings, for he, as other men, dreaded death. But yet he could so control himself, that no...

This verse shews that Jeremiah was not destitute of human feelings, for he, as other men, dreaded death. But yet he could so control himself, that no fear made him to turn aside from his duty. Fear, then, did not dishearten him, as the boldness which we have noticed was a manifest proof of his constancy. The Prophet therefore overcame, as to his work, every anxiety and the fear of death; and yet he did not disregard his life, but sought, as far as he could, deliverance from his evils. He asked for some alleviation from the king. We hence see that the Prophets were not logs of wood, nor had iron hearts; but though subject to human feelings, yet they elevated themselves to an invincible courage as to their work, so as to fulfill their office.

As to the words, Let my prayer fall before thee, they mean a humble supplication; it is a mode of expression derived, as we have before seen, from what was done by men in prostrating themselves in prayer, and is transferred here from God to mortals. The Prophet then humbly asked, that he might not be cast again into that horrid prison where he had been confined — and why? that he might not die We see that he shunned death, for this was natural; and yet he was prepared to die, whenever necessary, rather than to turn aside in the least from discharging the duty imposed on him by God.

Calvin: Jer 37:21 - NO PHRASE The Prophet tells us, that God regarded the miseries to which he had been unjustly exposed: and the king no doubt became humane towards Jeremiah, bec...

The Prophet tells us, that God regarded the miseries to which he had been unjustly exposed: and the king no doubt became humane towards Jeremiah, because God turned his heart towards what was just and right. We said, indeed, yesterday, that the king was not in disposition cruel or sanguinary; yet he would not have been so easily eritreated by the Prophet, had he not been influenced by the hidden working of God’s Spirit. We hence see how God favors his servants and has regard for their infirmity when necessary. We yet see also that the Prophet was not so kindly dealt with as to be allowed to return free to his own house, but that he was removed to another prison, where his condition was more tolerable. He was then in the court of the prison

He says, that a crust of bread was given to him daily, or every day. The word ככר , kekar, is by some rendered “mass,” or lump, and means sometimes a large loaf; but it is probable, that during so much scarcity the Prophet had but a scanty living. He had then a crust or piece of bread every day We see how mean was his food; but God often tries his servants in this way, withholding from them all the delicacies of this world. It is added, from the street of the bakers; by these words is meant, I think, that it was coarse bread, not made of fine flour, such as rich men did eat, for their mouths could not endure what was rough and course. Then God’s holy Prophet was content with the common bread. The king and his counsellors had their own bakers; but it is said that bread was brought to the Prophet from a common place, the street of the bakers And the bread then sold during such a scarcity was no doubt black bread. We hence see what kind of bread it was, because it was sold for the common use of the people.

Thus the Prophet shews, that though some relaxation was allowed him, he was still confined in prison, and also that no meat nor any delicacies were given him, but a crust of bread only. He however commemorates the favor of God, inasmuch as in so great a scarcity he was not without bread. He had, then, his daily bread until all provisions failed.

And hence we learn, that God often so provides for his servants, that he appears to have forsaken them; and yet he then especially takes care of them and supplies them with what is needful for their support. Had Jeremiah been at home, he might have been at any time stoned by the people; for there were not wanting those disposed to stir up famished men against him. He might then have been every moment in danger of his life at home. But now in prison, he was safe, and no one could do him any harm. Besides, had he been at home, many might have robbed him, so as to leave him nothing to preserve life; but in prison he had his daily allowance. Thus, then, God often conducts his servants in a manner that is wonderful and beyond what we can conceive, and in the meantime acts as the head of a family, in supplying their wants. In short, the Prophet here intimates that he was cared for by God, so that during the famine and scarcity among the whole people, his bread was yet given to him, when he could not have begged it. When he could not have procured bread for himself either by labor, or by industry, or by begging, or by money, he shews that God took care of him so as to feed him during that distress.

He however adds, that he was in the court of the prison, in order to shew that God tried his patience, for a prison was a place of degradation. The Prophet was exposed to the reproaches of all; and then the princes might have often threatened him with danger, and might have also transferred him to another place, as we shall hereafter see. Therefore, in a measure only did God bring aid to his Prophet, for it was not his pleasure wholly to deliver him, and yet he suffered him not to be reduced to extremities. Now follows —

Defender: Jer 37:2 - hearken Even after the fulfillment of all Jeremiah's prophetic warnings, along with the death of Jehoiakim and deportation of Jeconiah, the puppet-king Zedeki...

Even after the fulfillment of all Jeremiah's prophetic warnings, along with the death of Jehoiakim and deportation of Jeconiah, the puppet-king Zedekiah along with all his servants still rejected the words of God. Jeremiah continued to prophesy. His persecutions and prophecies during this difficult period constitute Part III of his book (chapters 37-39)."

TSK: Jer 37:1 - Zedekiah // Coniah // made am 3406-3416, bc 598-588 Zedekiah : 2Ki 24:17; 1Ch 3:15; 2Ch 36:10 Coniah : Jer 22:24, Jer 22:28, Jer 24:1, Jeconiah, Jer 52:31; 2Ki 24:12; 1Ch 3:16; ...

am 3406-3416, bc 598-588

Zedekiah : 2Ki 24:17; 1Ch 3:15; 2Ch 36:10

Coniah : Jer 22:24, Jer 22:28, Jer 24:1, Jeconiah, Jer 52:31; 2Ki 24:12; 1Ch 3:16; 2Ch 36:9, Jehoiachin

made : Eze 17:12-21

TSK: Jer 37:2 - neither // the prophet neither : 2Ki 24:19, 2Ki 24:20; 2Ch 36:12-16; Pro 29:12; Eze 21:25; 1Th 4:8 the prophet : Heb. the hand of the prophet, Exo 4:13; Lev 8:36; 2Sa 10:2, ...

neither : 2Ki 24:19, 2Ki 24:20; 2Ch 36:12-16; Pro 29:12; Eze 21:25; 1Th 4:8

the prophet : Heb. the hand of the prophet, Exo 4:13; Lev 8:36; 2Sa 10:2, 2Sa 12:25; 1Ki 14:18, 1Ki 16:7; Pro 26:6; Hos 12:10 *marg.

TSK: Jer 37:3 - Zephaniah // Pray Zephaniah : Jer 21:1, Jer 21:2, Jer 29:21, Jer 29:25, Jer 52:24 Pray : Jer 2:27, Jer 21:1, Jer 21:2, Jer 42:2-4, Jer 42:20; Exo 8:8, Exo 8:28, Exo 9:2...

TSK: Jer 37:4 - for for : Jer 37:15, Jer 32:2, Jer 32:3

TSK: Jer 37:5 - Pharaoh’ s // they Pharaoh’ s : This was Pharaoh Hophra, or Apries, as he is called by Herodotus, who succeeded his father Psammis on the throne of Egypt, am 3410, ...

Pharaoh’ s : This was Pharaoh Hophra, or Apries, as he is called by Herodotus, who succeeded his father Psammis on the throne of Egypt, am 3410, bc 594, and reigned twenty-five years. Having entered into a confederacy with Zedekiah (Eze 17:15), he marched out of Egypt with a great army to his relief; which caused Nebuchadnezzar to raise the siege of Jerusalem to meet him; during which period the transactions detailed here took place. Jer 37:7; 2Ki 24:7; Eze 17:15

they : Jer 37:11, Jer 34:21

TSK: Jer 37:7 - Thus // Pharaoh’ s Thus : Jer 37:3, Jer 21:2; 2Ki 22:18 Pharaoh’ s : Jer 17:5, Jer 17:6; Pro 21:30; Isa 30:1-6, Isa 31:1-3; Lam 4:17; Eze 17:17, Eze 29:6, Eze 29:7,...

TSK: Jer 37:8 - -- Jer 32:29, Jer 34:21, Jer 34:22, Jer 38:23, Jer 39:2-8

TSK: Jer 37:9 - Deceive // yourselves Deceive : Oba 1:3; Mat 24:4, Mat 24:5; Gal 6:3, Gal 6:7; Eph 5:6; 2Th 2:3; Jam 1:22 yourselves : Heb. your souls

Deceive : Oba 1:3; Mat 24:4, Mat 24:5; Gal 6:3, Gal 6:7; Eph 5:6; 2Th 2:3; Jam 1:22

yourselves : Heb. your souls

TSK: Jer 37:10 - though // wounded men // yet though : Jer 21:4-7, Jer 49:20, Jer 50:45; Lev 26:36-38; Isa 10:4, Isa 30:17 wounded men : Heb. men thrust through, Jer 51:4; Isa 13:15, Isa 14:19 yet...

though : Jer 21:4-7, Jer 49:20, Jer 50:45; Lev 26:36-38; Isa 10:4, Isa 30:17

wounded men : Heb. men thrust through, Jer 51:4; Isa 13:15, Isa 14:19

yet : Joe 2:11

TSK: Jer 37:11 - that // broken that : Jer 37:5 broken : Heb. made to ascend

that : Jer 37:5

broken : Heb. made to ascend

TSK: Jer 37:12 - went // the land // separate himself thence went : 1Ki 19:3, 1Ki 19:9; Neh 6:11; Mat 10:23; 1Th 5:22 the land : Jer 1:1; Jos 21:17, Jos 21:18; 1Ch 6:60 separate himself thence : or, slip away fr...

went : 1Ki 19:3, 1Ki 19:9; Neh 6:11; Mat 10:23; 1Th 5:22

the land : Jer 1:1; Jos 21:17, Jos 21:18; 1Ch 6:60

separate himself thence : or, slip away from thence

TSK: Jer 37:13 - in the // Hananiah // Thou in the : Jer 38:7; Zec 14:10 Hananiah : Jer 38:1, Jer 38:10-17, Jer 36:12 Thou : Jer 18:18, Jer 20:10, Jer 21:9, Jer 27:6, Jer 27:12, Jer 27:13, Jer 2...

TSK: Jer 37:14 - said // false said : Jer 40:4-6; Neh 6:8; Psa 27:12, Psa 35:11, Psa 52:1, Psa 52:2; Mat 5:11, Mat 5:12; Luk 6:22, Luk 6:23, Luk 6:26; 1Pe 3:16, 1Pe 4:14-16 false : ...

TSK: Jer 37:15 - the princes // put // in the the princes : Jer 20:1-3, Jer 26:16; Mat 21:35, Mat 23:34, Mat 26:67, Mat 26:68; Luk 20:10,Luk 20:11, Luk 22:64; Joh 18:22; Act 5:28, Act 5:40, Act 16...

TSK: Jer 37:16 - into the dungeon // cabins am 3415, bc 589 into the dungeon : Jer 38:6, Jer 38:10-13; Gen 40:15; Lam 3:53, Lam 3:55 cabins : or, cells

am 3415, bc 589

into the dungeon : Jer 38:6, Jer 38:10-13; Gen 40:15; Lam 3:53, Lam 3:55

cabins : or, cells

TSK: Jer 37:17 - asked // Is there // thou shalt asked : Jer 38:5, Jer 38:14-16, Jer 38:24-27; 1Ki 14:1-4 Is there : Jer 37:3, Jer 21:1, Jer 21:2; 1Ki 22:16; 2Ki 3:11-13; Mar 6:20 thou shalt : Jer 21...

TSK: Jer 37:18 - -- Jer 26:19; Gen 31:36; 1Sa 24:9-15, 1Sa 26:18-21; Pro 17:13, Pro 17:26; Dan 6:22; Joh 10:32; Act 23:1, Act 24:16, Act 25:8, Act 25:11, Act 25:25, Act 2...

TSK: Jer 37:19 - Where // your Where : Jer 2:28; Deu 32:36, Deu 32:37; 2Ki 3:13 your : Jer 6:14, Jer 8:11, Jer 14:13-15, Jer 23:17, Jer 27:14-18, Jer 28:1-5, Jer 28:10-17, Jer 29:31...

TSK: Jer 37:20 - be accepted before // lest be accepted before : Heb. fall before, Jer 36:7 *marg. lest : Jer 26:15, Jer 38:6-9; Act 23:16-22, Act 25:10,Act 25:11, Act 28:18, Act 28:19

be accepted before : Heb. fall before, Jer 36:7 *marg.

lest : Jer 26:15, Jer 38:6-9; Act 23:16-22, Act 25:10,Act 25:11, Act 28:18, Act 28:19

TSK: Jer 37:21 - into the // and that // until // Thus into the : Jer 32:2, Jer 32:8, Jer 38:13, Jer 38:28 and that : 1Ki 17:4-6; Job 5:20; Psa 33:18, Psa 33:19, Psa 34:9, Psa 34:10, Psa 37:3, Psa 37:19; P...

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Poole: Jer 37:1 - Coniah Coniah The king of Babylon made this Zedekiah king, who is here called the son of Josiah, and, 2Ki 24:17 , Jehoiachin’ s father’ s brother,...

Coniah The king of Babylon made this Zedekiah king, who is here called the son of Josiah, and, 2Ki 24:17 , Jehoiachin’ s father’ s brother, to distinguish him from another Zedekiah, son of Jehoiakim, as appears from 1Ch 3:16 .

Poole: Jer 37:2 - -- This Zedekiah was little better than Jehoiakim; he seemeth by his story to be of a little better temper, not so cruel and bloody; but he no more reg...

This Zedekiah was little better than Jehoiakim; he seemeth by his story to be of a little better temper, not so cruel and bloody; but he no more regarded God’ s word by his prophet than Jehoiakim had done.

Poole: Jer 37:3 - -- This was apparently in the time of the siege; for, Jer 37:5 , we read of Pharaoh’ s army being come to relieve the besieged, whether it was bef...

This was apparently in the time of the siege; for, Jer 37:5 , we read of Pharaoh’ s army being come to relieve the besieged, whether it was before the Babylonians were departed, or no, is uncertain; but it is plain, if they were departed, the king was afraid they would come back again. That which is most observable for us from hence is this, that wicked men of all ranks are desirous of the prayers of those ministers in their distresses, whose counsels and admonitions they never regard while they are in a time of prosperity; which is an evidence of their acting contrary to the convictions of their consciences, in obedience to their lusts, in their contempt of their instructions and admonitions. When affliction hath cooled their lusts, then their consciences can be heard in dictating their duty to them.

Poole: Jer 37:4 - -- We shall read afterward, Jer 37:15 , that he was imprisoned; and we have heard, Jer 32 , of two revelations he had while he was in prison; but as ye...

We shall read afterward, Jer 37:15 , that he was imprisoned; and we have heard, Jer 32 , of two revelations he had while he was in prison; but as yet he walked at liberty.

Poole: Jer 37:5 - -- Zedekiah was set up by the king of Babylon, instead of Jehoiachin, whom the king of Babylon had carried into Babylon. Zedekiah (as is usual in those...

Zedekiah was set up by the king of Babylon, instead of Jehoiachin, whom the king of Babylon had carried into Babylon. Zedekiah (as is usual in those cases, and as it appeareth, Eze 17:16 ) had taken an oath of allegiance to the king of Babylon, but brake it, and the covenant which he made with him, Jer 37:16 and, Jer 37:15 ,

rebelled against him, and sent his ambassador into Egypt for horses, and much people Now the king of Egypt came in person no more after the great overthrow given him in Carchemish, by the river Euphrates, of which we read Jer 46:2 , which was thirteen or fourteen years before this; yet he sent an army at Zedekiah’ s request to relieve him, at this time besieged by the armies of the king of Babylon. The Chaldeans that were in the siege of Jerusalem hearing of it, raised the siege for a time, during which time (probably) it was that Zedekiah sent to the prophet to pray for them.

Poole: Jer 37:7 - inquire The word inquire lets us know that Zedekiah did not send to the prophet only to pray for him, but to inquire of God what the issue would be of thi...

The word

inquire lets us know that Zedekiah did not send to the prophet only to pray for him, but to inquire of God what the issue would be of this future contingency; it may be more desirous to know that, than that Jeremiah should intercede with God for them. The prophet tells them from God that the king of Egypt’ s army should do them no service; it is expounded, Eze 17:17 , He should not make for him in the war, by casting up mounts, and building forts, to cut off many persons . Probably the Egyptian army, upon the sight of the strength of the Chaldeans, and the weak and impotent state of the Jews, were discouraged, and would not adventure to fight them, but by and by returned to their own land.

Poole: Jer 37:10 - -- The substance of the answer returned by the prophet to the king is this: That whereas they pleased themselves with fancies that the Babylonian army ...

The substance of the answer returned by the prophet to the king is this: That whereas they pleased themselves with fancies that the Babylonian army now withdrawn to meet with the army of the Egyptians would return no more to the siege, it was a dream; he assures them from God they should return, besiege the city, and take it, and burn it; and therefore they did but deceive themselves to think otherwise; though they were gone, yet it was but for a very short time. He further assures them that the potency or impotency of the Chaldeans was inconsiderable; for if their whole army were made up of wounded men, or if they could prevail so far as to wound all their soldiers, or thrust them through, (as the word is translated, Jer 51:4 ) yet they should do the work. When God is resolved upon an effect, the instruments are very little to be regarded. It is not the arm of flesh, but the power of God, which is in that case alone to be considered.

Poole: Jer 37:12 - -- The word we translate separate signifieth to divide, soften, or make slippery , which hath made interpreters vary in the exposition of it. But th...

The word we translate

separate signifieth to divide, soften, or make slippery , which hath made interpreters vary in the exposition of it. But the general use of it, especially in Pihel , (the conjugation in which it is here used,) being to signify a dividing or separating, and the latter signification being secondary, it seemeth most reasonably here translated to separate, or to withdraw. Jeremiah had no further revelation from God which he was under an obligation to communicate; and knowing the city would suddenly be taken, and that he could be no further useful to the people, taking advantage of the withdrawing of the Chaldean army, resolves to provide for himself, designing to go to his own country, to Anathoth, which was in the land of Benjamin; and because he was a noted person, who might probably be stopped (as he was) if known, he attempts to slip out in the crowd of people that were going out. This seemeth to me the most probable sense.

Poole: Jer 37:13 - The gate of Benjamin The gate of Benjamin was some gate that looked toward the inheritance of that tribe, or where those used to go out who went that way; we read of it J...

The gate of Benjamin was some gate that looked toward the inheritance of that tribe, or where those used to go out who went that way; we read of it Jer 38:7 . Irijah was a captain of the guard that was set to watch at the gates, to keep people from going out, or at least some persons; for it should seem by Jeremiah’ s endeavour to go out in the crowd, they suffered many to go out, as is usual in sieges, when victuals grow scarce; and though the Chaldeans were at present gone, yet they were not out of fear of their coming back. This captain apprehends Jeremiah, as one who was about to desert the city, and fall off to the Chaldeans. That Hananiah the grandfather of this Irijah was the false prophet we read of Jer 28 , who died according to Jeremiah’ s prophecy, and this his grandchild apprehended Jeremiah in some revenge of his grandfather, is but uncertainly guessed. But Jeremiah’ s so frequent prophesying that the Chaldeans should take the city exposed him to this suspicion probably.

Poole: Jer 37:14 - -- Though Jeremiah, as the Lord’ s prophet, faithfully revealed the will of God, that the Chaldeans should take the city, to warn the people (if p...

Though Jeremiah, as the Lord’ s prophet, faithfully revealed the will of God, that the Chaldeans should take the city, to warn the people (if possible) to prevent it by solemn addresses unto God, or at least to prevent what mischief might be prevented by a timely surrender to the king of Babylon, yet he had no design to fly to them; he was so far from delighting in their company, that when the city was taken, and the captain of the guard offered him either to go along with him to Babylon, promising to look well to him, Jer 40:4,5 , or to go back to Gedaliah, whom the king of Babylon had left as deputy governor in Judea, he chose rather to go and dwell under Gedaliah’ s government in a poor condition, than to mend his commons in an idolatrous country: but the captain would not believe him, but carrieth him before the princes.

Poole: Jer 37:15 - -- These princes seem more fierce against the prophet than those that were in the time of Jehoiakim, for they proceed here upon the captain’ s inf...

These princes seem more fierce against the prophet than those that were in the time of Jehoiakim, for they proceed here upon the captain’ s information, cause the prophet to be beaten, and send him to prison, a prison within the compass of the court, bad enough, as appeareth by Jeremiah’ s complaint of his condition there to the king, Jer 37:20 , and by what followeth in the next verse.

Poole: Jer 37:16 - dungeon The Hebrew words which we translate dungeon signify the house of the lake ; they certainly signify some pit, or deep hole, or place in the prison...

The Hebrew words which we translate

dungeon signify the house of the lake ; they certainly signify some pit, or deep hole, or place in the prison, where were some cells or apartments, in which they were wont to keep those whom they judged great malefactors, or against whom they had some special anger; how many days the prophet was forced to abide in this miserable place it is not said, but it should seem by Jer 37:9 , that it was until the Chaldean army was returned to the siege.

Poole: Jer 37:17 - Is there any word from the Lord? Is there any word from the Lord? that is, Hath God revealed any thing to thee, concerning what will be the issue of the return of the Chaldean army t...

Is there any word from the Lord? that is, Hath God revealed any thing to thee, concerning what will be the issue of the return of the Chaldean army to the siege of the city? What needed Zedekiah to have asked this, to whom God by this prophet had so often revealed his will in this case? Wicked men are always more curious to know, than careful to believe, observe, and obey the will of God. But God seldom or never speaketh good unto them: Jeremiah tells him there was, but it was a sad word, viz. that God would certainly deliver him into the hand or power of the king of Babylon.

Poole: Jer 37:18 - -- That is, What have I done worthy of bonds? I have faithfully heretofore revealed to you the mind and will of God; if this hath offended you, I am no...

That is, What have I done worthy of bonds? I have faithfully heretofore revealed to you the mind and will of God; if this hath offended you, I am not to be blamed, I could not but execute God’ s commands.

Poole: Jer 37:19 - -- You now see what kind of prophets they are, who fed you with hopes that the king of Babylon’ s army should return no more to the siege of the c...

You now see what kind of prophets they are, who fed you with hopes that the king of Babylon’ s army should return no more to the siege of the city. I told you they would return, you had other prophets that told you they should not, judge now who were the true prophets. The devil in all ages had some that contradicted the true prophets of the Lord. Three hundred false prophets contradicted one Micaiah, as to Ahab’ s going up to Ramoth-gilead, and prospering in that expedition. There were many that contradicted Isaiah and Jeremiah, and other true prophets, as to the king of Babylon’ s coming to besiege Jerusalem, and his return again to the siege when he had risen up from it to meet the Egyptian army; and as to the length of time in which the Jews should be in captivity; yet, (to let us see men’ s madness upon their lusts,) as there still have risen up in other generations false teachers and flatterers, so they have always found more favour than those that have dealt more faithfully in revealing God’ s will.

Poole: Jer 37:20 - -- Though Jeremiah had dealt very faithfully with the king and princes, and they had dealt very hardly and cruelly with him, casting him for no just ca...

Though Jeremiah had dealt very faithfully with the king and princes, and they had dealt very hardly and cruelly with him, casting him for no just cause into a nasty prison, and Jeremiah knew well enough that Zedekiah was very soon to be disarmed of his power; yet (to learn us our duty) he speaks with all due respect and reverence to his sovereign, though a very bad man, and one who had dealt very ill with him. This petition of Jeremiah speaks the prison he was in was in a very inconvenient place, where he was in danger of his life.

Poole: Jer 37:21 - Commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison Commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison so as he was a prisoner still, but in a freer air, where he did not suffer th...

Commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison so as he was a prisoner still, but in a freer air, where he did not suffer those inconveniences which he endured in the hole or dungeon. It is of no great moment to know whether the portion of bread allowed the prophet by the king were a loaf, (as some think,) or a piece of a loaf; it was such a proportion as could be allowed according to the proportion which others had, and the straits which the city was in, and so much as served to keep him alive. Jeremiah remained here till, upon the suggestion of the princes, he was removed to a worse place, as we shall read in the sixth verse of the next chapter; where he staid not long, but was again removed to the court of the prison, as we shall read there, Jer 38:13 , where (as it followeth there, Jer 38:28 ) he continued until the city was taken.

Haydock: Jer 37:1 - Sedecias Sedecias. He was less impious than his two predecessors; but too weak to do good.

Sedecias. He was less impious than his two predecessors; but too weak to do good.

Haydock: Jer 37:3 - Pray Pray, or consult. He wished to know whether the Chaldeans would return. (Calmet) --- He feared, yet ill-treated the prophet, as Herod did John the...

Pray, or consult. He wished to know whether the Chaldeans would return. (Calmet) ---

He feared, yet ill-treated the prophet, as Herod did John the Baptist. (Worthington)

Haydock: Jer 37:6 - Return Return, routed, chap. xlvi. 15. His army was small, Ezechiel xvii. 17., and xxx. 21. This king Ephree, (chap. xliv. 30.) or Apries, had succeeded P...

Return, routed, chap. xlvi. 15. His army was small, Ezechiel xvii. 17., and xxx. 21. This king Ephree, (chap. xliv. 30.) or Apries, had succeeded Psammis, after an interregnum of ten years' continuance. (Herodotus ii. 161.) ---

He foresaw that his own dominions would be invaded, after Jerusalem, the key, was taken. The other allies of Juda perfidiously sat still, or joined the Chaldeans. (Calmet)

Haydock: Jer 37:8 - Away Away. They departed indeed, but for a short time.

Away. They departed indeed, but for a short time.

Haydock: Jer 37:9 - Tent Tent. So easy it is for God to destroy by few as well as by many! (Haydock)

Tent. So easy it is for God to destroy by few as well as by many! (Haydock)

Haydock: Jer 37:11 - Possession Possession, lately purchased, chap. xxxii. (Lyranus) --- Yet some think this had not yet taken place. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "to buy provision...

Possession, lately purchased, chap. xxxii. (Lyranus) ---

Yet some think this had not yet taken place. (Calmet) ---

Septuagint, "to buy provisions among." Hebrew, "to slip away thence in the midst of the people." (Haydock) ---

He wished to escape the fury of his enemies at Jerusalem. (Calmet) ---

It is an old device of persecutors to lay false charges on the innocent, as Julian and the Arians did. (Hist. Tripart. vi. 27.) (Worthington)

Haydock: Jer 37:14 - Beat him // Prison Beat him, as a traitor and fugitive. --- Prison, very deep, ver. 19. (Calmet)

Beat him, as a traitor and fugitive. ---

Prison, very deep, ver. 19. (Calmet)

Haydock: Jer 37:15 - Prison Prison. Literally, "lake or pit," (Haydock) such as was used to keep wine. Thus God tries his chosen friends, according to their strength!

Prison. Literally, "lake or pit," (Haydock) such as was used to keep wine. Thus God tries his chosen friends, according to their strength!

Haydock: Jer 37:18 - Prophets Prophets. He insults over these impostors, and speaks boldly. The Chaldeans were now returned, chap. xxxviii.

Prophets. He insults over these impostors, and speaks boldly. The Chaldeans were now returned, chap. xxxviii.

Haydock: Jer 37:19 - Be Be. Hebrew, "fall prostrate," chap. xxxvi. 7.

Be. Hebrew, "fall prostrate," chap. xxxvi. 7.

Haydock: Jer 37:20 - Entry // Piece Entry, where he had been already, chap. xxxii. 1., and xxxiv. 1, 7. --- Piece. Roll, sufficient for a day's maintenance. (Calmet) --- Protestant...

Entry, where he had been already, chap. xxxii. 1., and xxxiv. 1, 7. ---

Piece. Roll, sufficient for a day's maintenance. (Calmet) ---

Protestants, "a piece of bread (Septuagint, a loaf) out of the baker's street." (Haydock)

Gill: Jer 37:1 - And King Zedekiah the son of Josiah reigned // instead of Coniah the son of Jehoiakim // whom Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon made king in the land of Judah And King Zedekiah the son of Josiah reigned,.... The brother of Jehoiakim, whose untimely death, and want of burial, are prophesied of in the precedin...

And King Zedekiah the son of Josiah reigned,.... The brother of Jehoiakim, whose untimely death, and want of burial, are prophesied of in the preceding chapter. The name of Zedekiah was Mattaniah before he was king; his name was changed by the king of Babylon, who made him king, 2Ki 24:17;

instead of Coniah the son of Jehoiakim: the same with Jehoiakim, or jeconiah, called Coniah by way of contempt; he reigned but three months, and so was not reckoned as a king, not being confirmed by the king of Babylon, but was carried captive by him, and his uncle placed in his stead:

whom Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon made king in the land of Judah; to whom he became tributary, and swore homage and fealty, 2Ch 36:13.

Gill: Jer 37:2 - But neither he, nor his servants, nor the people of the land // did hearken unto the words of the Lord, which he spake by Jeremiah the prophet But neither he, nor his servants, nor the people of the land,.... The king, his courtiers and subjects the royal family, nobility, and common people; ...

But neither he, nor his servants, nor the people of the land,.... The king, his courtiers and subjects the royal family, nobility, and common people; they were all degenerate and corrupt. Jarchi observes, that Jehoiakim was wicked, and his people righteous; and that Zedekiah was righteous, and his people wicked but he seems to found his character on that single action of taking Jeremiah out of prison; whereas, according to this account, king and people were all wicked: for neither one or other

did hearken unto the words of the Lord, which he spake by Jeremiah the prophet; neither those which were spoken in the former nor in the latter part of his reign, concerning the destruction of the city by the Chaldeans. This short count is given to show how just it was to give up such a prince and people to ruin.

Gill: Jer 37:3 - And Zedekiah the king sent Jehucal the son of Shelemiah, and Zephaniah the son of Maaseiah the priest // to the Prophet Jeremiah, saying, pray now unto the Lord our God for us And Zedekiah the king sent Jehucal the son of Shelemiah, and Zephaniah the son of Maaseiah the priest,.... That is, Zephaniah the priest, as the accen...

And Zedekiah the king sent Jehucal the son of Shelemiah, and Zephaniah the son of Maaseiah the priest,.... That is, Zephaniah the priest, as the accents shaw; though his father Maaseiah was doubtless a priest too; according to the Syriac version, both Jehucal, called Jucal, Jer 38:1; and Zephaniah, were priests; since it reads in the plural number, "priests": these the king sent as messengers

to the Prophet Jeremiah, saying, pray now unto the Lord our God for us. This message was sent either upon the rumour of the Chaldeans coming against Jerusalem, as some think; or rather when it had departed from the city, and was gone to meet the army of the king of Egypt; so that this petition to the prophet was to pray that the king of Egypt alight get the victory over the Chaldean army, and that that might not return unto them. Thus wicked men will desire the prayers of good men in times of distress, when their words, their cautions, admonitions, exhortations, and prayers too, are despised by them at another time.

Gill: Jer 37:4 - Now Jeremiah came in and went out among the people // for they had not put him into prison Now Jeremiah came in and went out among the people,.... Was at full liberty, and could go out of the city, and come in, when he pleased; or go into an...

Now Jeremiah came in and went out among the people,.... Was at full liberty, and could go out of the city, and come in, when he pleased; or go into any part of it, and converse with the people, and prophesy to them; which he could not do in the latter part of Jehoiakim's reign, who sent persons after him and Baruch to take them, and they were obliged to hide themselves, yea, the Lord hid them, Jer 36:19; but now he was under no restraint, as least as yet:

for they had not put him into prison; not yet; they afterwards did, Jer 37:15.

Gill: Jer 37:5 - Then Pharaoh's army was come forth out of Egypt // and when the Chaldeans that besieged Jerusalem // heard tidings of them // they departed from Jerusalem Then Pharaoh's army was come forth out of Egypt,.... At the time the above message was sent to Jeremiah. Zedekiah, though he had took an oath of homag...

Then Pharaoh's army was come forth out of Egypt,.... At the time the above message was sent to Jeremiah. Zedekiah, though he had took an oath of homage to the king of Babylon, rebelled against him, and entered into a league with the king of Egypt, to whom he sent for succours in his distress; and who, according to agreement, sent his army out of Egypt to break up the siege of Jerusalem; for though the king of Egypt came no more in person out of his land, after his defeat at Carchemish by Nebuchadnezzar, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim, Jer 46:2; yet he sent his army to the relief of Jerusalem:

and when the Chaldeans that besieged Jerusalem; which was in the ninth year of Zedekiah's reign that they first besieged it, and is the time here referred to, Jer 39:1;

heard tidings of them; the Egyptian army, and of its coming out against them; the rumour of which might be spread by the Jews themselves, to intimidate them; or which might come to them by spies they had in all parts to give them intelligence of what was doing; and what they had was good and certain, and on which they acted:

they departed from Jerusalem: not through fear, but to meet the Egyptian army, and give them battle, before they could be joined by any considerable force of the Jews. It was at this time the covenant was broken about the manumission of servants, Jer 34:10; which conduct ill agrees with their desire of the prophet's prayer.

Gill: Jer 37:6 - Then came the word of the Lord unto the Prophet Jeremiah // saying Then came the word of the Lord unto the Prophet Jeremiah,.... At the time when the messengers came to him from the king to pray for them; for Jer 37:4...

Then came the word of the Lord unto the Prophet Jeremiah,.... At the time when the messengers came to him from the king to pray for them; for Jer 37:4 are to be included in a parenthesis:

saying; as follows: which is an answer to the messengers.

Gill: Jer 37:7 - Thus saith the Lord, the God of Israel // thus shall ye say to the king of Judah, that sent you unto me, to inquire of me // behold, Pharaoh's army, which is come forth to help you, shall return to Egypt, into their own land Thus saith the Lord, the God of Israel,.... Which are the usual titles and characters the Lord takes to himself, when he spake by the prophet; see Jer...

Thus saith the Lord, the God of Israel,.... Which are the usual titles and characters the Lord takes to himself, when he spake by the prophet; see Jer 34:2;

thus shall ye say to the king of Judah, that sent you unto me, to inquire of me; in an oracular way; for by this it seems that they were not only sent to desire the prophet to pray for them, but to obtain an oracle from the Lord, confirming it to them, that the Chaldean army which was gone would not return any more; this they were willing to believe, but wanted to have a confirmation of it from the Lord; and so the Targum,

"to seek an oracle from me;''

or to ask instruction or doctrine from me: now these messengers are bid to go back and tell the king, his nobles, and all the people of the land, what follows:

behold, Pharaoh's army, which is come forth to help you, shall return to Egypt, into their own land; being afraid to face the Chaldean army; or being defeated and driven back by it. Josephus a says there was a battle fought between the Egyptians and Chaldeans, in which the latter were conquerors, and put the former to flight, and drove them out of all Syria. Jarchi relates a fable, how that the Egyptian army came by ships, and that at sea they saw strange appearances, upon which they said one to another, what means this? they replied, these are our fathers, whom the fathers of those we are going to help drowned in the sea; and immediately returned to their own land.

Gill: Jer 37:8 - And the Chaldeans shall come again // and fight against this city // and take it, and burn it with fire And the Chaldeans shall come again,.... To Jerusalem, after they have defeated or drove back the Egyptian army: and fight against this city; with f...

And the Chaldeans shall come again,.... To Jerusalem, after they have defeated or drove back the Egyptian army:

and fight against this city; with fresh rigour and resolution; being exasperated by the methods taken to oblige them to raise the siege:

and take it, and burn it with fire; as they did, Jer 39:8.

Gill: Jer 37:9 - Thus saith the Lord, deceive not yourselves // saying, the Chaldeans shall surely depart from us // for they shall not depart Thus saith the Lord, deceive not yourselves,.... Or, "your souls"; with a false opinion, a vain persuasion and belief of the departure of the Chaldean...

Thus saith the Lord, deceive not yourselves,.... Or, "your souls"; with a false opinion, a vain persuasion and belief of the departure of the Chaldeans never to return; which they would have confirmed by the Lord; or, "lift not up your souls" b; with vain hopes of the above things: self or soul deception is a dreadful thing; and sad is the disappointment when men are elated with a false and vain hope:

saying, the Chaldeans shall surely depart from us; they had departed from Jerusalem; but they were persuaded they would depart out of the land of Judea, and go into their own land, the land of Babylon, from whence they came, and never return more:

for they shall not depart; out of the land of Judea, into their own land; at least not till they had done the work they were sent about.

Gill: Jer 37:10 - For though ye had smitten the whole army of the Chaldeans that fight against you // and there remained but wounded men among them // yet should they rise up every man in his tent // and burn this city with fire For though ye had smitten the whole army of the Chaldeans that fight against you,.... Supposing the whole army of the Chaldeans had been vanquished an...

For though ye had smitten the whole army of the Chaldeans that fight against you,.... Supposing the whole army of the Chaldeans had been vanquished and slain by the Egyptians, the confederates of the Jews; or should they be slain by them in a second siege of them, excepting a few next mentioned:

and there remained but wounded men among them; and supposing that those of them that were left, that were not slain, were everyone of them wounded men, and so disabled for fighting, as might be thought:

yet should they rise up every man in his tent; where he was smitten, and lay wounded; or where he was carried to be cured of his wounds; such should rise up like persons from the dead almost, and fight with such strength and spirit, that they should soon take the city, though in such a condition:

and burn this city with fire; this being a thing determined by the Lord, and nothing should hinder it; for it matters not what the instruments are; though ever so impotent and disabled, they shall do the work allotted to them. Wherefore all the hopes of the Jews, founded upon the departure of the Chaldean army, were vain ones.

Gill: Jer 37:11 - And it came to pass, that when the army of the Chaldeans were broken up from Jerusalem // for fear of Pharaoh's army And it came to pass, that when the army of the Chaldeans were broken up from Jerusalem,.... When the siege of the city was broken up and raised: or, w...

And it came to pass, that when the army of the Chaldeans were broken up from Jerusalem,.... When the siege of the city was broken up and raised: or, when they "went up from Jerusalem" c; were gone from it;

for fear of Pharaoh's army; or rather "because of Pharaoh's army" d. The word "fear" is not in the text; nor did they leave Jerusalem for fear of his army, but to meet it, and give it battle, as they did; however, by this means there was a freer egress and regress from and to the city.

Gill: Jer 37:12 - Then Jeremiah went forth out of Jerusalem // to go into the land of Benjamin // to separate himself thence in the midst of the people Then Jeremiah went forth out of Jerusalem,.... At least he attempted to do so, taking the opportunity of the siege of the city being broke up: what we...

Then Jeremiah went forth out of Jerusalem,.... At least he attempted to do so, taking the opportunity of the siege of the city being broke up: what were his reasons for it are not certain; whether that he might not be put into prison, which he might fear for what he had just prophesied of concerning the return of the Chaldean army, that should take the city, and burn it; or to save himself from the destruction which he was sure would come upon it; or because he found he could do no good by his preaching and prophesying in it: however his view was

to go into the land of Benjamin; his native country, the tribe he belonged to; and very likely to Anathoth in that tribe, where he was born, and had lived. Josephus e is express for it, which he says was twenty furlongs from Jerusalem:

to separate himself thence in the midst of the people: or, "to slip away thence in the midst of the people" f; the siege being raised, the people that had fled to Jerusalem for safety crowded out again to go into their own countries, which the prophet thought to take the advantage of, and slip away in a crowd unobserved; though the words may be rendered, "to take part from thence in the midst of the people" g; either to take part of the spoil left there by the Chaldean army; or with the priests there, of what belonged to them, of whose number he was, Jer 1:1. The Targum is,

"to divide an inheritance which he had there in the midst of the people;''

and to the same sense are the Vulgate Latin and Syriac versions h.

Gill: Jer 37:13 - And when he was in the gate of Benjamin // a captain of the ward there // whose name was Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah // and he took Jeremiah the prophet, saying, thou fallest away to the Chaldeans And when he was in the gate of Benjamin,.... One of the gates of the city so called, either because it stood in the tribe of Benjamin, as part of Jeru...

And when he was in the gate of Benjamin,.... One of the gates of the city so called, either because it stood in the tribe of Benjamin, as part of Jerusalem did; or because it led to the land of Benjamin, whither the prophet was going: and just as he had got to that gate, and was going through it, he was stopped by

a captain of the ward there; who was placed at this gate, that none should go out to the Chaldeans, according to Kimchi; but rather he was the keeper of the gate, not at this time only, but always; Josephus i calls him one of the rulers:

whose name was Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah: the grandson as some think, of that Hananiah the false prophet, of whose death Jeremiah the prophet prophesied, Jer 28:16; and the Jews have a tradition that Hananiah ordered his son Shelemiah, that if he ever had an opportunity to bring Jeremiah to ruin, to do it; and the same charge Shelemiah gave to his son Irijah, who, having this opportunity, laid hold on him; Jarchi, Kimchi, and Abarbinel, make mention of it:

and he took Jeremiah the prophet, saying, thou fallest away to the Chaldeans; it looks as if, though he might not have a family grudge against him, as the Jews suggest, yet had a hatred of him for his prophecies, and therefore fixes this calumny on him; for otherwise, why did he suffer the people to pass in great numbers without any such charge?

Gill: Jer 37:14 - Then said Jeremiah, it is false // I fall not away to the Chaldeans // but he hearkened not to him // so Irijah took Jeremiah, and brought him to the princes Then said Jeremiah, it is false,.... Or a "falsehood" k; as undoubtedly it was; I fall not away to the Chaldeans; for the Chaldean army was gone f...

Then said Jeremiah, it is false,.... Or a "falsehood" k; as undoubtedly it was;

I fall not away to the Chaldeans; for the Chaldean army was gone from the city; nor did Jeremiah like so well to be with an idolatrous people; for after the city was taken, when Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard gave him his choice, either to go with him to Babylon, where he promised to take care of him; or to go to Gedaliah, who was made governor of Judah; he chose rather to be with him, and his poor company:

but he hearkened not to him; would not hear his defence, or however would not give any credit to it, being unwilling to let slip this opportunity of doing him ill will:

so Irijah took Jeremiah, and brought him to the princes; the princes of Zedekiah's court, or the princes of the people, the civil magistrates; or it may be the great sanhedrim, who he knew had no good disposition towards the prophet.

Gill: Jer 37:15 - Wherefore the princes were wroth with Jeremiah // and smote him // and put him in prison, in the house of Jonathan the scribe // for they had made that the prison Wherefore the princes were wroth with Jeremiah,.... For attempting to depart the city, and go off to the Chaldeans, as Irijah had suggested to them, a...

Wherefore the princes were wroth with Jeremiah,.... For attempting to depart the city, and go off to the Chaldeans, as Irijah had suggested to them, and to whom they hearkened; and perhaps would not hear what the prophet had to say for himself; and if they did, it had no weight with them:

and smote him; either with their fists, or with rods, or a scourge; perhaps he underwent the punishment of forty stripes save one, according to the law; and they may be said to smite or beat him, because they ordered it to be done:

and put him in prison, in the house of Jonathan the scribe; or secretary of state; such an one as Elishama was in Jehoiakim's time, who had a house or apartment at court as he had, who was now dead or removed, Jer 36:12;

for they had made that the prison; which had not used to be; but by the courtiers, and with the consent of this scribe, secretary, or chancellor, it was made a prison; not for common malefactors, but for state prisoners; and a bad prison it seems it was. Very probably this scribe was a very cruel wicked man, who used those very ill that were his prisoners; and indeed, if he had not been of such a character, he would scarcely have suffered his house to have been made a prison.

Gill: Jer 37:16 - When Jeremiah was entered into the dungeon // and into the cabins // and Jeremiah had remained there many days When Jeremiah was entered into the dungeon,.... Or, "into the house of the pit" l; a dungeon, like a pit or ditch, dark, dirty, or dismal: and into...

When Jeremiah was entered into the dungeon,.... Or, "into the house of the pit" l; a dungeon, like a pit or ditch, dark, dirty, or dismal:

and into the cabins; or "cells" m; into a place more inward than the cells, as the Targum; into the innermost and worst part in all the prison, where a man could not well lie, sit, nor stand:

and Jeremiah had remained there many days; in this very uncomfortable condition; very probably till the Chaldean army returned to Jerusalem, as he foretold it should.

Gill: Jer 37:17 - Then Zedekiah the king sent and took him out // and the king asked him secretly in his house // and said // is there any word from the Lord // and Jeremiah said, there is // for, said he, thou shall be delivered into the hand of the king of Babylon Then Zedekiah the king sent and took him out,.... After Jeremiah had been in prison for some time; and the Chaldean army being returned, and having re...

Then Zedekiah the king sent and took him out,.... After Jeremiah had been in prison for some time; and the Chaldean army being returned, and having renewed their siege, the king is frightened; and knowing the prophet was in prison, sends a messenger to take him out from thence, and bring him to him; which was accordingly done:

and the king asked him secretly in his house; he took him into some private apartment, and there alone conferred with him, for fear of his princes and courtiers; who he knew bore no good will to the prophet, and would be ready to charge him with timidity;

and said unto him,

is there any word from the Lord? he means any particular word of prophecy, any late one, and what concerned their present circumstances, showing what would be the issue of the return of the Chaldean army; for prophecy did not come at all times, nor even according to the will of man, but always according to the will of God, and when he thought fit; this the king knew very well, and he wanted a comfortable word, some good news of the failure of the present attempt:

and Jeremiah said, there is; but not such an one as he wanted; it was of the same strain with the former, and confirmed all that the prophet had from time to time told him and his predecessor what would certainly be the case:

for, said he, thou shall be delivered into the hand of the king of Babylon; which was boldly and faithfully said, to be said to the face of the king himself, risking his life in so doing; or, at least, exposing himself to severer treatment, if severer could be used.

Gill: Jer 37:18 - Moreover, Jeremiah said unto King Zedekiah // what have I offended against thee, or against thy servants, or against this people, that ye have put me in prison Moreover, Jeremiah said unto King Zedekiah,.... Having this opportunity with him alone, and perhaps observing the king was melted and softened with wh...

Moreover, Jeremiah said unto King Zedekiah,.... Having this opportunity with him alone, and perhaps observing the king was melted and softened with what he had said; however, finding liberty in his own mind, he enlarges his discourse, and freely expostulates with him in the following manner:

what have I offended against thee, or against thy servants, or against this people, that ye have put me in prison? or, "what have I sinned?" have I been guilty of treason against thee, O king? or of scandal and defamation of any of thy nobles and courtiers? have I done any injury to any of the king's subjects? has there been any falsehood in my prophecies? has not everything appeared to be true that I have spoken, concerning the coming of the Chaldeans to invade the land, and besiege the city? and concerning the return of the Chaldean army when broken up? why then should I be cast into prison, and detained there? is it not a clear case that what I have said comes from the Lord? and therefore ought not to be used in this manner.

Gill: Jer 37:19 - Where are now your prophets that prophesied unto you // saying, the king of Babylon shall not come against you, nor against this land Where are now your prophets that prophesied unto you,.... Your false prophets, as the Targum; what is become of their prophecies? where is the truth ...

Where are now your prophets that prophesied unto you,.... Your false prophets, as the Targum; what is become of their prophecies? where is the truth of them, to which general credit has been given? where are they? let them appear and defend themselves, if they can, from the charge of lying, and of being false prophets? or where are they? tacitly suggesting the different circumstances of him and them; he, who was a true prophet, was laid in a prison; they, who were false prophets, were caressed in the palaces of the king and his nobles, and in favour with the people in general:

saying, the king of Babylon shall not come against you, nor against this land? gave out that the king of Babylon would never invade the land of Judea, or besiege the city of Jerusalem, which proved false; and still they had the front to say, that when the siege was raised, he would never come again; whereas he was then returned to it, and was now besieging it; so that here were notorious falsehoods delivered out by them.

Gill: Jer 37:20 - Therefore hear now, one pray thee, O my lord the king // let my supplication be accepted before thee // that thou cause me not to return to the house of Jonathan the scribe // lest I die there Therefore hear now, one pray thee, O my lord the king,.... When the prophet spoke in the name of the Lord, and the words of the Lord, it was with grea...

Therefore hear now, one pray thee, O my lord the king,.... When the prophet spoke in the name of the Lord, and the words of the Lord, it was with great boldness and majesty; but when he spoke for himself, and on his own behalf, it was with great submission, as it became a subject to his king; and whom he owns as his sovereign lord, though a wicked prince, and whose destruction he knew was at hand:

let my supplication be accepted before thee; or, "fall before thee": see Jer 36:7; which was as follows:

that thou cause me not to return to the house of Jonathan the scribe; but that he might be discharged from his confinement; or however be removed into another prison, not so uncomfortable and disagreeable as this man's house or prison was; and which perhaps was still the worse through his cruel and ill natured carriage to him; and which all together endangered his life: wherefore he adds,

lest I die there; for though he had continued there many days, yet the place was so exceedingly noisome, that he thought he could not long continue there, was he remanded back to it.

Gill: Jer 37:21 - Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison // and that they should give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers' street // until all the bread in the city was spent // thus Jeremiah remained in the court of the prison Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison,.... He did not think fit to discharge him entirely, le...

Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison,.... He did not think fit to discharge him entirely, lest it should give offence to the princes, who had committed him; but he ordered him to be put in a court belonging to the prison, where he might breathe in a freer air, and have liberty of walking to and fro, where his friends might be admitted to come and see him:

and that they should give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers' street; it seems there was a street in Jerusalem so called, where the bakers lived; and perhaps the king's bakers; who had orders to deliver to the prophet every day a piece or loaf of bread, as much as was sufficient for a man; or, however, as much as the scarcity of provisions in a siege would allow. Kimchi makes mention of a Midrash, which interprets this of bread made of bran, which was sold without the palace; as if it was coarser bread than what was eaten at court:

until all the bread in the city was spent; that is, as long as there was any. These were the king's orders:

thus Jeremiah remained in the court of the prison: until the city was taken; unless a small time that he was in the dungeon of Malchiah, out of which he was taken again, and restored to the court of the prison, and there continued; see Jer 38:6.

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Ayat / Catatan Kaki

NET Notes: Jer 37:1 Heb “And Zedekiah son of Josiah whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon made king in the land of Judah ruled as king instead of Coniah son of Jehoia...

NET Notes: Jer 37:2 These two verses (37:1-2) are introductory to chs. 37–38 and are intended to characterize Zedekiah and his regime as disobedient just like Jehoi...

NET Notes: Jer 37:3 The priest Zephaniah son of Maaseiah was a member of the earlier delegation (21:2) and the chief of security in the temple to whom the Babylonian fals...

NET Notes: Jer 37:4 The words “as he pleased” are not in the text but are implicit in the idiom both in Hebrew and in English. They have been supplied in the ...

NET Notes: Jer 37:5 The Pharaoh referred to here is Pharaoh Hophra who is named in Jer 44:30. He ruled from 589-570 b.c. Shortly after he began to rule, Zedekiah had been...

NET Notes: Jer 37:6 Heb “And the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah, saying.”

NET Notes: Jer 37:7 Heb “will go back to its land, Egypt.”

NET Notes: Jer 37:8 Heb “the Chaldeans.” See the study note on 21:4 for the rendering “Babylonian.” The word “forces” is supplied in t...

NET Notes: Jer 37:9 Heb “Thus says the Lord, ‘Do not deceive yourselves, saying, “The Chaldeans will surely go away from against us” because they ...

NET Notes: Jer 37:10 The length and complexity of this English sentence violates the more simple style that has been used to conform such sentences to contemporary English...

NET Notes: Jer 37:11 For location see Map5 B1; Map6 F3; Map7 E2; Map8 F2; Map10 B3; JP1 F4; JP2 F4; JP3 F4; JP4 F4.

NET Notes: Jer 37:12 Though some commentators disagree, this transaction should not be viewed as subsequent to the transaction recorded in Jer 32 and seen as an attempt to...

NET Notes: Jer 37:13 Irijah’s charge was based on the suspicion that Jeremiah was following his own counsel to the people to surrender to the Babylonians if they wan...

NET Notes: Jer 37:14 Heb “the Chaldeans.” See the study note on 21:4 for explanation.

NET Notes: Jer 37:15 Heb “for they had made it into the house of confinement.” The causal particle does not fit the English sentence very well and “house...

NET Notes: Jer 37:16 Heb “Jeremiah.” But the proper name is somewhat redundant and unnecessary in a modern translation.

NET Notes: Jer 37:17 Jeremiah’s answer even under duress was the same that he had given Zedekiah earlier. (See Jer 34:3 and see the study note on 34:1 for the relati...

NET Notes: Jer 37:18 Heb “What crime have I committed against you, or your servants, or this people that you [masc. pl.] have put me in prison?” Some of the te...

NET Notes: Jer 37:19 Heb “And where are your prophets who prophesied to you, saying, ‘The king of Babylon will not come against you or against this land?’...

NET Notes: Jer 37:20 Or “So that I will not die there,” or “or I will die there”; Heb “and I will not die there.” The particle that int...

NET Notes: Jer 37:21 Heb “Stayed/Remained/ Lived.”

Geneva Bible: Jer 37:1 And king Zedekiah the son of Josiah reigned instead of ( a ) Coniah the son of Jehoiakim, whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon ( b ) made king in the l...

Geneva Bible: Jer 37:3 And Zedekiah the king ( c ) sent Jehucal the son of Shelemiah and Zephaniah the son of Maaseiah the priest to the prophet Jeremiah, saying, Pray now t...

Geneva Bible: Jer 37:4 Now Jeremiah came ( d ) in and went out among the people: for they had not put him into prison. ( d ) That is, was out of prison and free.

Geneva Bible: Jer 37:5 Then Pharaoh's army had ( e ) come from Egypt: and when the Chaldeans that besieged Jerusalem heard tidings of them, they departed from Jerusalem. ( ...

Geneva Bible: Jer 37:12 Then Jeremiah went out of Jerusalem to go into the ( f ) land of Benjamin, to separate himself from there in the midst of the people. ( f ) As some t...

Geneva Bible: Jer 37:13 And when he was in the ( g ) gate of Benjamin, a captain of the guard [was] there, whose name [was] Irijah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Hananiah;...

Geneva Bible: Jer 37:15 Wherefore the princes were angry with Jeremiah, and beat him, and put him in prison in the house of Jonathan the scribe: for they had made that the ( ...

Geneva Bible: Jer 37:21 Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the prison, and that they should give him daily a piece of bread o...

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Tafsiran/Catatan -- Catatan Rentang Ayat

Maclaren: Jer 37:1 - A Libation To Jehovah Zedekiah Zedekia the son of Josiah reigned as king, whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon made king.'--Jer. 37:1. ZEDEKIAH was a small man on a great s...

Maclaren: Jer 37:11-21 - A Libation To Jehovah The World's Wages To A Prophet And it came to pass, that when the army of the Chaldeans was broken up from Jerusalem for fear of Pharaoh's army, 12. ...

MHCC: Jer 37:1-10 - --Numbers witness the fatal effects of other men's sins, yet heedlessly step into their places, and follow the same destructive course. When in distress...

MHCC: Jer 37:11-21 - --There are times when it is the wisdom of good men to retire, to enter into their chambers, and to shut the doors, Isa 26:20. Jeremiah was seized as a ...

Matthew Henry: Jer 37:1-10 - -- Here is, 1. Jeremiah's preaching slighted, Jer 37:1, Jer 37:2. Zedekiah succeeded Coniah, or Jeconiah, and, though he saw in his predecessor the fat...

Matthew Henry: Jer 37:11-21 - -- We have here a further account concerning Jeremiah, who relates more passages concerning himself than any other of the prophets; for the histories o...

Keil-Delitzsch: Jer 37:1-5 - -- The account of what befell Jeremiah and what he did during the last siege of Jerusalem by the Chaldeans, until the taking of the city, is introduced...

Keil-Delitzsch: Jer 37:6-10 - -- Then came the word of the Lord to this effect: Jer 37:7. "Thus saith Jahveh, the God of Israel: Thus shall ye say to the king of Judah who hath se...

Keil-Delitzsch: Jer 37:11-12 - -- The imprisonment of Jeremiah. - During the time when the Chaldeans, on account of the advancing army of pharaoh, had withdrawn from Jerusalem and r...

Keil-Delitzsch: Jer 37:13 - -- When he was entering the gate of Benjamin, where Jeriah the son of Shelemiah kept watch, the latter seized him, saying, "Thou desirest to go over to...

Keil-Delitzsch: Jer 37:14-15 - -- Jeremiah replied: "A lie [= not true; cf. 2Ki 9:12] ; I am not going over to the Chaldeans. But he gave no heed to him; so Jeriah seized Jeremiah,...

Keil-Delitzsch: Jer 37:16-21 - -- Examination of the prophet by the king, and alleviation of his confinement. - Jer 37:16. "When Jeremiah had got into the dungeon and into the vaults...

Constable: Jer 2:1--45:5 - --II. Prophecies about Judah chs. 2--45 The first series of prophetic announcements, reflections, and incidents th...

Constable: Jer 34:1--45:5 - --D. Incidents surrounding the fall of Jerusalem chs. 34-45 The Book of Consolation contained messages of ...

Constable: Jer 37:1--39:18 - --2. Incidents during the fall of Jerusalem chs. 37-39 The events recorded in these chapters all t...

Constable: Jer 37:1-10 - --Zedekiah's prayer request and its answer 37:1-10 This event happened about 18 years afte...

Constable: Jer 37:1-5 - --The historical situation 37:1-5 37:1 Nebuchadnezzar, sovereign over Judah since Jehoiakim's unsuccessful rebellion against him in 598 B.C., set up Zed...

Constable: Jer 37:6-10 - --The Lord's message to Zedekiah 37:6-10 37:6-7 The Lord told Jeremiah to tell Zedekiah that the Egyptian army, which had come to help him, would return...

Constable: Jer 37:11-16 - --The reason for his arrest and imprisonment 37:11-16 37:11-12 During the lifting of the siege of Jerusalem just described (v. 5), Jeremiah left the cit...

Constable: Jer 37:17-21 - --The consequences of his arrest and imprisonment 37:17-21 37:17 Zedekiah secretly sent for Jeremiah and brought him into the palace. The king feared hi...

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Pendahuluan / Garis Besar

JFB: Jeremiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) JEREMIAH, son of Hilkiah, one of the ordinary priests, dwelling in Anathoth of Benjamin (Jer 1:1), not the Hilkiah the high priest who discovered the ...

JFB: Jeremiah (Garis Besar) EXPOSTULATION WITH THE JEWS, REMINDING THEM OF THEIR FORMER DEVOTEDNESS, AND GOD'S CONSEQUENT FAVOR, AND A DENUNCIATION OF GOD'S COMING JUDGMENTS FOR...

TSK: Jeremiah 37 (Pendahuluan Pasal) Overview Jer 37:1, The Egyptians having raised the seige of the Chaldeans, king Zedekiah sends to Jeremiah to pray for the people; Jer 37:6, Jerem...

Poole: Jeremiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) BOOK OF THE PROPHET JEREMIAH THE ARGUMENT IT was the great unhappiness of this prophet to be a physician to, but that could not save, a dying sta...

Poole: Jeremiah 37 (Pendahuluan Pasal) CHAPTER 37 The Egyptians raise the siege of the Chaldeans; and king Zedekiah sendeth to Jeremiah, to pray and inquire of the Lord for them, Jer 37:...

MHCC: Jeremiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) Jeremiah was a priest, a native of Anathoth, in the tribe of Benjamin. He was called to the prophetic office when very young, about seventy years afte...

MHCC: Jeremiah 37 (Pendahuluan Pasal) (Jer 37:1-10) The Chaldean army will return. (Jer 37:11-21) Jeremiah is imprisoned.

Matthew Henry: Jeremiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) An Exposition, with Practical Observations, of The Book of the Prophet Jeremiah The Prophecies of the Old Testament, as the Epistles of the New, are p...

Matthew Henry: Jeremiah 37 (Pendahuluan Pasal) This chapter brings us very near the destruction of Jerusalem by the Chaldeans, for the story of it lies in the latter end of Zedekiah's reign; we ...

Constable: Jeremiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) Introduction Title The title of this book derives from its writer, the late seventh an...

Constable: Jeremiah (Garis Besar) Outline I. Introduction ch. 1 A. The introduction of Jeremiah 1:1-3 B. T...

Constable: Jeremiah Jeremiah Bibliography Aharoni, Yohanan, and Michael Avi-Yonah. The Macmillan Bible Atlas. Revised ed. London: C...

Haydock: Jeremiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) THE PROPHECY OF JEREMIAS. INTRODUCTION. Jeremias was a priest, a native of Anathoth, a priestly city, in the tribe of Benjamin, and was sanct...

Gill: Jeremiah (Pendahuluan Kitab) INTRODUCTION TO JEREMIAH The title of the book in the Vulgate Latin version is, "the Prophecy of Jeremiah"; in the Syriac and Arabic versions, "the...

Gill: Jeremiah 37 (Pendahuluan Pasal) INTRODUCTION TO JEREMIAH 37 This chapter makes mention of the reign of Zedekiah, and what happened in it; of his message to Jeremiah, to pray for t...

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